Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 11 de 11
Filter
1.
Eur J Med Res ; 26(1): 98, 2021 Aug 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1371980

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is associated with a wide clinical spectrum of skin manifestations, including urticarial, vesicular, vasculitic and chilblain-like lesions. Recently, delayed skin reactions have been reported in 1% individuals following mRNA vaccination against SARS-CoV-2. The exact pathophysiology and the risk factors still remain unclear. PATIENTS AND METHODS: 6821 employees and patients were vaccinated at our institutions between February and June 2021. Every patient received two doses of the mRNA-1273 vaccine in our hospitals, and reported back in case of any side effects which were collected in our hospital managed database. RESULTS: Eleven of 6821 vaccinated patients (0.16%) developed delayed skin reactions after either the first or second dose of the mRNA-1273 vaccine against SARS-CoV-2. Eight of 11 patients (73%) developed a rash after the first dose, while in 3/11 (27%), the rash occurred after the second dose. More females (9/11) were affected. Four of 11 patients required antihistamines, with two needing additional topical steroids. All the cutaneous manifestations resolved within 14 days. None of the skin reactions after the first dose of the vaccine prevented the administration of the second dose. There were no long-term cutaneous sequelae in any of the affected individuals. CONCLUSION: Our data suggests that skin reactions after the use of mRNA-1273 vaccine against SARS-CoV-2 are possible, but rare. Further studies need to be done to understand the pathophysiology of these lesions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , COVID-19/prevention & control , Dermatitis/etiology , Erythema/etiology , Adult , Aged , Dermatitis/drug therapy , Dermatitis/epidemiology , Erythema/drug therapy , Erythema/epidemiology , Female , Histamine Antagonists/therapeutic use , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Steroids/therapeutic use , Vaccination/adverse effects
2.
J Cutan Pathol ; 49(1): 34-41, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1320386

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: As more people become vaccinated against the SARS-CoV-2 virus, reports of delayed cutaneous hypersensitivity reactions are beginning to emerge. METHODS: In this IRB-approved retrospective case series, biopsy specimens of potential cutaneous adverse reactions from the Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna mRNA vaccine were identified and reviewed. Clinical information was obtained through the requisition form, referring clinician, or medical chart review. RESULTS: Twelve cases were included. Histopathological features from two injection-site reactions showed a mixed-cell infiltrate with eosinophils and a spongiotic dermatitis with eosinophils. Three biopsy specimens came from generalized eruptions that showed interface changes consistent with an exanthematous drug reaction. Three biopsy specimens revealed a predominantly spongiotic pattern, consistent with eczematous dermatitis. Small-vessel vascular injury was seen in two specimens, which were diagnosed as urticarial vasculitis and leukocytoclastic vasculitis, respectively. There were two cases of new-onset bullous pemphigoid supported by histopathological examination and direct immunofluorescence studies. Eosinophils were seen in 10 cases. CONCLUSIONS: Dermatopathologists should be aware of potential cutaneous adverse reactions to mRNA-based COVID-19 vaccines. Histopathological patterns include mixed-cell infiltrates, epidermal spongiosis, and interface changes. Eosinophils are a common finding but are not always present. Direct immunofluorescence studies may be helpful for immune-mediated cutaneous presentations such as vasculitis or bullous pemphigoid.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , COVID-19/prevention & control , Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions/pathology , Hypersensitivity, Delayed/pathology , /adverse effects , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Biopsy/methods , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Dermatitis/etiology , Dermatitis/pathology , Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions/etiology , Eosinophils/pathology , Female , Fluorescent Antibody Technique, Direct/methods , Humans , Hypersensitivity, Delayed/etiology , Male , Middle Aged , Pemphigoid, Bullous/diagnosis , Pemphigoid, Bullous/pathology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Skin/pathology , Vasculitis/chemically induced , Vasculitis/pathology
4.
Clin Dermatol ; 39(1): 23-32, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1300688

ABSTRACT

The first cases of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in Iran were detected on February 19, 2020. Soon the entire country was hit with the virus. Although dermatologists were not immediately the frontline health care workers, all aspects of their practice were drastically affected. Adapting to this unprecedented crisis required urgent appropriate responses. With preventive measures and conserving health care resources being the most essential priorities, dermatologists, as an integral part of the health system, needed to adapt their practices according to the latest guidelines. The spectrum of the challenges encompassed education, teledermatology, lasers, and other dermatologic procedures, as well as management of patients who were immunosuppressed or developed drug reactions and, most importantly, the newly revealed cutaneous signs of COVID-19. These challenges have paved the way for new horizons in dermatology.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Dermatology/standards , Hospitals, University , Skin Diseases/etiology , Skin Diseases/therapy , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/drug therapy , Cosmetic Techniques , Dermatitis/etiology , Dermatologic Surgical Procedures , Dermatology/education , Dermatology/methods , Dermoscopy , Drug Eruptions/etiology , Hand Dermatoses/etiology , Hand Disinfection , Humans , Internship and Residency , Iran/epidemiology , Laser Therapy , Personal Protective Equipment/adverse effects , Phototherapy , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Private Practice , SARS-CoV-2 , Skin Diseases/drug therapy , Telemedicine
5.
Cutan Ocul Toxicol ; 40(2): 168-174, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1258707

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Skin lesions are either caused by COVID-19 disease or they can be due to other driving forces related to the COVID-19 pandemic. AIM: Considering the fact that the reported data in different articles for the type and prevalence of skin manifestations related to the COVID-19 pandemic are inconsistent, we have described the mechanism and type of skin lesions related to the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: In this review article, we have searched the Medline database (PubMed) for the combination of the following key terms "Dermatological Manifestation", "cutaneous Manifestation", "Skin Manifestation", "COVID-19", "SARS-CoV-2". RESULTS: The prevalence of skin manifestations related to COVID-19 ranged from 0.2% to 20%. The majority of these skin lesions are maculopapular eruptions. The skin presentations related to the COVID-19 pandemic are described below. Traumatic skin conditions such as dermatitis in individuals, especially those with allergies, might initiate secondary to over-washing or rinsing with inappropriate detergents. Also, inappropriate use of personal protective equipment (mask-gloves-shield) can trigger skin lesions on the face and hands or aggravate the lesions of acne, seborrhoeic dermatitis, eczema, etc. Furthermore, cutaneous adverse drug reactions may occur during hospitalization or outpatient treatment of COVID-19 patients. Also, psychocutaneous disorders due to acute stress can trigger or deteriorate several skin manifestations. Moreover, COVID-19 prevalence and course may be changed in patients with autoimmune or chronic inflammatory underlying skin disorders such as psoriasis, lupus erythematosus, pemphigus, scleroderma who are on immunosuppressive or biological medications to control their disorders. CONCLUSION: Due to the various dimensions of skin organ involvement and the large population affected, long-term skin conditions following this pandemic can be a lot more problematic than it appears. Serious preventive measures and medical supports are necessary to avoid skin disorders from becoming permanent or even chronic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Skin/pathology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/prevention & control , Dermatitis/etiology , Hand Disinfection , Humans , Personal Protective Equipment/adverse effects
7.
G Ital Dermatol Venereol ; 155(5): 632-635, 2020 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-966334

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The outbreak of the pandemic Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by a novel coronavirus named Severe acute respiratory syndrome Coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2), affecting a high number of patients in Italy, forced a great number of doctors, even dermatologists, to work in the first lines in the dedicated departments. We analyzed the features and the incidence of dermatological issues emerged during the hospitalization due to COVID-19 and absent before. METHODS: All the SARS-CoV-2 positive patients hospitalized in Celio Military Hospital - COVID hub no-intensive care wards from March 16, 2020 until May 4, 2020 were evaluated by dermatologists several times during the hospital stay. RESULTS: Ninety-six patients (15 civilians and 81 Italian servicepeople) were enrolled: 34 (35.4%) patients developed cutaneous manifestations; 15 (16.0%) suffered from skin dryness; 5 (5.2%) irritant contact dermatitis; 4 (4.2%) seborrheic dermatitis; 4 (4.2%) morbilliform rashes; 3 (3.1%) petechial rashes and 3 (3.1%) widespread hives. CONCLUSIONS: A deeper knowledge of cutaneous manifestations in military and civilian hospitalized COVID-19 patients could suggest more effective treatments to win the battle against SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Hospitals, Military/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Skin Diseases/etiology , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Dermatitis/epidemiology , Dermatitis/etiology , Exanthema/epidemiology , Exanthema/etiology , Female , Humans , Ichthyosis/epidemiology , Ichthyosis/etiology , Inpatients , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Military Personnel , Psoriasis/complications , Skin Diseases/epidemiology , Urticaria/epidemiology , Urticaria/etiology , Young Adult
9.
Minerva Endocrinol ; 45(4): 345-353, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-792806

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: In the next future, dermatologists, endocrinologist and physicians may cope with the impact of extent SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) infection over chronic inflammatory skin diseases and their treatment. COVID-19 pandemic obliged many countries to impose social restrictions, resulting in the need to adapt daily lifestyle habits and working activities. These changes have drastically reduced physical activity and social interactions, with the possible increase of anxiety, eating disorders and weight gain. EVIDENCE ACQUISITION: We searched for relevant studies (trials, real-life studies and case reports, meta-analysis, pooled data analysis, reviews) on endocrine disorders and inflammatory skin diseases. The database used was PubMed. The studies included were those published in the English language between January 1, 2018 and May 5, 2020. EVIDENCE SYNTHESIS: Several studies have been previously showed the association of overweight and obesity, with the metabolic syndrome and insulin-resistance. It has been demonstrated how these conditions correlate with the worsening of such chronic inflammatory skin diseases, such as psoriasis, hidradenitis suppurativa and acne. Many evidences suggest an important role of adipose tissue in the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (Leptin, adiponectin, TNFα, IL-6, MCP-1, PAI-1), involved in the pathogenesis and the exacerbations of these skin diseases. In addition, we should expect an increasing incidence rate of hypovitaminosis D in the next future due to reduced sun exposure caused by isolation at home and missed holidays. Scientific evidences already show the important immunomodulating role of vitamin D in inflammatory skin diseases. CONCLUSIONS: Our study pays attention on medium-long term effects of COVID-19 outbreak on inflammatory skin disorders, due to the lifestyle changes. In such context this review considers how a multidisciplinary approach, involving dermatologists, nutritionists and endocrinologists, may lead to a better management of dermatologic patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Dermatitis/etiology , Endocrine System Diseases/etiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks , Humans
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL