Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 12 de 12
Filter
1.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 101(30): e29571, 2022 Jul 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1967936

ABSTRACT

Concerns have been raised about allergic reactions to messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccines. A history of allergic reactions, including anaphylaxis to drugs, has been frequently reported in individuals with anaphylaxis to mRNA vaccines. To estimate the rate of immediate allergic reactions in patients with a history of drug allergy or other allergic disorders. We included adult patients who had received at least 1 dose of an mRNA COVID-19 vaccine at the Special Hospital for Pulmonary Diseases between March 1, 2021, and October 1, 2021, and who reported a history of drug allergy or other allergic diseases (asthma, allergic rhinitis, atopic dermatitis, food or insect venom allergy, mastocytosis, idiopathic anaphylaxis, acute or chronic urticaria, and/or angioedema). Immediate allergic reactions, including anaphylaxis, occurring within 4 hours of vaccination were recorded. Six immediate allergic reactions were noted in the cohort of 1679 patients (0.36%). One patient experienced anaphylaxis (0.06%), which resolved after epinephrine administration, and the other reactions were mild and easily treatable. Most patients with a history of allergies can safely receive an mRNA COVID-19 vaccine, providing adequate observation periods and preparedness to recognize and treat anaphylaxis.


Subject(s)
Anaphylaxis , COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Dermatitis, Atopic , Drug Hypersensitivity , Adult , Anaphylaxis/epidemiology , Anaphylaxis/etiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Dermatitis, Atopic/complications , Drug Hypersensitivity/complications , Humans , Incidence , RNA, Messenger
2.
Dermatol Ther ; 35(7): e15573, 2022 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1832028

ABSTRACT

During the SARS-COV-2 pandemic, using face masks became mandatory in many countries. Although evidence suggests that masks can exacerbate several inflammatory skin diseases, few studies focus on their real impact on eczema localized to the face in atopic dermatitis (AD) patients. The aim of this study is to evaluate facial eczema prevalence during pandemic and its psychological impact in AD patients pre-assessed for systemic treatment and/or in therapy with dupilumab. This study includes 71 patients affected by moderate-severe AD, treated with dupilumab at SCDU of Dermatology in Novara, Italy. We calculated the number of subjects with facial involvement in pre- and post-pandemic periods and the related localization trend. We evaluated, in the two groups, clinical and psychological indicators recorded at each visit and the score modifications during the observational period. No statistically significant differences were observed in facial eczema prevalence, between pre- and post-pandemic periods (p = 0.7618) and in facial eczema remission among the two groups (p = 0.1903). In post-pandemic period, psychological scores were significantly lower (DLQI and HADS respectively with p < 0.0001 and p = 0.0025) and the reduction in EASI score during observational period was significantly greater (p = 0.0001). Our analysis revealed a potential protective effect of masks on face eczema, suggesting that they could enhance dupilumab efficacy. Face masks, covering sensitive areas, can positively contribute to mental distress in patients with facial eczema, and being associated with a lower allergic diseases incidence may sustain dupilumab in reducing AD severity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dermatitis, Atopic , Eczema , Facial Dermatoses , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized , Dermatitis, Atopic/complications , Dermatitis, Atopic/drug therapy , Dermatitis, Atopic/epidemiology , Eczema/complications , Facial Dermatoses/complications , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Treatment Outcome
3.
Actas Dermosifiliogr ; 113(3): 286-293, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1827754

ABSTRACT

Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic skin disease that may be triggered by psychological conditions and several allergens. Patients with AD may be experienced disease exacerbation due to the COVID-19 pandemic lifestyle including home-quarantine and increased stress. We obtained the electronic data of 100 AD patients admitted to our hospital from 2016 to 2019 and called them with specific phone line. Out of 100 patients, 43 were male, and 57 were female (mean age ± SD: 45.85 ± 16.90). Sixty patients (37 females and 23males; mean age: 42.22 ± 14.71) confronted disease flare-up during the COVID-19 era. Exacerbation of AD was correlated with treatment dose alteration, a lengthy history of atopic dermatitis, eczema duration, self-isolation, frequent handwashing, hand disinfection, and POEM scoring (P < 0.05). Regarding the POEM scoring, 61 patients with moderate to severe AD experienced higher anxiety than 39 patients with silent to mild AD (P = 0.013). In this study, most patients experienced disease exacerbation and perceived mild anxiety in this pandemic.


