Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 24
Filter
1.
PLoS One ; 16(11): e0258893, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1700707

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Explore how previous work during the 2003 Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) outbreak affects the psychological response of clinical and non-clinical healthcare workers (HCWs) to the current COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A cross-sectional, multi-centered hospital online survey of HCWs in the Greater Toronto Area, Canada. Mental health outcomes of HCWs who worked during the COVID-19 pandemic and the SARS outbreak were assessed using Impact of Events-Revised scale (IES-R), Generalized Anxiety Disorder scale (GAD-7), and Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9). RESULTS: Among 3852 participants, moderate/severe scores for symptoms of post- traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) (50.2%), anxiety (24.6%), and depression (31.5%) were observed among HCWs. Work during the 2003 SARS outbreak was reported by 1116 respondents (29.1%), who had lower scores for symptoms of PTSD (P = .002), anxiety (P < .001), and depression (P < .001) compared to those who had not worked during the SARS outbreak. Multivariable logistic regression analysis showed non-clinical HCWs during this pandemic were at higher risk of anxiety (OR, 1.68; 95% CI, 1.19-2.15, P = .01) and depressive symptoms (OR, 2.03; 95% CI, 1.34-3.07, P < .001). HCWs using sedatives (OR, 2.55; 95% CI, 1.61-4.03, P < .001), those who cared for only 2-5 patients with COVID-19 (OR, 1.59; 95% CI, 1.06-2.38, P = .01), and those who had been in isolation for COVID-19 (OR, 1.36; 95% CI, 0.96-1.93, P = .05), were at higher risk of moderate/severe symptoms of PTSD. In addition, deterioration in sleep was associated with symptoms of PTSD (OR, 4.68, 95% CI, 3.74-6.30, P < .001), anxiety (OR, 3.09, 95% CI, 2.11-4.53, P < .001), and depression (OR 5.07, 95% CI, 3.48-7.39, P < .001). CONCLUSION: Psychological distress was observed in both clinical and non-clinical HCWs, with no impact from previous SARS work experience. As the pandemic continues, increasing psychological and team support may decrease the mental health impacts.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/epidemiology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/psychology , Adaptation, Psychological/physiology , Adolescent , Adult , Allied Health Personnel , Anxiety/psychology , Anxiety/virology , Anxiety Disorders/psychology , Anxiety Disorders/virology , COVID-19/virology , Canada , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/psychology , Depression/virology , Disease Outbreaks , Female , Humans , Male , Mental Health , Middle Aged , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Patient Health Questionnaire , Psychological Distress , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/virology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/psychology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/virology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
2.
PLoS One ; 17(1): e0262363, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1622363

ABSTRACT

AIM/GOAL/PURPOSE: Population surveys underrepresent people with severe mental ill health. This paper aims to use multiple regression analyses to explore perceived social support, loneliness and factor associations from self-report survey data collected during the Covid-19 pandemic in a sample of individuals with severe mental ill health. DESIGN/METHODOLOGY/APPROACH: We sampled an already existing cohort of people with severe mental ill health. Researchers contacted participants by phone or by post to invite them to take part in a survey about how the pandemic restrictions had impacted health, Covid-19 experiences, perceived social support, employment and loneliness. Loneliness was measured by the three item UCLA loneliness scale. FINDINGS: In the pandemic sub-cohort, 367 adults with a severe mental ill health diagnosis completed a remote survey. 29-34% of participants reported being lonely. Loneliness was associated with being younger in age (adjusted OR = -.98, p = .02), living alone (adjusted OR = 2.04, p = .01), high levels of social and economic deprivation (adjusted OR = 2.49, p = .04), and lower perceived social support (B = -5.86, p < .001). Living alone was associated with lower perceived social support. Being lonely was associated with a self-reported deterioration in mental health during the pandemic (adjusted OR = 3.46, 95%CI 2.03-5.91). PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS: Intervention strategies to tackle loneliness in the severe mental ill health population are needed. Further research is needed to follow-up the severe mental ill health population after pandemic restrictions are lifted to understand perceived social support and loneliness trends. ORIGINALITY: Loneliness was a substantial problem for the severe mental ill health population before the Covid-19 pandemic but there is limited evidence to understand perceived social support and loneliness trends during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Loneliness/psychology , Mental Disorders/psychology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Cohort Studies , Depression/psychology , Depression/virology , Female , Humans , Male , Mental Disorders/virology , Mental Health , Middle Aged , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Social Isolation/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires , United Kingdom , Young Adult
3.
PLoS One ; 16(11): e0258893, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1511820

