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1.
Int J Dermatol ; 62(3): e108-e109, 2023 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2298491
2.
Am J Clin Dermatol ; 24(4): 541-556, 2023 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2295953

ABSTRACT

The current 2022 mpox (monkeypox) outbreak has been officially recognized as a public health emergency. The mpox clinical symptoms include high fever, fatigue, chills, headache, swollen lymph nodes, muscle aches, and a disseminated painful rash. However, recent cases of mpox have shown a shift in clinical symptoms, with anogenital skin lesions emerging as the predominant feature. Due to the predominant skin manifestations of mpox, dermatologists could be crucial in detecting new mpox cases and educating frontline healthcare professionals about mpox. The mpox virus is continuously evolving and has several variants. Genome sequencing has revealed that the Clade IIb variant is responsible for the 2022 mpox outbreak. Mpox spread may occur through animal-to-human and human-to-human transmission; however, unlike coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), long-range airborne transmission has not been reported. Healthcare professionals are at higher risk of becoming infected since they are usually in close contact with both the patients and potentially contaminated fomites (e.g., examination table, gowns, gloves). Both public and healthcare professionals should take preventive and avoidance measures to limit the spread. Mpox is usually self-limiting and may require only symptomatic treatment; however, it may cause severe complications in special populations such as immunocompromised individuals. For severe infection, clinicians may consider antiviral drugs (off-label), tecovirimat and brincidofovir, originally approved for smallpox treatment. Two smallpox vaccines, ACAM2000® and JYNNEOSTM, can be used as pre-exposure prophylaxis against mpox. JYNNEOSTM, which carries approval for mpox use, has less adverse effect potential than ACAM2000®, and may also be used as post-exposure prophylaxis, preferably within 4 days of exposure.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Monkeypox , Smallpox , Animals , Humans , Diagnosis, Differential , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/prevention & control , Dermatologists , COVID-19 Testing
3.
J Dtsch Dermatol Ges ; 21(3): 255-262, 2023 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2286128

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Cutaneous reactions following COVID-19 vaccination have been frequently described, whereas larger case series by dermatologists are lacking. This study assesses SARS-CoV-2 vaccination-associated skin reactions, severity, treatment, course, eliciting vaccines, allergy test results and tolerance to revaccination. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Single-institutional, non-interventional study of dermatologists assessing cutaneous manifestations in 83 patients in Germany. RESULTS: 93 reactions were presented. Manifestations clustered into immediate (n = 51, 54.8%) and delayed hypersensitivity reactions (n = 10, 10.8%), chronic inflammatory skin diseases (n = 13, 14.0%), reactivation of latent herpes virus infection (pityriasis rosea/herpes zoster; n = 9; 9.7%) and others (n = 10, 10.8%). Vaccination was associated with new (76.3%) - mostly hypersensitivity reactions - or exacerbation of known skin diseases (23.7%), in this case predominantly chronic inflammatory skin diseases. Reactions occurred primarily within the first week (72.8%) and after first vaccination (62.0%). Treatment was required in 83.9% and hospitalization in 19.4%. In 48.8% revaccination led to recurrence of the same reactions. Disease was ongoing at last consultation in 22.6%, primarily in chronic inflammatory skin diseases. Allergy tests were performed in 15 patients (18.1%) and resulted negative. CONCLUSIONS: It can be assumed that vaccination may trigger immune activation-related reactions especially in those patients predisposed to develop respective skin diseases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Hypersensitivity , Humans , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Dermatologists , Germany , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination/adverse effects
5.
Clin Exp Dermatol ; 48(4): 345-351, 2023 Mar 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2241159

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Dermatology faces a workforce crisis against a backdrop of wider medical education shifts towards generalism. A pivot towards generalism may have an impact on dermatology trainee professional identity, which, to our knowledge, has not been investigated and is known to have an impact on competence and conceptualization of ethics among physicians. Disruption because of the COVID-19 pandemic led to dermatology trainee redeployment and therefore presents a unique opportunity to examine dermatology trainee professional identity during times of pressure. AIM: To identify the impact of COVID-19 redeployment on dermatology trainee professional identity, the factors influencing identity and whether such factors affect trainees' perceptions about their future careers. METHODS: Ten trainees were purposively recruited to the study. Data were collected through semistructured interviews and were analysed phenomenologically using the template analysis method. Central and integrative themes were identified. RESULTS: Three central themes were identified: trainee identity and values; redeployment transitions; and future clarity. Three integrative themes were found: tribes; sense of purpose; and uncertainty. Trainees see competence and community as central to the dermatologist identity. Most trainees experienced a reaffirmation of their prior values, psychologically retreating to close-knit communities. However, some underwent disorienting dilemmas, later reflecting on their futures as dermatologists. CONCLUSION: Healthcare crises may have a significant impact on dermatology trainee professional identity and may lead to reaffirmation of prior tribal values or disorienting reflection upon future career trajectories. Improved support among diverse communities, minimization of uncertainty and fostering a sense of purpose among trainees may aid identity enrichment and safeguard the future dermatology consultant workforce.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dermatology , Humans , Dermatologists , Dermatology/education , Identity Crisis , Pandemics
6.
J Cosmet Dermatol ; 22(4): 1152-1156, 2023 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2238800

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has given rise to several new onset or exacerbated dermatologic disorders including vitiligo. AIM AND METHOD: Here, we present different aspects of relationship between SARS-CoV-2 infection or its associated vaccines and vitiligo and aim to provide solutions to overcome the potential challenges. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: In brief, as the benefits overweigh the risks and since vaccine-triggered de novo or flares of vitiligo are uncommon and benign, these patients are recommended to get SARS-CoV-2 vaccines. Moreover, in individuals with previously recognized vitiligo, who are at risk of developing SARS-CoV-2 infection or those who are currently infected, special dermatologic consultation is needed in order to balance the immunosuppressive agents in their therapeutic regimen to prevent COVID-related morbidity and mortality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hypopigmentation , Vaccines , Vitiligo , Humans , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , SARS-CoV-2 , Pandemics/prevention & control , Dermatologists
7.
Int J Dermatol ; 62(5): 583-588, 2023 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2192637

ABSTRACT

Despite reaching historical lows in the early 2000s, cases of both primary and secondary syphilis and congenital syphilis have increased dramatically in the U.S. over the last decade. In the U.S., the current syphilis epidemic is disproportionately impacting communities that have been historically underserved in medicine. These include men who have sex with men, especially those infected with HIV; people of color; and reproductive-age women with poor access to prenatal care. With syphilis now being more commonly diagnosed in non-STI than STI clinics in all genders, and since primary and secondary syphilis and congenital syphilis present with characteristic mucocutaneous manifestations, dermatologists are in a position to help reduce the advance of this preventable epidemic, by actively considering this diagnosis and incorporating syphilis screening into their practice. Herein, we delineate strategies by which dermatologists can contribute to this critical effort in their roles as clinicians, public health advocates, and researchers. In particular, we discuss the rapidly changing demographics of syphilis, nuances in serologic testing and treatment, strategies to increase public healthcare access and equity in these underserved populations, and research gaps in this field.


Subject(s)
HIV Infections , Sexual and Gender Minorities , Syphilis, Congenital , Syphilis , Pregnancy , Humans , Female , Male , Syphilis/diagnosis , Syphilis/epidemiology , Homosexuality, Male , HIV Infections/diagnosis , HIV Infections/epidemiology , Syphilis, Congenital/diagnosis , Syphilis, Congenital/epidemiology , Syphilis, Congenital/prevention & control , Dermatologists
11.
Indian J Dermatol Venereol Leprol ; 88(2): 148-149, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1744421
12.
Clin Rheumatol ; 41(5): 1271-1283, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1653525

ABSTRACT

Telemedicine encompasses a variety of modalities that allow for the remote assessment and treatment of patients. The technologies, services, and tools available for telemedicine in the USA are increasingly becoming an integral part of the healthcare system to bridge the gaps in care that can arise from geographic and/or socioeconomic obstacles and provider shortages. Telemedicine can be applied to a spectrum of clinical areas, including rheumatic diseases. Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a chronic, inflammatory, multisystem disease with predominately skin and joint manifestations. PsA is often misdiagnosed and/or undiagnosed, which can lead to worse patient outcomes, including irreversible joint erosion and damage. The difficulties in diagnosing and managing PsA are confounded by the emergence and increased use of telemedicine because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Telemedicine presents the opportunity to increase access to healthcare by rheumatologists and dermatologists to improve training and education regarding PsA and to decrease time attributed to office visits associated with PsA. However, challenges in diagnosing PsA without a thorough in-person physical examination by a trained rheumatologist or dermatologist exist. We provide an overview of the ways telemedicine can be incorporated into clinical care and optimized for patients with PsA; characteristic clinical features of PsA, with a focus on skin and joint signs and symptoms; screening tools to be used in routine clinical care; assessments that can be used to evaluate quality of life, functional ability, and disease activity in PsA; and resources and recommendations for the development of future telemedicine use in rheumatology and dermatology. Key Points • Patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) are often misdiagnosed and/or undiagnosed. • Telemedicine can improve access to healthcare by rheumatologists and dermatologists. • Telemedicine can be incorporated into clinical care and optimized for managing PsA.


Subject(s)
Arthritis, Psoriatic , COVID-19 , Dermatology , Psoriasis , Rheumatology , Telemedicine , Arthritis, Psoriatic/drug therapy , Arthritis, Psoriatic/therapy , Dermatologists , Humans , Pandemics , Psoriasis/diagnosis , Quality of Life , Rheumatologists
13.
Dermatol Online J ; 27(10)2021 Oct 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1643787

ABSTRACT

Social distancing requirements associated with the COVID-19 pandemic have allowed for the expansion of different healthcare delivery modalities. Namely, there has been an increase in the utilization of remote diagnostic services for both primary and specialist care. Dermatology care has traditionally been inaccessible to many pediatric patients; this is due in part to a limited number of practicing pediatric dermatologists, as well as a maldistribution of the pediatric dermatology workforce with the majority of providers located in large metropolitan areas. There is therefore a need for an accessible alternative for care to reach underserved patient populations. This commentary highlights evidence from recent studies on remote dermatology care (teledermatology) and how it has not only improved access to dermatologic care but also quality of care. Although teledermatology does not completely replace traditional in-person visits and is limited by poor broadband access in traditionally underserved areas, teledermatology can, in some instances, be a cost-effective and efficient alternative for pediatric patients otherwise lacking dermatologic care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Dermatologists/supply & distribution , Dermatology/methods , Health Services Accessibility , Telemedicine , Child , Child, Preschool , Dermatology/statistics & numerical data , Health Services Accessibility/statistics & numerical data , Healthcare Disparities/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Pediatricians/supply & distribution , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data
14.
Dermatol Online J ; 27(10)2021 Oct 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1643785

ABSTRACT

Teledermatology has been widely adopted during the COVID-19 pandemic as virtual patient care promotes social distancing and decreases viral exposure risk. As teledermatology has become more prominent during this period, it is essential to assess whether virtual visits allow for adequate patient care. To assess perceptions of advantages and disadvantages of teledermatology, a survey was sent to academic dermatologists through the Association of Professors of Dermatology (APD) listserv. Of the physicians surveyed, 94% reported their departments had implemented teledermatology during the COVID-19 pandemic. The majority (64%) described teledermatology as an effective tool for patient care because of improved access to care, decreased risk of COVID-19 exposure, and convenience. Frequently cited limitations of teledermatology were image quality, technical difficulties, and inability to perform a comprehensive skin examination. Thirty-seven percent of respondents reported teledermatology as a contributor to their professional burnout. Although teledermatology has become more prevalent as a result of the pandemic, its role moving forward is uncertain given its limitations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Dermatologists , Dermatology/methods , Pandemics , Telemedicine , Adult , Age Distribution , Aged , Burnout, Professional/etiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Computer Terminals/standards , Dermatologists/psychology , Dermatologists/statistics & numerical data , Dermatology/trends , Female , Health Care Surveys , Health Services Accessibility , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Physical Examination , Sex Distribution , Telemedicine/trends , Uncertainty
17.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(21)2021 Oct 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1488545

ABSTRACT

The present study aimed at assessing the consequences of prolonged exposure to COVID-19 distress on mental health in non-frontline health care workers. For this purpose, we have conducted a survey on 425 Italian dermatologists, in the period February-March 2021. The psychopathological symptoms, depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress symptoms (PTSD), as well as resilience, have been evaluated. The main factors that influence the physician's psychological health have been also investigated. Our study showed that the physicians older than 40 years, as well as those who lived this period in company, reported more personal resources, better managing the distress. Resilience, COVID-19 beliefs, COVID-19 working difficulties, and age were the common predictors of the severe psychopathological symptoms. An interesting result is that the lower level of resilience was the most powerful predictor of a more severe depression, as well as of a higher severity of generalized anxiety disorder, but not of COVID-19 PTSD. The fear of COVID-19 was the most powerful predictor of COVID-19 PTSD. Home conditions and previous SARS-CoV2 infection constituted significant predictors of severe depressive symptoms, but not of anxiety and COVID-19 PTSD. These results are useful in a better understanding of protective and risk factors involved in COVID-19 long-term distress exposure.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , Anxiety/epidemiology , Depression/epidemiology , Dermatologists , Health Personnel , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Mental Health , Pandemics , RNA, Viral , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology
19.
Saudi Med J ; 42(9): 1024-1030, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1395384

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To assess teledermatology (TD) perception among dermatologists in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia during the COVID-19 pandemic and to identify the most common advantages and disadvantages of TD. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional survey-based study to address Saudi dermatologist perceptions of TD from July 2020 to December 2020, during Covid-19 pandemic. RESULTS: Out of 664 emails sent, 107 complete responses were returned. Approximately 40.2% used TD through phone calls, followed by those who used a virtual clinic (32.7%). Also, the best way to use TD, according to respondents, was for triage before inpatient and outpatient visits. When we compared the use of TD in the outpatient and inpatient settings, outpatient responses always had more positive attitudes than inpatients. The most important benefit of TD is to reduce the risk of pandemic infections (69%). More than half of the participants sometimes used TD for diagnosis (n=63, 58.9%) and management (n=59, 55.1%), and 69 (64.5%) considered using it in the future. CONCLUSION: Our survey-based study indicates that TD is an important part in the future dermatology because our participants agreed that TD decreases cost, increases access to dermatology care, and reduces the risk of pandemic infections. And it is necessary to establish an infrastructure for TD that protects patient's privacy and ensures accurate diagnosis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dermatologists , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Pandemics , Perception , SARS-CoV-2 , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology
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