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1.
Psychiatry Res ; 291: 113294, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-640985

ABSTRACT

To cope with Covid-19 and limits its spread among residents, retirement homes have prohibited physical contact between residents and families and friend and, in some cases, even between residents or between residents and caregivers. We investigated the effects of measures against Covid-19 on the mental health of participants with Alzheimer's disease (AD) who live in retirement homes in France. We instructed on-site caregivers to assess depression and anxiety in participants with mild AD who live in retirement homes. Fifty-eight participants consented to participate in the study. The participants rated their depression and anxiety during and before the Covid-19 crisis. Participants reported higher depression (p = .005) and anxiety (p = .004) during than before the Covid-19 crisis. These increases can be attributed to the isolation of the residents and/or to the drastic changes in their daily life and care they receive. While, in their effort to prevent infections, retirement homes are forced to physically separate residents from the outside world and to drastically reduce residents' activities, these decisions are likely to come at a cost to residents with AD and their mental health.


Subject(s)
Alzheimer Disease/complications , Anxiety/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections , Depression/diagnosis , Homes for the Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Alzheimer Disease/psychology , Anxiety/complications , Anxiety/psychology , Betacoronavirus , Caregivers , Depression/complications , Depression/psychology , Female , France , Humans , Male , Nursing Homes , Severity of Illness Index
2.
Inquiry ; 57: 46958020957114, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-751317

ABSTRACT

A novel coronavirus pneumonia broke out and gradually developed into a global public health problem. Health care workers, especially nurses, suffered from great occupational pressure and psychological distress during the outbreak of infectious diseases. We performed a cross-sectional survey to investigate the psychological status and self-efficacy of nurses in public hospital during COVID-19 outbreak between 16th and 25th February 2020. A total of 223 nurses participated in this study. The prevalence of anxiety and depression symptoms was 40.8% (CI 95%: 34.4%-47.2%) and 26.4% (CI 95%: 20.6%-42.2%), respectively. There was no difference in the prevalence of anxiety symptoms among demographic variables. There was significant differences in the prevalence of depression symptoms according to professional titles (P = .020). The mean score of self-efficacy was 25.90 ± 7.55. The self-efficacy was negatively correlated with anxiety (r = -0.161, P < .05). The psychological status of nurses in public hospital during COVID-19 outbreak needs our attention. Improving nurses' self-efficacy in dealing with emerging infectious diseases may be helpful to their psychology.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/psychology , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Depression/psychology , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Self Efficacy , Adult , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/nursing , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Mental Health , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/nursing , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
4.
Cancer Cytopathol ; 128(9): 597-598, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-743640
5.
J Med Internet Res ; 22(9): e22227, 2020 09 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-745101

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has recently spread dramatically worldwide, raising considerable concerns and resulting in detrimental effects on the psychological health of people who are vulnerable to the disease. Therefore, assessment of depression in members of the general public and their psychological and behavioral responses is essential for the maintenance of health. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to assess the prevalence of depression and the associated factors among the general public during the early stages of the COVID-19 pandemic in China. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey with convenience sampling was conducted from February 11 to 16, 2020, in the early stages of the COVID-19 outbreak in China. A self-administrated smartphone questionnaire based on the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) and psychological and behavioral responses was distributed to the general public. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis and multivariate logistic regression analysis were conducted to explore the associated factors of depression.aA cross-sectional survey with convenience sampling was conducted from February 11 to 16, 2020, in the early stages of the COVID-19 outbreak in China. A self-administrated smartphone questionnaire based on the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) and psychological and behavioral responses was distributed to the general public. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis and multivariate logistic regression analysis were conducted to explore the associated factors of depression. RESULTS: The prevalence of depression (PHQ-9 score ≥10) among the general public during the COVID-19 pandemic was 182/1342 (13.6%). Regression analysis indicated that feeling stressed, feeling helpless, persistently being worried even with support, never feeling clean after disinfecting, scrubbing hands and items repeatedly, hoarding food, medicine, or daily supplies, and being distracted from work or study were positively associated with depression, while social support and being calm were negatively associated with depression. CONCLUSIONS: The general public suffered from high levels of depression during the early stages of the COVID-19 pandemic. Thus, COVID-19-related mood management and social support should be provided to attenuate depression in the general public.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Depression/epidemiology , Health Surveys , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Adult , Anxiety/psychology , Betacoronavirus , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/psychology , Female , Humans , Male , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Prevalence , Self Report , Smartphone
6.
JAMA Netw Open ; 3(9): e2019686, 2020 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-739606

