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2.
JAMA Dermatol ; 157(3): 330-337, 2021 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1453488

ABSTRACT

Importance: Shared decision-making (SDM) can improve the quality of care for patients. The extent to which this tool has been used and the evidence supporting its use in dermatology have not been systematically examined. Objective: To perform a scoping review of the literature regarding SDM in dermatology. Evidence Review: Searches of Ovid MEDLINE, PsycINFO, PsycARTICLES, Sciverse Scopus, and EBM Reviews were conduced on July 11, 2019, and March 6, 2020. There were no limits on date, type of article, language, or subject for the initial search. A total of 1673 titles and abstracts were screened by 2 independent reviewers in the Covidence mixed-methods platform. Forty-one full-text studies were assessed for eligibility. For inclusion, articles needed to include a dermatologic diagnosis as well as discussion of SDM or patient decision aids. Two independent reviewers screened 29 full-text articles for inclusion and extracted qualitative data using a set of 26 predefined codes. Qualitative coding was applied to excerpts to categorize the article, define and describe advantages and disadvantages of SDM, understand patient and physician requests for SDM, and discuss methods of implementation. Findings: Despite a small number of articles on SDM (n = 29) in dermatology, the selected literature provided consistent messages regarding the importance of SDM for dermatology and a number of strategies and tools for implementation. Medical dermatology was the most common subspecialty studied, with melanoma, psoriasis, and connective tissue diseases most examined. Only 5 publications introduced SDM tools specifically for dermatologic conditions; of these, only 2 tools were validated. Barriers to implementation that were cited included time and a lack of training for clinicians, although the literature also provided potential solutions to these issues. All articles emphasized the value of SDM for both patients and physicians. Conclusions and Relevance: The literature regarding SDM in dermatology consistently suggests that it is a useful tool for providing patient-centered care. Established tools have been proposed since 2012. More research is needed to implement better practices, especially in dermatologic subspecialties. However, there are substantial suggestions from the literature for strategies and tools with which to begin a shared decision-making practice.


Subject(s)
Decision Making, Shared , Dermatology/standards , Quality of Health Care , Humans , Patient-Centered Care/standards , Skin Diseases/therapy
4.
Dermatol Clin ; 39(4): 587-597, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1343177

ABSTRACT

The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on dermatology practice cannot be overstated. At its peak, the pandemic resulted in the temporary closure of ambulatory sites as resources were reallocated towards pandemic response efforts. Many outpatient clinics have since reopened and are beginning to experience a semblance of pre-pandemic routine, albeit with restrictions in place. We provide an overview of how COVID-19 has affected dermatology practice globally beginning with the rise of teledermatology. A summary of expert recommendations that shape the "new normal" in various domains of dermatology practice, namely, dermatology consultation, procedural dermatology, and phototherapy, is also provided.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care Facilities/trends , Dermatology/standards , Primary Health Care/trends , Skin Diseases/therapy , Telemedicine/trends , COVID-19/epidemiology , Dermatology/trends , Health Services Accessibility/trends , Humans , Office Visits/trends , Skin Diseases/epidemiology
5.
Clin Dermatol ; 39(1): 23-32, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1300688

ABSTRACT

The first cases of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in Iran were detected on February 19, 2020. Soon the entire country was hit with the virus. Although dermatologists were not immediately the frontline health care workers, all aspects of their practice were drastically affected. Adapting to this unprecedented crisis required urgent appropriate responses. With preventive measures and conserving health care resources being the most essential priorities, dermatologists, as an integral part of the health system, needed to adapt their practices according to the latest guidelines. The spectrum of the challenges encompassed education, teledermatology, lasers, and other dermatologic procedures, as well as management of patients who were immunosuppressed or developed drug reactions and, most importantly, the newly revealed cutaneous signs of COVID-19. These challenges have paved the way for new horizons in dermatology.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Dermatology/standards , Hospitals, University , Skin Diseases/etiology , Skin Diseases/therapy , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/drug therapy , Cosmetic Techniques , Dermatitis/etiology , Dermatologic Surgical Procedures , Dermatology/education , Dermatology/methods , Dermoscopy , Drug Eruptions/etiology , Hand Dermatoses/etiology , Hand Disinfection , Humans , Internship and Residency , Iran/epidemiology , Laser Therapy , Personal Protective Equipment/adverse effects , Phototherapy , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Private Practice , SARS-CoV-2 , Skin Diseases/drug therapy , Telemedicine
8.
Cutis ; 107(4): E37-E39, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1239181

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic resulted in profound changes to most facets of medical practice. The field of dermatology has adapted by rapidly incorporating teledermatology as a means of evaluating, treating, and staying connected with our patients. Broader dermatology access, convenience to patients, and value to payers are benefits to this rapidly evolving practice model and suggest that teledermatology will be a part of day-to-day practice even as the worst of the pandemic is behind us. This interview provides one recent dermatology resident graduate's experiences incorporating teledermatology into his practice model and provides advice for future residents on preparing to do the same.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Remote Consultation/methods , Skin Diseases/therapy , Telemedicine/methods , COVID-19/epidemiology , Dermatology/standards , Humans
9.
J Drugs Dermatol ; 20(4): 374-378, 2021 Apr 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1184134

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Recent reports have surfaced from the United States Food and Drug Administration hearings in December 2020 regarding the COVID-19 vaccines and study participants who developed facial and/or lip swelling after receiving the newly developed drug. Despite an incidence rate of 0.02% in the vaccine arm of the Moderna mRNA-1273 trial, concerns have been expressed about the association of adverse reactions following soft tissue filler injections and the COVID-19 vaccines. The International Society for Dermatologic and Aesthetic Surgery (ISDS) understands these concerns and has designed the following study. METHODS: A global survey was designed to capture the incidence of adverse events related to: (1) previous soft tissue filler injections, (2) soft tissue filler injections during positive testing for COVID-19, and (3) soft tissue filler injections during and after receiving any of the COVID-19 vaccines globally available. RESULTS: The information of 106 survey participants from 18 different countries was analyzed. 80.2% (n=85) never experienced any adverse reaction following their soft tissue filler injection whereas 15.1% (n=16) experienced swelling and 4.7% (n=5) experienced pain that lasted longer than two days. Of those who received at least one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine (n=78), 94.9% reported not to have experienced any adverse reaction related to their previous soft tissue filler injection, whereas 5.1% (n=4) reported to have perceived pain that lasted longer than two days. CONCLUSION: The data collected does not support the concern for an increased risk of developing adverse reactions following soft tissue filler injections associated with the COVID-19 vaccines compared to that risk associated with other previously described triggers or the default risk following soft tissue filler injections. J Drugs Dermatol. 20(4):374-378. doi:10.36849/JDD.2021.6041.


Subject(s)
Biocompatible Materials/adverse effects , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , Dermatology/standards , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Edema/epidemiology , Edema/etiology , Face , Female , Humans , Incidence , Lip/pathology , Male , Middle Aged , Surgery, Plastic , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
11.
Arch Dermatol Res ; 313(9): 769-772, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1009128

ABSTRACT

Teledermatology has become critical for maintaining patient access to dermatologic services since the eruption of the COVID-19 pandemic. This survey of first-time synchronous teledermatology patients (n = 100) seen by providers of the University of Mississippi Medical Center during Spring 2020 was designed to learn more about patient experiences associated with the technical challenges of synchronous teledermatology. Our patient population had considerable experience with various social media including Facebook (82%) and hardware platforms, such as Apple devices (66%). We found that the majority of patients were satisfied (88.9%) with their synchronous teledermatology encounter and 81.8% of patients did not experience a technical difficulty with their consult. About 15% of patients lost connection with their provider during their consultation. Furthermore, about 30% of patients rated "showing their skin" to their provider as "hardest" on a ten scale. However, about 34% of patients sent "store-and-forward"-type images to supplement their encounter. Despite overwhelming satisfaction with synchronous teledermatology, a majority prefer an in-person consultation for their next visit (68.7%). Synchronous teledermatology offers a critical service to patients to expand access to specialty consultation. It is well-received by patients despite technical barriers, especially during a global health crisis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dermatology/methods , SARS-CoV-2 , Skin Diseases/diagnosis , Telemedicine/standards , Attitude , Data Collection , Dermatology/standards , Humans , Patient Satisfaction
13.
Int J Dermatol ; 59(12): 1437-1449, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-892266

ABSTRACT

Numerous unexplained pneumonia cases were reported to the World Health Organization (WHO) by Wuhan, China, in December 2020. Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2), a zoonotic pathogen, came into sight, spreading coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) all over the globe. Association of cutaneous signs and symptoms with COVID-19 is being studied worldwide, principally, to determine if these dermatoses can help in early recognition of SARS-CoV-2 infection. These dermatological manifestations can range from erythematous rash, urticaria to livedo reticularis, and acrocyanosis in patients of all age groups. Correspondingly, dermatologists treating COVID-19 patients, suffering from inflammatory dermatoses, with biologics or immunomodulators should exert caution and use specific protocols to adjust the doses of these medications. Prevention of person-to-person transmission of COVID-19 is being promoted universally, with the use of personal protective equipment (PPE), hand washes, and hand sanitizers around the clock. However, an array of cutaneous adverse effects such as contact dermatitis, irritant contact dermatitis, friction blisters, contact urticaria, acne, and infections are associated with the use of PPE. Extra-pulmonary manifestations of COVID-19 are still emerging in the community, and physicians and researchers are working together globally to strengthen the clinical management of these patients. Cases of COVID-19 continue to rise across the world, and an unprecedented approach has been taken to develop effective vaccines and therapeutic strategies against existing and forthcoming mutagenic strains of SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Dermatitis, Contact/epidemiology , Dermatology/trends , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Skin Diseases, Infectious/epidemiology , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , COVID-19 , Communicable Disease Control/instrumentation , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Communicable Disease Control/standards , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Dermatitis, Contact/diagnosis , Dermatitis, Contact/etiology , Dermatology/standards , Hand Hygiene/standards , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Personal Protective Equipment/adverse effects , Personal Protective Equipment/standards , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Skin Diseases, Infectious/diagnosis , Skin Diseases, Infectious/virology
20.
Australas J Dermatol ; 62(1): 27-36, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-748609

ABSTRACT

As the world tries to grapple with the COVID-19 pandemic, dermatologists are left in a lurch as there is a lacuna in dermatologic literature as well as training regarding the cutaneous manifestations of varied viral agents capable of causing epidemics/pandemics or the potential to be bio-weaponised. Such outbreaks have the potential to become a pandemic given this age of globalisation. The quote by George Santayana stands true 'Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it'. Thus, this article lends a perspective to the recent viral outbreaks and is aimed at summarising these agents and their clinical features to serve as a quick reference for dermatologists.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Testing , COVID-19/complications , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Skin Diseases, Viral/pathology , Biopsy , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/pathology , Dermatology/standards , Diagnosis, Differential , Disease Management , Early Diagnosis , Humans , Skin Diseases, Viral/diagnosis
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