Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 463
Filter
Add filters

Document Type
Year range
1.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 25(24): 7964-7970, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1608921

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to develop mental health nursing strategies for the inbound quarantined population based on the results of a survey study and frontline nursing experiences. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: A mixed research method was selected, we collected data by questionnaires from 128 quarantined people, and by semi-structured interviews from 5 registered nurses. Generalized anxiety disorder-7 (GAD-7), the patient health questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9), the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), Social Support Rating Scale (SSRS) were used in the quantitative research to identify the prevalence of psychological issues and risk factors. Semi-structured interviews were conducted in the qualitative study to conclude nursing experiences from RNs. RESULTS: The overall prevalence of anxiety, depression, and insomnia were 34%, 41%, and 18% respectively. Binary logistic regression analysis showed that social support, urban residence, and chronic disease were associated with mental health problems in certain aspects. Three themes were emerged from the analysis of RNs interviews: personality, chronic diseases, and social support. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of mental health issues in the inbound quarantined population was the same as the general population in the initial stage of COVID-19 outbreak, and significantly lower than people who lived in high-risk areas. Living in urban areas, with chronic diseases, and obtaining less social support are the risk factors. Finally, four nursing strategies were proposed by the research team for mental health well-being.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , Nurses/organization & administration , Psychiatric Nursing/organization & administration , Quarantine/psychology , Adult , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/prevention & control , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/prevention & control , Depression/psychology , Humans , Male , Pandemics/prevention & control , Prevalence , Professional Role , Quarantine/standards , Risk Factors , Self Report/statistics & numerical data , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/prevention & control , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/psychology , Social Support/psychology , Social Support/statistics & numerical data , Young Adult
2.
Biomed Res Int ; 2021: 9928276, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1582875

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a global public health crisis. However, whether it can cause respiratory dysfunction or physical and psychological disorders in patients remains unknown. Thus, this study was conducted to investigate the respiratory function, activities of daily living, quality of life, and mental status of patients with COVID-19. Participants and outcomes. Data was collected from the follow-up of eligible patients who attended the fever clinic of three hospitals in Jiangxi Province, from March to May 2020. The outcomes included respiratory muscle function, degree of dyspnea, aerobic capacity, activities of daily living, quality of life, and mental status. Results: A total of 139 patients (72 men and 67 women) were included in this study. The proportions of mild, moderate, severe, and critical cases of COVID-19 were 7.1% (10 cases), 68.3% (95 cases), 20.1% (28 cases), and 4.2% (6 cases), respectively. The rates of abnormal maximal inspiratory pressure were 10.0%, 25.2%, 25.0%, and 16.7%, respectively. There were 50%, 65.3%, 50%, and 66.7% of the patients with abnormal dyspnea in the four clinical classifications, respectively. Patients generally show a decline in quality of life, anxiety, and depression symptoms. Conclusions: Respiratory dysfunction, decreased quality of life, and psychological disorders were present in each clinical classification of COVID-19. Therefore, it is necessary to carry out respiratory rehabilitation and psychological intervention for COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
Activities of Daily Living , COVID-19 , Quality of Life , Respiratory Mechanics , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Aged , Anxiety/physiopathology , Anxiety/psychology , Anxiety/rehabilitation , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/psychology , COVID-19/rehabilitation , Depression/physiopathology , Depression/psychology , Depression/rehabilitation , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies
3.
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth ; 21(1): 846, 2021 Dec 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1582096

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The pregnant population experienced unique COVID-19 physical and psychosocial stressors such as direct health concerns related to the virus and loss of access to resources since the COVID-19 emerged as a global pandemic in early 2020. Despite these COVID-19-related stress and concerns, the maternal experience of bonding with their unborn children has not been well studied. This work aimed to study the association between mental health history, current mental health symptoms, psychological factors, COVID-19-related worries, and self-reported maternal-fetal bonding of pregnant women. METHODS: This online, survey-based cross-sectional study focused on women pregnant during the pandemic and assessed 686 women using data collected from May 19, 2020 to October 3, 2020. Enrolled respondents completed assessments in which they self-reported maternal-fetal bonding, mental health symptomatology, psychological factors, and COVID-19-related worries regarding health, pregnancy, and resources. RESULTS: Depressive symptoms in pregnant women were associated with lower quality maternal-fetal bonding, while a higher level of anxiety was positively associated with bonding; however, past history of depression or generalized anxiety diagnosis did not appear to be as relevant as active symptomatology. Maternal resilience, but not distress tolerance, appeared to be a protective factor resulting in improved bonding. Higher levels of worry regarding impact of COVID-19 on health were significantly associated with improved bonding, while worries regarding the impact of COVID-19 on the pregnancy or resources were not significantly associated with bonding. The study also found associations between different sociodemographic variables and bonding, including a strong positive association between first time motherhood and bonding and a negative association between higher education and income and bonding. CONCLUSIONS: This study was the first to report potential protective and risk factors to the maternal-fetal bonding process in women pregnant during the COVID-19 pandemic. Unique COVID-19 concerns exist; however, anxiety and COVID-19 concerns do not appear to undermine maternal-fetal bonding while active depressive symptomatology may negatively influence bonding; interventions increasing maternal resilience may be particularly valuable.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Maternal-Fetal Relations/psychology , Adult , Anxiety/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/psychology , Female , Humans , Mental Health , Middle Aged , Pregnancy , Protective Factors , Resilience, Psychological , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
5.
PLoS One ; 16(11): e0258893, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1511820

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Explore how previous work during the 2003 Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) outbreak affects the psychological response of clinical and non-clinical healthcare workers (HCWs) to the current COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A cross-sectional, multi-centered hospital online survey of HCWs in the Greater Toronto Area, Canada. Mental health outcomes of HCWs who worked during the COVID-19 pandemic and the SARS outbreak were assessed using Impact of Events-Revised scale (IES-R), Generalized Anxiety Disorder scale (GAD-7), and Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9). RESULTS: Among 3852 participants, moderate/severe scores for symptoms of post- traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) (50.2%), anxiety (24.6%), and depression (31.5%) were observed among HCWs. Work during the 2003 SARS outbreak was reported by 1116 respondents (29.1%), who had lower scores for symptoms of PTSD (P = .002), anxiety (P < .001), and depression (P < .001) compared to those who had not worked during the SARS outbreak. Multivariable logistic regression analysis showed non-clinical HCWs during this pandemic were at higher risk of anxiety (OR, 1.68; 95% CI, 1.19-2.15, P = .01) and depressive symptoms (OR, 2.03; 95% CI, 1.34-3.07, P < .001). HCWs using sedatives (OR, 2.55; 95% CI, 1.61-4.03, P < .001), those who cared for only 2-5 patients with COVID-19 (OR, 1.59; 95% CI, 1.06-2.38, P = .01), and those who had been in isolation for COVID-19 (OR, 1.36; 95% CI, 0.96-1.93, P = .05), were at higher risk of moderate/severe symptoms of PTSD. In addition, deterioration in sleep was associated with symptoms of PTSD (OR, 4.68, 95% CI, 3.74-6.30, P < .001), anxiety (OR, 3.09, 95% CI, 2.11-4.53, P < .001), and depression (OR 5.07, 95% CI, 3.48-7.39, P < .001). CONCLUSION: Psychological distress was observed in both clinical and non-clinical HCWs, with no impact from previous SARS work experience. As the pandemic continues, increasing psychological and team support may decrease the mental health impacts.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/epidemiology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/psychology , Adaptation, Psychological/physiology , Adolescent , Adult , Allied Health Personnel , Anxiety/psychology , Anxiety/virology , Anxiety Disorders/psychology , Anxiety Disorders/virology , COVID-19/virology , Canada , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/psychology , Depression/virology , Disease Outbreaks , Female , Humans , Male , Mental Health , Middle Aged , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Patient Health Questionnaire , Psychological Distress , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/virology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/psychology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/virology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
6.
Eur J Psychotraumatol ; 12(1): 1984667, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1510837

ABSTRACT

Background: Research is urgently needed to understand health care workers' (HCWs') experiences of moral-ethical dilemmas encountered throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, and their associations with organizational perceptions and personal well-being. This research is important to prevent long-term moral and psychological distress and to ensure that workers can optimally provide health services. Objective: Evaluate associations between workplace experiences during COVID-19, moral distress, and the psychological well-being of Canadian HCWs. Method: A total of 1362 French- and English-speaking Canadian HCWs employed during the COVID-19 pandemic were recruited to participate in an online survey. Participants completed measures reflecting moral distress, perceptions of organizational response to the pandemic, burnout, and symptoms of psychological disorders, including depression, anxiety, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Results: Structural equation modelling showed that when organizational predictors were considered together, resource adequacy, positive work life impact, and ethical work environment negatively predicted severity of moral distress, whereas COVID-19 risk perception positively predicted severity of moral distress. Moral distress also significantly and positively predicted symptoms of depression, anxiety, PTSD, and burnout. Conclusions: Our findings highlight an urgent need for HCW organizations to implement strategies designed to prevent long-term moral and psychological distress within the workplace. Ensuring availability of adequate resources, reducing HCW risk of contracting COVID-19, providing organizational support regarding individual priorities, and upholding ethical considerations are crucial to reducing severity of moral distress in HCWs.