ABSTRACT

Importance: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic and the policies to contain it have been a near ubiquitous exposure in the US with unknown effects on depression symptoms. Objective: To estimate the prevalence of and risk factors associated with depression symptoms among US adults during vs before the COVID-19 pandemic. Design, Setting, and Participants: This nationally representative survey study used 2 population-based surveys of US adults aged 18 or older. During COVID-19, estimates were derived from the COVID-19 and Life Stressors Impact on Mental Health and Well-being study, conducted from March 31, 2020, to April 13, 2020. Before COVID-19 estimates were derived from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, conducted from 2017 to 2018. Data were analyzed from April 15 to 20, 2020. Exposures: The COVID-19 pandemic and outcomes associated with the measures to mitigate it. Main Outcomes and Measures: Depression symptoms, defined using the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 cutoff of 10 or higher. Categories of depression symptoms were defined as none (score, 0-4), mild (score, 5-9), moderate (score, 10-14), moderately severe (score, 15-19), and severe (score, ≥20). Results: A total of 1470 participants completed the COVID-19 and Life Stressors Impact on Mental Health and Well-being survey (completion rate, 64.3%), and after removing those with missing data, the final during-COVID-19 sample included 1441 participants (619 participants [43.0%] aged 18-39 years; 723 [50.2%] men; 933 [64.7%] non-Hispanic White). The pre-COVID-19 sample included 5065 participants (1704 participants [37.8%] aged 18-39 years; 2588 [51.4%] women; 1790 [62.9%] non-Hispanic White). Depression symptom prevalence was higher in every category during COVID-19 compared with before (mild: 24.6% [95% CI, 21.8%-27.7%] vs 16.2% [95% CI, 15.1%-17.4%]; moderate: 14.8% [95% CI, 12.6%-17.4%] vs 5.7% [95% CI, 4.8%-6.9%]; moderately severe: 7.9% [95% CI, 6.3%-9.8%] vs 2.1% [95% CI, 1.6%-2.8%]; severe: 5.1% [95% CI, 3.8%-6.9%] vs 0.7% [95% CI, 0.5%-0.9%]). Higher risk of depression symptoms during COVID-19 was associated with having lower income (odds ratio, 2.37 [95% CI, 1.26-4.43]), having less than $5000 in savings (odds ratio, 1.52 [95% CI, 1.02-2.26]), and exposure to more stressors (odds ratio, 3.05 [95% CI, 1.95-4.77]). Conclusions and Relevance: These findings suggest that prevalence of depression symptoms in the US was more than 3-fold higher during COVID-19 compared with before the COVID-19 pandemic. Individuals with lower social resources, lower economic resources, and greater exposure to stressors (eg, job loss) reported a greater burden of depression symptoms. Post-COVID-19 plans should account for the probable increase in mental illness to come, particularly among at-risk populations.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Depression/epidemiology , Income/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Adolescent , Adult , Betacoronavirus , Depression/psychology , Educational Status , Female , Humans , Male , Marital Status/statistics & numerical data , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Patient Health Questionnaire , Prevalence , Risk Factors , Severity of Illness Index , Stress, Psychological/psychology , United States/epidemiology , Young Adult
7.
Mov Disord ; 35(8): 1287-1292, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-734140

ABSTRACT

The impact of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) on clinical features of Parkinson's disease (PD) has been poorly characterized so far. Of 141 PD patients resident in Lombardy, we found 12 COVID-19 cases (8.5%), whose mean age and disease duration (65.5 and 6.3 years, respectively) were similar to controls. Changes in clinical features in the period January 2020 to April 2020 were compared with those of 36 PD controls matched for sex, age, and disease duration using the clinical impression of severity index for PD, the Movement Disorders Society Unified PD Rating Scale Parts II and IV, and the nonmotor symptoms scale. Motor and nonmotor symptoms significantly worsened in the COVID-19 group, requiring therapy adjustment in one third of cases. Clinical deterioration was explained by both infection-related mechanisms and impaired pharmacokinetics of dopaminergic therapy. Urinary issues and fatigue were the most prominent nonmotor issues. Cognitive functions were marginally involved, whereas none experienced autonomic failure. © 2020 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Parkinson Disease/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Case-Control Studies , Cognition/physiology , Cognition Disorders/virology , Depression/psychology , Depression/virology , Humans , Pandemics , Parkinson Disease/complications , Parkinson Disease/virology
8.
Sleep Med ; 75: 12-20, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-731180

ABSTRACT

Background: The 2019 Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19) pandemic has become a global health emergency. The extreme actions aimed to reduce virus diffusion have profoundly changed the lifestyles of the Italian population. Moreover, fear of contracting the infection has generated high levels of anxiety. This study aimed to understand the psychological impact of the COVID-19 outbreak on sleep quality, general anxiety symptomatology, and psychological distress. Methods: An online survey collected information on socio-demographic data and additional information concerning the COVID-19 pandemic. Furthermore, sleep quality, sleep disorders, generalized anxiety symptoms, psychological distress, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptomatology related to COVID-19 were assessed. Results: This study included 2291 respondents. The results revealed that 57.1% of participants reported poor sleep quality, 32.1% high anxiety, 41.8% high distress, and 7.6% reported PTSD symptomatology linked to COVID-19. Youth and women, those uncertain regarding possible COVID-19 infection, and greater fear of direct contact with those infected by COVID-19 had an increased risk of developing sleep disturbances, as well as higher levels of anxiety and distress. Finally, a significant relationship between sleep quality, generalized anxiety, and psychological distress with PTSD symptoms related to COVID-19 was evidenced. Conclusions: Our findings indicate that the COVID-19 pandemic appears to be a risk factor for sleep disorders and psychological diseases in the Italian population, as previously reported in China. These results should be used as a starting point for further studies aimed to develop psychological interventions to minimize the brief and long-term consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Psychological Distress , Quarantine/psychology , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/psychology , Adult , Anxiety/psychology , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Depression/psychology , Female , Health Status , Humans , Italy , Male , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/etiology
9.
J Int Med Res ; 48(8): 300060520948382, 2020 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-729469

ABSTRACT

Rehabilitation is important for patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infection. Given the lack of guidelines in English on the rehabilitation of these patients, we conducted a review of the most recent reports. We performed this literature review using the principal research databases and included randomized trials, recommendations, quasi-randomized or prospective controlled clinical trials, reports, guidelines, field updates, and letters to the editor. We identified 107 studies in the database search, among which 85 were excluded after screening the full text or abstract. In total, 22 studies were finally included. The complexity of the clinical setting and the speed of spread of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2, which leads to rapid occupation of beds in the intensive care unit, make it necessary to discharge patients with COVID-19 who have mild symptoms as soon as possible. For these reasons, it is necessary to formulate rehabilitation programs for these patients, to help them restore physical and respiratory function and to reduce anxiety and depression, particularly patients with comorbidities and those who live alone or in rural settings, to restore a good quality of life.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Coronavirus Infections/rehabilitation , Patient Discharge Summaries , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/rehabilitation , Anxiety/psychology , Betacoronavirus , Depression/psychology , Humans , Pandemics , Patient Discharge , Quality of Life
10.
IEEE Pulse ; 11(4): 8-13, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-729276

ABSTRACT

One of the most pernicious side effects of the COVID-19 pandemic is a steep rise in stress and mental health problems. According to a poll by the Kaiser Family Foundation, nearly half of American adults say that worry and stress about the pandemic is hurting their mental health [1]. There are plenty of factors feeding into this phenomenon. People are anxious about getting sick, grieving lost loved ones, and experiencing financial stress, parental stress, and loneliness. The pandemic places additional burdens on essential workers and people of color, both of whom are at greater risk of dying from the disease. COVID-19 itself has been linked to neurological problems as well as anxiety, depression, and sleep disorders [2].