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Explore how previous work during the 2003 Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) outbreak affects the psychological response of clinical and non-clinical healthcare workers (HCWs) to the current COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A cross-sectional, multi-centered hospital online survey of HCWs in the Greater Toronto Area, Canada. Mental health outcomes of HCWs who worked during the COVID-19 pandemic and the SARS outbreak were assessed using Impact of Events-Revised scale (IES-R), Generalized Anxiety Disorder scale (GAD-7), and Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9). RESULTS: Among 3852 participants, moderate/severe scores for symptoms of post- traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) (50.2%), anxiety (24.6%), and depression (31.5%) were observed among HCWs. Work during the 2003 SARS outbreak was reported by 1116 respondents (29.1%), who had lower scores for symptoms of PTSD (P = .002), anxiety (P < .001), and depression (P < .001) compared to those who had not worked during the SARS outbreak. Multivariable logistic regression analysis showed non-clinical HCWs during this pandemic were at higher risk of anxiety (OR, 1.68; 95% CI, 1.19-2.15, P = .01) and depressive symptoms (OR, 2.03; 95% CI, 1.34-3.07, P < .001). HCWs using sedatives (OR, 2.55; 95% CI, 1.61-4.03, P < .001), those who cared for only 2-5 patients with COVID-19 (OR, 1.59; 95% CI, 1.06-2.38, P = .01), and those who had been in isolation for COVID-19 (OR, 1.36; 95% CI, 0.96-1.93, P = .05), were at higher risk of moderate/severe symptoms of PTSD. In addition, deterioration in sleep was associated with symptoms of PTSD (OR, 4.68, 95% CI, 3.74-6.30, P < .001), anxiety (OR, 3.09, 95% CI, 2.11-4.53, P < .001), and depression (OR 5.07, 95% CI, 3.48-7.39, P < .001). CONCLUSION: Psychological distress was observed in both clinical and non-clinical HCWs, with no impact from previous SARS work experience. As the pandemic continues, increasing psychological and team support may decrease the mental health impacts.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/epidemiology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/psychology , Adaptation, Psychological/physiology , Adolescent , Adult , Allied Health Personnel , Anxiety/psychology , Anxiety/virology , Anxiety Disorders/psychology , Anxiety Disorders/virology , COVID-19/virology , Canada , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/psychology , Depression/virology , Disease Outbreaks , Female , Humans , Male , Mental Health , Middle Aged , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Patient Health Questionnaire , Psychological Distress , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/virology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/psychology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/virology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
4.
Diabetes Metab Syndr ; 15(4): 102129, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1230437

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Worldwide the COVID-19 pandemic has accelerated sufferings of mental health and behaviour attitudes of people. Many countries, including Bangladesh, reported suicide as extreme consequences of the psychological burden influenced by COVID-19. The present study explores human stress and its factor influenced by COVID-19 in Bangladesh, which significantly affect the quality of life. METHODS: An online-based questionnaire survey was conducted among 651 adult Bangladeshi populations by capturing socio-demographic information, possible human stress, and consequences of the pandemic. A set of statistical tools such as Pearson's Correlation Matrix (PCM), T-test, Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Hierarchical Cluster Analysis (HCA) were applied to identify the relationship between different factors and influential factors increasing human stress. RESULTS: More than 83% of the participants are facing COVID-19 related mental stress, which results in short temper, sleep disorder, and family chaos. PCA and HCA outcomes indicated a significant relationship between the respondents' opinions and human stress factors, which harmonized with the country's existing scenario. PCM results enlighten the relationship between human stress factors and found financial hardship, cutting back daily spending, and food crisis are interconnected together causes stress. Also, hampering students' formal education and future career plans significantly contribute to mental stress. CONCLUSION: Based on the above findings, it's crucial to introduce a time-oriented strategy and implement precaution monitoring plans for Bangladesh. The rescue plan will help people to manage the pandemic and improve mental health to fight against psychological challenges related to COVID-19 and future pandemics.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/complications , Depression/epidemiology , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Adult , Aged , Anxiety/psychology , Anxiety/virology , Bangladesh/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19/virology , Depression/psychology , Depression/virology , Female , Humans , Male , Mental Health , Middle Aged , Online Systems , Perception , Prognosis , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Stress, Psychological/virology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
5.
PLoS One ; 16(4): e0250412, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1194502

ABSTRACT

In attempts to control the spread of the Covid-19 virus, many governments have resorted to imposing national lockdowns on their citizens. Previous research has demonstrated the passage of time becomes distorted for many people during these lockdowns. To date, research has only examined how time was experienced early in initial lockdowns. The current study examined whether distortions to the passage of time were also present later into the global pandemic. An online questionnaire was used to collect passage of time judgments for the day, week and 8 month period since the first UK lockdown. In addition, measures of affect, social satisfaction, task-load, compliance and health status were also recorded. The results show that over 80% of people reported experiencing distortion to the passage of time during the second English lockdown in comparison with normal. Depression, satisfaction with social interaction and shielding status were found to be significant predictors of temporal distortion. A slower passage of time was associated with greater depression, shielding and greater dissatisfaction with social interactions. Feeling like it was longer than 8 months since the UK's first lockdown was associated with greater depression, increased dissatisfaction with social interaction and greater change of life as a result of lockdown. The results suggest that distortions to the passage of time are an enduring feature of lockdown life and that different factors predict temporal experience during different points in lockdown.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Depression/psychology , Quarantine/psychology , Adult , Affect , Aged , Anxiety/psychology , Anxiety/virology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Depression/virology , England/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Social Behavior , Social Interaction , Surveys and Questionnaires
6.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 25(6): 2808-2821, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1173131

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: In response to the COVID-19 disaster, people have developed several psychological problems mainly stress, anxiety, and depression. These psychological problems have been seen in either normal people during the lockdown (who are waiting to get infected with COVID-19) and patients with COVID-19 (who are waiting for death). These psychological problems adversely affect immune functions causing more increase in the severity of COVID-19 associated disorders and death rates. Increasing the aerobic capacity is one of the effective methods that could be used to decrease stress, anxiety, and depression. Besides, increasing the aerobic capacity increases immune functions through autonomic regulation. Thus, this review was developed to summarize the effect of increasing the aerobic capacity on psycho-immune hormones commonly disturbed in people during the lockdown or patients with COVID-19 infection. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This review was carried out by searching through Web of Science, Scopus, EBSCO, Medline databases. The search was conducted over clinical trials, literature reviews, and systematic reviews. The search included the possible effects of increasing the aerobic capacity on the functions of psycho-immune hormones. RESULTS: This review found that increasing the aerobic capacity can decrease psychological problems commonly seen in people with COVID-19 and increase immune functions by modulating the levels of glucocorticoid, oxytocin, insulin, thyroid hormones. CONCLUSIONS: This review demonstrated that increasing the aerobic capacity is a recommended treatment for decreasing the psychological problems commonly seen in people with COVID-19 because it has the potential for decreasing psychological problems and improving immune functions which would help counter COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/therapy , COVID-19/psychology , Depression/therapy , Exercise Therapy/methods , Stress, Psychological/therapy , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/virology , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19/virology , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/virology , Humans , Oxygen Consumption , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/virology
7.
J Neurovirol ; 27(1): 168-170, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1009224

ABSTRACT

People living with HIV (PLWH) may be at higher risk for adverse outcomes indirectly associated with the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2). When comparing responses to questionnaires administered when social distancing and quarantine guidelines were first implemented, we found that PLWH were more likely to have restricted access to medical care, increased financial stress, increased symptoms of anxiety and depression, and increased substance use compared to demographically-similar people without HIV.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Depression/epidemiology , HIV Infections/epidemiology , Pandemics , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Substance-Related Disorders/epidemiology , Adult , Aged , Anxiety/economics , Anxiety/psychology , Anxiety/virology , COVID-19/economics , COVID-19/psychology , COVID-19/virology , Comorbidity , Depression/economics , Depression/psychology , Depression/virology , Female , HIV Infections/economics , HIV Infections/psychology , HIV Infections/virology , HIV-1/pathogenicity , Health Services Accessibility/economics , Health Services Accessibility/ethics , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Missouri/epidemiology , Physical Distancing , Quarantine/economics , Quarantine/psychology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Stress, Psychological/economics , Stress, Psychological/virology , Substance-Related Disorders/economics , Substance-Related Disorders/psychology , Substance-Related Disorders/virology , Surveys and Questionnaires
8.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 99(47): e23185, 2020 Nov 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1006268