Antecedentes: Se necesita con urgencia investigaciones para comprender las experiencias de los dilemas éticos y morales que los trabajadores de la salud encontraron durante la pandemia de la COVID-19 y su asociación con las percepciones de la organización y el bienestar personal. Esta investigación es importante para prevenir la angustia moral y psicológica a largo plazo y para asegurar que los trabajadores de la salud puedan proveer de manera óptima los servicios de salud.Objetivo: Evaluar la asociación entre las experiencias en el lugar de trabajo durante la COVID-19, la angustia moral y el bienestar psicológico de los trabajadores de salud canadienses.Métodos: Se reclutó a un total de 1362 trabajadores de salud canadienses, que hablaban francés e inglés y que fueron contratados durante la pandemia de la COVID-19, para participar en un cuestionario en línea. Los participantes completaron mediciones que reflejaban la angustia moral, la percepción de la respuesta de la organización a la pandemia, el burnout y los síntomas de trastornos psicológicos, que incluían a la depresión, a la ansiedad y al trastorno de estrés postraumático (TEPT).Resultados: El modelo de ecuaciones estructurales mostró que cuando los predictores de la organización se consideraban en conjunto ­ los recursos adecuados, el impacto positivo en la vida laboral y un ambiente de trabajo ético ­, predijeron negativamente la gravedad de la angustia moral, mientras que la percepción del riesgo de contraer la COVID-19 predijo positivamente la gravedad de la angustia moral. La angustia moral también predijo de manera significativa y positiva los síntomas de la depresión, la ansiedad, el TEPT y el burnout.Conclusiones: Nuestros hallazgos resaltan la urgente necesidad de que las organizaciones de trabajadores de salud implementen estrategias diseñadas para prevenir la angustia moral y psicológica a largo plazo en el lugar de trabajo. El asegurar la disponibilidad de los recursos adecuados, el reducir el riesgo de que los trabajadores de salud contraigan la COVID-19, el proveer un soporte organizacional adecuado según las prioridades individuales y el respetar las consideraciones éticas son fundamentales para reducir la gravedad de la angustia moral en los trabajadores de salud.背景:亟需研究以了解卫生保健工作者 (HCW) 在整个 COVID-19 疫情期间遇到的道德伦理困境的经历, 及其与组织观念和个人幸福感的关联。本研究对于预防长期道德和心理困扰并确保工作人员能够最好地提供健康服务非常重要。目的:评估加拿大医护人员的 COVID-19 期间工作场所经历, 道德困扰和心理健康之间的关联。方法:共招募了 1362 名在 COVID-19 疫情期间受雇的讲法语和英语的加拿大 HCW 参与在线调查。参与者完成了反映道德困扰, 组织对疫情, 倦怠和心理障碍症状 (包括抑郁, 焦虑和创伤后应激障碍 (PTSD)) 的看法的测量。结果:结构方程模型表明, 当同时考虑组织预测因素时, 资源充足性, 积极的工作生活影响和道德工作环境负向预测道德困扰的严重程度, 而 COVID-19 风险感知正向预测道德困扰的严重程度。道德困扰也显著且正向预测了抑郁, 焦虑, PTSD和倦怠的症状。结论:我们的结果强调了 HCW 组织迫切需要实施旨在预防工作场所内长期道德和心理困扰的策略。确保可获取足够资源, 降低HCW接触 COVID-19 的风险, 提供个体优先性相关的组织支持以及坚持伦理考虑对于降低医护人员道德困境的严重程度至关重要.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Personnel , Mental Health/trends , Morals , Psychological Distress , Workplace/psychology , Adult , Anxiety/psychology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Canada , Depression/psychology , Female , Health Personnel/ethics , Health Personnel/psychology , Humans , Internet , Male , Middle Aged , Organizational Culture , Surveys and Questionnaires
7.
Ann Med ; 53(1): 2120-2131, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1510753

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic has been influencing people's psychological health, especially in pregnant women. We aimed to examine associated factors of fear of COVID-19, anxiety and depression among pregnant women during the pandemic where the impacts of healthy eating behaviour (HES) and health literacy (HL) were emphasized. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted between 14 February 2020 and 31 May 2020 in 18 health centres and hospitals across Vietnam. Data of 518 pregnant women were analysed, including socio-demographics, pregnant-related factors, HES, HL, health-related behaviours, fear of COVID-19 scale (FCoV-19S), anxiety (using the generalized anxiety disorder (GAD-7)) and depression (using the patient health questionnaire with 9 items (PHQ-9)). Regression analysis was utilized to explore the associations. RESULTS: Pregnant women with higher scores of HES and HL had lower likelihood of anxiety (odds ratio, OR, 0.79; 95% confidence interval (95%CI), 0.73, 0.87; p < .001; and OR, 0.94; 95%CI, 0.90, 0.99; p = .018) and depression (OR, 0.84; 95%CI, 0.78, 0.91; p < .001; and OR, 0.96; 95%CI, 0.91, 0.99; p = .044), respectively. Pregnant women being employed had a lower FCoV-19S score (regression coefficient, B, -1.46; 95%CI, -2.51, -0.40; p = .007). Besides, other significant predictors of anxiety were eating healthier during the pandemic, unchanged or more physical activity, elevated gestational age and smoking. Other significant predictors of depression were eating healthier during the pandemic, elevated gestational age and smoking. CONCLUSIONS: Among others, HES and HL had positive impacts on protecting pregnant women against anxiety and depression. Improving HES and HL should be addressed as a strategic approach to improve reproductive health during the pandemic.KEY MESSAGEThe COVID-19 pandemic influences antenatal mental disorders with the higher level as opposed to that before the pandemic.Healthy eating behaviour and better health literacy (HL) had critical roles in lowering prenatal anxiety and depression during the COVID-19 crisis.Strategic approaches for improving healthy eating and HL should be recommended for protecting pregnant women from mental health problems during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/psychology , Depression/psychology , Diet, Healthy , Fear/psychology , Health Literacy , Pregnant Women/psychology , Adult , Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Feeding Behavior , Female , Humans , Pandemics , Pregnancy , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
8.
Eur J Psychotraumatol ; 12(1): 1984049, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1506934

ABSTRACT

Background: Frontline healthcare workers, recovered COVID+ patients who had severe illness, and close others of COVID+ patients who have recovered or died are at risk for clinical levels of mental health symptoms in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. RESTORE (Recovering from Extreme Stressors Through Online Resources and E-health) was specifically designed for this context. RESTORE is a transdiagnostic guided online intervention adapted from evidence-based cognitive-behavioural therapies. Objectives: RESTORE was designed to address depression, anxiety, and posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms associated with exposure to COVID-19-related traumatic and extreme stressors, and to overcome multiple barriers to accessing psychotherapies. Method: This paper describes the intervention components and platform, as well as the principles used to develop RESTORE. Current research and future directions in developing and testing RESTORE are outlined. Results: Preliminary data from an initial uncontrolled trial evaluating RESTORE in frontline healthcare workers is highly promising. Conclusion: We believe RESTORE has great potential to provide accessible, evidence-based psychological intervention to those in great need.


Antecedentes: Los trabajadores de salud de primera línea, los pacientes de COVID positivo recuperados que tenían una enfermedad grave y las personas cercanas a los pacientes de COVID positivo que se han recuperado o fallecido están en riesgo de presentar niveles clínicos de síntomas de salud mental en el contexto de la pandemia de COVID-19. RESTORE (por sus siglas en inglés: Recovering from Extreme Stressors Through Online Resources and E-health: Recuperación de estresores extremos a través de recursos en línea y salud electrónica) fue diseñada específicamente para este contexto. RESTORE es una intervención en línea guiada transdiagnóstica adaptada de terapias cognitivo-conductuales basadas en la evidencia.Objetivos: RESTORE fue diseñado para abordar la depresión, la ansiedad y los síntomas del trastorno de estrés postraumático asociados con la exposición a factores estresantes traumáticos y extremos relacionados con COVID-19, y para superar múltiples barreras para acceder a psicoterapias.Método: Este artículo describe los componentes y la plataforma de la intervención, así como los principios utilizados para desarrollar RESTORE. Se describen las investigaciones actuales y las direcciones futuras para desarrollar y testear RESTORE.Resultados: Los datos preliminares de un ensayo inicial no controlado que evalúa RESTORE en trabajadores de salud de primera línea son muy prometedores.Conclusión: Creemos que RESTORE tiene un gran potencial para brindar una intervención psicológica accesible y basada en la evidencia a quienes más lo necesitan.背景: 在 COVID-19 疫情背景下, 一线医护人员, 重症 COVID+ 康复患者以及已康复或死亡的 COVID+ 患者的其他亲友都有出现临床心理健康症状的风险。 RESTORE (通过在线资源和电子健康从极端应激源中恢复) 专为这种情况而设计。 RESTORE 是一种改编自循证认知行为疗法的跨诊断指导的在线干预。目的: RESTORE 旨在致力于 COVID-19 相关创伤性和极端应激源暴露相关的抑郁, 焦虑和创伤后应激障碍症状, 并克服心理治疗可得性的多种障碍。方法: 本文介绍了干预组成和平台, 以及用于开发RESTORE的原则。概述了开发和测试 RESTORE 的当前研究和未来方向。结果: 来自评估一线医护人员 RESTORE 的初始非对照试验的初步数据大有前景。结论: 我们相信 RESTORE 有很大的潜力为急需帮助者提供易得, 询证的心理干预。.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/therapy , COVID-19/psychology , Cognitive Behavioral Therapy , Depression/therapy , Health Personnel/psychology , Internet-Based Intervention , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/therapy , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Humans , Mental Health , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/psychology
9.
Eur J Psychotraumatol ; 12(1): 1871555, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1493526