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections , Depression , Mental Health , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Sleep Wake Disorders , Stress, Psychological , Adult , Coronavirus Infections/economics , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Depression/economics , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/physiopathology , Depression/psychology , Humans , Pandemics/economics , Pneumonia, Viral/economics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Sleep Wake Disorders/economics , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/physiopathology , Sleep Wake Disorders/psychology , Stress, Psychological/economics , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/physiopathology , Stress, Psychological/psychology
11.
BMC Psychiatry ; 20(1): 417, 2020 08 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-727269

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: To investigate the resilience of non-local medical workers sent to support local medical workers in treating the outbreak of 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19). METHODS: In February 2020, non-local medical workers who had been sent to Wuhan as support staff to respond to the COVID-19 outbreak were asked to complete an online survey composed of the Connor Davidson Resilience Scale (CD-RISC), Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale (HADS) and Simplified Coping Style Questionnaire (SCSQ). RESULTS: Survey responses from 114 non-local medical workers were analyzed. CD-RISC scores were high (67.03 ± 13.22). The resilience level was highest for physicians (73.48 ± 11.49), followed by support staff, including health care assistants, technicians (67.78 ± 12.43) and nurses (64.86 ± 13.46). Respondents differed significantly in the levels of education, training/support provided by the respondent's permanent hospital (where he or she normally works), and in their feelings of being adequately prepared and confident to complete tasks (P < 0.05). Resilience correlated negatively with anxiety (r = -.498, P < 0.01) and depression (r = -.471, P < 0.01) but positively with active coping styles (r = .733, P < 0.01). Multiple regression analysis showed that active coping (ß = 1.314, p < 0.05), depression (ß = -.806, p < 0.05), anxiety (ß = - 1.091, p < 0.05), and training/support provided by the respondent's permanent hospital (ß = 3.510, p < 0.05) were significant associated with resilience. CONCLUSION: Our data show that active coping, depression, anxiety, and training/support provided by the respondent's permanent hospital are associated with resilience. Managers of medical staff should use these data to develop psychosocial interventions aimed at reinforcing the resilience of medical workers during highly stressful and prolonged medical emergencies, as seen during the COVID-19 outbreak.


Subject(s)
Adaptation, Psychological , Anxiety/epidemiology , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Depression/epidemiology , Health Personnel/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Resilience, Psychological , Adult , Anxiety/psychology , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/psychology , Disease Outbreaks , Female , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Surveys and Questionnaires
12.
Clin Ther ; 42(6): 962-963, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-716622

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic embodies overwhelming stresses-unemployment, death, and isolation, among others. When called upon, clinicians must try to sort out demoralization from depression. This commentary discerns the characteristics of demoralization versus depression, and suggests solutions for both, together with a cautionary word on the use chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine in patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Depression/diagnosis , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Anxiety/diagnosis , Anxiety/psychology , Chloroquine/therapeutic use , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Depression/psychology , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Unemployment/psychology
13.
Middle East Afr J Ophthalmol ; 27(2): 79-85, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-714533

