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1.
Dermatol Surg ; 48(6): 636-641, 2022 Jun 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1764684

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has caused an increasing shift toward the utilization of telehealth services. There are limited data on patient preferences for these services in dermatologic surgery. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate patient preferences regarding telehealth in dermatologic surgery for pre- and postsurgical care. METHODS: A survey was administered to patients in an academic dermatology practice. RESULTS: Two hundred twenty-four patients participated. An in-person presurgical consultation was preferred by 62.1%, and a postsurgical in-person visit was preferred by 67.7%. The most commonly cited reason was desire for physical interaction with their surgeon. For each 10-year increase in age, there was a 1.26-fold and 1.12-fold increase in preference for in-person consultation and follow-up, respectively. Eighty-seven percent felt safe during office visit, and 41% reported no anxiety regarding fear of contracting COVID-19. The proportion of patients preferring in-person pre- or postsurgical visits was similar regardless of sex, presence of an immunocompromising condition, prior dermatologic surgery, anxiety level for contracting COVID-19, and perceived level of office safety. CONCLUSION: A majority of patients prefer in-person visits for pre- and postsurgical care. Older patients have a greater preference for in-person care. Anxiety level regarding COVID-19 and perceived level of office safety were not related to preference for in-person visits.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Telemedicine , COVID-19/epidemiology , Dermatologic Surgical Procedures , Humans , Pandemics , Patient Preference
2.
Clin Exp Dermatol ; 47(5): 953-956, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1583632

ABSTRACT

Understanding patient concerns regarding skin surgery during the COVID-19 pandemic is a vital way of learning from individual experiences. A shift towards using superficial absorbable sutures (AS) has been anecdotally observed. We explored patient attitudes to the use of AS, and their experiences and perceptions of attending for skin surgery during the pandemic. In total, 35 participants were interviewed (74% men, 100% white British; mean age 72.5 years, range 43-95 years). Participants reported that they were reassured by precautions taken to minimize exposure and risk from COVID-19. The majority (86%) did not feel that personal protective equipment worn by staff impaired their experience, and 29% reported that their experience of attending for skin surgery during the lockdown period was more efficient and organized than on prepandemic visits. The vast majority (94%) of participants would opt to have AS again or had no strong preference for either suture type. Based on their experiences, most participants would have no concerns about attending for further skin surgery during the pandemic and would opt to have AS.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control , Dermatologic Surgical Procedures , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics/prevention & control , Sutures , United Kingdom/epidemiology
8.
Clin Dermatol ; 39(1): 23-32, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1300688

ABSTRACT

The first cases of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in Iran were detected on February 19, 2020. Soon the entire country was hit with the virus. Although dermatologists were not immediately the frontline health care workers, all aspects of their practice were drastically affected. Adapting to this unprecedented crisis required urgent appropriate responses. With preventive measures and conserving health care resources being the most essential priorities, dermatologists, as an integral part of the health system, needed to adapt their practices according to the latest guidelines. The spectrum of the challenges encompassed education, teledermatology, lasers, and other dermatologic procedures, as well as management of patients who were immunosuppressed or developed drug reactions and, most importantly, the newly revealed cutaneous signs of COVID-19. These challenges have paved the way for new horizons in dermatology.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Dermatology/standards , Hospitals, University , Skin Diseases/etiology , Skin Diseases/therapy , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/drug therapy , Cosmetic Techniques , Dermatitis/etiology , Dermatologic Surgical Procedures , Dermatology/education , Dermatology/methods , Dermoscopy , Drug Eruptions/etiology , Hand Dermatoses/etiology , Hand Disinfection , Humans , Internship and Residency , Iran/epidemiology , Laser Therapy , Personal Protective Equipment/adverse effects , Phototherapy , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Private Practice , SARS-CoV-2 , Skin Diseases/drug therapy , Telemedicine
14.
J Cosmet Dermatol ; 19(12): 3160-3165, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-894776

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) disease has rapidly spread worldwide with a multitude effects on daily life. Since the transmission risk increases with close contact, some cosmetic procedures are considered high risk and majority of them had to be postponed or canceled in private dermatocosmetology clinics especially during the heavy period of the outbreak. AIMS: We aimed to document the medical and socioeconomic problems emerged in dermatocosmetology clinics in Turkey caused by COVID-19 pandemic and to discuss the management strategies taken by dermatologists. PATIENTS/METHODS: This survey research was conducted with 100 dermatologists who work in private dermatocosmetology clinics. The survey included 38 questions about office re-arrangements including patient admission and office environment, safety precautions taken for cosmetic procedures, management of clinic staff, and financial impact of the pandemic. RESULTS: A remarkable decrease in major cosmetic interest was reported in private clinics; meanwhile, there was an increase in applicants for noncosmetic dermatological complaints. The most avoided cosmetic procedures were application of skin care devices, lasers, chemical peeling, and thread lifting, while botulinum toxin injection was the most performed procedure. Nearly half of the participants had severe financial damage. Of the participants, 55% reported that they worked anxiously during this period and 60% believed that they managed the early period of the pandemic successfully. CONCLUSION: Private dermatocosmetology clinics have to work in a totally different period that they have never experienced before. The pandemic has had serious impacts on both medical and socioeconomic issues which had to be managed carefully.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care Facilities/organization & administration , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cosmetic Techniques/economics , Dermatologic Surgical Procedures/economics , Infection Control/methods , Adult , Aged , Ambulatory Care Facilities/economics , Ambulatory Care Facilities/standards , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19 Testing , Cosmetic Techniques/statistics & numerical data , Cross-Sectional Studies , Dermatologic Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Facilities and Services Utilization , Female , Health Care Surveys , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Office Management , Pandemics/economics , SARS-CoV-2 , Socioeconomic Factors , Turkey/epidemiology
18.
J Cosmet Dermatol ; 19(12): 3189-3198, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-796059

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Doctors and healthcare workers (HCW) are at frontline in control of the pandemic caused by the novel coronavirus infection (COVID-19). The virus is transmitted by contact, droplet, and airborne transmission; hence, hand hygiene, social distancing, environmental disinfection, and use of appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) form important components to protect HCWs from cross-infection. Appropriate use of PPE is of paramount importance not only to reduce the risk of transmission but also to maintain adequate stock for those who are dealing directly with COVID-19 patients. AIMS: In this article, we aim to provide the rationale for appropriate use of PPE in the dermatology setting in the current scenario. We have also discussed the scientific evidence for use of each component of protection and the practical problems faced in our COVID referral tertiary hospital. METHODS: Our review was based on articles that have studied or analyzed the efficacy of various protective measures being utilized by health workers against spread of COVID-19. This was done by carrying out a PUBMED search with terms "coronavirus, COVID-19, personal protective equipment (PPE), transmission, mask, face shields, goggles, gloves." We also scrutinized the various pragmatic issues being faced by doctors in our setup while using PPE. RESULTS: In order to maximize the appropriate use of PPE, the rationale for use needs to be understood and problems encountered in daily practice need to be addressed. CONCLUSION: Adherence to protective measures and use of PPE is of utmost importance for HCWs to prevent cross-infection in this pandemic. The use of PPE can limit transmission to a great extent, but appropriate use and avoiding misuse is equally important in the dermatology setting in order to avoid depletion of stock. It is also essential to consider various practical issues with use of PPE and device measures to avoid them so that breach in protocols can be prevented and spread of infection minimized.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/transmission , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Dermatologic Surgical Procedures , Infection Control/methods , Personal Protective Equipment , Tertiary Care Centers/organization & administration , Asymptomatic Diseases , Dermatologic Surgical Procedures/standards , Humans , Medical Staff, Hospital , Referral and Consultation , SARS-CoV-2 , Tertiary Care Centers/standards
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