ABSTRACT

Background: It has been suggested that resilience is best conceptualized as healthy and stable functioning in the face of a potentially traumatic event. However, most research on this field has focused on self-reported resilience, and other patterns of response when facing adversity, in cross-sectional designs. Objective: Alternatively, we aimed to study changing patterns of psychological responses to the COVID-19 pandemic in the general population, based on patterns of symptoms, and factors contributing to those patterns. Method: A national representative sample of Spain (N = 1,628) responded to an internet-based survey at two assessment points, separated by 1 month (April and May 2020), during the official national confinement stage. Based upon whether participants exhibited absence/presence of distress (i.e., significant trauma-related, depression, or anxiety symptoms) at one or two of the assessment times, patterns of psychological responses were defined by categorizing individuals into one of the four categories: Resilience, Delayed distress, Recovered, and Sustained distress. Results: Analyses of the levels of disturbance associated with the symptoms provided support to that four-fold distinction of patterns of responses. Furthermore, resilience responses were the most common psychological response to the pandemic. Multinomial regression analyses revealed that the main variables increasing the probability of resilience to COVID-19 were being male, older, having no history of mental health difficulties, higher levels of psychological well-being and high identification with all humanity. Also, having low scores in several variables (i.e., anxiety and economic threat due to COVID-19, substance use during the confinement, intolerance to uncertainty, death anxiety, loneliness, and suspiciousness) was a significant predictor of a resilient response to COVID-19. Conclusion: Our findings are consistent with previous literature that conceptualizes resilience as a dynamic process. The clinical implications of significant predictors of the resilience and the rest of psychological patterns of response are discussed.


Antecedentes: Se ha sugerido que la mejor manera de conceptualizar la resiliencia es como un funcionamiento saludable y estable ante un evento potencialmente traumático. Sin embargo, la mayor parte de las investigaciones sobre la resiliencia y otras pautas de respuesta ante la adversidad se han centrado en el uso de cuestionarios de autoinforme de resiliencia en diseños transversales.Objetivo: Alternativamente, nuestro objetivo fue estudiar los cambios en los patrones de las respuestas psicológicas a la pandemia de COVID-19 en la población general y analizar de manera empírica las características que contribuyen a la respuesta resiliente.Métodos: Se utilizó una muestra nacional representativa española (N=1.628), que respondió a una encuesta realizada a través de Internet, en dos momentos de evaluación, separados por un mes, durante la etapa de confinamiento asociada a la pandemia (Abril y Mayo 2020). Se definieron los patrones de respuesta psicológica en función de la ausencia/presencia de malestar (v.g., síntomas significativos de estrés post-traumático, depresión y Ansiedad) en los dos momentos de evaluación, clasificando a los individuos en: resiliencia, malestar tardío, recuperación y malestar sostenido.Resultados: Análisis de los niveles de interferencia apoyaron estos cuatro de patrones dinámicos de respuesta psicológica. Además, la respuesta de resiliencia fue la más común frente a la pandemia. Un análisis de regresión multinomial indicó que los predictores de una mayor probabilidad de resiliencia fueron ser hombre, tener más edad, no tener antecedentes de salud mental, y altos niveles de identificación con la humanidad y de bienestar psicológico. Además, bajos niveles en otras variables (ansiedad y amenaza económica debida a la pandemia, consumo de sustancias durante el confinamiento, intolerancia a la incertidumbre, ansiedad ante la muerte, soledad, y desconfianza) fueron también predictores significativos de una respuesta de resiliencia psicológica al COVID-19.Conclusión: Nuestros hallazgos están en línea con la literatura previa que identifica la resiliencia como un patrón de respuesta común y un proceso dinámico. Se discuten las implicaciones clínicas de los predictores significativos de los cuatro diferentes patrones de respuesta.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Quarantine/psychology , Resilience, Psychological , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Adult , Aged , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Female , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Spain/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires
10.
PLoS One ; 16(10): e0259012, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1480465

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: This study aims to investigate the potential factors associated with mental health outcomes among Chinese adults during the Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) epidemic. METHODS: This is an online cross-sectional survey conducted among Chinese adults in February 2020. Outcome measurements included the three-item UCLA Loneliness Scale (UCLA-3), two-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-2), two-item Generalized Anxiety Disorder Questionnaire (GAD-2), and two items from the Clinician-Administered Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Scale. COVID-19 related factors, physical health, lifestyle, and self-efficacy were also measured. Univariable and multivariable logistic regressions were performed. RESULTS: This study included 1456 participants (age: 33.8±10.5 years; female: 59.1%). The prevalence of depressive symptoms, anxiety symptoms, loneliness, and PTSD symptoms were 11.3%, 7.6%, 38.7%, and 33.9%, respectively. In multivariable analysis, loneliness was associated with being single, separated/divorced/widowed, low level of education, current location, medication, more somatic symptoms, lower self-efficacy, and going out frequently. Depression was associated with fear of infection, binge drinking, more somatic symptoms, lower self-efficacy, and longer screen time. Anxiety was associated with more somatic symptoms and lower self-efficacy. PTSD symptoms were associated with more somatic symptoms, lower self-efficacy, higher perceived risk of infection, fear of infection, and self-rated more negative influence due to the epidemic (p<0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Mental health problems during the COVID-19 epidemic were associated with various biopsychosocial and COVID-19 related factors. Psychological interventions should be aware of these influencing factors and prioritize support for those people at higher risk.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Depression , Loneliness , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/etiology , Depression/psychology , Female , Humans , Male , Prevalence , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/etiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/psychology
11.
Psychiatry Res ; 301: 113863, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1474998

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic and its accompanying infection control measures introduced significant disruptions to the routines of many higher education students around the world. It also deprived them of in-person counselling services and social support. These changes have put students at a greater risk of developing mental illness. The objective of this review is to assess the prevalence of depressive symptoms, anxiety symptoms and sleep disturbances in higher education students during the pandemic. A systematic search of English and Chinese databases was conducted current to January 1st, 2021. The quality of included studies was evaluated using a modified Newcastle-Ottawa scale. Prevalence of depressive symptoms, anxiety symptoms and sleep disturbances were pooled using random-effects meta-analysis. Eighty-nine studies (n=1,441,828) were included. The pooled prevalence of depressive symptoms, anxiety symptoms, and sleep disturbances was 34%, 32% and 33%, respectively. The prevalence values differ based on geographical regions, diagnostic criteria, education level, undergraduate year of study, financial situation, living arrangements and gender. Overall, the prevalence of depressive symptoms and anxiety symptoms synthesized in this study was higher compared to pre-pandemic prevalence in similar populations. Evidently, mental health screening and intervention should be a top priority for universities and colleges during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Depression/epidemiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Students/psychology , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep/physiology , Universities
12.
PLoS One ; 16(10): e0258475, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1468176

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The spread of COVID-19 into a global pandemic has negatively affected the mental health of frontline healthcare-workers. This study is a multi-centre, cross-sectional epidemiological study that uses nationwide data to assess the prevalence of stress, anxiety, depression and burnout among health care workers managing COVID-19 patients in Cyprus. The study also investigates the mechanism behind the manifestation of these pathologies, as to allow for the design of more effective protective measures. METHODS: Data on the mental health status of the healthcare workers were collected from healthcare professionals from all over the nation, who worked directly with Covid patients. This was done via the use of 64-item, self-administered questionnaire, which was comprised of the DASS21 questionnaire, the Maslach Burnout Inventory and a number of original questions. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to investigate factors associated with each of the mental health measures. RESULTS: The sample population was comprised of 381 healthcare professionals, out of which 72.7% were nursing staff, 12.9% were medical doctors and 14.4% belonged to other occupations. The prevalence of anxiety, stress and depression among the sample population were 28.6%, 18.11% and 15% respectively. The prevalence of burnout was 12.3%. This was in parallel with several changes in the lives of the healthcare professionals, including; working longer hours, spending time in isolation and being separated from family. DISCUSSION: This study indicates that the mental health of a significant portion of the nation's workforce is compromised and, therefore, highlights the need for an urgent intervention particularly since many countries, including Cyprus, are suffering a second wave of the pandemic. The identified risk factors should offer guidance for employers aiming to protect their frontline healthcare workers from the negative effects of the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional/psychology , COVID-19 , Health Personnel/psychology , Mental Health , Adult , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Cyprus/epidemiology , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Prevalence , Risk Factors , Surveys and Questionnaires
13.
PLoS One ; 16(10): e0256530, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1463305

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Telework has been widely discussed in several fields; however, there is a lack of research on the health aspects of teleworking. The current study was conducted to determine the health effects of teleworking during an emergency statement as evidence for future policy development. METHOD: This was a cross-sectional study in which we administered an online questionnaire to 5,214 general workers (response rate = 36.4%) from June 2020 to August 2020. Based on working methods during the pandemic, workers were categorized into the office group (n = 86) and telework group (n = 1597), and we characterized their demographics, changes in lifestyle, telework status, physical symptoms, and mental health. RESULTS: The results showed that the workers' residence, marital status, management positions, and employee status affected the choice of the work method. During the emergency, teleworkers experienced more changes in their habits than office workers. In terms of exercise habits, 67.0% of the individuals belonging to the office-telework (OT) group exercised less. Approximately half of the teleworkers were satisfied with their telework, and those in the OT group were less satisfied with their telework than those in the telework-telework (TT) group, and they reported an increase in both working hours and meeting hours. Work-family conflict was more pronounced in the TT group than in the two other groups. Only 13.2% of individuals did not experience any stress in the past 30 days, and all three groups showed varying degrees of anxiety and depressive tendencies. In addition, all teleworkers experienced adverse physical symptoms before and after the emergency. CONCLUSION: Health issues associated with teleworking should be given adequate attention.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Depression/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Teleworking , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/psychology , Female , Humans , Japan/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged
14.
J Nerv Ment Dis ; 209(10): 727-733, 2021 10 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1440682

