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2.
Pediatr Int ; 64(1): e15131, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1961797

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: This study investigated the impact of coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic school closures on the mental health of school students with chronic diseases. METHODS: Questionnaires were distributed to students from 4th-9th grade diagnosed with chronic diseases at Osaka Medical College Hospital and their parents or caregivers. Questionnaires from 286 families were returned by mail after the schools reopened. The students were divided into the "psychosomatic disorder" group (group P, n = 42), the "developmental disorder" group (group D, n = 89), and the "other disease" group (group O, n = 155). Using students' self-reports on the Questionnaire for Triage and Assessment with 30 items, we assessed the proportion of students with a high risk of psychosomatic disorder in three groups. We investigated how the students requiring the support of somatic symptom (SS) felt about school during school closure. Further, using parents' and caregivers' answers, SS scores were calculated before and during school closure and after school reopening. RESULTS: The proportion of students with a high risk of developing psychosomatic disorder increased in all groups. For the students in Group P, the response "I did not want to think about school" indicated an increase in SS scores, and for the students in Group O, "I wanted to get back to school soon" indicated a decrease. Furthermore, especially in Group P students, SS scores decreased transiently during school closure and increased after school reopening. CONCLUSIONS: The impact of school closure on mental health differed depending on students' diagnoses and feelings about school during school closures.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , Schools , COVID-19/prevention & control , Child , Chronic Disease , Developmental Disabilities/epidemiology , Humans , Japan/epidemiology , Pandemics , Psychophysiologic Disorders/epidemiology , Risk Factors , Surveys and Questionnaires
3.
Eur J Psychotraumatol ; 13(1): 2087979, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1915468

ABSTRACT

Background: Parents of children with intellectual and developmental disorders often experience potentially traumatic events while caring for their children. Heightened posttraumatic stress (PTS) and posttraumatic growth (PTG) have been found in this population. Objective: We aimed to explore risk and protective factors for their PTS and PTG. Method: A cross-sectional study was conducted with 385 parents (average age M = 43.14 years, SD = 7.40; 95.3% mothers). Results: Parenting trauma showed an adverse effect on developing PTS (beta = 0.25, p < .01) and a positive role in promoting PTG (beta = 0.16, p < .01). Social support was protective in its correlation with lower levels of PTS (beta = -0.12, p < .01) and higher levels of PTG (beta = 0.22, p < .01). Barriers to care were associated with increased PTS (beta = 0.23, p < .01), but unrelated to PTG (beta = .01, p = .855). Negative parenting showed a significant, but small, correlation with more severe PTS (beta = 0.11, p < .05), and was unrelated to PTG (beta = -0.09, p = .065). Conclusions: Our study increases the understanding of posttraumatic reactions in parents, predominantly mothers, of children with IDD and identified parenting-related trauma, social support, and barriers to mental health care as predictive factors of the reactions. More research is needed to confirm and validate the effects of the discussed factors. Although causation can not be inferred, prompt and adequate screening and therapeutic resources should be provided to those mothers who were exposed to multiple stressful caregiving events and had limited healthcare access and less support from their spouses, peers, and caregiving partners. HIGHLIGHTS: Parents of a child with Intellectual and Developmental Disorders with parenting trauma had higher posttraumatic stress (PTS) and posttraumatic growth (PTG).Social support was related to lower PTS and higher PTG.Barriers to care were related to higher PTS but unrelated to PTG.


Antecedentes: Los padres de niños con trastornos intelectuales y del desarrollo a menudo experimentan eventos potencialmente traumáticos mientras cuidan a sus hijos. En esta población se han encontrado un elevado estrés postraumático (PTS por sus siglas en ingles) y crecimiento postraumático (PTG por sus siglas en ingles).Objetivo: Nuestro objetivo fue explorar los factores protectores y de riesgo para PTS y PTG.Método: Se realizó un estudio transversal con 385 padres (con edad promedio M = 43,14 años, DS = 7,40; 95,3% madres).Resultados: El trauma parental mostró ser un efecto adverso en el desarrollo de PTS (beta = 0.25, p < 0.01) y un papel positivo en la promover el PTG (beta = 0.16, p < 0,01). El apoyo social fue protector en su correlación con niveles más bajos de PTS (beta = −0.12, p < .01) y niveles más altos de PTG (beta = 0.22, p < .01). Las barreras a la atención se asociaron con un aumento de PTS (beta = 0.23, p < 0.01), pero no se relacionaron con PTG (beta = 0.01, p = 0,855). La crianza negativa mostró una correlación significativa, pero pequeña, con PTS más severos (beta = 0.11, p < 0,05) y no estuvo relacionado con el PTG (beta = −0.09, p = 0.065).Conclusiones: Nuestro estudio aumenta la comprensión de las reacciones postraumáticas en los padres, predominantemente madres, de niños con IDD e identificó el trauma relacionado con la crianza, el apoyo social y las barreras para la atención de la salud mental como factores predictivos de estas reacciones. Se necesita más investigación para confirmar y validar los efectos de los factores discutidos. Si bien no se puede inferir causalidad, se deben proporcionar recursos terapéuticos y de detección, rápidos y adecuados, a aquellas madres que estuvieron expuestas a múltiples eventos estresantes del cuidado y tuvieron acceso limitado a la atención médica y menos apoyo de sus cónyuges, compañeros y cuidadores.


Subject(s)
Posttraumatic Growth, Psychological , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , Adaptation, Psychological , Adult , Child , Cross-Sectional Studies , Developmental Disabilities , Humans , Parenting , Parents/psychology , Protective Factors , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/diagnosis
5.
Res Dev Disabil ; 127: 104270, 2022 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1867742

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: About 18% of college students have disabilities. Social capital, resources we can tap from relationships, may be particularly valuable for students with disabilities. Yet, disabilities often limit the individual's ability to develop or use social capital. We studied how college students with developmental disabilities understand, develop, and use social capital. METHODS AND PROCEDURES: We conducted in-depth semi-structured Zoom interviews with 10 women with developmental disabilities enrolled at a public university in the southeastern United States early in 2021. We examined the qualitative data with thematic analysis. OUTCOMES AND RESULTS: Participants averaged age 20; 70% reported attention deficit disorder or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder; 90% reported multiple diagnoses. Most participants described COVID-19 pandemic-related isolation and stress, which magnified both the need for relationships and awareness of that need, prompting participants to become proactive in forming and maintaining relationships despite anxiety about them. Themes were: foundational relationships, reciprocity, expanding horizons, a need for new relationships, focus on the future and relationship barriers. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS: Results highlight the importance of social relationships and the resources they provide to students with disabilities, particularly in stressful times. Colleges can help students by connecting them with others and providing strategies for building and maintaining social capital. WHAT THIS PAPER ADDS: College students with developmental disabilities often face challenges developing and maintaining social capital, resources derived from relationships with other people. These resources are key to success in school and after graduation, as students continue into adulthood. We studied how students with developmental disabilities build social capital. The students described their relationships with others and the types of support they contributed to and received from those relationships. We also extended previous research by examining pandemic-related effects, interviewing participants nearly one year into the COVID-19 pandemic. We provide recommendations for further research and ways colleges and universities can encourage social capital development among all students.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Social Capital , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Developmental Disabilities/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Pandemics , Students , Universities , Young Adult
7.
J Intellect Disabil Res ; 66(5): 399-412, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1764976

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Due to the functional, cognitive and communication impairments associated with intellectual and/or developmental disabilities (IDD), adaptations to service delivery during the COVID-19 pandemic may impact people with IDD differently than others. For community and hospital-based services, this study describes the proportion of adults with and without IDD who used health care in the year pre-COVID-19 and the first year of the pandemic. METHODS: This retrospective cohort study used linked health administrative databases to identify adults aged 18-105 years with and without IDD using unique encoded identifiers. Counts and proportions of adults who used health care services were reported for the pre-COVID-19 year (16 March 2019 to 14 March 2020) and the first COVID-19 year (15 March 2020 to 15 March 2021). RESULTS: Across services, the proportion of adults who used services was lower during the first COVID-19 year compared with the year prior, except for virtual physician visits that increased markedly for people with and without IDD. While the proportion of adults who used services was higher for those with IDD compared with those without IDD for both years, differences were greatest for mental health emergency visits and hospitalisations; adults with IDD were 6.3 to 10.9 times more likely to use these services than others with no IDD during the pandemic. CONCLUSIONS: During the first COVID-19 year in Ontario, Canada, service use decreased for all service types, except for virtual physician visits. In both years, adults with IDD remained more likely to use services than other adults, with the largest differences in use of mental health hospitalisations and mental health emergency department visits.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Intellectual Disability , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Delivery of Health Care , Developmental Disabilities/complications , Developmental Disabilities/epidemiology , Developmental Disabilities/therapy , Hospitals , Humans , Intellectual Disability/complications , Intellectual Disability/epidemiology , Intellectual Disability/therapy , Ontario/epidemiology , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies
8.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(6)2022 03 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1742429

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in substantial service disruption and transition from in-person services to telehealth for children with developmental disabilities. However, there is limited knowledge about the specific dimensions and consequences of the disruption and transition. This study aims to examine the extent of service disruption and transition, the experiences of client children and their caregivers with telehealth vis-à-vis in-person services, and the impacts of the disruption and transition on child wellbeing. The cross-sectional study collected data from parents of children with developmental disabilities using an online survey. McNemar's tests were used to compare service changes before and after the pandemic outbreak, and multivariate analyses were used to examine how service changes were associated with child wellbeing. Results show that more than two-thirds of the children experienced reduction in service amount, and one-third lost services for more than two months in about five months into the pandemic. While telehealth had comparable features relative to in-person services, it had lower ratings with respect to diagnostic accuracy, treatment effectiveness, and rapport building. Service disruption/transition and social isolation were associated with behavioral and emotional deterioration in children. However, child and family stress may have confounded these adverse effects. We concluded that the magnitude of service disruption and transition was large in the first half year after the pandemic outbreak, and the amount and duration of service loss varied substantially across clients. Diagnostic accuracy, treatment efficacy, and rapport building were areas in which parents had major concerns toward telehealth relative to in-person services. However, such drawbacks may partially be due to the limited logistics in telehealth implementation during the pandemic. Service disruption and transition seemed to contribute to family stress, which played a direct role in eroding child wellbeing. Implications of these findings for future research and practices are discussed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Telemedicine , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Child Health , Cross-Sectional Studies , Developmental Disabilities/epidemiology , Developmental Disabilities/therapy , Humans , Pandemics , Telemedicine/methods
9.
J Intellect Disabil Res ; 66(6): 503-516, 2022 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1702190

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Although correlates of physical activity (PA) have been extensively examined in both children and adolescents who are typically developing, little is known about correlates of moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and sedentary time in adolescents with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD). Therefore, we examined intrapersonal, interpersonal and environmental factors and their association with device-based MVPA and sedentary time in adolescents with IDD. METHODS: MVPA and sedentary time was assessed using a hip-worn ActiGraph model wGT3x-BT tri-axial accelerometer across a 7-day period in adolescents with IDD and one of their parents. Pearson and point-biserial correlations were calculated to inspect the associations of PA (MVPA, sedentary time) with intrapersonal factors (demographic characteristic, BMI, waist circumference, motor ability, muscle strength, grip strength, cardiovascular fitness and self-efficacy for PA), interpersonal factors (parent demographics, parent BMI, parent MVPA and sedentary time, family social support for PA, parent barriers and support for PA, parent's beliefs/attitudes towards PA and number of siblings), and environmental factors (meteorologic season and COVID-19). Ordinary least squares regression was used to estimate the unique contributions of key factors to PA after controlling for participants' age, sex, race, waist circumference and total wear time. RESULTS: Ninety-two adolescents (15.5 ± 3.0 years old, 21.7% non-White, 6.5% Hispanic, 56.5% female) provided valid accelerometer data. Average sedentary time was 494.6 ± 136.4 min/day and average MVPA was 19.8 ± 24.2 min/day. Age (r = 0.27, P = 0.01), diagnosis of congenital heart disease (r = -0.26, P = 0.01) and parent sedentary time (r = 0.30, P = 0.01) were correlated with sedentary time. BMI (r = -0.24, P = 0.03), waist circumference (r = -0.28, P = 0.01), identifying as White (r = -0.23, P = 0.03) and parent MVPA (r = 0.56, P < 0.001) were correlated with MVPA. After adjusting for the adolescent's age, sex, race, waist circumference, and total wear time, the association between parent and adolescent MVPA remained significant (b = 0.55, P < 0.01, partial η2  = 0.11). CONCLUSION: The results of this study provide evidence that race, waist circumference and parental MVPA may influence the amount of MVPA in adolescents with IDD. The limited available information and the potential health benefits of increased MVPA highlight the need to evaluate the effectiveness of multi-component interventions targeting both intrapersonal and interpersonal levels to promote increased PA in adolescents with IDD.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sedentary Behavior , Adolescent , Child , Developmental Disabilities , Exercise/physiology , Female , Humans , Male , Waist Circumference
10.
BMC Infect Dis ; 22(1): 139, 2022 Feb 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1690952

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) living in congregated settings have increased risk of COVID-19 infection and mortality. Little is known about variant B.1.1.519 with spike mutation T478K, dominant in Mexico. We describe a linked SARS-CoV-2 B.1.1.519 outbreak in three IDD facilities in the Netherlands. METHODS: Following notification of the index, subsequent cases were identified through serial PCR group testing. Positive specimens were submitted for whole-genome-sequencing. Clinical information was gathered through interviews with staff members of the three facilities. RESULTS: Attack rate (AR) in clients of the index facility was 92% (23/25), total AR in clients 45% (33/73) and in staff members 24% (8/34). 55% (18/33) of client cases were asymptomatic, versus 25% (2/8) of staff members. Five client cases (15%) were hospitalized, two died (6%). Sequencing yielded the same specific B.1.1.519 genotype in all three facilities. No significant difference in median viral load was established comparing the B.1.1.519 variant with other circulating variants. The index of the linked outbreak reported no travel history or link to suspected or confirmed cases suggesting regional surveillance. Observed peak regional prevalence of B.1.1.519 during the outbreak supports this. CONCLUSION: AR, morbidity and mortality prior to control measures taking effect were high, probably related to the specific characteristics of the IDD setting and its clients. We assessed no evidence for intrinsic contributing properties of variant B.1.1.519. Our study argues for enhanced infection prevention protocols in the IDD setting, and prioritization of this group for vaccination against COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Assisted Living Facilities , COVID-19 , Cross Infection , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Cross Infection/epidemiology , Cross Infection/virology , Developmental Disabilities , Disease Outbreaks , Humans , Mutation , Netherlands/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics
11.
CMAJ ; 194(4): E112-E121, 2022 01 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1686133

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Disability-related considerations have largely been absent from the COVID-19 response, despite evidence that people with disabilities are at elevated risk for acquiring COVID-19. We evaluated clinical outcomes in patients who were admitted to hospital with COVID-19 with a disability compared with patients without a disability. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective cohort study that included adults with COVID-19 who were admitted to hospital and discharged between Jan. 1, 2020, and Nov. 30, 2020, at 7 hospitals in Ontario, Canada. We compared in-hospital death, admission to the intensive care unit (ICU), hospital length of stay and unplanned 30-day readmission among patients with and without a physical disability, hearing or vision impairment, traumatic brain injury, or intellectual or developmental disability, overall and stratified by age (≤ 64 and ≥ 65 yr) using multivariable regression, controlling for sex, residence in a long-term care facility and comorbidity. RESULTS: Among 1279 admissions to hospital for COVID-19, 22.3% had a disability. We found that patients with a disability were more likely to die than those without a disability (28.1% v. 17.6%), had longer hospital stays (median 13.9 v. 7.8 d) and more readmissions (17.6% v. 7.9%), but had lower ICU admission rates (22.5% v. 28.3%). After adjustment, there were no statistically significant differences between those with and without disabilities for in-hospital death or admission to ICU. After adjustment, patients with a disability had longer hospital stays (rate ratio 1.36, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.19-1.56) and greater risk of readmission (relative risk 1.77, 95% CI 1.14-2.75). In age-stratified analyses, we observed longer hospital stays among patients with a disability than in those without, in both younger and older subgroups; readmission risk was driven by younger patients with a disability. INTERPRETATION: Patients with a disability who were admitted to hospital with COVID-19 had longer stays and elevated readmission risk than those without disabilities. Disability-related needs should be addressed to support these patients in hospital and after discharge.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Disabled Persons/statistics & numerical data , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Brain Injuries, Traumatic/epidemiology , COVID-19/mortality , Cohort Studies , Developmental Disabilities/epidemiology , Female , Hearing Loss/epidemiology , Hospital Mortality , Hospitals/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Ontario/epidemiology , Patient Readmission/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Vision Disorders/epidemiology
12.
Int J Infect Dis ; 116: 328-330, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1654568

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDDs) and severe COVID-19 outcomes, 30-day readmission, and/or increased length of stay (LOS) using a large electronic administrative database. METHODS: Patients hospitalized with COVID-19 were identified between March 2020 and June 2021 from more than 900 hospitals in the United States. IDDs included intellectual disability, cerebral palsy, Down syndrome, autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and other intellectual disabilities. Outcomes included intensive care unit (ICU) admission, invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV), 30-day readmission, mortality, and LOS. RESULTS: Among 643,765 patients with COVID-19, multivariate models showed that patients with any IDD were at a significantly greater risk of at least 1 severe outcome, 30-day readmission, or longer LOS than patients without any IDD. Compared with those without any IDD, patients with Down syndrome had the greatest odds of ICU admission (odds ratio [OR] and 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.96 [1.73-2.21]), IMV (OR: 2.37 [2.07-2.70]), and mortality (OR: 2.33 [2.00-2.73]). Patients with ASD and those with Down syndrome both had over a 40% longer mean LOS. Patients with intellectual disabilities had a 23% (12-35%) increased odds of 30-day readmission. CONCLUSIONS: Results suggest that patients hospitalized with COVID-19 with IDD have a significantly increased risk of severe outcomes, 30-day readmission, and longer LOS.


Subject(s)
Autism Spectrum Disorder , COVID-19 , Autism Spectrum Disorder/complications , Autism Spectrum Disorder/epidemiology , Autism Spectrum Disorder/therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Child , Developmental Disabilities/epidemiology , Humans , Length of Stay , Patient Readmission , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology
15.
Res Dev Disabil ; 122: 104178, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1633075

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: For a number of reasons, persons with intellectual and developmental disability (IDD) are at increased risk of contracting COVID-19. AIMS: This study explored the influence of congregate setting on testing positive for COVID-19 among adults with IDD in Ontario. METHODS AND PROCEDURES: 833 home care recipients with IDD were included, 204 were tested at least once for COVID-19. These data were linked to the homecare assessment data. The association between living in a congregate setting and receiving a positive COVID-19 test was explored using a logistic regression model among the total sample and those tested for COVID-19. OUTCOMES AND RESULTS: 77 individuals tested positive for COVID-19 (9.24 %). Congregate setting, age, aggression, and mobility were significantly associated with receiving a positive COVID-19 test in the total sample. Among the subgroup, congregate setting and age were significant. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS: Adults with IDD have an increased risk for positive COVID-19 tests at younger ages than other high-risk populations, such as elderly persons. These findings confirm the vulnerability of adults with IDD living in group settings to COVID-19. As such, they should be prioritized when COVID-19 prevention and public health strategies, including vaccination and boosters, are introduced.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Intellectual Disability , Adult , Aged , Child , Developmental Disabilities/epidemiology , Humans , Intellectual Disability/epidemiology , Ontario/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
17.
J Appl Res Intellect Disabil ; 35(2): 577-586, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1566301

ABSTRACT

AIM: This study analysed the impact that COVID-19 and the response measures implemented by the Spanish Government have had on families of individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities. METHOD: Data on 323 family members (M = 52.3 years old; SD = 10.5) were collected through an online survey, which was focused on analysing difficulties experienced and service provision during lockdown. RESULTS: Many families (66.3%) have seen their level of stress increased during lockdown because of, among other reasons, a greater burden of care. Difficulties were associated with the closure and changes in disability-related services. Families of people with extensive support needs have generally experienced greater difficulties. CONCLUSION: Support services should have been considered essential services during lockdown. The failure to receive support has resulted in excessive burden on families, who had to assume a multitude of roles to support their family member with intellectual and developmental disability.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Intellectual Disability , Child , Communicable Disease Control , Developmental Disabilities , Humans , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2
18.
Popul Health Manag ; 25(3): 335-342, 2022 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1532423

ABSTRACT

Emerging evidence on the disproportionate impact of COVID-19 on people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) points to the underlying risk and burden of infectious diseases (IDs) in this population. The objective of this study was to examine the risk of ID-related emergency department (ED) visits, subsequent hospitalizations, and hospital-based mortality during ID-related visits among adults with IDD compared to those without IDD. The authors conducted a retrospective study using data from the 2016 Nationwide Emergency Department Sample. The sample included 94,928 adults with IDD identified using ICD-10-CM codes, and age- and sex-matched 284,763 non-IDD adults in a 1:3 case-control ratio. A Poisson regression model was used to compare the risk of ID-related ED visits, subsequent hospitalizations, and hospital-based mortality during ID-related visits between adults with and without IDD. Covariates included sociodemographic and hospital characteristics. Results showed that adults with IDD are at a higher risk for ID-related ED visits, subsequent hospitalization, and mortality during ID-related ED visits compared to non-IDD adults. Adults with IDD continued to experience higher risks even after accounting for sociodemographic, hospital, and clinical characteristics. Septicemia and respiratory tract infections are the leading causes of ED visits, hospitalization, and mortality. This study found substantial disparities in ID-related ED visits, subsequent hospitalization, and mortality among the burdens for adults with IDD. These observations underscore the importance of integrated strategies to reduce ID-related morbidity among adults with IDD.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communicable Diseases , Intellectual Disability , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Developmental Disabilities/epidemiology , Emergency Service, Hospital , Hospitalization , Humans , Intellectual Disability/epidemiology , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , United States/epidemiology
20.
Arch. argent. pediatr ; 119(5): 296-: I-303, XXVIII, oct. 2021. tab, ilus
Article in English, Spanish | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-1502722

ABSTRACT

Los problemas del sueño (PS) son frecuentes, principalmente en niñas y niños con trastornos del desarrollo (TD), y causan un impacto en su funcionamiento y calidad de vida familiar. El pediatra tiene un rol importante en su abordaje. Objetivo. Definir la frecuencia y los tipos de PS en una muestra de niñas y niños con TD, determinar la proporción de pediatras que abordaron estas dificultades, evaluar los efectos de la higiene del sueño (HS) y describir el impacto de la pandemia por COVID-19 en el sueño. Población y métodos. Estudio cuasiexperimental. El diagnóstico de PS se realizó con la preocupación de los padres y/o criterios clínicos. Se brindaron estrategias de HS, luego se evaluó su efecto según referencia de los padres y uso del cuestionario CSHQ-S (Children ́s Sleep Habits Questionnaire en español) pre- y posestrategias. Durante la pandemia por COVID-19, se midió nuevamente la variable PS y las relacionadas a HS. Resultados. Se incluyeron 161 niñas y niños. La frecuencia de PS fue del 55 %. El 80 % mejoró con HS. El 83 % tenía pediatra de cabecera, y de ellos, el 45 % había preguntado acerca del sueño. Durante la pandemia por COVID-19 hubo aumento de PS y cambios en las variables de HS. Conclusión. Aproximadamente la mitad de los niñas y niños con TD presentan PS; esto solo fue abordado por el 45 % de los pediatras. La HS resultó beneficiosa para la mayoría, por lo que la intervención del pediatra parece fundamental. Durante la pandemia por COVID-19 aumentaron los PS, como posible reflejo del impacto ambiental en los niñas y niños con TD.


Sleep problems (SPs) are common, especially among children with developmental disorders (DDs), and affect their functioning and quality of family life. Pediatricians play a major role in their management. Objective. To define the frequency and types of SPs in a sample of children with DDs, determine the proportion of pediatricians who addressed such difficulties, assess the effects of sleep hygiene (SH), and describe the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on sleep. Population and methods. This was a quasi-experiment. SPs were diagnosed based on parents' concerns and/or clinical criteria. SH strategies were provided and their effect was assessed as per parents' reports and the Children's Sleep Habits Questionnaire in Spanish (CSHQ-S) before and after the strategies. During the COVID-19 pandemic, the SP outcome measure and SH-related outcome measures were measured again. Results. A total of 161 children were included. The frequency of SPs was 55 %; 80 % improved with SH. Eighty-three percent of children had a primary pediatrician; of these, 45 % had consulted about sleep. During the COVID-19 pandemic, SPs increased and SH outcome measures changed. Conclusion. Approximately half of children with DDs have SPs; and the problem was only addressed by 45 % of pediatricians. SH was beneficial for most children, so pediatricians' role seems critical. During the COVID-19 pandemic, SPs increased, probably as a result of its environmental impact on children with DD


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Infant , Child, Preschool , Child , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , COVID-19 , Sleep , Developmental Disabilities , Surveys and Questionnaires , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
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