La dermatitis atópica (DA) es una enfermedad cutánea crónica que puede desencadenarse debido a situaciones psicológicas y ciertos alérgenos. Los pacientes con DA pueden haber experimentado una exacerbación de la enfermedad debido al estilo de vida durante la pandemia de la COVID-19, incluyendo el confinamiento domiciliario y el incremento del estrés. Obtuvimos los datos electrónicos de 100 pacientes con DA ingresados en nuestro hospital de 2016 a 2019, y les llamamos con una línea telefónica específica.De los 100 pacientes, 43 eran varones y 57 mujeres (edad media ± DE: 45,85 ± 16,90), de los cuales 60 (37 mujeres y 23 varones, con edad media de 42,22 ± 14,71) experimentaron el brote de la enfermedad durante la etapa de la COVID-19. La exacerbación de la DA guardó relación con la alteración de la dosis de tratamiento, un largo historial de dermatitis atópica, la duración del eccema, el autoaislamiento, la frecuencia del lavado de manos, la desinfección de las manos, y la puntuación POEM (p < 0,05). En lo referente a dicha puntuación, los 61 pacientes con DA de moderada a grave experimentaron mayor ansiedad que los 39 pacientes con DA de silente a leve (p = 0,013).En este estudio muchos pacientes experimentaron exacerbación de la enfermedad y percibieron ansiedad leve durante la pandemia.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dermatitis, Atopic , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Dermatitis, Atopic/complications , Dermatitis, Atopic/epidemiology , Disease Progression , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Severity of Illness Index
4.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract ; 10(1): 134-142, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1487805

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In the SARS-CoV-2/COVID-19 pandemic, we need to understand the impact of immunomodulatory medications on COVID-19 symptom severity in patients with inflammatory diseases, including the type 2/Th2 polarized skin disease, atopic dermatitis (AD). OBJECTIVE: Because it is believed that type 1/Th1 immunity controls viral infections and that there is a Th1/Th2 counter-regulation, we hypothesized that Th2 targeting with the IL-4Rα-antagonist, dupilumab, in patients with moderate-to-severe AD would rebalance the Th1/Th2 axis, potentially leading to attenuated COVID-19 symptoms. METHODS: A total of 1237 patients with moderate-to-severe AD in the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Department of Dermatology were enrolled in a registry. Patients were screened for COVID-19-related symptoms and assigned a severity score (asymptomatic [0]-fatal [5]). Scores were compared among 3 treatment groups: dupilumab (n = 632), other systemic treatments (n = 107), and limited/no treatment (n = 498). Demographic and comorbid covariates were adjusted by multivariate generalized logistic regression models. RESULTS: The dupilumab-treated group showed reduced incidence and severity of COVID-19 symptoms versus other treatment groups. Dupilumab-treated patients were less likely to experience moderate-to-severe symptoms versus patients on other systemics (P = .01) and on limited/no treatment (P = .04), and less likely to experience any symptoms versus patients on other systemics (P = .01). This effect was seen in our entire cohort and in the subgroup of patients with verified COVID-19 or high-risk exposure. CONCLUSIONS: Patients on dupilumab experienced less severe COVID-19 manifestations and lesser symptoms compared with patients on other systemics and on limited/no treatment. These results suggest that Th2 modulation with dupilumab may have a protective effect on anti-viral immune response in patients with AD.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , COVID-19 , Dermatitis, Atopic , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/drug therapy , Dermatitis, Atopic/complications , Dermatitis, Atopic/drug therapy , Humans , Pandemics , Severity of Illness Index , Treatment Outcome
7.
Dermatitis ; 32(1S): S45-S52, 2021 Oct 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1276257