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of anxiety, depression, and irritability symptoms in children during the COVID-19 outbreak and to investigate the associated factors of these symptoms. This study was conducted with 1071 children aged 6 to 17. Results showed that 49.9% of the participants had anxiety symptoms, 29.5% had depression symptoms, and 51.4% had irritability symptoms. Low age was a potential risk factor for anxiety symptoms. Female sex was a potential risk factor for anxiety and depression symptoms. A COVID-19 death in the family or environment was a potential risk factor for depression and irritability symptoms. Exposure to COVID-19 information on television and on the internet was a potential risk factor for anxiety, depression, and irritability symptoms. In conclusion, this study revealed that the COVID-19 outbreak may have serious effects on the mental health of children, and the study highlighted potential risk factors.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/epidemiology , Depression/epidemiology , Irritable Mood , Adolescent , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/psychology , Female , Humans , Internet , Life Change Events , Male , Mass Media , Pandemics , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Turkey/epidemiology
15.
J Adolesc ; 92: 189-193, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1432709

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Adolescents with moderate-to-severe levels of trait rumination are at heightened risk for psychopathology and may be particularly vulnerable to disruptions caused by the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic. As most past research documenting the impact of COVID-19 on adolescent well-being has been cross-sectional, it is unclear exactly how ruminative adolescents responded to the onset of the pandemic as it unfolded. METHODS: We used ecological momentary assessment (EMA) to explore changes in rumination among adolescents during the initial transition to distance learning in the United States. A subsample of 22 ruminative youth (Mage = 13.58; SD = 0.96; 54.5% male; 86.4% White) from a larger study provided EMA data throughout January-April 2020 (M responses per participant = 105.09, SD = 65.59). Following school closures, we hypothesized that adolescents would report greater rumination (i.e., focusing on emotions and problems) and depressive symptom level would moderate this effect. RESULTS: Surprisingly, rumination decreased, and this effect was moderated by depressive symptom level for emotion-focused rumination, i.e., those with average and below-average depressive symptoms experienced decreases in rumination. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that the first wave of stay-at-home orders and the transition to distance learning were not immediately distressing to vulnerable adolescents. However, more research is needed to determine whether the results from recent research are generalizable to other adolescents and to examine the long-term impact of the pandemic on adolescent well-being.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Depression/psychology , Ecological Momentary Assessment , Rumination, Cognitive , Students/psychology , Adolescent , Adolescent Behavior , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Schools
16.
Allergy Asthma Proc ; 42(4): e107-e115, 2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1435924

ABSTRACT

Background: The impact of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) related mental health status on chronic spontaneous urticaria (CSU) has not been addressed before. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the depression, anxiety and stress levels, and the fear of COVID-19 in patients with mild-to-moderate CSU and to determine their impact on urticaria activity during the pandemic. Methods: A total of 509 patients with mild-to-moderate CSU were prospectively evaluated with validated scales, the Depression Anxiety Stress Scale 21 (DASS-21) and the Fear of COVID-19 Scale (FCV-19S) during the lockdown period (LP) and the return to normal period (RTNP). CSU activity was determined with the urticaria activity score summed over 7 days (UAS7) and medication scores (MS). UAS7 and MS before the pandemic were retrospectively collected from medical records. Results: The median UAS7 and MS were both significantly higher in the LP than in the median of related scores during the prepandemic period (p < 0.0001) and the RTNP (p < 0.0001). The mean FCV-19S and DASS-21 scores were both significantly higher in the LP than in the RTNP (p < 0.0001). The FCV-19S and the DASS-21 anxiety and stress subscales were significantly higher in women. The UAS7s were positively correlated with the FCV-19S and depression, anxiety, and stress subscale scores. Conclusion: Fear of COVID-19, anxiety, depression, and stress during the COVID-19 pandemic, especially when strict isolation measures are taken, have a significant impact on mental health and urticaria activity in patients with mild-to-moderate CSU, even though they are not infected. Psychological support for patients with CSU seems to be important to control disease activity during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Chronic Urticaria/psychology , Cost of Illness , Mental Health , Adult , Anxiety/diagnosis , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Chronic Urticaria/diagnosis , Chronic Urticaria/epidemiology , Chronic Urticaria/therapy , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/diagnosis , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Fear , Female , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , Psychiatric Status Rating Scales , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Stress, Psychological/diagnosis , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Time Factors , Turkey/epidemiology , Young Adult
17.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 18644, 2021 09 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1428901

