Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 81
Filter
1.
Front Endocrinol (Lausanne) ; 13: 925844, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1933633

ABSTRACT

Objective: There are still not enough studies on the prediction of non-utilization of a complication test or a glycated hemoglobin test for preventing diabetes complications by using large-scale community-based big data. This study identified the ratio of not taking a diabetes complication test (fundus examination and microprotein urination test) among adult diabetic patients over 19 years using a national survey conducted in South Korea and developed a model for predicting the probability of not taking a diabetes complication test based on it. Methods: This study analyzed 25,811 subjects who responded that they had been diagnosed with diabetes by a doctor in the 2020 Community Health Survey. Outcome variables were defined as the utilization of the microprotein urination test and the fundus examination during the past year. This study developed a model for predicting the utilization of a diabetes complication test using logistic regression analysis and nomogram to understand the relationship of predictive factors on the utilization of a diabetes complication test. Results: The results of this study confirmed that age, education level, the recognition of own blood glucose level, current diabetes treatment, diabetes management education, not conducting the glycated hemoglobin test in the past year, smoking, single-person household, subjectively good health, and living in the rural area were independently related to the non-utilization of diabetes complication test after the COVID-19 pandemic. Conclusion: Additional longitudinal studies are required to confirm the causality of the non-utilization of diabetes complication screening tests.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Complications , Diabetes Mellitus , Adult , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Diabetes Complications/diagnosis , Diabetes Complications/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/diagnosis , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Glycated Hemoglobin A/analysis , Humans , Machine Learning , Pandemics
2.
Circulation ; 143(8): 837-851, 2021 02 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1883363

ABSTRACT

More than 40 years after the 1978 Bethesda Conference on the Declining Mortality from Coronary Heart Disease provided the scientific community with a blueprint for systematic analysis to understand declining rates of coronary heart disease, there are indications the decline has ended or even reversed despite advances in our knowledge about the condition and treatment. Recent data show a more complex situation, with mortality rates for overall cardiovascular disease, including coronary heart disease and stroke, decelerating, whereas those for heart failure are increasing. To mark the 40th anniversary of the Bethesda Conference, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and the American Heart Association cosponsored the "Bending the Curve in Cardiovascular Disease Mortality: Bethesda + 40" symposium. The objective was to examine the immediate and long-term outcomes of the 1978 conference and understand the current environment. Symposium themes included trends and future projections in cardiovascular disease (in the United States and internationally), the evolving obesity and diabetes epidemics, and harnessing emerging and innovative opportunities to preserve and promote cardiovascular health and prevent cardiovascular disease. In addition, participant-led discussion explored the challenges and barriers in promoting cardiovascular health across the lifespan and established a potential framework for observational research and interventions that would begin in early childhood (or ideally in utero). This report summarizes the relevant research, policy, and practice opportunities discussed at the symposium.


Subject(s)
Cardiovascular Diseases/mortality , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Cardiovascular Diseases/pathology , Congresses as Topic , Coronary Disease/epidemiology , Coronary Disease/mortality , Coronary Disease/pathology , Diabetes Complications/epidemiology , Humans , Morbidity/trends , Obesity/complications , Obesity/epidemiology , Risk Factors , Stroke/epidemiology , Stroke/mortality , Stroke/pathology , Survival Rate/trends , United States/epidemiology , Urbanization
4.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(9)2022 04 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1820251

ABSTRACT

This study aimed to investigate the implementation of diabetes complications screening in South Korea during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak. Data from the Korea Community Health Surveys conducted in 2019 and 2020 were used. This study included 51,471 participants. Multiple level analysis was used to investigate the relationships between screening for diabetic retinopathy and diabetic nephropathy and variables of both individual- and community-level factors in 2019 and 2020, before and after the COVID-19 outbreak. Diabetes nephropathy complications screening in 2020 had a lower odds ratio. However, regions heavily affected by COVID-19 showed a negative association with diabetes complications screening after the COVID-19 outbreak. For those being treated with medication for diabetes, there was a significant negative association with diabetic nephropathy screening after the outbreak. The COVID-19 outbreak was associated with a reduction in the use of diabetes nephropathy complications screening. Additionally, only regions heavily affected by COVID-19 spread showed a negative association with diabetes complications screening compared to before the COVID-19 outbreak. In this regard, it appears that many patients were unable to attend outpatient care due to COVID-19. As such, these patients should be encouraged to visit clinics for diabetes complications screening. Furthermore, alternative methods need to be developed to support these patients. Through these efforts, the development of diabetes-related complications should be prevented, and the costs associated with these complications will be reduced.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Complications , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 , Diabetic Nephropathies , Diabetic Retinopathy , COVID-19/epidemiology , Diabetes Complications/complications , Diabetes Complications/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/epidemiology , Diabetic Nephropathies/diagnosis , Diabetic Nephropathies/epidemiology , Diabetic Nephropathies/etiology , Diabetic Retinopathy/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks , Humans , Republic of Korea/epidemiology
6.
Front Endocrinol (Lausanne) ; 13: 780663, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1731765

ABSTRACT

There seems to be a bidirectional interplay between Diabetes mellitus (DM) and coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). On the one hand, people with diabetes are at higher risk of fatal or critical care unit-treated COVID-19 as well as COVID-19 related health complications compared to individuals without diabetes. On the other hand, clinical data so far suggest that the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) may result in metabolic dysregulation and in impaired glucose homeostasis. In addition, emerging data on new onset DM in previously infected with SARS-CoV-2 patients, reinforce the hypothesis of a direct effect of SARS-CoV-2 on glucose metabolism. Attempting to find the culprit, we currently know that the pancreas and the endothelium have been found to express Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) receptors, the main binding site of the virus. To move from bench to bedside, understanding the effects of COVID-19 on metabolism and glucose homeostasis is crucial to prevent and manage complications related to COVID-19 and support recovering patients. In this article we review the potential underlying pathophysiological mechanisms between COVID-19 and glucose dysregulation as well as the effects of antidiabetic treatment in patients with diabetes and COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Diabetes Complications/virology , Diabetes Mellitus/etiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/pathology , Causality , Comorbidity , Diabetes Complications/epidemiology , Diabetes Complications/metabolism , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/pathology , Humans , Patient Acuity , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
7.
Int J Med Sci ; 19(2): 402-415, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1662815

ABSTRACT

Hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and coronary artery disease are common comorbidities and dangerous factors for infection and serious COVID-19. Polymorphisms in genes associated with comorbidities may help observe susceptibility and disease severity variation. However, specific genetic factors and the extent to which they can explain variation in susceptibility of severity are unclear. Therefore, we evaluated candidate genes associated with COVID-19 and hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and coronary artery disease. In particular, we performed searches against OMIM, NCBI, and other databases, protein-protein interaction network construction, and GO and KEGG pathway enrichment analyses. Results showed that the associated overlapping genes were TLR4, NLRP3, MBL2, IL6, IL1RN, IL1B, CX3CR1, CCR5, AGT, ACE, and F2. GO and KEGG analyses yielded 302 GO terms (q < 0.05) and 29 signaling pathways (q < 0.05), respectively, mainly including coronavirus disease-COVID-19 and cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction. IL6 and AGT were central in the PPI, with 8 and 5 connections, respectively. In this study, we identified 11 genes associated with both COVID-19 and three comorbidities that may contribute to infection and disease severity. The key genes IL6 and AGT are involved in regulating immune response, cytokine activity, and viral infection. Therefore, RAAS inhibitors, AGT antisense nucleotides, cytokine inhibitors, vitamin D, fenofibrate, and vaccines regulating non-immune and immune factors could be potential strategies to prevent and cure COVID-19. The study provides a basis for further investigation of genes and pathways with predictive value for the risk of infection and prognosis and could help guide drug and vaccine development to improve treatment efficacy and the development of personalised treatments, especially for COVID-19 individuals with common comorbidities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Coronary Artery Disease/complications , Coronary Artery Disease/epidemiology , Coronary Artery Disease/genetics , Diabetes Complications/epidemiology , Diabetes Complications/genetics , Humans , Hypertension/complications , Hypertension/epidemiology , Hypertension/genetics , Mutation , Protein Interaction Maps
9.
J Med Virol ; 93(12): 6660-6670, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1544317

ABSTRACT

With the wide spread of Coronavirus, most people who infected with the COVID-19, will recover without requiring special treatment. Whereas, elders and those with underlying medical problems are more likely to have serious illnesses, even be threatened with death. Many more disciplines try to find solutions and drive master plan to this global trouble. Consequently, by taking one particular population, Hungary, this study aims to explore a pattern of COVID-19 victims, who suffered from some underlying conditions. Age, gender, and underlying medical problems form the structure of the clustering. K-Means and two step clustering methods were applied for age-based and age-independent analysis. Grouping of the deaths in the form of two different scenarios may highlight some concepts of this deadly disease for public health professionals. Our result for clustering can forecast similar cases which are assigned to any cluster that it will be a serious cautious for the population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Adolescent , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Asthma/complications , COVID-19/etiology , Diabetes Complications/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Hungary/epidemiology , Lung Diseases/complications , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasms/complications , Obesity/complications , Risk Factors , Schizophrenia/complications , Sex Factors , Young Adult
10.
Clin Appl Thromb Hemost ; 27: 10760296211045902, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1443743

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Diabetes is the most common of comorbidity in patients with SARS-COV-2 pneumonia. Coagulation abnormalities with D-dimer levels are increased in this disease. OBJECTIFS: We aimed to compare the levels of D-dimer in diabetic and non-diabetic patients with COVID 19. A link between D-dimer and mortality has also been established. MATERIALS: A retrospective study was carried out at the University Hospital Center of Oujda (Morocco) from November 01st to December 01st, 2020. Our study population was divided into two groups: a diabetic group and a second group without diabetes to compare clinical and biological characteristics between the two groups. In addition, the receiver operator characteristic curve was used to assess the optimal D-dimer cut-off point for predicting mortality in diabetics. RESULTS: 201 confirmed-COVID-19-patients were included in the final analysis. The median age was 64 (IQR 56-73), and 56% were male. Our study found that D-dimer levels were statistically higher in diabetic patients compared to non-diabetic patients. (1745 vs 845 respectively, P = 0001). D-dimer level > 2885 ng/mL was a significant predictor of mortality in diabetic patients with a sensitivity of 71,4% and a specificity of 70,7%. CONCLUSION: Our study found that diabetics with COVID-19 are likely to develop hypercoagulation with a poor prognosis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , Diabetes Mellitus/blood , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/analysis , SARS-CoV-2 , Thrombophilia/blood , Aged , Area Under Curve , Biomarkers , C-Reactive Protein/analysis , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Diabetes Complications/blood , Diabetes Complications/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Hypertension/epidemiology , Inflammation/immunology , Kaplan-Meier Estimate , Male , Middle Aged , Oxidative Stress , Prognosis , ROC Curve , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Thrombophilia/etiology , Thrombophilia/immunology
11.
J Pediatr Endocrinol Metab ; 35(2): 191-195, 2022 Feb 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1438367

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Coronavirus disease 2019 has caused a major epidemic worldwide, and lockdowns became necessary in all countries to prevent its spread. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of staying-at-home practices on the metabolic control of children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes during the pandemic period. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Eighty-nine patients younger than 18 years old who were diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at least one year before the declaration of the pandemic were included in the study. The last visit data of the patients before and after the declaration of the pandemic, and the frequency of presentation of diabetes-related emergencies from one year after diagnosis of type 1 diabetes to the declaration of the pandemic, and from the declaration of the pandemic to the last visit after the pandemic declaration were compared. RESULTS: The total number of patients was 89, and 48 (53.9%) were boys. The mean (± standard deviation [SD]) age at diagnosis was 8.4 ± 3.7 years (boys 7.9 ± 3.6 years; girls 8.9 ± 3.9 years). There was no statistically significant difference when the SD values of the anthropometric measurements, and the glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and lipid profile tests were compared. However, the frequency of admission to the emergency service related to diabetes was significantly different. CONCLUSIONS: Although the pandemic did not significantly affect the metabolic and glycemic controls of the children with type 1 diabetes included in this study, an increase in the frequency of diabetes-related emergency admissions was noted.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/metabolism , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/therapy , Glycemic Control , Pandemics , Adolescent , Age of Onset , Anthropometry , Body Weight , Child , Child, Preschool , Diabetes Complications/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/diet therapy , Exercise Therapy , Female , Glycated Hemoglobin A/analysis , Humans , Lipids/blood , Male , Patient Compliance
12.
Eur J Endocrinol ; 185(2): 299-311, 2021 Jul 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1398974

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Male sex is one of the determinants of severe coronavirus diseas-e-2019 (COVID-19). We aimed to characterize sex differences in severe outcomes in adults with diabetes hospitalized for COVID-19. METHODS: We performed a sex-stratified analysis of clinical and biological features and outcomes (i.e. invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV), death, intensive care unit (ICU) admission and home discharge at day 7 (D7) or day 28 (D28)) in 2380 patients with diabetes hospitalized for COVID-19 and included in the nationwide CORONADO observational study (NCT04324736). RESULTS: The study population was predominantly male (63.5%). After multiple adjustments, female sex was negatively associated with the primary outcome (IMV and/or death, OR: 0.66 (0.49-0.88)), death (OR: 0.49 (0.30-0.79)) and ICU admission (OR: 0.57 (0.43-0.77)) at D7 but only with ICU admission (OR: 0.58 (0.43-0.77)) at D28. Older age and a history of microvascular complications were predictors of death at D28 in both sexes, while chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) was predictive of death in women only. At admission, C-reactive protein (CRP), aspartate amino transferase (AST) and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), according to the CKD-EPI formula predicted death in both sexes. Lymphocytopenia was an independent predictor of death in women only, while thrombocytopenia and elevated plasma glucose concentration were predictors of death in men only. CONCLUSIONS: In patients with diabetes admitted for COVID-19, female sex was associated with lower incidence of early severe outcomes, but did not influence the overall in-hospital mortality, suggesting that diabetes mitigates the female protection from COVID-19 severity. Sex-associated biological determinants may be useful to optimize COVID-19 prevention and management in women and men.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/diagnosis , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Sex Characteristics , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/therapy , Diabetes Complications/diagnosis , Diabetes Complications/epidemiology , Female , France/epidemiology , Hospital Mortality , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Incidence , Inpatients , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Prognosis , Respiration, Artificial/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Severity of Illness Index
13.
Metabolism ; 123: 154845, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1340768

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Individuals with diabetes/stress hyperglycemia carry an increased risk for adverse clinical outcome in case of SARS-CoV-2 infection. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether this risk is, at least in part, modulated by an increase of thromboembolic complications. METHODS: We prospectively followed 180 hospitalized patients with confirmed COVID-19 pneumonia admitted to the Internal Medicine Units of San Raffaele Hospital. Data from 11 out of 180 patients were considered incomplete and excluded from the analysis. We analysed inflammation, tissue damage biomarkers, hemostatic parameters, thrombotic events (TEs) and clinical outcome according to the presence of diabetes/stress hyperglycemia. RESULTS: Among 169 patients, 51 (30.2%) had diabetes/stress hyperglycemia. Diabetes/stress hyperglycemia and fasting blood glucose (FBG) were associated with increased inflammation and tissue damage circulating markers, higher D-dimer levels, increased prothrombin time and lower antithrombin III activity. Forty-eight venous and 10 arterial TEs were identified in 49 (29%) patients. Diabetes/stress hyperglycemia (HR 2.71, p = 0.001), fasting blood glucose (HR 4.32, p < 0.001) and glucose variability (HR 1.6, p < 0.009) were all associated with an increased risk of thromboembolic complication. TEs significantly increased the risk for an adverse clinical outcome only in the presence of diabetes/stress hyperglycemia (HR 3.05, p = 0.010) or fasting blood glucose ≥7 mmol/L (HR 3.07, p = 0.015). CONCLUSIONS: Thromboembolism risk is higher among patients with diabetes/stress hyperglycemia and COVID-19 pneumonia and is associated to poor clinical outcome. In case of SARS-Cov-2 infection patients with diabetes/stress hyperglycemia could be considered for a more intensive prophylactic anticoagulation regimen.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Hyperglycemia/epidemiology , Thromboembolism/etiology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/therapy , Diabetes Complications/diagnosis , Diabetes Complications/epidemiology , Diabetes Complications/therapy , Diabetes Mellitus/blood , Diabetes Mellitus/diagnosis , Diabetes Mellitus/therapy , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Hyperglycemia/diagnosis , Hyperglycemia/etiology , Hyperglycemia/therapy , Inflammation/complications , Inflammation/diagnosis , Inflammation/epidemiology , Inflammation/therapy , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Mortality , Prognosis , Risk Factors , Stress, Psychological/complications , Stress, Psychological/diagnosis , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Thromboembolism/diagnosis , Thromboembolism/epidemiology , Treatment Outcome
14.
Diabetes Metab Syndr ; 15(5): 102231, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1333363

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIM: This review aims to report the current status of COVID-19 among people with diabetes, newly diagnosed diabetes, diabetic ketoacidosis, and programmatic efforts including vaccinations. METHODS: We conducted a literature search using PubMed, Google, and Scopus until July 15, 2021. RESULTS: In Saudi Arabia, most studies have reported diabetes as one of the highly prevalent comorbidities among patients with COVID-19. Currently, there are limited studies from Saudi Arabia on the newly diagnosed diabetes and diabetic ketoacidosis caused by COVID-19. The Saudi ministry has taken several measures to control the impact of COVID-19 among people with diabetes, including comprehensive guidelines and prioritized vaccinations. During the COVID-19 pandemic, the use of telehealth services dramatically increased in diabetes clinics in Saudi Arabia. CONCLUSIONS: Focused and evidence-based interventions are essential to control the impact of COVID-19 among people with diabetes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Diabetes Complications/epidemiology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , Diabetes Complications/complications , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Diabetic Ketoacidosis/complications , Diabetic Ketoacidosis/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology , Vaccination/statistics & numerical data
15.
Diabetes Metab Syndr ; 15(5): 102228, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1333362

ABSTRACT

AIM: Amidst COVID-19 pandemic, the health care delivery in India faces major challenges owing to the overwhelming hospitals, exhausted healthcare workers, and shortage of crucial medical supplies such as ventilators and oxygen. The study aims to propose a novel successful interventional home care model, the Virtual COVID In-Patient (VCIP) care for effective COVID management. METHODS: The Covid-19 positive patients enrolled in VCIP were chosen for the study. A 24/7 active multidisciplinary WhatsApp group was created for each patient, for remote monitoring of temperature, blood pressure, blood glucose, respiratory and pulse rate along with the symptoms. Advice on sleep and exercises were given along with the medication via video-audio consultations. Lab facility was provided at the doorstep. Training on various devices, medications including steroids, delivering subcutaneous injections etc were given via video platforms. RESULTS: Among the 220 patients who availed the VCIP facility, only two were hospitalized, yielding a 99.5 % success rate in preventing hospitalizations and patients enrolled have been immensely satisfied with their experience. CONCLUSIONS: With similar pandemics anticipated in near future, VCIP model may be considered for successful domiciliary treatment and overcoming the challenges.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Home Care Services/organization & administration , Models, Organizational , Algorithms , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Communicable Disease Control/organization & administration , Diabetes Complications/epidemiology , Diabetes Complications/therapy , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/therapy , Female , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , India/epidemiology , Internationality , Male , Middle Aged , Models, Nursing , Monitoring, Physiologic/methods , Pandemics , Prognosis , Referral and Consultation/organization & administration , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Treatment Outcome
16.
Prev Chronic Dis ; 18: E66, 2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1323410

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Severe COVID-19 illness in adults has been linked to underlying medical conditions. This study identified frequent underlying conditions and their attributable risk of severe COVID-19 illness. METHODS: We used data from more than 800 US hospitals in the Premier Healthcare Database Special COVID-19 Release (PHD-SR) to describe hospitalized patients aged 18 years or older with COVID-19 from March 2020 through March 2021. We used multivariable generalized linear models to estimate adjusted risk of intensive care unit admission, invasive mechanical ventilation, and death associated with frequent conditions and total number of conditions. RESULTS: Among 4,899,447 hospitalized adults in PHD-SR, 540,667 (11.0%) were patients with COVID-19, of whom 94.9% had at least 1 underlying medical condition. Essential hypertension (50.4%), disorders of lipid metabolism (49.4%), and obesity (33.0%) were the most common. The strongest risk factors for death were obesity (adjusted risk ratio [aRR] = 1.30; 95% CI, 1.27-1.33), anxiety and fear-related disorders (aRR = 1.28; 95% CI, 1.25-1.31), and diabetes with complication (aRR = 1.26; 95% CI, 1.24-1.28), as well as the total number of conditions, with aRRs of death ranging from 1.53 (95% CI, 1.41-1.67) for patients with 1 condition to 3.82 (95% CI, 3.45-4.23) for patients with more than 10 conditions (compared with patients with no conditions). CONCLUSION: Certain underlying conditions and the number of conditions were associated with severe COVID-19 illness. Hypertension and disorders of lipid metabolism were the most frequent, whereas obesity, diabetes with complication, and anxiety disorders were the strongest risk factors for severe COVID-19 illness. Careful evaluation and management of underlying conditions among patients with COVID-19 can help stratify risk for severe illness.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Complications , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Multimorbidity , Noncommunicable Diseases/epidemiology , Obesity , Phobic Disorders , Age Factors , Aged , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , Comorbidity , Diabetes Complications/diagnosis , Diabetes Complications/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Mortality , Obesity/diagnosis , Obesity/epidemiology , Phobic Disorders/diagnosis , Phobic Disorders/epidemiology , Risk Assessment/methods , Risk Assessment/statistics & numerical data , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , United States/epidemiology
18.
Front Endocrinol (Lausanne) ; 12: 649525, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1295632

ABSTRACT

The relationship between COVID-19 and diabetes mellitus is complicated and bidirectional. On the one hand, diabetes mellitus is considered one of the most important risk factors for a severe course of COVID-19. Several factors that are often present in diabetes mellitus are likely to contribute to this risk, such as older age, a proinflammatory and hypercoagulable state, hyperglycemia and underlying comorbidities (hypertension, cardiovascular disease, chronic kidney disease and obesity). On the other hand, a severe COVID-19 infection, and its treatment with steroids, can have a specific negative impact on diabetes itself, leading to worsening of hyperglycemia through increased insulin resistance and reduced ß-cell secretory function. Worsening hyperglycemia can, in turn, adversely affect the course of COVID-19. Although more knowledge gradually surfaces as the pandemic progresses, challenges in understanding the interrelationship between COVID-19 and diabetes remain.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/etiology , COVID-19/pathology , Diabetes Mellitus , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Diabetes Complications/diagnosis , Diabetes Complications/epidemiology , Diabetes Complications/pathology , Diabetes Mellitus/diagnosis , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/pathology , Diabetes Mellitus/virology , Disease Progression , Humans , Pandemics , Prognosis , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Severity of Illness Index
19.
Am J Trop Med Hyg ; 105(2): 368-371, 2021 Jun 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1270182

ABSTRACT

Sickle cell trait (SCT) carriers inherit one copy of the Glu6Val mutation in the hemoglobin gene and is particularly common in Black individuals (5-10%). Considering the roles of hemoglobin in immune responses and the higher risk for coronavirus disease (COVID-19) among Black individuals, we tested whether Black SCT carriers were at increased risk for COVID-19 infection and mortality according to the United Kingdom Biobank. Among Black individuals who were tested for COVID-19, we found similar infection rates among SCT carriers (14/72; 19.7%) and noncarriers (167/791; 21.1%), but higher COVID-19 mortality rates among SCT carriers (4/14; 28.6%) than among noncarriers (21/167; 12.6%) (odds ratio [OR], 3.04; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.69-11.82; P = 0.12). Notably, SCT carriers with preexisting diabetes had significantly higher COVID-19 mortality (4/4; 100%) than those without diabetes (0/10; 0%; (OR, 90.71; 95% CI, 5.66-infinite; P = 0.0005). These findings suggest that Black SCT carriers with preexisting diabetes are at disproportionally higher risk for COVID-19 mortality. Confirmation by larger studies is warranted.


Subject(s)
Biological Specimen Banks/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/mortality , Sickle Cell Trait/complications , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/ethnology , Diabetes Complications/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Odds Ratio , Population , Preexisting Condition Coverage/statistics & numerical data , Risk Factors , Sickle Cell Trait/epidemiology , Sickle Cell Trait/ethnology , United Kingdom
20.
Diabetes Metab Syndr ; 15(3): 757-764, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1269263

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: COVID-19 is a pandemic that has affected beyond 100 million and caused nearly 3 million deaths globally. Vitamin D is a known risk factor for COVID-19. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the association of prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and mean vitamin D level with COVID-19 infection and mortality in Asia, predicting with other confounding factors such as median age, obesity, and diabetes. METHODS: COVID-19 infections and mortalities among the Asian countries were retrieved from the Worldometer website. Information on prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and mean vitamin D values in each Asian country was retrieved through literature searching on PubMed® and Google scholar. The associations between COVID-19 infections and mortalities with prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and mean vitamin D level were explored with correlation coefficients. As a predictive analysis, multiple linear regression was carried out with all confounders. RESULTS: Positive correlations were observed for prevalence of vitamin D deficiency with COVID-19 infections (r = 0.55; p = 0.01; R2 = 0.31) and mortalities (r = 0.50; p = 0.01; R2 = 0.25). Moreover, the associations for the COVID-19 infections and mortalities improved to r = 0.76 (p = 0.002; R2 = 0.58) and r = 0.65 (p = 0.03; R2 = 0.42), respectively, after predicting with confounding factors. Similarly, mean vitamin D level had a significant negative correlation with COVID-19 infections (r = -0.77; p = 0.04; R2 = 0.59) and mortalities (r = -0.80; p = 0.03; R2 = 0.63) when combining with confounders. CONCLUSION: Prevalence of vitamin D deficiency is significantly positively associated whereas the mean vitamin D level is significantly negatively associated with both infection and mortality rate of COVID-19 among Asian countries upon predicting with all confounders.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Vitamin D Deficiency/epidemiology , Adolescent , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Asia/epidemiology , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/mortality , Child , Child, Preschool , Diabetes Complications/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Male , Middle Aged , Mortality , Obesity/complications , Obesity/epidemiology , Pandemics , Prevalence , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Vitamin D Deficiency/mortality , Young Adult
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL