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1.
Dermatol Online J ; 27(10)2021 Oct 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1643785

ABSTRACT

Teledermatology has been widely adopted during the COVID-19 pandemic as virtual patient care promotes social distancing and decreases viral exposure risk. As teledermatology has become more prominent during this period, it is essential to assess whether virtual visits allow for adequate patient care. To assess perceptions of advantages and disadvantages of teledermatology, a survey was sent to academic dermatologists through the Association of Professors of Dermatology (APD) listserv. Of the physicians surveyed, 94% reported their departments had implemented teledermatology during the COVID-19 pandemic. The majority (64%) described teledermatology as an effective tool for patient care because of improved access to care, decreased risk of COVID-19 exposure, and convenience. Frequently cited limitations of teledermatology were image quality, technical difficulties, and inability to perform a comprehensive skin examination. Thirty-seven percent of respondents reported teledermatology as a contributor to their professional burnout. Although teledermatology has become more prevalent as a result of the pandemic, its role moving forward is uncertain given its limitations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Dermatologists , Dermatology/methods , Pandemics , Telemedicine , Adult , Age Distribution , Aged , Burnout, Professional/etiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Computer Terminals/standards , Dermatologists/psychology , Dermatologists/statistics & numerical data , Dermatology/trends , Female , Health Care Surveys , Health Services Accessibility , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Physical Examination , Sex Distribution , Telemedicine/trends , Uncertainty
2.
J Dermatol Sci ; 104(3): 185-192, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1509987

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Since 2014, universal varicella vaccination has reduced the varicella and herpes zoster (HZ) incidence in vaccine recipients and increased the incidence in the child-rearing generation until 2017. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to understand the future epidemiologic trends of HZ after the disappearance of varicella epidemics and during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. METHODS: The Miyazaki Dermatologist Society has been monitoring and analyzing the incidence of HZ patients after universal vaccination since 1997. RESULTS: The HZ incidence in Oka varicella vaccine recipients aged 0-4 years decreased with the reduction in chickenpox incidence. The HZ incidence among those aged 5-9 years increased between 2015 and 2017 and decreased thereafter. From 2014-2020, the HZ incidence continued to increase to 36.6%, 51.3%, 70.2%, 56.7%, and 27.3% among those aged 10-19, 20-29, 30-39, 40-49, and 50-59 years, respectively. The HZ incidence in patients aged ≥ 60 years increased by 2.3% annually from 2014 to 2020, corresponding to an annual 2% increase since 1997, and was unaffected by varicella epidemics. COVID-19 infection control measures, lifestyle changes and the resulting stress did not affect the HZ incidence in 2020. CONCLUSION: Universal varicella vaccination eliminated varicella epidemics, and HZ was reduced in vaccine recipients. The HZ incidence for those aged 10-59 years increased from 2014 to 2020, in contrast to those aged ≥ 60 years, which is attributable to booster immunity expiration due to varicella contact in this age group.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Chickenpox Vaccine/therapeutic use , Herpes Zoster/epidemiology , Herpes Zoster/prevention & control , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Chickenpox/prevention & control , Child , Child, Preschool , Dermatology/trends , Female , Health Behavior , Humans , Immunization Programs , Incidence , Life Style , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Vaccination , Young Adult
3.
Actas Dermosifiliogr (Engl Ed) ; 112(4): 324-329, 2021 Apr.
Article in English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1384815

ABSTRACT

The use and acceptance of teledermatology increased more in the last 2 months of the recent lockdown owing to coronavirus disease 2019 than in the preceding 20 years. This sudden popularity -even among the greatest skeptics- was driven by the need to offer solutions to patients in both public and private settings who suddenly found themselves unable to access in-person dermatological care. Even departments already offering an asynchronous, store-and-forward teledermatology service were obliged to create new systems to support direct interaction between specialists and patients (the direct-to-consumer model). This article suggests some practical ways to implement TD safely and to expedite and optimize teleconsultations; these ideas are not just applicable to a pandemic situation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dermatology/trends , Skin Diseases , Telemedicine/trends , Humans , Pandemics
4.
Dermatol Clin ; 39(4): 587-597, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1343177

ABSTRACT

The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on dermatology practice cannot be overstated. At its peak, the pandemic resulted in the temporary closure of ambulatory sites as resources were reallocated towards pandemic response efforts. Many outpatient clinics have since reopened and are beginning to experience a semblance of pre-pandemic routine, albeit with restrictions in place. We provide an overview of how COVID-19 has affected dermatology practice globally beginning with the rise of teledermatology. A summary of expert recommendations that shape the "new normal" in various domains of dermatology practice, namely, dermatology consultation, procedural dermatology, and phototherapy, is also provided.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care Facilities/trends , Dermatology/standards , Primary Health Care/trends , Skin Diseases/therapy , Telemedicine/trends , COVID-19/epidemiology , Dermatology/trends , Health Services Accessibility/trends , Humans , Office Visits/trends , Skin Diseases/epidemiology
5.
J Am Acad Dermatol ; 86(2): 414-422, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1333530

ABSTRACT

The Janus kinase-signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK-STAT) intracellular signaling pathway is implicated in the pathogenesis of a number of inflammatory dermatoses. Clinical trials and other studies have demonstrated the efficacy of JAK inhibitors in the treatment of a variety of dermatologic conditions. Here we review JAK inhibitors currently under investigation for the treatment of alopecia areata, vitiligo, sarcoidosis, necrobiosis lipoidica, granuloma annulare, and systemic lupus erythematosus with a special emphasis on safety and the implications of JAK inhibitors during the novel coronavirus 2019 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Dermatology , Janus Kinase Inhibitors , Skin Diseases/drug therapy , COVID-19 , Dermatology/trends , Humans , Janus Kinase Inhibitors/therapeutic use
8.
Dermatol Clin ; 39(4): 619-625, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1252648

ABSTRACT

In this article, we discuss the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on various areas of global health dermatology, including patient care, neglected tropical diseases, education, and collaborations. Information was collected from literature review and informal interviews with more than 20 dermatologists from around the world. Many of the setbacks and hardships experienced by the global health community in the last year highlight long-standing global interdependencies and systems that perpetuate ethnic, economic, and social inequalities on local and global scales. The pandemic has brought discussions on global health colonialism and domestic health inequality to the forefront.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Dermatology/trends , Global Health , Health Status Disparities , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Skin Diseases/therapy , Social Problems , Socioeconomic Factors
10.
Am J Clin Dermatol ; 22(4): 467-475, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1174044

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has fundamentally transformed the landscape of providing dermatologic care. In an age of lockdowns and social distancing, teledermatology (TD) has emerged as a powerful tool to deliver remote care. Here, we review literature on TD use during the pandemic to evaluate the positives and negatives of TD implementation. We especially consider the reception of TD in underserved communities and the developing world as well as the ethico-legal challenges wrought by the burgeoning utilization of this new paradigm of care. The potential of TD to occupy a more prominent role in dermatologic care in a post-COVID-19 world is also discussed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Dermatology/trends , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Telemedicine/trends , Humans , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2
11.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep ; 21(4): 26, 2021 03 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1155324

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This article aims to summarize some recent trends in occupational allergic contact dermatitis (ACD), including dermatitis related to pandemic-level personal protective equipment in healthcare workers, hazards patients may experience when working from home, and occupational perspectives on the recent American Contact Dermatitis Society (ACDS) allergens of the year and ACDS Core Allergen Series updates. RECENT FINDINGS: Recent ACDS Allergens of the Year may be particularly relevant to healthcare workers, including isobornyl acrylate, which is present in glucose sensors and propylene glycol present in hand cleansers and disinfectants. Lavender, limonene, and linalool, all of which are new additions to the ACDS Core Allergen Series, have been reported as causes for occupational ACD in massage therapists and aromatherapists. Isothiazolinone allergy continues to rise in both consumer and occupational settings. Finally, the COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in a wave of occupational ACD in healthcare workers to personal protective equipment, and revealed new potential allergens for individuals working from home. Occupational allergic contact dermatitis continues to exert a significant occupational disease burden. Remaining aware of the current trends in allergens may allow for earlier recognition, diagnosis, and treatment, subsequently helping our patients to work in healthier and safer environments.


Subject(s)
Allergens/adverse effects , COVID-19/epidemiology , Dermatitis, Allergic Contact/diagnosis , Dermatitis, Occupational/diagnosis , Acrylates , Acyclic Monoterpenes/adverse effects , Allergy and Immunology/trends , Camphanes , Dermatitis, Occupational/etiology , Dermatology/trends , Health Personnel , Humans , Lavandula/adverse effects , Limonene/adverse effects , Pandemics , Patch Tests/adverse effects , Propylene Glycol , Societies, Medical , United States
12.
Clin Exp Dermatol ; 46(3): 419, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1150109
13.
Pediatr Dermatol ; 38(2): 364-370, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1142960

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVE: In spring 2020, high numbers of children presented with acral pernio-like skin rashes, concurrent with the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Understanding their clinical characteristics/ infection status may provide prognostic information and facilitate decisions about management. METHODS: A pediatric-specific dermatology registry was created by the Pediatric Dermatology COVID-19 Response Task Force of the Society for Pediatric Dermatology (SPD) and Pediatric Dermatology Research Alliance (PeDRA) and was managed by Children's Hospital of Philadelphia using REDCap. RESULTS: Data from 378 children 0-18 years entered into the registry between April 13 and July 17, 2020 were analyzed. Data were drawn from a standardized questionnaire completed by clinicians which asked for demographics, description of acral lesions, symptoms before and after acral changes, COVID-19 positive contacts, treatment, duration of skin changes, laboratory testing including SARS-CoV-2 PCR and antibody testing, as well as histopathology. 229 (60.6%) were male with mean age of 13.0 years (± 3.6 years). Six (1.6%) tested positive for SARS-CoV-2. Pedal lesions (often with pruritus and/or pain) were present in 96%. 30% (114/378) had COVID-19 symptoms during the 30 days prior to presentation. Most (69%) had no other symptoms and an uneventful course with complete recovery. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Children with acral pernio-like changes were healthy and all recovered with no short-term sequelae. We believe these acral changes are not just a temporal epiphenomenon of shelter in place during the spring months of the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic and may be a late phase reaction that needs further study.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dermatology/trends , Pediatrics/trends , Skin Diseases/epidemiology , Adolescent , Child , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Philadelphia , Registries
14.
Dermatol Ther ; 33(6): e14136, 2020 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1140163

ABSTRACT

The aim of this study was to evaluate the changing trends in dermatology clinical practice at a tertiary center during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. This retrospective cohort study was conducted on patients who were admitted to Ufuk University Hospital with dermatologic complaints/diseases before and during the pandemic. The patients were divided into two groups: (a) the pre-pandemic period (March-May 2019) and (b) the Pandemic period (March-May 2020). Demographic features, clinical characteristics, dermatologic diseases/complaints, dermatologic procedures/interventions, hospitalization rate, and use of biologic agents were compared between the two groups. Total number of hospital admissions have decreased from 1165 to 717. Admission rates for acne, dermatophytosis, and benign neoplasm of the skin significantly lower during the pandemic period (P values were .02, .04, and .006, respectively). Contact dermatitis, acne accompanying dermatitis, cicatricial hair loss, lichen planus, and zona zoster infection rates were significantly higher (P values were .007, <.001, .009, .04, and .03, respectively). Rates of biopsy and electrocautery procedures were decreased significantly (P values were <.001 and .002, respectively). The hospitalization rate was similar between the groups (P = .51). However, the use of biologic agents significantly decreased during the pandemic period (P = .01). Updated clinical protocols should be established for the new normal period in accordance with these findings.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dermatologists/trends , Dermatology/trends , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/trends , Skin Diseases/therapy , Tertiary Care Centers/trends , Adult , Aged , Biological Products/therapeutic use , Biopsy/trends , Electrocoagulation/trends , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Admission/trends , Retrospective Studies , Skin Diseases/diagnosis , Skin Diseases/etiology , Time Factors , Turkey/epidemiology , Young Adult
15.
Dermatol Ther ; 33(6): e14096, 2020 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1140159

ABSTRACT

As an increasing number of COVID-19 cases, there were changes in the number of patients who attended the dermatology outpatient clinics. We aimed to investigate the change profiles of dermatologic diseases in the first and second months of the COVID-19 pandemic in Turkey by comparing with the corresponding period of the previous year. The total number and diagnosis of patients, who attended a tertiary care hospital for the dermatology outpatient clinic between 1 April 2020 and 31 May 2020, were included in this study. These data were compared with the corresponding period of the previous year. The percentage of the patients with scabies, contact dermatitis, psoriasis, pityriasis rosea, urticaria, and alopecia areata were statistically significantly increased a month after the occurrence of the COVID-19 pandemic, while the percentage of patients with scabies, alopecia areata, telogen effluvium, acne vulgaris, and xerosis cutis were statistically significantly increased 2 months after the occurrence of the COVID-19 pandemic (P < 0.05). An increase in the number of certain diseases such as urticaria and pityriasis rosea may indicate the risk of asymptomatic COVID-19 carriage in these patients. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and/or antibody-based further studies should be performed to explore whether certain dermatologic diseases are related to asymptomatic COVID-19 cases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dermatology/trends , Outpatient Clinics, Hospital/trends , Skin Diseases/epidemiology , Humans , Retrospective Studies , Skin Diseases/diagnosis , Skin Diseases/therapy , Time Factors , Turkey/epidemiology
17.
Rev Med Inst Mex Seguro Soc ; 59(1): 1-3, 2021 Feb 02.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1119706

ABSTRACT

There is no doubt that nobody was prepared for the changes we have been experiencing since the SARS-CoV 2 emerged in China. The occupation of hospitals to deal with this pandemic has raised the implementation of telemedicine to continue monitoring chronic diseases, and dermatology has not been the exception. Likewise, the training of specialists must continue, so digital education is more than ever a useful tool, but also a challenge for our specialty in which direct visualization of the dermatological lesions is often necessary.


Sin duda nadie estaba preparado para los cambios que hemos experimentado a partir de que surgió el SARS-CoV-2 en China. La ocupación de los hospitales para hacer frente a esta pandemia ha planteado la implementación de telemedicina para continuar con la vigilancia de enfermedades crónicas, y la dermatología no ha sido la excepción. Así mismo, la formación de especialistas tiene que continuar, por lo cual la educación digital se ha vuelto una posibilidad, pero también un reto para nuestra especialidad, en la que la visualización directa de las lesiones es muchas veces necesaria.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Dermatology/trends , SARS-CoV-2 , Skin Diseases , Telemedicine/methods , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Mexico , Pandemics , Remote Consultation , Skin Diseases/diagnosis , Skin Diseases/therapy , Virtual Reality
19.
Dermatol Online J ; 26(12)2020 Dec 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1017550

ABSTRACT

Owing to the COVID-19 outbreak, the use of telemedicine applications has increased throughout the United States. Using an algorithm to analyze mobile application rankings, we were able to examine how applications with telemedicine services have increased in prevalence and rank pre- and post- COVID-19. Telemedicine apps saw an increase of 210.92 ranked positions on average. Within US telehealth, skin conditions have become the fifth most common diagnosis. Widespread use of teledermatology has been well-accepted. Dermatologists and patients report high satisfaction using teledermatology during COVID-19 and intend to continue using these services in the future. COVID-19 has assisted in reducing physician concerns previously preventing some dermatologists from utilizing teledermatology in their services. Additionally, the geographical and socioeconomic barriers preventing some patients from receiving dermatologic care have been minimized through the use of teledermatology. Addressing these obstacles for dermatologic care improves healthcare equity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Dermatology/statistics & numerical data , Epidemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19/psychology , Dermatology/trends , Humans , Mobile Applications , Patient Preference , Patient Satisfaction , Telemedicine/trends , United States
20.
J Invest Dermatol ; 141(1): 1-2, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1007878
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