ABSTRACT

The student population has been highly vulnerable to the risk of mental health deterioration during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic. This study aimed to reveal the prevalence and predictors of mental health among students in Poland, Slovenia, Czechia, Ukraine, Russia, Germany, Turkey, Israel, and Colombia in a socioeconomic context during the COVID-19 pandemic. The study was conducted among 2349 students (69% women) from May-July 2020. Data were collected by means of the Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD-7), Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-8), Perceived Stress Scale (PSS-10), Gender Inequality Index (GII), Standard & Poor's Global Ratings, the Oxford COVID-19 Government Response Tracker (OxCGRT), and a sociodemographic survey. Descriptive statistics and Bayesian multilevel skew-normal regression analyses were conducted. The prevalence of high stress, depression, and generalized anxiety symptoms in the total sample was 61.30%, 40.3%, and 30%, respectively. The multilevel Bayesian model showed that female sex was a credible predictor of PSS-10, GAD-7, and PHQ-8 scores. In addition, place of residence (town) and educational level (first-cycle studies) were risk factors for the PHQ-8. This study showed that mental health issues are alarming in the student population. Regular psychological support should be provided to students by universities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Mental Health , Pandemics , Students/psychology , Universities , Anxiety Disorders/epidemiology , Anxiety Disorders/psychology , Bayes Theorem , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Female , Geography , Humans , Male , Multilevel Analysis , Prevalence , Regression Analysis , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/psychology
18.
J Korean Med Sci ; 36(36): e262, 2021 Sep 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1406817

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: This study explored the clinical variables related to public workers' stress and anxiety regarding the viral epidemic, and the mediating effect of resilience on the relationship between their depression and anxiety in response to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. METHODS: A total of 938 public workers answered anonymous questionnaires in May 2020. The survey included rating scales such as the Stress and Anxiety to Viral Epidemics-9 (SAVE-9), Patients Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9), Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 (GAD-7), and Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale 2 items (CD-RISC 2), and subjects also answered whether they were employed in COVID-19 related fields. RESULTS: Married, female, junior, public workers reported a higher level of stress and anxiety in response to the viral epidemic. Furthermore, high levels of stress and anxiety toward the epidemic are defined by high PHQ-9, high GAD-7, and low CD-RISC 2 scores. It could also be seen that resilience mediated the effect of depression in public workers and their stress and anxiety levels toward the epidemic. CONCLUSION: It is important to reduce the psychological burden of public workers and manage their mental health to help them cope with the epidemic wisely and efficiently. Among many mental health factors, psychological resilience represents an essential target for psychological intervention among public workers.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , Resilience, Psychological , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Aged , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Young Adult
19.
Workplace Health Saf ; 69(2): 92, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1406688

ABSTRACT

Suicide prevention begins with understanding depression and mental health protection.


Subject(s)
Depression/diagnosis , Occupational Health Nursing/methods , Suicide/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , Depression/psychology , Humans , Suicide/psychology
20.
JMIR Public Health Surveill ; 7(9): e31052, 2021 09 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1394691

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic has caused great panic among the public, with many people suffering from adverse stress reactions. To control the spread of the pandemic, governments in many countries have imposed lockdown policies. In this unique pandemic context, people can obtain information about pandemic dynamics on the internet. However, searching for health-related information on the internet frequently increases the possibility of individuals being troubled by the information that they find, and consequently, experiencing symptoms of cyberchondria. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to examine the relationships between people's perceived severity of the COVID-19 pandemic and their depression, anxiety, and stress to explore the role of cyberchondria, which, in these relationship mechanisms, is closely related to using the internet. In addition, we also examined the moderating role of lockdown experiences. METHODS: In February 2020, a total of 486 participants were recruited through a web-based platform from areas in China with a large number of infections. We used questionnaires to measure participants' perceived severity of the COVID-19 pandemic, to measure the severity of their cyberchondria, depression, anxiety, and stress symptoms, and to assess their lockdown experiences. Confirmatory factor analysis, exploratory factor analysis, common method bias, descriptive statistical analysis, and correlation analysis were performed, and moderated mediation models were examined. RESULTS: There was a positive association between perceived severity of the COVID-19 pandemic and depression (ß=0.36, t=8.51, P<.001), anxiety (ß=0.41, t=9.84, P<.001), and stress (ß=0.46, t=11.45, P<.001), which were mediated by cyberchondria (ß=0.36, t=8.59, P<.001). The direct effects of perceived severity of the COVID-19 pandemic on anxiety (ß=0.07, t=2.01, P=.045) and stress (ß=0.09, t=2.75, P=.006) and the indirect effects of cyberchondria on depression (ß=0.10, t=2.59, P=.009) and anxiety (ß=0.10, t=2.50, P=.01) were moderated by lockdown experience. CONCLUSIONS: The higher the perceived severity of the COVID-19 pandemic, the more serious individuals' symptoms of depression, anxiety, and stress. In addition, the associations were partially mediated by cyberchondria. Individuals with higher perceived severity of the COVID-19 pandemic were more likely to develop cyberchondria, which aggravated individuals' depression, anxiety, and stress symptoms. Negative lockdown experiences exacerbated the COVID-19 pandemic's impact on mental health.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Perception , Quarantine/psychology , Stress, Psychological/complications , Adolescent , Adult , Anxiety/etiology , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/etiology , Depression/psychology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Quarantine/standards , Social Media/standards , Social Media/statistics & numerical data , Stress, Psychological/psychology
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL
...