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1.
Contact Dermatitis ; 87(6): 500-510, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2001622

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Occupational hand eczema (HE) is common among healthcare workers (HCWs) and has-in some regions of the world-increased during the COVID-19 pandemic due to related hygiene measures. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the efficacy of an intervention for HE prevention in HCWs during the pandemic. METHODS: A prospective, controlled, unblinded interventional trial was conducted in 302 HCWs. The intervention group (IG) (n = 135) received online-based health education and free access to hand cleansing and hand care products. The control group (CG) (n = 167) did not receive any intervention within the study. At baseline (T0), after 3 (T1) and 6 (T2) months, participants completed standardized questionnaires. The Osnabrueck Hand Eczema Severity Index (OHSI) was assessed at T0 and T2. RESULTS: During the observation period, there were no new HE cases in the IG (n = 115) and 12 cases (8.8%) in the CG (n = 136). OHSI values at T2 were lower in the IG (b = -1.44, p < 0.001). Daily use of emollients was higher at work (b = 1.73, p < 0.001) and at home (b = 1.62, p < 0.001) in the IG at T2. CONCLUSIONS: The intervention was effective in HE prevention and improving skin care behaviour during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dermatitis, Allergic Contact , Dermatitis, Occupational , Eczema , Hand Dermatoses , Humans , COVID-19/prevention & control , Dermatitis, Occupational/prevention & control , Eczema/prevention & control , Eczema/epidemiology , Hand Dermatoses/prevention & control , Hand Dermatoses/epidemiology , Health Personnel , Pandemics , Prospective Studies
3.
Ned Tijdschr Tandheelkd ; 128(6): 323-330, 2021 Jun.
Article in Dutch | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1259697

ABSTRACT

In recent decades, hand eczema has been seen more frequently in oral care practices. Hand eczema is a difficult problem, especially since the start of the current COVID-19-pandemic, and can lead to absence due to illness at work. The main trio in the development of eczema is predisposition (atopy), irritation and allergy. Irritative contact dermatitis is caused by damage to the skin barrier. In dentistry, this is often caused by frequent contact with water, soaps, disinfectants and the use of gloves. The cause of allergic contact dermatitis is related to the use of various materials in oral care practice, such as acrylates, rubber and rubber additives. Essential measures are very important in oral care practice to prevent hand eczema. Various measures are key: adequate skin care with liniments, good skin protection with proper gloves and no-touch techniques. Knowledge of possible allergens and adequate hand hygiene and hand care are crucial to minimize the risk of chronic eczema.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dermatitis, Occupational , Hand Dermatoses , Occupational Health , Dermatitis, Occupational/epidemiology , Dermatitis, Occupational/etiology , Dermatitis, Occupational/prevention & control , Hand Dermatoses/epidemiology , Hand Dermatoses/etiology , Hand Dermatoses/prevention & control , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
8.
J Wound Ostomy Continence Nurs ; 47(6): 551-557, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-930148

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Extended use of N95 respirator masks is far more prevalent during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. As WOC nurses, we were tasked with formulating procedures for protecting the facial skin integrity of healthcare workers (HCWs) using personal protective devices when caring for patients with suspected or active COVID-19, while avoiding contamination when the masks are donned or doffed. This quality improvement project describes how we approached this project within the limited time frame available as we cared for patients with established and suspected COVID-19. PARTICIPANTS AND SETTING: This project focused on HCW use of N95 respirator masks and dressings currently available in our facility. The 4 WOC nurses acted as quality improvement project directors and as participants. The setting for our project was our facility's simulation laboratory. APPROACH: We evaluated 6 topical products (an alcohol-free liquid acrylate, thin film dressing, thin hydrocolloid dressing, hydrocolloid blister care cushion, thin foam transfer dressing, and thick foam dressing) applied to skin in contact with 3 N95 respirators; all are available on our facility's formulary and all are in widespread clinical use. After the product was applied to the face and nose, the N95 respirator was donned and evaluated for fit. Participants then wore the devices for 10 hours and doffed the mask using established facility procedures. In order to evaluate for potential contamination including possible aerosolization, we applied a commercially available fluorescent lotion to simulate the presence of infectious particles. Contamination was assessed using an ultraviolet light for all dressings except for the alcohol-free liquid acrylate. We also evaluated cutaneous responses (skin integrity, irritation, comfort) during this period. OUTCOMES: We found that contamination of the simulated pathogen did not occur with removal of any of the protective products. No skin irritation was noted with any of the tested products after a 10-hour wear time underneath the N95 respirator masks, but mild discomfort was experienced with 3 of the dressings (thin film dressing and both hydrocolloid dressings). CONCLUSION: Based on these experiences, we recommend application of an alcohol-free liquid acrylate film to prevent facial skin injury associated with friction from the extended use of an N95 respirator mask. We further recommend performing a fit test and user-performed seal check with the use of any topical dressing and especially those that add cushion. For the duration of the COVID-19 pandemic, we recommend use of protective dressings to maintain skin integrity and protection from coronavirus infection as HCWs continue to provide care to all of patients under their care.


Subject(s)
Bandages , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Dermatitis, Occupational/prevention & control , Masks/adverse effects , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Respiratory Protective Devices/adverse effects , Skin Diseases/prevention & control , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Dermatitis, Occupational/etiology , Humans , Infection Control , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Quality Improvement , SARS-CoV-2 , Skin Diseases/etiology
9.
Dermatol Ther ; 33(6): e14528, 2020 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-917742

ABSTRACT

Given the current lack of a therapeutic vaccine for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), preventive measures including mask wearing are crucial in slowing the transmission of cases. However, prolonged wearing of protective respirators, medical and fabric masks can easily generate excessive sweating, moisture and friction. Closed and warm environments heighten the skin's permeability and sensitivity to physical or chemical irritants, leading to chronic cumulative irritant contact dermatitis or, rarely, even allergic contact dermatitis. Although not representing a life-threatening condition, contact dermatitis can have a significant impact on emergency management, as it is potentially able to reduce work performance and create emotional discomfort due to the involvement of evident body areas. To minimize the skin breakdown, adherence to standards on wearing protective and safe equipments and avoidance of overprotection should be performed. At the same time, some measures of skin care are recommended. Here, we offer some tips on how to prevent and manage contact dermatitis due to masks not only in health care workers, but also in the general population during this COVID-19 outbreak.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Dermatitis, Contact/prevention & control , Dermatitis, Occupational/prevention & control , Facial Dermatoses/prevention & control , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Inhalation Exposure/prevention & control , Masks/adverse effects , N95 Respirators/adverse effects , Skin Care , Administration, Cutaneous , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/administration & dosage , Anti-Allergic Agents/administration & dosage , Anti-Bacterial Agents/administration & dosage , COVID-19/transmission , Dermatitis, Contact/diagnosis , Dermatitis, Contact/etiology , Dermatitis, Occupational/diagnosis , Dermatitis, Occupational/etiology , Facial Dermatoses/diagnosis , Facial Dermatoses/etiology , Humans , Inhalation Exposure/adverse effects , Occupational Health , Protective Factors , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , Treatment Outcome
10.
Dermatol Ther ; 33(6): e14396, 2020 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-840549

ABSTRACT

Frequency of hand disinfection and adverse skin reactions among health care workers dramatically increased since the COVID-19 outbreak and consensus recommendations on hand hygiene were presented. The aim of the present study was to check the efficacy of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology (EADV) Task Force (TF) on Contact Dermatitis (CD) recommendations in a real life and to search if providing products mentioned in that recommendations may increase its efficacy. Doctors and nurses who worked with patients during COVID-19 pandemic and use hand disinfectants received adopted recommendations of the EADV TF on CD only or together with mentioned in that recommendations gel with ethanol and glycerin and emollient. Prevalence of adverse skin reactions on hand disinfectants at baseline was 80.21%. In a month significant improvement of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and self-assessed improvement of hand skin (P < .01 for both) was reported in "products" group only. Number of participants that had no impact on their HRQoL became higher and the Dermatology Life Quality Index scores lower than in "recommendations only" group (P = .03 and P = .02, respectively). Our results showed that recommendations of the EADV TF on CD may significantly improve HRQoL and hand skin status in health care professionals but provision with products mentioned in that recommendations is crucial.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Dermatitis, Occupational/prevention & control , Emollients/administration & dosage , Glycerol/administration & dosage , Hand Dermatoses/prevention & control , Hand Disinfection , Hand Sanitizers/adverse effects , Infection Control , Nursing Staff, Hospital , Physicians , Administration, Cutaneous , Adult , COVID-19/transmission , Dermatitis, Occupational/diagnosis , Dermatitis, Occupational/epidemiology , Female , Gels , Hand Dermatoses/diagnosis , Hand Dermatoses/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Occupational Health , Prevalence , Prospective Studies , Quality of Life , Treatment Outcome , Young Adult
12.
J Am Acad Dermatol ; 83(6): 1730-1737, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-665321

ABSTRACT

The recent COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in increased hand hygiene and hand cleansing awareness. To prevent virus transmission, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends frequent hand washing with soap and water. Hand hygiene products are available in a variety of forms, and while each of these formulations may be effective against COVID-19, they may also alter skin barrier integrity and function. As health care workers and the general population focus on stringent hand hygiene, the American Contact Dermatitis Society anticipates an increase in both irritant contact and allergic contact hand dermatitis. Alcohol-based hand sanitizers with moisturizers have the least sensitizing and irritancy potential when compared to soaps and synthetic detergents. This article provides an overview of the most frequently used hand hygiene products and their associations with contact dermatitis as well as recommendations from the American Contact Dermatitis Society on how to treat and prevent further dermatitis.


Subject(s)
Dermatitis, Contact/prevention & control , Dermatitis, Occupational/prevention & control , Hand Dermatoses/prevention & control , Hand Hygiene/standards , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Anti-Infective Agents, Local/administration & dosage , Anti-Infective Agents, Local/adverse effects , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , COVID-19 , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Communicable Disease Control/standards , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Dermatitis, Contact/etiology , Dermatitis, Occupational/etiology , Hand Dermatoses/chemically induced , Health Personnel , Humans , Irritants/administration & dosage , Irritants/adverse effects , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Soaps/adverse effects , Societies, Medical/standards , United States
14.
Dermatitis ; 31(4): 233-237, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-611904

ABSTRACT

In-hospital transmission is one of the main routes of the 2019 novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) spreading among health care workers (HCWs) who are the frontline fighters. However, coming into contact with COVID-19-positive patients is unavoidable. Therefore, hand hygiene is of utmost importance for the prevention of COVID-19 among HCWs. This purpose can be achieved by applying alcohol-based hand rubs, washing hands properly with soap and water, and applying other antiseptic agents. Nevertheless, regular hand hygiene could also be challenging, because water, detergents, and disinfectants may predispose HCWs to hand dermatitis. The current article reviews the risk factors for the development of hand dermatitis, with further focus on the most common agents used among HCWs. In addition, the risk of occupational hand dermatitis for each agent is evaluated to increase awareness of this common condition. Finally, some recommendations are discussed to reduce the effect of hand dermatitis on HCWs.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Dermatitis, Occupational/etiology , Dermatitis, Occupational/prevention & control , Hand Hygiene , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Anti-Infective Agents, Local/adverse effects , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Disinfectants/adverse effects , Health Personnel , Humans , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Soaps/adverse effects
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