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1.
Hautarzt ; 73(3): 212-215, 2022 Mar.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1838290

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The advantages and disadvantages of the nationwide skin cancer screening which was introduced in 2008 are regularly discussed. OBJECTIVES: Do missed skin cancer screenings change the tumor depths? METHODS: Evaluation and analysis of office data from the second quarters of 2019, 2020 and 2021 were compared using the one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) with Welch's F test. RESULTS: There was a significant increase in the tumor thickness in squamous cell carcinoma and basal cell carcinoma, while there was only a tendency due to the small amount of data available for malignant melanoma. CONCLUSIONS: The results of the analysis emphasize the importance of the skin cancer screening as a method of early detection and reduction of mutilating operations and expensive immunotherapies by the prompt detection of malignant tumors.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Carcinoma, Basal Cell , Dermatology , Skin Neoplasms , COVID-19/epidemiology , Carcinoma, Basal Cell/diagnosis , Dermatology/methods , Early Detection of Cancer , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Skin Neoplasms/diagnosis , Skin Neoplasms/epidemiology , Skin Neoplasms/pathology
2.
Rev Med Chil ; 149(10): 1467-1472, 2021 Oct.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1760907

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The day after COVID-19 quarantine started, we initiated patient care through Tele-dermatology. AIM: To report the experience of the implementation of Telemedicine in dermatology and to assess its impact on the number of dermatological visits compared with the pre-pandemic period. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study was conducted between March 27th, 2020, and April 30th, 2020. All patients submitted clinical images of their skin condition via secure email before the telemedicine visit. All telemedicine visits were conducted using the Zoom video conferencing platform. Patient demographics and medical history were recorded. If the dermatologist was unable to reach a diagnosis, the patient was sent for an in-person visit, skin biopsy, or additional laboratory workup. RESULTS: We recorded 1,357 Tele dermatology visits from 1,222 patients aged 29 ± 18 years (38% males). Visits increased from 104 to 298 from the first to the last week, corresponding to 17% of the patient volume seen before the pandemic (1,709 in-person patients/week). A preliminary diagnosis was made in 95% of cases. Ninety percent of patients sent photos. Fifty eight percent of cases were chronic diseases, and were classified as inflammatory in 68%, infectious in 15%, neoplastic/tumoral in 7%, or other conditions in 11%. Less than 1% of these visits were COVID-19 related. CONCLUSIONS: In this prospective study of Tele-dermatology lasting five weeks, a preliminary diagnosis could be made in approximately 95% of cases and in the first five weeks of implementation, a volume of consultations equivalent to 17% of those made in the pre-pandemic period was carried out. Therefore, Tele-dermatology can be implemented quickly and successfully in practices when healthcare access is limited.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dermatology , Telemedicine , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Dermatology/methods , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Prospective Studies , Young Adult
3.
Dermatol Online J ; 27(10)2021 Oct 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1643787

ABSTRACT

Social distancing requirements associated with the COVID-19 pandemic have allowed for the expansion of different healthcare delivery modalities. Namely, there has been an increase in the utilization of remote diagnostic services for both primary and specialist care. Dermatology care has traditionally been inaccessible to many pediatric patients; this is due in part to a limited number of practicing pediatric dermatologists, as well as a maldistribution of the pediatric dermatology workforce with the majority of providers located in large metropolitan areas. There is therefore a need for an accessible alternative for care to reach underserved patient populations. This commentary highlights evidence from recent studies on remote dermatology care (teledermatology) and how it has not only improved access to dermatologic care but also quality of care. Although teledermatology does not completely replace traditional in-person visits and is limited by poor broadband access in traditionally underserved areas, teledermatology can, in some instances, be a cost-effective and efficient alternative for pediatric patients otherwise lacking dermatologic care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Dermatologists/supply & distribution , Dermatology/methods , Health Services Accessibility , Telemedicine , Child , Child, Preschool , Dermatology/statistics & numerical data , Health Services Accessibility/statistics & numerical data , Healthcare Disparities/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Pediatricians/supply & distribution , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data
4.
Dermatol Online J ; 27(10)2021 Oct 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1643785

ABSTRACT

Teledermatology has been widely adopted during the COVID-19 pandemic as virtual patient care promotes social distancing and decreases viral exposure risk. As teledermatology has become more prominent during this period, it is essential to assess whether virtual visits allow for adequate patient care. To assess perceptions of advantages and disadvantages of teledermatology, a survey was sent to academic dermatologists through the Association of Professors of Dermatology (APD) listserv. Of the physicians surveyed, 94% reported their departments had implemented teledermatology during the COVID-19 pandemic. The majority (64%) described teledermatology as an effective tool for patient care because of improved access to care, decreased risk of COVID-19 exposure, and convenience. Frequently cited limitations of teledermatology were image quality, technical difficulties, and inability to perform a comprehensive skin examination. Thirty-seven percent of respondents reported teledermatology as a contributor to their professional burnout. Although teledermatology has become more prevalent as a result of the pandemic, its role moving forward is uncertain given its limitations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Dermatologists , Dermatology/methods , Pandemics , Telemedicine , Adult , Age Distribution , Aged , Burnout, Professional/etiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Computer Terminals/standards , Dermatologists/psychology , Dermatologists/statistics & numerical data , Dermatology/trends , Female , Health Care Surveys , Health Services Accessibility , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Physical Examination , Sex Distribution , Telemedicine/trends , Uncertainty
5.
JNMA J Nepal Med Assoc ; 59(243): 1094-1097, 2021 Nov 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1605596

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Teledermatology provides virtual consultation to patients using telecommunication technology. Using this method dermatologists can diagnose a condition with the help of pictures of the lesions and short history. During the COVID-19 pandemic, practicing this method has become more relevant. Providing teleconsultations to patients with fungal skin infections can prevent inadvertent use of topical corticosteroids. The objective of this study was to find the prevalence of fungal infections among teledermatology consultations done in a tertiary care hospital. METHODS: It was a descriptive cross-sectional study where the store and forward and real-time methods were used between February 2020 to July 2020. Ethical clearance was taken from the institutional review board (reference number: 245). Data of those patients who wanted consultations from this department were sent by medical officers deployed in military hospitals that are under the central army hospital located in Kathmandu. Convenient sampling was used. The collected data was entered and analyzed in the Statistical Package of Social Sciences version 20. Point estimate at 95% Confidence Interval was calculated along with frequency and percentage for binary data. RESULTS: A total of 451 (33.45%) (30.93-35.97 at 95% Confidence Interval) were diagnosed with fungal infections out of 1348 patients who were enrolled for the study. About 361 (80%) of the patients suffering from fungal infections belonged to the Terai region and 90 (20%) belonged to mountainous areas. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of fungal infection among teledermatology consultation was lower than the findings from a similar international study.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dermatology , Mycoses , Cross-Sectional Studies , Dermatology/methods , Humans , Pandemics , Referral and Consultation , SARS-CoV-2 , Tertiary Care Centers
15.
Clin Dermatol ; 39(1): 23-32, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1300688

ABSTRACT

The first cases of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in Iran were detected on February 19, 2020. Soon the entire country was hit with the virus. Although dermatologists were not immediately the frontline health care workers, all aspects of their practice were drastically affected. Adapting to this unprecedented crisis required urgent appropriate responses. With preventive measures and conserving health care resources being the most essential priorities, dermatologists, as an integral part of the health system, needed to adapt their practices according to the latest guidelines. The spectrum of the challenges encompassed education, teledermatology, lasers, and other dermatologic procedures, as well as management of patients who were immunosuppressed or developed drug reactions and, most importantly, the newly revealed cutaneous signs of COVID-19. These challenges have paved the way for new horizons in dermatology.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Dermatology/standards , Hospitals, University , Skin Diseases/etiology , Skin Diseases/therapy , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/drug therapy , Cosmetic Techniques , Dermatitis/etiology , Dermatologic Surgical Procedures , Dermatology/education , Dermatology/methods , Dermoscopy , Drug Eruptions/etiology , Hand Dermatoses/etiology , Hand Disinfection , Humans , Internship and Residency , Iran/epidemiology , Laser Therapy , Personal Protective Equipment/adverse effects , Phototherapy , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Private Practice , SARS-CoV-2 , Skin Diseases/drug therapy , Telemedicine
16.
J Invest Dermatol ; 141(7): 1615-1621.e1, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1274328

ABSTRACT

The scientific process depends on social interactions: communication and dissemination of research findings, evaluation and discussion of scientific work, and collaboration with other scientists. Social media, and specifically, Twitter has accelerated the ability to accomplish these goals. We discuss the ways that Twitter is used by scientists and provide guidance on navigating the academic Twitter community.


Subject(s)
Biomedical Research/methods , Communication , Information Dissemination , Social Media , Dermatology/methods , Humans , Research Personnel
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