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The burden of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) among patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) is poorly understood. OBJECTIVES: The aims of the study were to characterize a large cohort of COVID-19-positive adult patients with AD and to identify predictors of COVID-19-associated hospitalization and mortality. METHODS: A population-based nested case-control study was performed. Multivariable logistic regression was used to evaluate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals of predictors for COVID-19-associated hospitalization and mortality. RESULTS: Of 78,073 adult patients with AD, 3618 (4.6%) tested positive for COVID-19. Subclinical COVID-19 infection occurred in 3368 (93.1%) of COVID-19-positive patients, whereas 123 (3.4%), 46 (1.3%), 55 (1.5%), and 26 (0.7%) patients developed a mild, moderate, severe, and critical disease, respectively. Altogether, 250 patients (6.0%) were hospitalized, and 40 patients (1.1%) died because of COVID-19 complications. Coronavirus disease 2019-associated hospitalization was independently associated with the intake of extended courses of systemic corticosteroids (adjusted odds ratio, 1.96; 95% confidence interval, 1.23-3.14; P = 0.005). None of AD-related variables independently predicted COVID-19-associated mortality. The presence of comorbid metabolic syndrome, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, chronic renal failure, and depression projected both COVID-19-associated hospitalization and mortality. CONCLUSIONS: Prolonged systemic corticosteroids during the pandemic are associated with increased odds of COVID-19-associated hospitalization and should be avoided in patients with AD.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/mortality , Cost of Illness , Dermatitis, Atopic/complications , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/diagnosis , Case-Control Studies , Cohort Studies , Dermatitis, Atopic/epidemiology , Dermatitis, Atopic/therapy , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Logistic Models , Male , Middle Aged , Odds Ratio , Survival Rate , Young Adult
8.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol ; 126(5): 569-575, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1114370

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) emerged as a pandemic toward the end of 2019, causing large numbers of people to become infected and die. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether allergic diseases are a risk factor for hospitalization in COVID-19. METHODS: We conducted a study including 107 pediatric patients after COVID-19 recovery. The International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood Phase 3 questionnaires were distributed together with a detailed history of environmental factors and an allergic evaluation including skin prick tests, specific immunoglobulin E tests, and spirometry. We investigated the prevalence of allergic diseases and evaluated the factors associated with hospitalization in COVID-19. RESULTS: A total of 61 (57%) patients were hospitalized and 46 (43%) patients were followed closely in the outpatient clinic. The prevalences of allergic rhinitis, asthma, atopic dermatitis, and episodic wheezing were 10.3%, 6,5%, 4.7%, and 3.7%, respectively, within the whole study population. Although having asthma with or without allergic rhinitis, atopic dermatitis, and passive tobacco exposure were not found to be related to hospitalization because of COVID-19, having a pet at home was found to decrease the risk of hospitalization (odds ratio, 0.191; 95% confidence interval, 0.047-0.779; P = .02). Spirometry tests revealed a higher forced expiratory volume in one second to forced vital capacity ratio and a peak expiratory flow reversibility in hospitalized patients than in nonhospitalized ones (P = .02 and P = .003, respectively). CONCLUSION: Asthma and allergic diseases do not seem to be risk factors for hospitalization in children because of COVID-19, and having a pet at home can be a protective effect. Pulmonary function testing seems to be important for monitoring lung damage after COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Asthma/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Coinfection/epidemiology , Dermatitis, Atopic/epidemiology , Rhinitis, Allergic/epidemiology , Adolescent , Asthma/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/pathology , Child , Child, Preschool , Coinfection/diagnosis , Coinfection/pathology , Dermatitis, Atopic/complications , Disease Susceptibility/pathology , Female , Forced Expiratory Volume/physiology , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Infant , Male , Prospective Studies , Rhinitis, Allergic/complications , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Surveys and Questionnaires , Tobacco Smoke Pollution/adverse effects , Treatment Outcome , Vital Capacity/physiology
9.
Dermatol Ther ; 34(1): e14581, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-991332

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There are conflicting results in the literature regarding the frequency of allergic diseases in COVID-19 patients. The effect of having an allergic disease on COVID-19 disease severity has been little studied. PURPOSE: In this study, we tried to determine the frequency of allergic diseases in COVID-19 patients and the effect of having an allergic disease on COVID-19 disease severity. DESIGN/METHOD: A retrospective cross-sectional study was conducted in patients diagnosed with COVID-19 in a state hospital in Istanbul, Turkey. Patients were contacted by phone and those who approved to participate in the study were questioned about their sociodemographic characteristics, body mass index, smoking history, and about their atopic status. Rate of atopic diseases among mild and severe COVID-19 patients and risk estimates for mild disease in atopic and non-atopic COVID-19 patients were calculated. RESULTS: Study population consisted of 235 adults with COVID-19 (mean age, 45.3 years [standard deviation, 15.0 years]; 139 [59.1%] male). Among study population, 16 (6.8%) subjects had one of the three atopic symptoms, which were wheezing, rhinitis, or eczema. Among the subjects with atopic status, four (1.7%) subjects had wheezing, eight (3.4%) had rhinitis, and four (1.7%) had eczema within the last 12 months. Although atopic status is associated with 3.1 times higher odds for mild disease, being atopic or not being atopic was not found to be associated with COVID-19 severity (P = .054). CONCLUSION: The information that atopic diseases are less common in COVID-19 patients may guide clinical risk classification.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dermatitis, Atopic/complications , Adult , Asthma , COVID-19/complications , Cross-Sectional Studies , Famine , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prevalence , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Turkey/epidemiology
10.
J Allergy Clin Immunol ; 146(4): 790-798, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-714478

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There is inconclusive and controversial evidence of the association between allergic diseases and the risk of adverse clinical outcomes of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). OBJECTIVE: We sought to determine the association of allergic disorders with the likelihood of a positive severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) test result and with clinical outcomes of COVID-19 (admission to intensive care unit, administration of invasive ventilation, and death). METHODS: A propensity-score-matched nationwide cohort study was performed in South Korea. Data obtained from the Health Insurance Review & Assessment Service of Korea from all adult patients (age, >20 years) who were tested for SARS-CoV-2 in South Korea between January 1, 2020, and May 15, 2020, were analyzed. The association of SARS-CoV-2 test positivity and allergic diseases in the entire cohort (n = 219,959) and the difference in clinical outcomes of COVID-19 were evaluated in patients with allergic diseases and SARS-CoV-2 positivity (n = 7,340). RESULTS: In the entire cohort, patients who underwent SARS-CoV-2 testing were evaluated to ascertain whether asthma and allergic rhinitis were associated with an increased likelihood of SARS-CoV-2 test positivity. After propensity score matching, we found that asthma and allergic rhinitis were associated with worse clinical outcomes of COVID-19 in patients with SARS-CoV-2 test positivity. Patients with nonallergic asthma had a greater risk of SARS-CoV-2 test positivity and worse clinical outcomes of COVID-19 than patients with allergic asthma. CONCLUSIONS: In a Korean nationwide cohort, allergic rhinitis and asthma, especially nonallergic asthma, confers a greater risk of susceptibility to SARS-CoV-2 infection and severe clinical outcomes of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Asthma/complications , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Cardiovascular Diseases/complications , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Dermatitis, Atopic/complications , Diabetes Complications/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Rhinitis, Allergic/complications , Adult , Aged , Asthma/diagnosis , Asthma/immunology , Asthma/mortality , Betacoronavirus/immunology , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Cardiovascular Diseases/diagnosis , Cardiovascular Diseases/immunology , Cardiovascular Diseases/mortality , Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Cohort Studies , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Dermatitis, Atopic/diagnosis , Dermatitis, Atopic/immunology , Dermatitis, Atopic/mortality , Diabetes Complications/immunology , Diabetes Complications/mortality , Diabetes Mellitus/diagnosis , Diabetes Mellitus/immunology , Diabetes Mellitus/mortality , Disease Susceptibility , Female , Humans , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Odds Ratio , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Rhinitis, Allergic/diagnosis , Rhinitis, Allergic/immunology , Rhinitis, Allergic/mortality , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Survival Analysis
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL