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1.
Environ Health Prev Med ; 27: 40, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2079615

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The effect of the prolonged coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic on the mental health of nursing students is unclear. This study assesses the prevalence of anxiety, depression, and insomnia among nursing students in Japan during the pandemic and determines the risk factors associated with such symptoms. METHODS: An online survey-based cross-sectional study was conducted from August 16 to October 16, 2021. Participants were first- to fourth-year nursing students enrolled in undergraduate programs at the eight universities in Japan. Anxiety, depression, and insomnia were assessed using the Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7, Patient Health Questionnaire-9, and Insomnia Severity Index-7, respectively. We calculated descriptive statistics for each measurement item and performed univariate and logistic regression analyses to evaluate the potential risk factors. RESULTS: We received responses from 1,222 of 3,056 nursing students (response rate: 40.0%). After 25 participants were excluded due to missing outcome values, 1,197 students (valid response rate: 98.0%) were included in the analysis. The prevalence of anxiety, depression, and insomnia was 4.8%, 12.4%, and 18.0%, respectively. The risk of anxiety was lower among participants who did not have any relatives or friends who had been infected with SARS-CoV-2 than among those who did (aOR 0.36, 95% CI 0.14-0.94). The risk of depression was higher among participants whose financial status had worsened during the pandemic than among those whose financial status had not changed (aOR 3.44; 95% CI 1.98-5.96). Common factors that increased the risk of anxiety, depression, and insomnia were life satisfaction and fear of COVID-19. CONCLUSION: Mental health-related symptoms among nursing students in Japan have not necessarily worsened with the spread of COVID-19 but were exacerbated by the intensity of changes in daily living and fear, which are psychosocial effects associated with the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders , Students, Nursing , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/etiology , Humans , Japan/epidemiology , Mental Health , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/etiology
2.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(20)2022 Oct 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2071412

ABSTRACT

In light of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic and the enormous amount of uncertainty caused by it, mental health issues have become a great concern. Evidence regarding the effects of psychological resilience on the Thai population is scarce. We evaluated psychological resilience during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic and its association with the risk of mental health outcomes, such as depression, anxiety, stress, and health-related well-being. This cross-sectional study was a part of the HOME-COVID-19 project, which conducted an online survey of 4004 members of the general population in Thailand using the Brief Resilience Coping Scale. Logistic regression was performed to identify the association between psychological resilience and mental health issues and well-being. Groups with prevalence rates of 43.9%, 39.2%, and 16.9% were classified as low, moderate, and high resilient copers, respectively. Using high resilient copers as a reference group, the low resilient copers had a higher chance of having mental health adversities. The adjusted odds ratio (OR) was 1.89 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.39-2.56; p < 0.001) for depression, 2.13 (95% CI, 1.45-3.14; p < 0.001) for anxiety, 4.61 (95% CI, 3.30-6.45; p < 0.001) for perceived stress, and 3.18 (95% CI, 2.31-4.38; p < 0.001) for low well-being. For the medium resilient copers, only low well-being was found to be statistically significant (OR, 1.60; 95% CI, 1.16-2.20; p = 0.004). It is important that resilience be considered in the development of strategies for managing the COVID-19 pandemic to prevent or reduce adverse mental health outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Resilience, Psychological , Humans , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Thailand/epidemiology , Mental Health , Cross-Sectional Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/etiology , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/etiology
3.
Ann Palliat Med ; 11(9): 2871-2879, 2022 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2067478

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease of 2019 (COVID-19) poses an unprecedented challenge to health and the financial system, especially the healthcare of patients with cancer. However, the research on the negative effect of the pandemic on the anxiety and depressive symptoms of cancer patients in closed-loop is rarely reported at present. In view of the limitations of previous studies. In this study, we compared the anxiety and depressive symptoms of head and neck cancer patients in the closed-loop management system before and during the 2019 coronavirus pandemic. METHODS: In this comparative study, a total of 526 head and neck cancer patients (269 and 257 patients before and during the COVID-19 pandemic) were enrolled in the present study. The two groups of patients' median age (53 years, 52 years), female distribution (70.26%, 66.15%) and male distribution (29.74%, 33.85%) were analyzed before and after the COVID-19 epidemic. They received questionnaires using the standardized data forms of Self-Rating Anxiety Scale (SAS) and the Self-Rating Depression Scale (SDS) to collect the relevant data of patients for retrospective investigation. For data analysis, either the chi-squared test or Fisher's exact test was employed for categorical variables, and we described the time trend of psychological states before and after the outbreak with Cochran-Armitage trend (CAT) test. RESULTS: A total of 526 head and neck cancer patients were included in the final analysis; 26.85% and 50.19% of cases experienced anxiety and depression during the COVID-19 epidemic. In contrast, 18.22% and 33.46% of cases had experienced anxiety and depression before the pandemic. According to the statistical results, the prevalence of anxiety and depression in patients during the COVID-19 epidemic was higher compared to that of patients prior to the pandemic (P=0.018). More importantly, both anxiety and depression incidence trends increased significantly before and after the outbreak of COVID-19 (P=0.000). CONCLUSIONS: The present study demonstrates the significant impact of COVID-19 on the psychological states of cancer patients in the case of closed-loop management system, effectively indicating the need for appropriate changes in treatment decisions, enhanced psychotherapy, and interventions to reduce the incidence of anxiety, depression, and even suicide during this pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Head and Neck Neoplasms , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/etiology , Female , Head and Neck Neoplasms/therapy , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
4.
Ideggyogy Sz ; 75(9-10): 307-315, 2022 Sep 30.
Article in Hungarian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2067419

ABSTRACT

Background and purpose: The problems caused by the COVID-19 epidemic have the worst impact on chronic patient populations. People with chronic pain are one of the most vulnerable groups due to stress, disruption of daily routine, family problems, illness and difficulty in hospital care. It is therefore essential to assess the situation and mental well-being of this group. The aim of this survey was to assess chronic pain patients during the COVID-19 pandemic, addressing psychological background factors that might affect pain symptoms, such as depression, emotion regulation, alexithymia, well-being, health literacy and social support. Methods: 158 people participated in the survey, reporting pain for at least 3 months but had not received medical treatment. Data was collected at two dates: February and December 2021. Participants completed an online questionnaire due to the pandemic situation. The following six psychological questionnaires were used in the survey: Toronto Alexithymia Scale, Beck Depression Inventory 9-item version, Difficulty in Emotion Regulation Scale, Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support, Chew-questions measuring health literacy, WHO Well-being Index. Results: The participants ranged from 20 to 80 years in age, of whom 140 (88%) were female. 42 participants (27%) achieved severe alexithymia. 118 people (75%) had depression, of which 72 people (46%) had mild depression, 26 (16%) had moderate depression, and 20 (13%) had severe depression. The degree of pain and alexithy-mia (r(158) = 0.16, p = 0.004), depression (r(158) = 0.41, p < 0.001), difficulties in emotion regulation (r(158) = 0.26, p = 0.004), and health literacy, and difficulties in emotion regulation (r(158) = 0.25, p = 0.001) were positively and significantly related. Conclusion: In addition to the characteristic comorbidities of people living with pain (e.g. anxiety, emotion disorder, sleep disorder), the epidemic-induced prolonged social isolation, stress and fear of illness may explain the proportion of high depression, emotion regulation difficulties or health literacy problems in the study sample which exacerbate alexithymia and the degree of pain. Based on these results it is important to draw the attention of professionals to the appropriate health care and educational needs of those affected.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Chronic Pain , Affective Symptoms/diagnosis , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/etiology , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Chronic Pain/epidemiology , Chronic Pain/etiology , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/etiology , Depression/psychology , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires
5.
BMC Psychiatry ; 22(1): 638, 2022 10 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2064763

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The context of the COVID-19 pandemic has harmed the mental health of the population, increasing the incidence of mental health problems such as depression, especially in those who have had COVID-19. Our study puts forward an explanatory model of depressive symptoms based on subjective psychological factors in those hospitalized for COVID-19 with and without biological markers (i.e., inflammatory markers). Therefore, we aim to evaluate the hypotheses proposed in the model to predict the presence of depressive symptoms. METHOD: We conducted a cross-sectional study, using a simple random sampling. Data from 277 hospitalized patients with COVID-19 in Lima-Peru, were collected to assess mental health variables (i.e., depressive, anxiety, post-traumatic stress, and somatic symptoms), self-perception of COVID-19 related symptoms, and neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio (NLR) such as inflammatory marker. We performed a structural equation modeling analysis to evaluate a predictive model of depressive symptoms. RESULTS: The results showed a prevalence of depressive symptoms (11.2%), anxiety symptoms (7.9%), somatic symptoms (2.2%), and symptoms of post-traumatic stress (6.1%) in the overall sample. No association was found between the prevalence of these mental health problems among individuals with and without severe inflammatory response. The mental health indicators with the highest prevalence were sleep problems (48%), low energy (47.7%), nervousness (48.77%), worry (47.7%), irritability (43.7%) and back pain (52%) in the overall sample. The model proposed to explain depressive symptoms was able to explain more than 83.7% of the variance and presented good goodness-of-fit indices. Also, a different performance between the proposed model was found between those with and without severe inflammatory response. This difference was mainly found in the relationship between anxiety and post-traumatic stress symptoms, and between the perception of COVID-19 related symptoms and somatic symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: Results demonstrated that our model of mental health variables may explain depressive symptoms in hospitalized patients of COVID-19 from a third-level hospital in Peru. In the model, perception of symptoms influences somatic symptoms, which impact both anxiety symptoms and symptoms of post-traumatic stress. Thus, anxiety symptoms could directly influence depressive symptoms or through symptoms of post-traumatic stress. Our findings could be useful to decision-makers for the prevention of depression, used to inform the creation of screening tools (i.e., perception of symptoms, somatic and anxiety symptoms) to identify vulnerable patients to depression.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Medically Unexplained Symptoms , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , Anxiety/psychology , Biomarkers , COVID-19/complications , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/diagnosis , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/etiology , Humans , Pandemics , Perception , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/diagnosis , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/etiology
6.
Niger J Clin Pract ; 25(9): 1571-1579, 2022 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2055767

ABSTRACT

Background: The physical activity of university students is restricted during the pandemic, changes in education and training, and uncertainties during the pandemic caused their social lives to change completely. Aim: This study aims to determine the relationship between the depression, anxiety, and stress, and positivity attitudes of university students during the Covid-19 (coronavirus disease-2019) outbreak and their attitudes and behaviors toward the pandemic. Subjects and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted online among university students, n = 2153 from April 30, 2020 to May 10, 2020. Data were collected with the Positivity Scale and the Depression Anxiety Stress Scale. Results: The proportion of those with moderate and above depression, anxiety, and stress symptoms in the study group, respectively, were 40.6%, 24.6%, and 22.5%. The risk ratio of these symptoms is higher among those with lower positive attitudes (OR [odds ratio] = 0.804, 0.897, 0.895, respectively), being women (OR = 1.446, 1.666, 1.471), who are concerned with the transmission of the Covid-19 (OR = 1.144, 1.374, 1.201), who believe their intra-family relations (OR = 1.886, 1.728, 2.083) and education (OR = 1.680, 1.682, 2.132) are negatively affected, and those who are more worried about life after the pandemic. Conclusion: Compared with the pre-pandemic period, the frequency of university students showing symptoms of depression increased, and there was no significant change in anxiety and stress levels.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/etiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/etiology , Female , Humans , Male , Mental Health , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Students , Universities
7.
Dis Markers ; 2022: 7099908, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2053426

ABSTRACT

Objective: This research sets out to elucidate the influence of evidence-based nursing (EBN) on psychological status (PSY), neurological function, and quality of life (QoL) of patients with acute poststroke depression (PSD). Methods: One hundred and fifty stroke patients who received treatment in the Characteristic Medical Center of PLA Rocket Force between December 2019 and December 2021 were enrolled, including 100 cases (Group A) treated with comprehensive EBN and 50 patients (Group B) with routine nursing. Anxiety and depression (Self-Rating Anxiety Scale [SAS] and Self-Rating Depression Scale [SDS] scores), neurological function (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale [NIHSS] and Scandinavian Stroke Scale [SSS] scores), QoL (Generic Quality Of Life Inventory-74 [GQOLI-74] score), and complication rate of both groups were evaluated, as well as total effective rate and nursing satisfaction. Results: Group A outperformed Group B with lower scores of NIHSS, SSS, SAS, and SDS and higher GOOLI-74 scores. Besides, lower complication rate and higher total effective rate and nursing satisfaction were determined in Group A. Conclusions: EBN can better improve the PSY of patients with acute PSD, restore their neurological function, and effectively improve their QoL.


Subject(s)
Depression , Stroke , Depression/etiology , Evidence-Based Nursing , Humans , Polyesters , Quality of Life/psychology , Stroke/complications
8.
PLoS One ; 17(10): e0275455, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2054382

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic and its consequences have caused fear and anxiety worldwide and imposed a significant physical and psychological burden on people, especially women living with HIV (WLHIV). However, WLHIV were not studied as well as others during the pandemic. Hence, this study aimed to determine the relationships between COVID-19 phobia, health anxiety, and social relations in WLHIV. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This cross-sectional study enrolled 300 WLHIV who had records at the Iranian Research Center for HIV/AIDS of Tehran University of Medical Sciences. Data were collected using sociodemographic questionnaire, the fear of COVID-19 scale, the social relations questionnaire, the socioeconomic status scale and the health anxiety inventory. Path-analysis was used to assess the direct and indirct associations between variables. RESULTS: Based on the path analysis, among variables that had significant causal relationships with social relations, socioeconomic status (ß = -0.14) showed the greatest negative relationship, and health anxiety (ß = 0.11) had the strongest positive relationship on the direct path. On the indirect path, fear of COVID-19 (ß = 0.049) displayed the greatest positive relationship. The level of education (ß = 0.29) was the only variable showing a significant positive relationship with social relations on both direct and indirect paths. CONCLUSION: Our result showed that increased fear and health anxiety related to a higher social relations score in WLHIV. Hence, due to their vulnerability, these people require more support and education to adhere to health protocols in future pandemics and similar situations.


Subject(s)
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome , COVID-19 , Phobic Disorders , Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome/psychology , Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/etiology , Female , Humans , Iran/epidemiology , Pandemics
9.
BMC Psychol ; 10(1): 227, 2022 Sep 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2053978

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The mental health of students is affected by COVID-19. We aim to evaluate the anxiety and depression symptoms among college students during COVID-19 pandemic, analyze the influence factors that contribute to college students' anxiety and depression symptoms, and provide some suggestions for improving the mental health of college students. METHODS: With 179 college students participating, an online questionnaire consisting of a general questionnaire, Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD-7), and Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) was conducted in universities in Shanghai. The anxiety and depression symptoms among college students were evaluated using GAD-7 and PHQ-9 scales, and influence factors were analyzed using an unordered multi-class Logistic regression model. RESULTS: The reliability and validity of the GAD-7 and PHQ-9 scales were good (reliability ≥ 0.9, validity = 100%). The incidence of anxiety was 32.4%, of which were 23.5%, 8.4%, and 0.6% in mild, moderate, and severe, respectively; and the incidence of depression was 46.40%, of which in mild, moderate, moderate to severe, and severe were 28.5%, 10.1%, 7.3%, and 0.6%, respectively. Multivariate analysis revealed that male students with strong psychological quality, who were not easily affected by the COVID-19 pandemic, who received less negative or false information, and who had a strong grasp of psychology and related knowledge were less likely to suffer from mild or moderate anxiety symptoms [OR (95% CI) 0.18 (0.04, 0.81), 0.12 (0.05, 0.33), 0.23 (0.06, 0.89) and 0.07 (0.01, 0.74)]. Furthermore, college students who were not affected by the COVID-19 pandemic were less likely to suffer from mild, moderate, and moderate to severe depression symptoms [OR (95% CI) 0.23 (0.08, 0.65), 0.22 (0.05, 0.93), 0.10 (0.02, 0.54)]. CONCLUSION: The GAD-7 and PHQ-9 scales are suitable for evaluating anxiety and depression symptoms in college students. The COVID-19 pandemic was associated with a high incidence of anxiety and depression symptoms among college students, although gender and mental state fluctuations during the pandemic, negative and false information, and exposure to psychology and related courses were the main influencing factors.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Anxiety/diagnosis , Anxiety Disorders , COVID-19/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/etiology , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Reproducibility of Results , SARS-CoV-2 , Students/psychology
10.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 101(38): e30629, 2022 Sep 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2042655

ABSTRACT

Prevalence of depression is high among medical students and several mental problems are identified as risk factors. Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic causes difficulties that could adversely affect mental health. However, data concerning prevalence of mental problems, and whether or not these problems remain risk factors for depression during the COVID-19 pandemic in medical students are scarce. To investigate the prevalence of depression, social media addiction, game addiction, sleep quality, eating disorder risk, and perceived stress among Thai medical students, risk factors for depression were investigated. Online surveys via our faculty's learning portals were advertized to medical students who engaged online learning and 224 respondents provided complete data. Study-related medical students' data were collected using the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 for depression, the Social-Media Addiction Screening Scale for social media addiction, the Game Addiction Screening Test for game addiction, the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index for sleep quality, the Eating Attitudes Test for eating disorder risk, and the Perceived Stress Scale for perceived stress. Depression was reported in 35.7% of medical students, social-media addiction in 22.3%, game addiction in 4.5%, eating disorder risk in 4.9%, poor sleep quality in 80.8%, and moderate-to-high perceived stress in 71.4%. The independent predictors of depression were lower grade point average, social media addiction, and moderate-to-high perceived stress. A high prevalence of depression, stress, and poor sleep was found among medical students during the COVID-19 pandemic. Medical students who are stressed, have lower grades, and/or who are addicted to social media warrant depression screening.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders , Students, Medical , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/etiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/etiology , Humans , Pandemics , Risk Factors , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology
11.
Semergen ; 48(7): 101813, 2022 Oct.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2036514

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The current health situation is causing a detriment to mental health, where primary care physicians is a very affected group. OBJECTIVE: The objective is to discover whether the resilience variable is a predictor of the negative impact generated by COVID-19, understood in the variables of depression, anxiety and stress; and analyze, in turn, which resilient factors help to explain the variances of the variables and which control variables are also predictors. METHOD: A quantitative research has been carried out, specifically a single group non-experimental ex post facto design. The selected sample consisted of 268 primary care physicians, a group highly affected by the pandemic, who were administered a sociodemographic questionnaire, the SV-RES Resilience Scale, in its reduced version of 36 items, and the Depression, Anxiety and Depression Scale, DAS-21 stress. RESULTS: The results of the linear regressions showed how resilience, with a negative relationship, predicts depression (22.2%), anxiety (8.3%) and stress (12.3%), being the goals and identity factors that contribute significantly to explain the different variances. In turn, within the control variables, taking drugs, gender (except for the depression variable) and the decision to go to the psychologist were predictors of the various variables. CONCLUSIONS: The findings of this research intensify the necessity of promoting resilience among primary care physicians, with the intention of reducing their levels of depression, anxiety, and stress.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Physicians, Primary Care , Resilience, Psychological , Humans , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/etiology , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/etiology
12.
Wiad Lek ; 75(8 pt 1): 1868-1875, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2026697

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The aim: To study the structure of cognitive impairment in patients who were hospitalized with moderate to severe COVID-19 pneumonia. Investigate the correlation with demographic, biochemical parameters, as well as the emotional state of the patient. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Materials and methods: Cognitive functions were assessed using the MOCA test. PHQ-9 depression and GAD-7 anxiety questionnaires were used to study psychopathological symptoms. Demographic, clinical and laboratory data were extracted from medical records. RESULTS: Results: Cognitive performance is impaired in 94% of patients with COVID-19. This allows to suggest that COVID-19 has a serious impact on cognition, especially in elder people. Among different domains only visuospatial and executive functioning, abstract thinking, attention and delayed recall were severely impaired, while other domains stayed relatively intact. Patients after COVID-19 also tend to have a mild depressive and anxiety state. Anxiety levels were higher than depressive levels, but not connected to cognitive functioning. Also, there was seen a positive correlation between anxiety and pO2 and negative between anxiety and comorbid cardiac pathology. However, this requires further studies to reveal. Another interesting finding was non-linear relationship between cognitive performance and depression, that allows to suggest rapidly evolving depressive mood in persons with severe cognitive impairment after COVID-19. Cognitive and emotional state of patients after COVID-19 was also highly connected with working status. CONCLUSION: Conclusion: Significant cognitive impairment was presented in almost all patients with COVID-19. There was a selective impairment in domains of visuospatial/ executive functioning, abstract thinking, attention and delayed recall. Conclusions: Significant cognitive impairment was presented in almost all patients with COVID-19. There was a selective impairment in domains of visuospatial/ executive functioning, abstract thinking, attention and delayed recall.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cognitive Dysfunction , Aged , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cognitive Dysfunction/epidemiology , Cognitive Dysfunction/etiology , Demography , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/etiology , Depression/psychology , Humans , Neuropsychological Tests
13.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 101(31): e29931, 2022 Aug 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2008660

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The diagnosis and treatment rate of Parkinson disease (PD) with depression has a low diagnostic rate, and there is no consensus on the choice of treatment mode. This study evaluates the global research trends of scientific outputs related to depression in PD from multiple perspectives, using a bibliometric analysis and visualization tool to scientifically analyze the knowledge from the literature. METHODS: Literature related to depression in PD published from 2012 to 2021 was included and selected from the Web of Science Core Collection database in October 2021. CiteSpace software was used to visualize and analyze co-occurrence analyses for countries, institutions, authors, and keywords. RESULTS: A total of 4533 articles from the Web of Science database were included. The United States made the largest contribution with the majority of publications (1215; 29.40%). Toronto University was the most productive institution. PD, depression, quality of life, dementia, nonmotor symptom, prevalence, anxiety, Alzheimer disease, symptom, and disorder would be significantly correlated with depression in PD. The current hot spots in this field focus on the following: risk factors for depression in PD, assessment scale of depression in PD, and rehabilitation of depression in PD. CONCLUSIONS: This analysis not only reveals the current research trends and hotspots but also provides some instructive suggestions on the development of depression in PD.


Subject(s)
Parkinson Disease , Bibliometrics , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/etiology , Humans , Parkinson Disease/complications , Parkinson Disease/epidemiology , Parkinson Disease/therapy , Publications , Quality of Life , United States
14.
J Affect Disord ; 318: 40-47, 2022 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2004181

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: COVID-19 has caused an unprecedented psychological affection that might impact the nationwide vaccination program in China. This study was to explore the association between COVID-19 vaccination and psychological disorders among healthcare workers. METHODS: The study included 1571 healthcare workers from an anonymous online survey. Participants' sociodemographic characteristics, uptake data for the COVID-19 vaccine, and scores of the Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale (DASS-21) were collected. Nonparametric tests were conducted to compare the mean scores of DASS-21 between different subgroups. The potential factors related to psychological disorders of healthcare workers were analyzed using logistic regression. RESULTS: The vaccination rate was 69.6 %, the incidence of vaccine-related adverse events was 35.13 %, and the prevalence of depression, anxiety, and stress were 24.8 %, 32 %, and 33.4 % in this study, respectively. Compared to vaccinated participants (single-dose and double-dose vaccines), unvaccinated participants got significantly higher mean scores of DASS-21 (p < 0.05 for all). Vaccinated participants who suffered no adverse events scored significantly lower than those who suffered 1-2 or ≥3 adverse events (p < 0.05 for all). Vaccination was negatively associated with higher depression, anxiety, and stress, however, the number of vaccine-related adverse events was positively associated with them. LIMITATIONS: As this is a cross-sectional study, we could only speculate on the causality. CONCLUSIONS: An obvious impact of the psychological disorders on the COVID-19 vaccine coverage and related adverse events was detected in this study. Public health agencies should attach great importance to the psychological states of our citizens before getting vaccinated.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/etiology , Depression/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination/adverse effects
15.
South Med J ; 115(9): 717-721, 2022 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2002699

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Since the inception of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, the United States has been the leader in cases and deaths. Healthcare workers treating these severely ill patients are at risk of many deleterious consequences. Residents, in particular, may be affected by physical as well as psychological consequences. Because data are sparse on perceptions, coping strategies, and the mental health of residents during COVID-19, we explored these issues in survey data from a community-based academic program in the southeastern United States. METHODS: In May 2020, when US deaths from COVID-19 reached 100,000, we administered multiple-choice online anonymous surveys to assess resident perceptions, coping strategies, and self-reported levels of depression, anxiety, and stress. We used the COPE inventory to assess coping strategies and the Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale-21 questionnaire. RESULTS: A total of 59 (41.3%) of 143 eligible residents completed the survey, 52 (88.1%) of whom believed that they were likely or very likely to become infected with COVID-19. If infected, 17 (28.8%) believed that their illness would be serious or very serious. The top three strategies to cope with COVID-19 included acceptance, self-distraction, and use of emotional support. With respect to depression, anxiety, and stress, all of the mean scores were in the normal range. CONCLUSIONS: During COVID-19, residents in a southern community-based program with an academic affiliation reported effective coping strategies, predominantly acceptance, self-distraction, and use of emotional support. They reported concerns about becoming infected and, if they did, that their illness would likely be serious. Finally, they have not experienced depression, anxiety, or reported stress. The findings may be restricted in generalizability to a southern community-based program with an academic affiliation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adaptation, Psychological , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/etiology , Humans , Mental Health , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires
16.
Int J Ment Health Nurs ; 31(6): 1492-1502, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2001654

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 pandemic has had a great impact worldwide, specially affecting mental health and has undoubtedly taken part in human behaviour modification, increasing global health burden and with stress, anxiety and depression being the main contributors to this load. Because of the importance of this issue, the objective of this study was the creation of an explanatory model for the causal relationship of the main psychological variables: stress, anxiety and depression in the COVID-19 pandemic context. A cross-sectional study was carried out with a sample of 709 volunteers, sociodemographic variables and psychological symptoms were measured through a virtual DASS-21 questionnaire, during the COVID-19 pandemic, dated from November 2 to 6, 2020. A structural equation model using the weighted least squares means and the adjusted variance was employed for the creation and adjustment of the explanatory relational model. The results showed the presence of stress, anxiety and depression symptoms among the general population. The model showed an adequate fit (CFI = 0.94; TLI = 0.94; RMSEA = 0.06; P = 0.000) and was able to explain more than 80% of depressive symptoms (R2 = 0.86) and more than 70% of anxiety symptoms (R2 = 0.72), in addition to showing a unidirectional causal relationship of long-term stress on anxiety, and anxiety on depressive symptoms, showing a linked behaviour of the same, in the adjusted model. It was also outlined that this model was characterized by being expressed mainly in women, with lower quality of sleep and at a younger age.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Female , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/etiology , Depression/psychology , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/etiology , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/etiology , Anxiety/psychology
17.
Hum Resour Health ; 20(1): 64, 2022 08 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2002195

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Community health workers (CHWs) involved in the COVID-19 response might be at increased risk of developing depression, though evidence is scarce. We investigated effects of COVID-19-related work on changes in depression levels among CHWs in Vietnam and identified sub-groups among CHWs who are at particular risk of developing severe depression. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional online survey among 979 CHWs who were involved in the COVID-19 response in Vietnam, in particular during the 2021 Tet holiday outbreak between January and March 2021. Respondents were asked to report depression symptoms at two-time points, before the start of the COVID-19 pandemic (average June to December 2019) and during the 2021 Tet holiday outbreak using the PHQ-9 mental health questionnaire. We estimated depression levels at both time points and developed univariate and multivariable logistic regression models to estimate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) to explore the association between deterioration to high depression levels and selected risk factors. RESULTS: Median depression levels among CHWs in Vietnam doubled from 3 (IQR = 2-7) before COVID-19 to 6 (IQR = 3-9) on the PHQ-9 scale during the Tet holiday outbreak. The proportion with normal/minimal levels decreased from 77.1% (95% CI = 74.4-79.7) to 50.9% (95% CI = 47.7-54) (p-value < 0.001), while the proportion of CHWs with moderate, moderately severe, and severe depression levels increased 4.3, 4.5, and five-fold, respectively. Less sleep and poor sleep quality, working in unfavorable work environments, and being involved in contact tracing and the organization of quarantine for suspected cases were associated with an increased risk of deterioration to high depression levels. CONCLUSIONS: We found a substantial increase in overall depression levels among CHWs in Vietnam due to their COVID-19 related work and a particularly worrisome rise in CHWs suffering from severe depression. CHWs are an indispensable yet often overlooked cadre of work in many low- and middle-income countries and shoulder a heavy psychological burden during the COVID-19 pandemic. Targeted psychological support for CHWs is needed to improve their mental health and to ensure the sustainability of community-based health interventions during COVID-19 and future epidemics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiology , Community Health Workers , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/etiology , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Vietnam/epidemiology
18.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(16)2022 08 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1997583

ABSTRACT

Welfare recipients were often considered the least deserving of COVID-related support. Despite the recent attention paid to the impact of COVID-19 pandemic on mental health, few studies have explored the mental distress experienced by welfare recipients. This cross-sectional study on female Comprehensive Social Security Allowance recipients in Hong Kong aimed to explore their level of mental distress and its association with a range of risk factors specific to welfare recipients. Hence, 316 valid cases from a local community center responded to our online survey. We found that 52.3%, 23.4%, and 78% of the participants showed moderate to extremely severe depression, anxiety, and stress symptoms, respectively. A higher level of mental distress was associated with having a psychiatric diagnosis, poorer social, and greater concerns over disciplining children, the living environment, daily expenses and being infected by COVID-19. Unexpectedly, being married, having a permanent residence, and having a job were not significant protective factors for this group. The models explained 45.5%, 44.6%, and 52.5% of the overall variance in the level of depression, anxiety, and stress (p < 0.01), respectively. Our findings have important implications for supporting female welfare recipients during a public health crisis and may help frontline staff and professionals provide prompt assistance to this group in need.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mental Disorders , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/etiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/etiology , Female , Hong Kong/epidemiology , Humans , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Security
19.
Nutrition ; 103-104: 111825, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1996459

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to explore the consequences of the pandemic lockdown among the Italian general population by focusing on depression and emotional overeating (EO). METHODS: QuarantEat was an Italian, nationwide, cross-sectional study conducted using a computer-assisted web interview method (May 6-31, 2020). The 40-item questionnaire included the five-item World Health Organization Wellbeing Index and EO Questionnaire-5. Multivariable logistic regressions were performed. RESULTS: A total of 1865 adults participated in the study. Depression and EO were reported by 57.6% and 49.3%, respectively, of the sample. When considering multivariable models, women, students, participants who smoked more/equal during lockdown, and individuals with EO were more likely to report depression. Following a healthier diet or exercising during lockdown reduced the probability of depression. The likelihood of EO was higher for participants who were female, consumed more food, had a less healthy diet, were overweight and obese, consumed more chocolate, consumed more snacks between meals or before going to sleep/during the night, and were at risk for depression. Increasing age, having a relationship, and not having increased television/computer watching time while eating reduced the odds of EO. CONCLUSIONS: QuarantEat highlighted high levels of depression and EO right after the end of pandemic lockdown measures, and outlined the importance of the relationships between mental health and health risk behaviors, such as smoking, exercise, diet, and changes in eating behaviors due to the pandemic lockdown. Planning interventions using a holistic approach and reaching every individual to overcome the limits caused by the restrictive lockdown measures is essential.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Adult , Female , Humans , Male , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/etiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Hyperphagia
20.
Arch Womens Ment Health ; 25(5): 943-956, 2022 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1990651

ABSTRACT

Our primary objective was to document COVID-19 induced changes to perinatal care across the USA and examine the implication of these changes for maternal mental health. We performed an observational cross-sectional study with convenience sampling using direct patient reports from 1918 postpartum and 3868 pregnant individuals collected between April 2020 and December 2020 from 10 states across the USA. We leverage a subgroup of these participants who gave birth prior to March 2020 to estimate the pre-pandemic prevalence of specific birthing practices as a comparison. Our primary analyses describe the prevalence and timing of perinatal care changes, compare perinatal care changes depending on when and where individuals gave birth, and assess the linkage between perinatal care alterations and maternal anxiety and depressive symptoms. Seventy-eight percent of pregnant participants and 63% of postpartum participants reported at least one change to their perinatal care between March and August 2020. However, the prevalence and nature of specific perinatal care changes occurred unevenly over time and across geographic locations. The separation of infants and mothers immediately after birth and the cancelation of prenatal visits were associated with worsened depression and anxiety symptoms in mothers after controlling for sociodemographic factors, mental health history, number of pregnancy complications, and general stress about the COVID-19 pandemic. Our analyses reveal widespread changes to perinatal care across the US that fluctuated depending on where and when individuals gave birth. Disruptions to perinatal care may also exacerbate mental health concerns, so focused treatments that can mitigate the negative psychiatric sequelae of interrupted care are warranted.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/etiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/etiology , Female , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Mental Health , Pandemics , Perinatal Care , Pregnancy
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