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To assess the psychological impact and mental health outcomes including depression, anxiety, and insomnia during COVID-19 crisis among ophthalmologists. METHODS: This was a simple random study in which ophthalmologists practicing in Saudi Arabia were asked to fill in a self-administered online survey during the period from March 28, 2020, to April 04, 2020. Four validated psychiatric assessment tools were used to detect symptoms of depression, anxiety, insomnia, and stress perception. RESULTS: One hundred and seven participants successfully completed the survey with a response rate of 30.6%. Males constituted 56.1% (n = 60). Ophthalmology residents constituted the majority (n = 66, 61.7%). About half of the physicians exhibited symptoms of depression (n = 56, 50.5%), anxiety (n = 50, 46.7%), and insomnia (n = 48, 44.9%). Symptoms of stress ranged between low (28%), moderate (68.2%), and high (3.7%). According to the cutoff values for severe symptoms, 29% were identified as having depression, 38.3% had anxiety, and 15% had insomnia.Depression was found to be more common among female ophthalmologists (P = 0.06), those living with an elderly (P = 0.003), and fellows (P = 0.006). Female ophthalmologists suffering from anxiety were significantly more than male ophthalmologists (P = 0.046). There was a trend toward suffering from anxiety in frontline health-care providers (P = 0.139) and in ophthalmologists who are living with an elderly (P = 0.149). Female participants exhibited significantly more moderate-to-high symptoms of stress (P = 0.018). CONCLUSIONS: Ophthalmologists' psychological needs, females in particular, should be addressed appropriately during the COVID-19 pandemic. Establishing psychological support units, especially for high-risk individuals, should be considered to minimize psychological adverse effects.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/psychology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Ophthalmologists/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/psychology , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Adult , Anxiety/epidemiology , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus , Depression/epidemiology , Female , Health Personnel , Humans , Male , Needs Assessment , Ophthalmologists/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology , Sex Factors , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
14.
PLoS One ; 15(8): e0237056, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-711074

ABSTRACT

The rapid spread of the coronavirus and the strategies to slow it have disrupted just about every aspect of our lives. Such disruption may be reflected in changes in psychological function. The present study used a pre-posttest design to test whether Five Factor Model personality traits changed with the coronavirus outbreak in the United States. Participants (N = 2,137) were tested in early February 2020 and again during the President's 15 Days to Slow the Spread guidelines. In contrast to the preregistered hypotheses, Neuroticism decreased across these six weeks, particularly the facets of Anxiety and Depression, and Conscientiousness did not change. Interestingly, there was some evidence that the rapid changes in the social context had changed the meaning of an item. Specifically, an item about going to work despite being sick was a good indicator of conscientiousness before COVID-19, but the interpretation of it changed with the pandemic. In sum, the unexpected small decline in Neuroticism suggests that, during the acute phase of the coronavirus outbreak, feelings of anxiety and distress may be attributed more to the pandemic than to one's personality.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Neuroticism , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Anxiety/pathology , Anxiety/psychology , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Consciousness , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Depression/pathology , Depression/psychology , Female , Humans , Internet , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States/epidemiology , Young Adult
16.
J Affect Disord ; 276: 555-561, 2020 Nov 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-701502

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There was an outbreak of COVID-19 towards the end of 2019 in China, which spread all over the world rapidly. The Chinese healthcare system is facing a big challenge where hospital workers are experiencing enormous psychological pressure. This study aimed to (1) investigate the psychological status of hospital workers and (2) provide references for psychological crisis intervention in the future. METHOD: An online survey was conducted to collect sociodemographic features, epidemic-related factors, results of PHQ-9, GAD-7, PHQ-15, suicidal and self-harm ideation (SSI), and the score of stress and support scales. Chi-square test, t-test, non-parametric, and logistic regression analysis were used to detect the risk factors to psychological effect and SSI. RESULTS: 8817 hospital workers participated in this online survey. The prevalence of depression, anxiety, somatic symptoms, and SSI were 30.2%, 20.7%, 46.2%, and 6.5%, respectively. Logistic regression analysis showed that female, single, Tujia minority, educational background of junior or below, designated or county hospital, need for psychological assistance before or during the epidemic, unconfident about defeating COVID-19, ignorance about the epidemic, willingness of attending parties, and poor self-rated health condition were independent factors associated with high-level depression, somatic symptom, and SSI among hospital workers (P<0.05). LIMITATIONS: This cross-sectional study cannot reveal the causality, and voluntary participation could be prone to selection bias. A modified epidemic-related stress and support scale without standardization was used. The number of hospital workers in each hospital was unavailable. CONCLUSION: There were a high level of psychological impact and SSI among hospital workers, which needed to be addressed. County hospital workers were more severe and easier to be neglected. More studies on cognitive and behavioral subsequence after a public health disaster among hospital workers are needed.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections , Health Personnel/psychology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Anxiety/psychology , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/psychology , Epidemics , Female , Humans , Male , Patient Health Questionnaire , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Prevalence , Suicidal Ideation
17.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 17(15)2020 Jul 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-693559

ABSTRACT

The number of health workers infected with COVID-19 in Spain is one of the highest in the world. The aim of this study is to analyse posttraumatic stress, anxiety and depression during the COVID-19 pandemic. Associations between burnout, resilience, demographic, work and COVID-19 variables are analysed. Cross-sectional data on 1422 health workers were analysed. A total of 56.6% of health workers present symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder, 58.6% anxiety disorder, 46% depressive disorder and 41.1% feel emotionally drained. The profile of a health worker with greater posttraumatic stress symptoms would be a person who works in the Autonomous Community of Madrid, in a hospital, is a woman, is concerned that a person he/she lives with may be infected, and thinks that he/she is very likely to be infected. The risk variables for anxiety and depression would be a person that is a woman, working 12- or 24-h shifts, and being worried that a family member could be infected. High scores on emotional exhaustion and depersonalization are risk factors for mental health, with resilience and personal fulfilment being protective variables. Data are provided to improve preventive measures for occupational health workers.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/psychology , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Depression/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Resilience, Psychological , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/psychology , Adult , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology
18.
J Coll Physicians Surg Pak ; 30(6): 26-31, 2020 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-691307

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To assess the levels of health anxiety and Beck depression according to demographic variables among a sample of healthcare workers during the COVID-19 pandemic. STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional, analytical study. PLACE AND DURATION OF STUDY: Firat University and Medical Park Hosspital, Elazig, Turkey, from March  to April 2020. METHODOLOGY: A total of 270 healthcare workers (100 males and 170 females) filled out health anxiety inventory (HAI), Beck depression inventory (BDI), questionnaires. Evaluations of HAI and BDI were conducted according to demographic variables ( age, gender, marital status, jop, life style, smoking habits, sistemic disease). RESULTS: Female healthcare workers had higher HAI and BDI scores than male (p <0.001, p <0.001). Young healthcare workers had higher HAI scores than aged healthcare workers (p=0.021) Healthcare workers with more knowledge about COVID-19 had lower HAI and BDI in (p=0.021, p=0.019). There is statistical significant differences in HAI and BDI scores in marital status (p = 0.022, p=0.002). The HAI and BDI scores of participants, who had close contact, were significantly higher than those who had no contact (p = 0.009 p=0.028). There were significant correlations between the two scales (p <0.05). CONCLUSION: During the COVID-19 pandemic, psychological support should be provided to all healthcare workers and working conditions should be corrected to relieve the anxiety and worry. Key Words: COVID-19, Healthcare workers, Health anxiety, Beck depress.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/psychology , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Depression/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Adult , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Mental Health , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Turkey/epidemiology , Young Adult
20.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 99(30): e21279, 2020 Jul 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-682425

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The article presents a protocol of a cross-sectional study of mental health of pregnant women in relation to the coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19) pandemic. The primary aim is to compare differences in anxiety and depression scores of pregnant women between countries affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. The secondary aim is to assess demographic, economic, and social aspects affecting maternal anxiety and depression scores among pregnant women worldwide in the time of the COVID-19 pandemic. Finally, we will be able to compare differences in perception of the different aspects of the COVID-19 pandemic (social distancing, restrictions related to delivery) between countries and according to the epidemic status (number of infected patients, number of reported deaths). The comparisons will also be done according to the COVID-19 status of the participants. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: It is a web-based anonymous survey of pregnant women living in countries affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. The survey is comprised of 3 sections:Web-based recruitment for health research has proven to be cost-effective and efficient. At current times with the COVID-19 pandemic, limited resources and social distancing restrictions, performing a mental health study involving pregnant women on a large international scale cannot be safely conducted without involving social-media.The fears of pregnant women fall into 3 categories: the medical condition, the economic status and the organization of daily activity.The study has received approval of the medical ethics committee and has been registered on Clinicaltrials.gov. Results will be published in peer-reviewed journals and made public through all available media.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/psychology , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Depression/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/psychology , Pregnancy Complications/psychology , Pregnant Women/psychology , Adult , Anxiety/epidemiology , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications/epidemiology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/prevention & control , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , Risk Factors , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
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