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1.
J Med Case Rep ; 16(1): 17, 2022 Jan 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1608781

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors are among the new-generation oral antihyperglycemic agents that have been used in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. With the recent coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic and rise of cases in the third wave, diagnosis of life-threatening euglycemic diabetic ketoacidosis may easily be overlooked or missed. CASE PRESENTATION: We present the case of a 37-year-old Malay gentleman with underlying type 2 diabetes mellitus on empagliflozin, who presented to our hospital with symptomatic coronavirus disease 2019 infection and diabetic ketoacidosis. He developed severe rebound euglycemic diabetic ketoacidosis due to the continuous usage of empagliflozin for glycemic control alongside intravenous insulin. CONCLUSIONS: Physicians should have a high index of suspicion in diagnosing and managing euglycemic diabetic ketoacidosis, including withholding treatment of sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors during the acute management of diabetic ketoacidosis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 , Diabetic Ketoacidosis , Sodium-Glucose Transporter 2 Inhibitors , Adult , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/complications , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/drug therapy , Diabetic Ketoacidosis/chemically induced , Diabetic Ketoacidosis/diagnosis , Diabetic Ketoacidosis/drug therapy , Glucose , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , Sodium , Sodium-Glucose Transporter 2 Inhibitors/adverse effects
3.
Lancet Diabetes Endocrinol ; 9(5): 293-303, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1531930

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In patients with type 2 diabetes, hyperglycaemia is an independent risk factor for COVID-19-related mortality. Associations between pre-infection prescription for glucose-lowering drugs and COVID-19-related mortality in people with type 2 diabetes have been postulated but only investigated in small studies and limited to a few agents. We investigated whether there are associations between prescription of different classes of glucose-lowering drugs and risk of COVID-19-related mortality in people with type 2 diabetes. METHODS: This was a nationwide observational cohort study done with data from the National Diabetes Audit for people with type 2 diabetes and registered with a general practice in England since 2003. Cox regression was used to estimate the hazard ratio (HR) of COVID-19-related mortality in people prescribed each class of glucose-lowering drug, with covariate adjustment with a propensity score to address confounding by demographic, socioeconomic, and clinical factors. FINDINGS: Among the 2 851 465 people with type 2 diabetes included in our analyses, 13 479 (0·5%) COVID-19-related deaths occurred during the study period (Feb 16 to Aug 31, 2020), corresponding to a rate of 8·9 per 1000 person-years (95% CI 8·7-9·0). The adjusted HR associated with recorded versus no recorded prescription was 0·77 (95% CI 0·73-0·81) for metformin and 1·42 (1·35-1·49) for insulin. Adjusted HRs for prescription of other individual classes of glucose-lowering treatment were as follows: 0·75 (0·48-1·17) for meglitinides, 0·82 (0·74-0·91) for SGLT2 inhibitors, 0·94 (0·82-1·07) for thiazolidinediones, 0·94 (0·89-0·99) for sulfonylureas, 0·94 (0·83-1·07) for GLP-1 receptor agonists, 1·07 (1·01-1·13) for DPP-4 inhibitors, and 1·26 (0·76-2·09) for α-glucosidase inhibitors. INTERPRETATION: Our results provide evidence of associations between prescription of some glucose-lowering drugs and COVID-19-related mortality, although the differences in risk are small and these findings are likely to be due to confounding by indication, in view of the use of different drug classes at different stages of type 2 diabetes disease progression. In the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, there is no clear indication to change prescribing of glucose-lowering drugs in people with type 2 diabetes. FUNDING: None.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/complications , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/drug therapy , Hypoglycemic Agents/adverse effects , Aged , COVID-19/complications , Cohort Studies , England , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Proportional Hazards Models
4.
Front Endocrinol (Lausanne) ; 12: 731974, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1485049

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is causing a worldwide epidemic. It spreads very fast and hits people of all ages, especially patients with underlying diseases such as diabetes. In this review, we focus on the influences of diabetes on the outcome of SARS-CoV-2 infection and the involved mechanisms including lung dysfunction, immune disorder, abnormal expression of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), overactivation of mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway, and increased furin level. On the other hand, SARS-CoV-2 may trigger the development of diabetes. It causes the damage of pancreatic ß cells, which is probably mediated by ACE2 protein in the islets. Furthermore, SARS-CoV-2 may aggravate insulin resistance through attacking other metabolic organs. Of note, certain anti-diabetic drugs (OADs), such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) activator and glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonist, have been shown to upregulate ACE2 in animal models, which may increase the risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection. However, Metformin, as a first-line medicine for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), may be a potential drug benefiting diabetic patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection, probably via a suppression of mTOR signaling together with its anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrosis function in lung. Remarkably, another kind of OADs, dipeptidyl Peptidase 4 (DPP4) inhibitor, may also exert beneficial effects in this respect, probably via a prevention of SARS-CoV-2 binding to cells. Thus, it is of significant to identify appropriate OADs for the treatment of diabetes in the context of SARS-CoV-2 infections.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/metabolism , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/antagonists & inhibitors , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Animals , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/drug therapy , Dipeptidyl-Peptidase IV Inhibitors/pharmacology , Dipeptidyl-Peptidase IV Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Humans , Hypoglycemic Agents/pharmacology , Hypoglycemic Agents/therapeutic use , Lung/drug effects , Lung/metabolism , T-Lymphocytes/drug effects , T-Lymphocytes/metabolism , TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases/antagonists & inhibitors , TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases/metabolism
5.
BMJ Open ; 11(10): e052310, 2021 10 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1476607

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To investigate the association between baseline use of glucose-lowering drugs and serious clinical outcome among patients with type 2 diabetes. DESIGN: Territory-wide retrospective cohort of confirmed cases of COVID-19 between January 2020 and February 2021. SETTING: All public health facilities in Hong Kong. PARTICIPANTS: 1220 patients with diabetes who were admitted for confirmed COVID-19. PRIMARY AND SECONDARY OUTCOME MEASURES: Composite clinical endpoint of intensive care unit admission, requirement of invasive mechanical ventilation and/or in-hospital death. RESULTS: In this cohort (median age 65.3 years, 54.3% men), 737 (60.4%) patients were treated with metformin, 385 (31.6%) with sulphonylureas, 199 (16.3%) with dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors and 273 (22.4%) with insulin prior to admission. In multivariate Cox regression, use of metformin and DPP-4 inhibitors was associated with reduced incidence of the composite endpoint relative to non-use, with respective HRs of 0.51 (95% CI 0.34 to 0.77, p=0.001) and 0.46 (95% CI 0.29 to 0.71, p<0.001), adjusted for age, sex, diabetes duration, glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c), smoking, comorbidities and drugs. Use of sulphonylureas (HR 1.55, 95% CI 1.07 to 2.24, p=0.022) and insulin (HR 6.34, 95% CI 3.72 to 10.78, p<0.001) were both associated with increased hazards of the composite endpoint. CONCLUSIONS: Users of metformin and DPP-4 inhibitors had fewer adverse outcomes from COVID-19 compared with non-users, whereas insulin and sulphonylurea might predict a worse prognosis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 , Dipeptidyl-Peptidase IV Inhibitors , Metformin , Pharmaceutical Preparations , Aged , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/drug therapy , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/epidemiology , Female , Glucose , Hong Kong/epidemiology , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Hypoglycemic Agents/therapeutic use , Male , Metformin/therapeutic use , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
6.
Front Endocrinol (Lausanne) ; 12: 708494, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1450802

ABSTRACT

Aims: We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess various antidiabetic agents' association with mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) who have coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Methods: We performed comprehensive literature retrieval from the date of inception until February 2, 2021, in medical databases (PubMed, Web of Science, Embase, and Cochrane Library), regarding mortality outcomes in patients with T2DM who have COVID-19. Pooled OR and 95% CI data were used to assess relationships between antidiabetic agents and mortality. Results: Eighteen studies with 17,338 patients were included in the meta-analysis. Metformin (pooled OR, 0.69; P=0.001) and sulfonylurea (pooled OR, 0.80; P=0.016) were associated with lower mortality risk in patients with T2DM who had COVID-19. However, patients with T2DM who had COVID-19 and received insulin exhibited greater mortality (pooled OR, 2.20; P=0.002). Mortality did not significantly differ (pooled OR, 0.72; P=0.057) between DPP-4 inhibitor users and non-users. Conclusions: Metformin and sulfonylurea could be associated with reduced mortality risk in patients with T2DM who have COVID-19. Furthermore, insulin use could be associated with greater mortality, while DPP-4 inhibitor use could not be. The effects of antidiabetic agents in patients with T2DM who have COVID-19 require further exploration. Systematic Review Registration: PROSPERO (identifier, CRD42021242898).


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/drug therapy , Hypoglycemic Agents/adverse effects , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/complications , Humans , Hypoglycemic Agents/therapeutic use , Risk Assessment
7.
Cardiovasc Diabetol ; 20(1): 198, 2021 10 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1448234

ABSTRACT

Patients with Covid-19 place new challenges on the management of type 2 diabetes, including the questions of whether glucose-lowering therapy should be adjusted during infection and how to manage a return to normal care after resolution of Covid-19 symptoms. Due to the sudden onset of the pandemic, physicians have by necessity made such important clinical decisions in the absence of robust evidence or consistent guidelines. The risk to patients is compounded by the prevalence of cardiovascular disease in this population, which alongside diabetes is a major risk factor for severe disease and mortality in Covid-19. We convened as experts from the Central and Eastern European region to consider what advice we can provide in the setting of type 2 diabetes and Covid-19, considering the evidence before, during and after infection. We review recommendations that have been published to date, and consider the best available-but currently limited-evidence from large observational studies and the DARE-19 randomized control trial. Notably, we find a lack of guidance on restarting patients on optimal antidiabetic therapy after recovering from Covid-19, and suggest that this may provide an opportunity to optimize treatment and counter clinical inertia that predates the pandemic. Furthermore, we emphasize that optimization applies not only to glycaemic control, but other factors such as cardiorenal protection. While we look forward to the emergence of new evidence that we hope will address these gaps, in the interim we provide a perspective, based on our collective clinical experience, on how best to manage glucose-lowering therapy as patients with Covid-19 recover from their disease and return to normal care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/complications , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/drug therapy , Glycemic Control , Hypoglycemic Agents/therapeutic use , Insulin/therapeutic use , Humans , Hypoglycemic Agents/adverse effects , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Risk Factors , Time Factors
8.
Infect Disord Drug Targets ; 21(5): e270421186842, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1435859

ABSTRACT

The novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is on the rampage claiming over 297000 lives globally. Disease severity and mortality rates are higher in patients with underlying diabetes mellitus. Till date, there exists no effective vaccine or therapy against COVID-19. However, with limited clinical data, HCQ is being used for treatment and prophylaxis in patients with COVID-19. HCQ is also used as an anti-diabetic drug and has been approved in India as an adjunct to diet and exercise to improve glycemic control of patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) on metformin and sulfonylurea combination in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM). Thus, although indiscriminate use of HCQ is fraught with danger, HCQ can be considered as a third-line add on anti-diabetic agent in people with T2DM amid the ongoing pandemic after having ruled out the contraindications to the use of this drug.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/drug therapy , Humans , India , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
9.
Pediatr Endocrinol Diabetes Metab ; 27(2): 134-140, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1405503

ABSTRACT

Metformin is a widely used biguanide drug recommended as a first-line antidiabetic for type 2 diabetes. Currently, metformin is used not only in the treatment of diabetes but also in other diseases. Some studies have shown that metformin causes weight loss in insulin-sensitive and insulin-resistant overweight and obese patients. Metformin is an effective and safe option for women with gestational diabetes and type 2 diabetes in pregnancy, and it may also increase the ovulation rate in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Longer survival times have been observed in cancer patients using metformin. Metformin has been shown to significantly correlate with lower mortality in obese or type 2 diabetic women hospitalized for COVID-19. It also has a protective effect on the development and progression of many types of cancer. The mechanisms of action of metformin are complex and still not fully understood. Metformin has been shown to act through both AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-dependent mechanisms and AMPK-independent mechanisms. This paper presents the benefits of using metformin in the treatment of various diseases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 , Metformin , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/drug therapy , Female , Humans , Hypoglycemic Agents/therapeutic use , Metformin/therapeutic use , Pregnancy , SARS-CoV-2
10.
Diabetes Care ; 44(7): 1564-1572, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1405389

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To determine the respective associations of premorbid glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist (GLP1-RA) and sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitor (SGLT2i) use, compared with premorbid dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitor (DPP4i) use, with severity of outcomes in the setting of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: We analyzed observational data from SARS-CoV-2-positive adults in the National COVID Cohort Collaborative (N3C), a multicenter, longitudinal U.S. cohort (January 2018-February 2021), with a prescription for GLP1-RA, SGLT2i, or DPP4i within 24 months of positive SARS-CoV-2 PCR test. The primary outcome was 60-day mortality, measured from positive SARS-CoV-2 test date. Secondary outcomes were total mortality during the observation period and emergency room visits, hospitalization, and mechanical ventilation within 14 days. Associations were quantified with odds ratios (ORs) estimated with targeted maximum likelihood estimation using a super learner approach, accounting for baseline characteristics. RESULTS: The study included 12,446 individuals (53.4% female, 62.5% White, mean ± SD age 58.6 ± 13.1 years). The 60-day mortality was 3.11% (387 of 12,446), with 2.06% (138 of 6,692) for GLP1-RA use, 2.32% (85 of 3,665) for SGLT2i use, and 5.67% (199 of 3,511) for DPP4i use. Both GLP1-RA and SGLT2i use were associated with lower 60-day mortality compared with DPP4i use (OR 0.54 [95% CI 0.37-0.80] and 0.66 [0.50-0.86], respectively). Use of both medications was also associated with decreased total mortality, emergency room visits, and hospitalizations. CONCLUSIONS: Among SARS-CoV-2-positive adults, premorbid GLP1-RA and SGLT2i use, compared with DPP4i use, was associated with lower odds of mortality and other adverse outcomes, although DPP4i users were older and generally sicker.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 , Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor/agonists , Sodium-Glucose Transporter 2 Inhibitors , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/diagnosis , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/drug therapy , Female , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Middle Aged , Sodium-Glucose Transporter 2 Inhibitors/therapeutic use , United States
11.
Int J Clin Pract ; 75(11): e14833, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1402929

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND-AIM: Diabetes, obesity and hypertension are common comorbidities associated with increased severity and mortality rates from Corona Virus Disease (COVID)-19. METHODS: In this narrative review (using the PubMed database), we discuss epidemiological data and pathophysiological links between diabetes and COVID-19. The potential effects of glycaemic control and antidiabetic drugs on the prevalence and outcomes of COVID-19 are also reviewed, as well as the role of telemedicine and diabetes self-management in the post-COVID-19 era. RESULTS: Diabetes has been linked to COVID-19 morbidity and mortality, although further research is needed to elucidate this association. In the meantime, physicians should be aware of the potential rise in the prevalence of diabetes (due to unhealthy lifestyle changes during the pandemic), its severity and complications and focus on achieving optimal diabetes prevention and management. Telemedicine and diabetes self-management may help towards this direction. Dipeptidyl-peptidase 4 (DPP4) inhibitors, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists and sodium-glucose transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors may affect viral entry and infection, and thus COVID-19 outcomes, as shown in observational studies. CONCLUSION: Diabetes has been associated with COVID-19 development and progression. Certain antidiabetic drugs may influence COVID-19 prevention and management. The results of ongoing randomized clinical trials will shed more light on this field.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 , Sodium-Glucose Transporter 2 Inhibitors , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/complications , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/drug therapy , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/epidemiology , Humans , Hypoglycemic Agents/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2
12.
BMJ Open Diabetes Res Care ; 9(1)2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1398617

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: People with type 2 diabetes (T2D) have an increased rate of hospitalization and mortality related to COVID-19. To identify ahead of time those who are at risk of developing severe diseases and potentially in need of intensive care, we investigated the independent associations between longitudinal glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), the impact of common medications (metformin, insulin, ACE inhibitors (ACEIs), angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), and corticosteroids) and COVID-19 severity in people with T2D. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Retrospective cohort study was conducted using deidentified claims and electronic health record data from the OptumLabs Data Warehouse across the USA between January 2017 and November 2020, including 16 504 individuals with T2D and COVID-19. A univariate model and a multivariate model were applied to evaluate the association between 2 and 3-year HbA1c average, medication use between COVID-19 diagnosis and intensive care unit admission (if applicable), and risk of intensive care related to COVID-19. RESULTS: With covariates adjusted, the HR of longitudinal HbA1c for risk of intensive care was 1.12 (per 1% increase, p<0.001) and 1.48 (comparing group with poor (HbA1c ≥9%) and adequate glycemic control (HbA1c 6%-9%), p<0.001). The use of corticosteroids and the combined use of insulin and metformin were associated with significant reduction of intensive care risk, while ACEIs and ARBs were not associated with reduced risk of intensive care. CONCLUSIONS: Two to three-year longitudinal glycemic level is independently associated with COVID-19-related severity in people with T2D. Here, we present a potential method to use HbA1c history, which presented a stronger association with COVID-19 severity than single-point HbA1c, to identify in advance those more at risk of intensive care due to COVID-19 in the T2D population. The combined use of metformin and insulin and the use of corticosteroids might be significant to prevent patients with T2D from becoming critically ill from COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 , Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/therapeutic use , COVID-19 Testing , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/drug therapy , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/epidemiology , Humans , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
13.
BMJ Open ; 11(9): e049782, 2021 09 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1394115

ABSTRACT

MAIN OBJECTIVE: To determine how and to what extent COVID-19 has affected real-world, self-reported glycaemic management in Americans with type 1 or type 2 diabetes taking insulin and/or secretagogues, with or without infection. DESIGN: A cross-sectional substudy using data from the Investigating Novel Predictions of Hypoglycemia Occurrence using Real-world Models panel survey. SETTING: USA. PARTICIPANTS: Americans 18-90 years old with type 1 or 2 diabetes taking insulin and/or secretagogues were conveniently sampled from a probability-based internet panel. PRIMARY OUTCOME MEASURE: A structured, COVID-19-specific questionnaire was administered to assess the impact of the pandemic (irrespective of infection) on socioeconomic, behavioural/clinical and psychosocial aspects of glycaemic management. RESULTS: Data from 667 respondents (type 1 diabetes: 18%; type 2 diabetes: 82%) were analysed. Almost 25% reported A1c values ≥8.1%. Rates of severe and non-severe hypoglycaemia were 0.68 (95% CI 0.5 to 0.96) and 2.75 (95% CI 2.4 to 3.1) events per person-month, respectively. Ten respondents reported a confirmed or probable COVID-19 diagnosis. Because of the pandemic, 24% of respondents experienced difficulties affording housing; 28% struggled to maintain sufficient food to avoid hypoglycaemia; and 19% and 17% reported challenges accessing diabetes therapies and testing strips, respectively. Over one-quarter reported issues retrieving antihyperglycaemics from the pharmacy and over one-third reported challenges consulting with diabetes providers. The pandemic contributed to therapeutic non-adherence (14%), drug rationing (17%) and reduced monitoring (16%). Many struggled to keep track, and in control, of hypoglycaemia (12%-15%) and lacked social support to help manage their risk (19%). Nearly half reported decreased physical activity. Few statistically significant differences were observed by diabetes type. CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19 was found to cause substantial self-reported deficiencies in glycaemic management. Study results signal the need for decisive action to restabilise routine diabetes care in the USA. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT04219514.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19 Testing , Cross-Sectional Studies , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/drug therapy , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/epidemiology , Humans , Hypoglycemic Agents/therapeutic use , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Self Report , United States/epidemiology , Young Adult
14.
BMJ Open Diabetes Res Care ; 9(1)2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1376471

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Community clinics often face pragmatic barriers, hindering program initiation and replication of controlled research trial results. Mentoring is a potential strategy to overcome these barriers. We piloted an in-person and telehealth mentoring strategy to implement the Telehealth-supported, Integrated Community Health Workers (CHWs), Medication-access, group visit Education (TIME) program in a community clinic. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Participants (n=55) were low-income Latino(a)s with type 2 diabetes. The study occurred in two, 6-month phases. Phase I provided proof-of-concept and an observational experience for the clinic team; participants (n=37) were randomized to the intervention (TIME) or control (usual care), and the research team conducted TIME while the clinic team observed. Phase II provided mentorship to implement TIME, and the research team mentored the clinic team as they conducted TIME for a new single-arm cohort of participants (n=18) with no previous exposure to the program. Analyses included baseline to 6-month comparisons of diabetes outcomes (primary outcome: hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c)): phase I intervention versus control, phase II (within group), and research-run (phase I intervention) versus clinic-run (phase II) arms. We also evaluated baseline to 6-month CHW knowledge changes. RESULTS: Phase I: compared with the control, intervention participants had superior baseline to 6-month improvements for HbA1c (mean change: intervention: -0.73% vs control: 0.08%, p=0.016), weight (p=0.044), target HbA1c (p=0.035), hypoglycemia (p=0.021), medication non-adherence (p=0.0003), and five of six American Diabetes Association (ADA) measures (p<0.001-0.002). Phase II: participants had significant reductions in HbA1c (mean change: -0.78%, p=0.006), diastolic blood pressure (p=0.004), body mass index (0.012), weight (p=0.010), medication non-adherence (p<0.001), and six ADA measures (p=0.007-0.005). Phase I intervention versus phase II outcomes were comparable. CHWs improved knowledge from pre-test to post-tests (p<0.001). CONCLUSIONS: A novel, mentored approach to implement TIME into a community clinic resulted in improved diabetes outcomes. Larger studies of longer duration are needed to fully evaluate the potential of mentoring community clinics.


Subject(s)
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 , Blood Pressure , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/drug therapy , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/epidemiology , Glycated Hemoglobin A/analysis , Humans , Mentors , Pilot Projects
15.
J Fam Pract ; 70(6S): S1-S6, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1372160

ABSTRACT

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: At the end of the activity, participants will be able to: • Identify how heart failure (HF), chronic kidney disease (CKD), and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and associated cardiovascular (CV) risks are interconnected. • Initiate guideline-recommended therapy to reduce CV risk in patients with HF, CKD, and/or T2DM. • Apply evidence for sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 inhibitors (SGLT-2 inhibitors) to clinical practice, based on recent and emerging trials. • Review evidence suggesting increased incidence and severity of COVID-19 infection in patients with diabetes.


Subject(s)
Cardiovascular Diseases/drug therapy , Cardiovascular Diseases/prevention & control , Sodium-Glucose Transporter 2 Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Cardiovascular System/drug effects , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/drug therapy , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/prevention & control , Diabetic Cardiomyopathies/drug therapy , Diabetic Cardiomyopathies/prevention & control , Diabetic Nephropathies/drug therapy , Diabetic Nephropathies/prevention & control , Dipeptidyl-Peptidase IV Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Humans , Hypoglycemic Agents/therapeutic use , Treatment Outcome
16.
Expert Opin Drug Saf ; 20(11): 1309-1315, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1366929

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: A number of anti-diabetic treatments have been favored during the continuing spread of the current SARS-CoV-2 pandemic. Glucagon like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP1-RAs) are a group of antidiabetic drugs, the glucose reducing effect of which is founded on augmenting glucose-dependent insulin secretion with concomitant reduction of glucagon secretion and delayed gastric emptying. Apart from their glucose lowering effects, GLP1-RAs also exert a plethora of pleiotropic activities in the form of anti-inflammatory, anti-thrombotic and anti-obesogenic properties, with beneficial cardiovascular and renal impact. All these make this class of drugs a preferred option for managing patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D), and potentially helpful in those with SARS-CoV2 infection. AREAS COVERED: In the present article we propose a hypothetical molecular mechanism by which GLP1-RAs may interact with SARS-CoV-2 activity. EXPERT OPINION: The beneficial properties of GLP1-RAs may be of specific importance during COVID-19 infection for the most fragile patients with chronic comorbid conditions such as T2D, and those at higher cardiovascular and renal disease risk. Yet, further studies are needed to confirm our hypothesis and preliminary findings available in the literature.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/drug therapy , Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor/agonists , Hypoglycemic Agents/therapeutic use , Incretins/therapeutic use , Animals , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/metabolism , Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor/metabolism , Humans , Hypoglycemic Agents/adverse effects , Incretins/adverse effects , Signal Transduction , Treatment Outcome
19.
Prim Care Diabetes ; 15(5): 806-812, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1340786

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Diabetes mellitus (DM) increases mortality and morbidity in patients with coronavirus disease (COVID-19). In this study, it was aimed to assess factors influencing on COVID-19 pneumonia in hospitalized patients with diabetes and association with oral anti-diabetic drugs. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This cross-sectional study included 432 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus diagnosed with COVID-19. Data regarding clinical characteristics, demographic characteristics, intensive care unit (ICU) rate in patients admitted to ICU, laboratory results on day 1 and 7, thoracic computed tomography (CT) findings and oral anti-diabetic drugs used were extracted from medical records. In all patients, 75-days mortality was recorded. Data were assessed independently. RESULTS: There was pneumonia in 386 (89.4%) of 432 patients with diabetes. The risk for pneumonia was markedly higher in patients on DPP-4 inhibitors; however, there was no significant among other oral anti-diabetic groups and subgroups. In addition, elevated CRP was linked to the increased risk for pneumonia. Only patients in the pneumonia group had SGLT-2 inhibitor use. During follow-up, 91 patients died. In Cox regression analysis, low Glasgow Coma Scale score, and increased lactate dehydrogenase levels were identified as significant independent risk factors for mortality. CONCLUSION: The study indicated that DPP-4 inhibitor used and elevated CRP level were associated with pneumonia development. Only patients in the pneumonia group had SGLT-2 inhibitor use. No oral anti-diabetics was found to be associated with COVID-19 related death.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 , Pharmaceutical Preparations , Cross-Sectional Studies , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/diagnosis , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/drug therapy , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/epidemiology , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
20.
Endocrinol Metab (Seoul) ; 36(4): 904-908, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1328154

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic remains an unbeaten enemy. Unfortunately, no targeted treatment option is available. Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) have increased odds for severe or fatal disease, as demonstrated in recent observational studies. There is an ongoing discussion regarding the impact of different antidiabetic drug classes on outcomes of interest among affected subjects. Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors have been placed at the epicenter, since the DPP-4 enzyme seems to be implicated in the disease pathogenesis. Herein we present an updated meta-analysis of observational studies addressing the risk of COVID-19 death among patients with T2DM on prior DPP-4 inhibitor treatment. We pooled data from 10 observational studies, showing that DPP-4 inhibitors produce a non-significant decrease in the risk for COVID-19-related death. However, when administered in the inpatient setting, DPP-4 inhibitors decrease the risk for COVID-19-related death by 50%. Ongoing randomized controlled trials will shed further light.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/mortality , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/drug therapy , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/mortality , Dipeptidyl-Peptidase IV Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Observational Studies as Topic/methods , COVID-19/blood , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/blood , Dipeptidyl Peptidase 4/blood , Dipeptidyl-Peptidase IV Inhibitors/pharmacology , Humans , Hypoglycemic Agents/pharmacology , Hypoglycemic Agents/therapeutic use , Mortality/trends
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