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3.
Indian J Dermatol Venereol Leprol ; 88(2): 148-149, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1744421
4.
Clin Rheumatol ; 41(5): 1271-1283, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1653525

ABSTRACT

Telemedicine encompasses a variety of modalities that allow for the remote assessment and treatment of patients. The technologies, services, and tools available for telemedicine in the USA are increasingly becoming an integral part of the healthcare system to bridge the gaps in care that can arise from geographic and/or socioeconomic obstacles and provider shortages. Telemedicine can be applied to a spectrum of clinical areas, including rheumatic diseases. Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a chronic, inflammatory, multisystem disease with predominately skin and joint manifestations. PsA is often misdiagnosed and/or undiagnosed, which can lead to worse patient outcomes, including irreversible joint erosion and damage. The difficulties in diagnosing and managing PsA are confounded by the emergence and increased use of telemedicine because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Telemedicine presents the opportunity to increase access to healthcare by rheumatologists and dermatologists to improve training and education regarding PsA and to decrease time attributed to office visits associated with PsA. However, challenges in diagnosing PsA without a thorough in-person physical examination by a trained rheumatologist or dermatologist exist. We provide an overview of the ways telemedicine can be incorporated into clinical care and optimized for patients with PsA; characteristic clinical features of PsA, with a focus on skin and joint signs and symptoms; screening tools to be used in routine clinical care; assessments that can be used to evaluate quality of life, functional ability, and disease activity in PsA; and resources and recommendations for the development of future telemedicine use in rheumatology and dermatology. Key Points • Patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) are often misdiagnosed and/or undiagnosed. • Telemedicine can improve access to healthcare by rheumatologists and dermatologists. • Telemedicine can be incorporated into clinical care and optimized for managing PsA.


Subject(s)
Arthritis, Psoriatic , COVID-19 , Dermatology , Psoriasis , Rheumatology , Telemedicine , Arthritis, Psoriatic/drug therapy , Arthritis, Psoriatic/therapy , Dermatologists , Humans , Pandemics , Psoriasis/diagnosis , Quality of Life , Rheumatologists
5.
Dermatol Online J ; 27(10)2021 Oct 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1643787

ABSTRACT

Social distancing requirements associated with the COVID-19 pandemic have allowed for the expansion of different healthcare delivery modalities. Namely, there has been an increase in the utilization of remote diagnostic services for both primary and specialist care. Dermatology care has traditionally been inaccessible to many pediatric patients; this is due in part to a limited number of practicing pediatric dermatologists, as well as a maldistribution of the pediatric dermatology workforce with the majority of providers located in large metropolitan areas. There is therefore a need for an accessible alternative for care to reach underserved patient populations. This commentary highlights evidence from recent studies on remote dermatology care (teledermatology) and how it has not only improved access to dermatologic care but also quality of care. Although teledermatology does not completely replace traditional in-person visits and is limited by poor broadband access in traditionally underserved areas, teledermatology can, in some instances, be a cost-effective and efficient alternative for pediatric patients otherwise lacking dermatologic care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Dermatologists/supply & distribution , Dermatology/methods , Health Services Accessibility , Telemedicine , Child , Child, Preschool , Dermatology/statistics & numerical data , Health Services Accessibility/statistics & numerical data , Healthcare Disparities/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Pediatricians/supply & distribution , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data
6.
Dermatol Online J ; 27(10)2021 Oct 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1643785

ABSTRACT

Teledermatology has been widely adopted during the COVID-19 pandemic as virtual patient care promotes social distancing and decreases viral exposure risk. As teledermatology has become more prominent during this period, it is essential to assess whether virtual visits allow for adequate patient care. To assess perceptions of advantages and disadvantages of teledermatology, a survey was sent to academic dermatologists through the Association of Professors of Dermatology (APD) listserv. Of the physicians surveyed, 94% reported their departments had implemented teledermatology during the COVID-19 pandemic. The majority (64%) described teledermatology as an effective tool for patient care because of improved access to care, decreased risk of COVID-19 exposure, and convenience. Frequently cited limitations of teledermatology were image quality, technical difficulties, and inability to perform a comprehensive skin examination. Thirty-seven percent of respondents reported teledermatology as a contributor to their professional burnout. Although teledermatology has become more prevalent as a result of the pandemic, its role moving forward is uncertain given its limitations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Dermatologists , Dermatology/methods , Pandemics , Telemedicine , Adult , Age Distribution , Aged , Burnout, Professional/etiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Computer Terminals/standards , Dermatologists/psychology , Dermatologists/statistics & numerical data , Dermatology/trends , Female , Health Care Surveys , Health Services Accessibility , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Physical Examination , Sex Distribution , Telemedicine/trends , Uncertainty
10.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(21)2021 Oct 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1488545

ABSTRACT

The present study aimed at assessing the consequences of prolonged exposure to COVID-19 distress on mental health in non-frontline health care workers. For this purpose, we have conducted a survey on 425 Italian dermatologists, in the period February-March 2021. The psychopathological symptoms, depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress symptoms (PTSD), as well as resilience, have been evaluated. The main factors that influence the physician's psychological health have been also investigated. Our study showed that the physicians older than 40 years, as well as those who lived this period in company, reported more personal resources, better managing the distress. Resilience, COVID-19 beliefs, COVID-19 working difficulties, and age were the common predictors of the severe psychopathological symptoms. An interesting result is that the lower level of resilience was the most powerful predictor of a more severe depression, as well as of a higher severity of generalized anxiety disorder, but not of COVID-19 PTSD. The fear of COVID-19 was the most powerful predictor of COVID-19 PTSD. Home conditions and previous SARS-CoV2 infection constituted significant predictors of severe depressive symptoms, but not of anxiety and COVID-19 PTSD. These results are useful in a better understanding of protective and risk factors involved in COVID-19 long-term distress exposure.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , Anxiety/epidemiology , Depression/epidemiology , Dermatologists , Health Personnel , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Mental Health , Pandemics , RNA, Viral , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology
12.
Saudi Med J ; 42(9): 1024-1030, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1395384

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To assess teledermatology (TD) perception among dermatologists in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia during the COVID-19 pandemic and to identify the most common advantages and disadvantages of TD. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional survey-based study to address Saudi dermatologist perceptions of TD from July 2020 to December 2020, during Covid-19 pandemic. RESULTS: Out of 664 emails sent, 107 complete responses were returned. Approximately 40.2% used TD through phone calls, followed by those who used a virtual clinic (32.7%). Also, the best way to use TD, according to respondents, was for triage before inpatient and outpatient visits. When we compared the use of TD in the outpatient and inpatient settings, outpatient responses always had more positive attitudes than inpatients. The most important benefit of TD is to reduce the risk of pandemic infections (69%). More than half of the participants sometimes used TD for diagnosis (n=63, 58.9%) and management (n=59, 55.1%), and 69 (64.5%) considered using it in the future. CONCLUSION: Our survey-based study indicates that TD is an important part in the future dermatology because our participants agreed that TD decreases cost, increases access to dermatology care, and reduces the risk of pandemic infections. And it is necessary to establish an infrastructure for TD that protects patient's privacy and ensures accurate diagnosis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dermatologists , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Pandemics , Perception , SARS-CoV-2 , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology
14.
J Cosmet Dermatol ; 20(10): 3066-3073, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1367344

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Major epidemic outbreaks create an increased demand for healthcare workers (HCWs) and pose increased health risk and psychological distress to them as well. AIM: The aim of this cross sectional study was to find out the prevalence of depression, anxiety and stress among Egyptian dermatologists and their possible predictor factors. PATIENTS/METHODS: A cross sectional study was designed and data were collected using structured self-administered online depression, anxiety, and stress scale (DASS-21). RESULTS: The depression scale of DASS was 18.98 ± 9.56 among which 38% of dermatologists had either severe or extremely severe depression and 34.2% complained of moderate depression. Meanwhile, the anxiety scale was 12.92 ± 7.75 and 35.4 % of surveyed dermatologists had either severe or extremely severe anxiety. Thirty three percent of dermatologists were normal on stress score. Female dermatologists possessed more significant depression and stress than males (19.70 ± 9.71 vs. 16.62 ± 8.68, p = 0.003; 21.42 ± 9.53 vs. 17.40 ± 8.49, p <0.001 respectively). On the contrary, male dermatologists expressed more anxiety than female dermatologists however this was not statistically significant (13.26 ± 7.99 vs. 12.82 ± 7.69, p = 0.625). CONCLUSION: To our knowledge, this is the first study to explore the differential impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on Egyptian dermatologists. Mental health care and support are of extreme importance to physicians mid this pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Dermatologists , Egypt/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Mental Health , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires
16.
Dermatol Online J ; 27(6)2021 Jun 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1357581

ABSTRACT

To investigate the extent to which dermatology programs use social media to connect with applicants, we conducted a search of all 140 residency programs on Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube. Our search revealed 74 (53%) Instagram, 21 (15%) Facebook, 20 (14%) Twitter, and four (3%) YouTube accounts for dermatology programs, with the number of Instagram accounts increasing five-fold from the end of 2019 to present. Our results demonstrate that conditions created during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic accelerated dermatology residency programs' acceptance of social media, particularly Instagram, as a means to communicate and share information with applicants.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Internship and Residency , Pandemics , Social Media/statistics & numerical data , Dermatologists/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Personnel Selection/methods , Personnel Selection/statistics & numerical data , Social Media/trends , Students, Medical/statistics & numerical data
18.
Dermatol Online J ; 27(6)2021 Jun 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1339681

ABSTRACT

Burnout in dermatology is on the rise, with 36% of U.S. dermatologists experiencing burnout in 2020. The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic may exacerbate this problem with healthcare workers reporting increased anxiety, depression, and insomnia. To assess the rate, severity, and causes of burnout before and during the pandemic, a survey was sent to academic dermatologists through the Association of Professors of Dermatology (APD) listserv and compared to a similar survey administered to the same population prior to the pandemic. Burnout rates have increased from 2018, with 53% of participants experiencing burnout once a week or more and 17% experiencing burnout daily during the pandemic. The most common COVID-related burnout factors involve uncertainty about the future, teledermatology, fear of exposing loved ones to COVID-19, and compensation reduction. The challenges posed by the COVID-19 pandemic compound existing burnout within dermatology, warranting consideration by academic institutions.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Dermatologists/psychology , Pandemics , Adult , Aged , Anxiety/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Depression/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Income , Male , Middle Aged , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires/statistics & numerical data , Telemedicine , Uncertainty
20.
Dermatol Ther ; 34(5): e15056, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1299126

ABSTRACT

As COVID-19 vaccination has started worldwide to control this pandemic, dermatologists may face various challenges with these new vaccines. In this manuscript, we review different types of available COVID-19 vaccines and their various production platforms. Vaccination considerations in patients with skin diseases, especially those using immunomodulatory drugs will be presented. Finally, adverse cutaneous reactions of COVID-19 vaccines will be reviewed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Vaccines , COVID-19 Vaccines , Dermatologists , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccines/adverse effects
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