ABSTRACT

This study investigates the effect of progressive muscle relaxation training on negative mood and sleep quality in Coronavirus Pneumonia (COVID-19) patients.COVID-19 is an emerging infectious disease, and there is still uncertainty about when the outbreak will be contained and the effectiveness of treatments. Considering that this disease is highly contagious, patients need to be treated in isolation. This may lead to psychological symptoms such as anxiety and depression, and even sleep problems.This study is a clinical observation study.Participants included 79 COVID-19 patients admitted to a designated hospital for COVID-19 patients in Wuhan from February to March, 2020. Patients were selected and assigned to the control group and the observation group according to their wishes, with 40 and 39 cases in each group, respectively. The control group received routine treatment and nursing, and the observation group received progressive muscle relaxation training, in addition to the routine treatment and nursing. We compared scores of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index Scale (PSQI), the Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD-7), and the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) before and after the intervention.There was no significant difference in PSQI, GAD-7, and PHQ-9 scores between the control group and the observation group before the intervention (P > .05). After the intervention, the difference in scores of PSQI, GAD-7, and PHQ-9 in the 2 groups were statistically significant (P < .05).Progressive muscle relaxation training can significantly reduce anxiety and depression and improve sleep quality in COVID-19 patients during isolation treatment.Progressive muscle relaxation training was shown to improve the treatment effect of patients and is worthy of clinical promotion.


Subject(s)
Anxiety Disorders/therapy , Autogenic Training/methods , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Sleep Wake Disorders/therapy , Sleep/physiology , Adult , Anxiety Disorders/virology , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Depression/therapy , Depression/virology , Emotions/physiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Patient Health Questionnaire , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep Wake Disorders/virology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Treatment Outcome
9.
Med Clin (Barc) ; 156(7): 332-335, 2021 04 09.
Article in English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-957301

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Rise of central cytokines resulting from infections produces neuronal changes. Covid-19 allows the study of depressive symptoms in sustained stress and its relationship with molecular mechanisms. OBJECTIVES: To assess correlation between IL-6, IL-1ß and TNF-α and depressive symptoms. Characterize the depressive symptoms present. METHODS: Observational study. Patients admitted for Covid-19 older than 60 years with a interleukin determination were included. The Yesavage Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) was used, associating each item with a neurotransmitter. RESULTS: 27 patients included. We did not find correlation between IL-6 levels and the GDS scale score (rho=0.204; 95% CI -0.192 to 0.543); with IL-1ß levels (rho=-0.126; 95% CI -0.490 to 0.276); nor of TNF-α (rho=-0.033; 95% CI -0.416 to 0.360). 3 patients (11.1%) presented score compatible with depressive disorder. It was associated with a deficiency of noradrenaline and serotonin. CONCLUSIONS: We found no correlation between the levels of IL-6, IL-1ß, and TNF-α with the GDS score. Depressive symptomatology is similar to vascular depressions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Depression/immunology , Depression/virology , Interleukin-1beta/blood , Interleukin-6/blood , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/blood , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/immunology , Depression/blood , Depression/diagnosis , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Psychiatric Status Rating Scales , Risk Factors
10.
J Affect Disord ; 280(Pt A): 7-10, 2021 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-917328

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To assess the psychological status of college students in China during the COVID-19 outbreak, and offer some theoretical evidence for psychological intervention of college students. METHODS: An online survey was conducted from May 10, 2020 to June 10, 2020. Anxiety symptoms were measured by the Generalized Anxiety Disorder 7-Item Scale (GAD-7). Categorical data were reported as number and percentage, while continuous data were reported as mean ± SD. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to evaluate the association between different factors and anxiety symptoms. RESULTS: A total of 89,588 college students participated in the current study, among which 36,865 students (41.1%) reported anxiety symptoms. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that the risk factors for anxiety symptoms included the age of 26-30 (OR=1.456), sophomore (OR=1.038), junior (OR=1.087) and senior grades (OR=1.161), a higher paternal education level (OR=1.055), low economic status (OR=1.520), and low social support (OR=1.542). CONCLUSIONS: About two-fifths of Chinese college students experienced anxiety symptoms during the COVID-19 epidemic. Timely and appropriate psychological interventions for college students should be implemented to reduce the psychological harm caused by COVID-19 epidemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Depression/virology , Female , Humans , Male , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Students/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Universities/statistics & numerical data , Young Adult
11.
PLoS One ; 15(11): e0241658, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-910301

ABSTRACT

New Zealand's early response to the novel coronavirus pandemic included a strict lockdown which eliminated community transmission of COVID-19. However, this success was not without cost, both economic and social. In our study, we examined the psychological wellbeing of New Zealanders during the COVID-19 lockdown when restrictions reduced social contact, limited recreation opportunities, and resulted in job losses and financial insecurity. We conducted an online panel survey of a demographically representative sample of 2010 adult New Zealanders in April 2020. The survey contained three standardised measures-the Kessler Psychological Distress Scale (K10), the GAD-7, and the Well-Being Index (WHO-5)-as well as questions designed specifically to measure family violence, suicidal ideation, and alcohol consumption. It also included items assessing positive aspects of the lockdown. Thirty percent of respondents reported moderate to severe psychological distress (K10), 16% moderate to high levels of anxiety, and 39% low wellbeing; well above baseline measures. Poorer outcomes were seen among young people and those who had lost jobs or had less work, those with poor health status, and who had past diagnoses of mental illness. Suicidal ideation was reported by 6%, with 2% reporting making plans for suicide and 2% reporting suicide attempts. Suicidality was highest in those aged 18-34. Just under 10% of participants had directly experienced some form of family harm over the lockdown period. However, not all consequences of the lockdown were negative, with 62% reporting 'silver linings', which included enjoying working from home, spending more time with family, and a quieter, less polluted environment. New Zealand's lockdown successfully eliminated COVID-19 from the community, but our results show this achievement brought a significant psychological toll. Although much of the debate about lockdown measures has focused on their economic effects, our findings emphasise the need to pay equal attention to their effects on psychological wellbeing.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/psychology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Domestic Violence/psychology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Quarantine/psychology , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Suicide/psychology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/virology , COVID-19 , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Depression/virology , Female , Humans , Male , Mental Health , Middle Aged , New Zealand/epidemiology , Psychological Distress , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/virology , Young Adult
12.
Infect Dis Poverty ; 9(1): 148, 2020 Oct 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-892372

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has been affecting people's psychosocial health and well-being through various complex pathways. The present study aims to investigate the perceived psychosocial health and its sociodemographic correlates among Chinese community-dwelling residents. METHODS: This cross-sectional survey was carried out online and using a structured questionnaire during April 2020. In total, 4788 men and women with the age range of 11-98 years from eight provinces in eastern, central and western China were included in the analysis. We adopted a tactical approach to capture three key domains of perceived psychosocial health that are more likely to occur during a pandemic including hopelessness, loneliness, and depression. Multiple regression method, binary logistic regression model and variance inflation factor (VIF) were used to conduct data analysis. RESULTS: Respectively 34.8%, 32.5% and 44.8% of the participants expressed feeling more hopeless, lonely, and depressed during the pandemic. The percentage of all three indicators was comparatively higher among women than among men: hopelessness (50.7% vs 49.3%), loneliness (52.4% vs 47.6%), and depression (56.2% vs 43.8%). Being married was associated with lower odds of loneliness among men (odds ratio [OR] = 0.63, 95% CI: 0.45-0.90). Loneliness was negatively associated with smoking (OR = 0.67, 95% CI: 0.45-0.99) and positively associated with drinking (OR = 1.45, 95% CI: 1.04-2.02). Compared with those in the lowest income bracket (< CNY 10 000), men (OR = 0.34, 95% CI: 0.21-0.55) and women (OR = 0.36, 95% CI: 0.23-0.56) in the highest level of annually housed income (> CNY 40 000) had the lowest odds of reporting perceived hopelessness (OR = 0.35, 95% CI: 0.25-0.48). Smoking also showed negative association with depression only among men (OR = 0.63, 95% CI: 0.43-0.91). CONCLUSIONS: More than one-third of the participants reported worsening in the experience of hopelessness and loneliness, with more than two-fifth of worsening depression during the pandemic compared with before the outbreak. Several socioeconomic and lifestyle factors were found to be associated with the outcome variables, most notably participants' marital status, household income, smoking, alcohol drinking, existing chronic conditions. These findings may be of significance to treat patients and help them recover from the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Depression/epidemiology , Loneliness/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Self Concept , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , COVID-19 , Child , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/psychology , Depression/virology , Female , Humans , Logistic Models , Male , Mental Health , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Prevalence , Regression Analysis , SARS-CoV-2 , Socioeconomic Factors , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
13.
Prostaglandins Leukot Essent Fatty Acids ; 161: 102177, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-796199

ABSTRACT

As the infected cases of COVID-19 reach more than 20 million with more than 778,000 deaths globally, an increase in psychiatric disorders including anxiety and depression has been reported. Scientists globally have been searching for novel therapies and vaccines to fight against COVID-19. Improving innate immunity has been suggested to block progression of COVID-19 at early stages, while omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) have been shown to have immunomodulation effects. Moreover, n-3 PUFAs have also been shown to improve mood disorders, thus, future research is warranted to test if n-3 PUFAs may have the potential to improve our immunity to counteract both physical and mental impact of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Depression/prevention & control , Dietary Supplements , Fatty Acids, Omega-3/administration & dosage , Immunologic Factors/administration & dosage , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Anxiety/immunology , Anxiety/metabolism , Anxiety/virology , Betacoronavirus/immunology , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/metabolism , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Cytokines/biosynthesis , Cytokines/immunology , Dendritic Cells/drug effects , Dendritic Cells/immunology , Dendritic Cells/virology , Depression/immunology , Depression/metabolism , Depression/virology , Epithelial Cells/drug effects , Epithelial Cells/immunology , Epithelial Cells/virology , Fatty Acids, Omega-3/immunology , Fatty Acids, Omega-3/metabolism , Host-Pathogen Interactions/drug effects , Host-Pathogen Interactions/immunology , Humans , Immunity, Innate/drug effects , Immunologic Factors/immunology , Immunologic Factors/metabolism , Lymphocytes/drug effects , Lymphocytes/immunology , Lymphocytes/virology , Macrophages/drug effects , Macrophages/immunology , Macrophages/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/metabolism , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2
14.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 99(38): e22260, 2020 Sep 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-787428

ABSTRACT

We explored the psychological changes in suspected patients during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) epidemic and obtained evidence for early psychological guidance and intervention in this group. A total of 31 inpatients with suspected COVID-19 were identified at our hospital. The depression module of the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9), the General Anxiety Disorder (GAD)-7 scale, and the Self-Reporting Questionnaire (SRQ-20) mental health self-assessment questionnaire were used to assess depression, anxiety, and overall mental health. Among the patients, 32.3% had symptoms of depression and 19.4% had symptoms of anxiety. Levels of anxiety and fear varied. In comparing the PHQ-9 and 7-item Generalized Anxiety Disorder Scale scores of suspected and confirmed patients, there was no significant difference in the distribution of severity of anxiety or depression in the 2 groups. The PHQ-9 scores indicated mild depression symptoms in 25.8% of suspected patients, moderate symptoms in 0%, and severe symptoms in 6.5%. Overall, 50% of confirmed patients had symptoms, with 30.8% classified as mild, 15.4% classified as moderate, and 3.8% classified as severe. The 7-item Generalized Anxiety Disorder Scale scores in the group of suspected patients showed that 9.7% had mild symptoms, 0% had moderate symptoms, and 9.7% had severe symptoms. In the group of confirmed patients, 38.4% had symptoms (34.6% mild, 0% moderate, and 3.8% severe). Diagnosed patients had more visible symptoms of depression and different total PHQ-9 scores. During the COVID-19 epidemic, suspected and diagnosed patients had different levels of mental health problems. Diagnosed patients had more visible symptoms. The performance of suspected patients was higher, but their mental state was more polarized. It may thus be important to monitor the psychological state of suspected patients as early as possible to enable timely interventions that promote psychological rehabilitation.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/diagnosis , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Depression/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Adult , Aged , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/virology , COVID-19 , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/virology , Fear/psychology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Psychiatric Status Rating Scales , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Surveys and Questionnaires
15.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 99(38): e22235, 2020 Sep 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-787426

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The outbreak of the novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection, has emerged to be the biggest global health threat worldwide. COVID-19 marks the emergence of the third large-scale epidemic related to the coronavirus, after SARS-CoV in 2002 and Middle-East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERSCoV) in 2012. The pandemic has had a harmful effect on the public mental health, especially on depression. Increasing systematic reviews (SRs) of coronavirus were focusing on depression. However, the methodological quality of these SRs is unclear. Therefore, to evaluate and compare the normativity of report of SR, we conducted a comprehensive overview of depression during the SARS, MERS, and COVID-19 pandemics. METHODS: Two independent reviewers will conduct comprehensively searches in PubMed, EMBASE.com, Web of Science, the Cochrane Library, Chinese biomedical literature database (CBM), Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), Wan fang Database, Chongqing VIP (CQVIP). Reference lists of articles, gray literature, and conference proceedings will also be searched. We will extract the data and assess the methodological quality using the Assessment of Multiple Systematic Reviews-2 (AMSTAR-2) measurement tool and the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statement. General characteristics of the eligible SRs will be summarized and described. We will provide AMSTAR-2 and PRISMA assessments in tabular form for each review, the total percentage of each item will be calculated. Endnote X8 and EXCEL will be used. RESULTS: Using the draft search strategy of databases, 8 SRs met the a priori criteria and were included. The overview of SRs will be published in a peer-reviewed journal. CONCLUSION: Our overview will be a comprehensive synthesis of the existing systemic review on depression with SARS, MERS, and COVID-19. PROTOCOL REGISTRATION: INPLASY202080003.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Depression/epidemiology , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/psychology , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Depression/virology , Humans , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Prevalence , Research Design , SARS Virus , SARS-CoV-2 , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/epidemiology , Systematic Reviews as Topic
17.
Mov Disord ; 35(8): 1287-1292, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-734140

ABSTRACT

The impact of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) on clinical features of Parkinson's disease (PD) has been poorly characterized so far. Of 141 PD patients resident in Lombardy, we found 12 COVID-19 cases (8.5%), whose mean age and disease duration (65.5 and 6.3 years, respectively) were similar to controls. Changes in clinical features in the period January 2020 to April 2020 were compared with those of 36 PD controls matched for sex, age, and disease duration using the clinical impression of severity index for PD, the Movement Disorders Society Unified PD Rating Scale Parts II and IV, and the nonmotor symptoms scale. Motor and nonmotor symptoms significantly worsened in the COVID-19 group, requiring therapy adjustment in one third of cases. Clinical deterioration was explained by both infection-related mechanisms and impaired pharmacokinetics of dopaminergic therapy. Urinary issues and fatigue were the most prominent nonmotor issues. Cognitive functions were marginally involved, whereas none experienced autonomic failure. © 2020 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Parkinson Disease/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , COVID-19 , Case-Control Studies , Cognition/physiology , Cognition Disorders/virology , Depression/psychology , Depression/virology , Humans , Pandemics , Parkinson Disease/complications , Parkinson Disease/virology , SARS-CoV-2
18.
Psychiatry Res ; 293: 113382, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-704016

ABSTRACT

This review was done to synthesize the existing evidence on the prevalence of various psychological morbidities among general public, healthcare workers and COVID-19 patients amidst this pandemic situation. Systematic searches were conducted in various databases and search engines such as Medline, Chinese national knowledge infrastructure, Cochrane library, ScienceDirect, and Google Scholar from inception until 22 April 2020. Newcastle Ottawa scale was used to assess the quality of included studies. We carried out a meta-analysis with random-effects model and reported pooled prevalence with 95% confidence intervals (CIs).A total of 50 studies were included in the review. Only seven studies (14%) had low risk of bias. Pooled prevalence rate of psychological morbidities includes poor sleep quality (40%), stress (34%), psychological distress (34%), insomnia (30%), post-traumatic stress symptoms (27%), anxiety (26%), depression (26%). Pooled prevalence rate of psychological morbidities with respect to impact of event due to COVID-19 pandemic was 44% (95%CI-42% to 47%). The burden of these psychological morbidities was highest among the COVID-19 patients followed by healthcare workers and general population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Aged , Anxiety/psychology , Anxiety/virology , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/virology , Female , Health Personnel/psychology , Humans , Male , Mental Disorders/virology , Middle Aged , Morbidity , Prevalence , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/virology , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/virology , Young Adult
19.
Depress Anxiety ; 37(10): 957-964, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-645368

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The current study examines interrelationships between social vulnerability, individual stressors, social and psychological resources, and depressive symptomatology among US adults during the current coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. METHODS: Using an online survey platform, a poststratified (by age, gender, race, income, and geography), representative sample (n = 10,368 adults) is used in the analysis. RESULTS: On average, sample respondents report Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression (CES-D) Scale symptomatology nearly a point higher than the often used cutoff score for clinical caseness (16+); one-third of respondents had CES-D scores higher than 25. Multiple regression results show elevated levels of depressive symptomatology among the socially vulnerable (women, Hispanic, unmarried, not working). Those persons expressing heightened COVID-19 fear and moderate to high levels of food insecurity report more depressive symptoms than persons with less fear and low or no food insecurity. All three of the resource variables (mastery of fate, strength of ties, and optimism) are significant and in the negative direction. CONCLUSIONS: In a snapshot, the data provide an important point prevalence assessment of adult depressive symptoms during the current public health crisis. Results highlight the significance of vulnerability and individual stressors in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. In addition, the analysis affirms the importance of access to social and psychological resources to combat heightened fear and anxiety that persons report during the current pandemic.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections , Depression , Pneumonia, Viral , Social Support , Stress, Psychological , Adult , COVID-19/psychology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Depression/virology , Fear , Female , Humans , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
20.
Laryngoscope ; 130(11): 2520-2525, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-626250

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to determine the burden of depressed mood and anxiety in COVID-19, and associated disease characteristics. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This is a prospective, cross-sectional study of 114 COVID-19 positive patients diagnosed using RT-PCR-based testing over a 6-week period. The two-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-2) and the two-item Generalized Anxiety Disorder questionnaire (GAD-2) were used to measure depressed mood and anxiety level, respectively, at enrollment and for participants' baseline, pre-COVID-19 state. Severity of smell loss, loss of taste, nasal obstruction, rhinorrhea/mucus production, fever, cough, and shortness of breath (SOB) during COVID-19 were assessed. RESULTS: PHQ-2 and GAD-2 significantly (P < .001) increased from baseline to enrollment. PHQ-2 was associated with smell loss (adjusted incidence rate ratio [aIRR] = 1.40, 95% CI, 1.10-1.78, P = .006), age (aIRR = 1.02, 95% CI, 1.01-1.04, P = .006), and baseline PHQ-2 score (aIRR = 1.39, 95% CI, 1.09-1.76, P = .007). GAD-2 score was associated with smell loss (aIRR = 1.29, 95% CI, 1.02-1.62, P = .035), age (aIRR = 1.02, 95% CI, 1.01-1.04, P = .025) and baseline GAD-2 score (aIRR = 1.55, 95% CI, 1.24-1.93, P < .001). Loss of taste also exhibited similar associations with PHQ-2 and GAD-2. PHQ-2 and GAD-2 scores were not associated with severities of any other symptoms during the COVID-19 course. CONCLUSIONS: Despite the occurrence of symptoms-such as SOB-associated with severe manifestations of COVID-19, only the severities of smell and taste loss were associated with depressed mood and anxiety. These results may raise the novel possibility of emotional disturbance as a CNS manifestation of COVID-19 given trans-olfactory tract penetration of the central nervous system (CNS) by coronaviruses. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: 3 Laryngoscope, 130:2520-2525, 2020.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/virology , COVID-19/complications , Central Nervous System/virology , Depression/virology , Olfaction Disorders/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Olfaction Disorders/psychology , Prospective Studies , Severity of Illness Index , Taste Disorders/psychology , Taste Disorders/virology
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL