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1.
Lancet Diabetes Endocrinol ; 9(11): 786-798, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1586178

ABSTRACT

Up to 50% of the people who have died from COVID-19 had metabolic and vascular disorders. Notably, there are many direct links between COVID-19 and the metabolic and endocrine systems. Thus, not only are patients with metabolic dysfunction (eg, obesity, hypertension, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and diabetes) at an increased risk of developing severe COVID-19 but also infection with SARS-CoV-2 might lead to new-onset diabetes or aggravation of pre-existing metabolic disorders. In this Review, we provide an update on the mechanisms of how metabolic and endocrine disorders might predispose patients to develop severe COVID-19. Additionally, we update the practical recommendations and management of patients with COVID-19 and post-pandemic. Furthermore, we summarise new treatment options for patients with both COVID-19 and diabetes, and highlight current challenges in clinical management.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/metabolism , Disease Management , Metabolic Diseases/epidemiology , Metabolic Diseases/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19/therapy , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/metabolism , Diabetes Mellitus/therapy , Humans , Hypertension/epidemiology , Hypertension/metabolism , Hypertension/therapy , Metabolic Diseases/therapy , Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease/epidemiology , Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease/metabolism , Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease/therapy , Obesity/epidemiology , Obesity/metabolism , Obesity/therapy
2.
Biomed Pharmacother ; 144: 112230, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1517059

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic caused by the coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 has become a serious challenge for medicine and science. Analysis of the molecular mechanisms associated with the clinical manifestations and severity of COVID-19 has identified several key points of immune dysregulation observed in SARS-CoV-2 infection. For diabetic patients, factors including higher binding affinity and virus penetration, decreased virus clearance and decreased T cell function, increased susceptibility to hyperinflammation, and cytokine storm may make these patients susceptible to a more severe course of COVID-19 disease. Metabolic changes induced by diabetes, especially hyperglycemia, can directly affect the immunometabolism of lymphocytes in part by affecting the activity of the mTOR protein kinase signaling pathway. High mTOR activity can enhance the progression of diabetes due to the activation of effector proinflammatory subpopulations of lymphocytes and, conversely, low activity promotes the differentiation of T-regulatory cells. Interestingly, metformin, an extensively used antidiabetic drug, inhibits mTOR by affecting the activity of AMPK. Therefore, activation of AMPK and/or inhibition of the mTOR-mediated signaling pathway may be an important new target for drug therapy in COVID-19 cases mostly by reducing the level of pro-inflammatory signaling and cytokine storm. These suggestions have been partially confirmed by several retrospective analyzes of patients with diabetes mellitus hospitalized for severe COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Diabetes Mellitus/drug therapy , Hypoglycemic Agents/therapeutic use , Immunity, Cellular/drug effects , Metformin/therapeutic use , Severity of Illness Index , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/metabolism , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/immunology , Diabetes Mellitus/metabolism , Humans , Hypoglycemic Agents/pharmacology , Immunity, Cellular/physiology , Lymphocytes/drug effects , Lymphocytes/immunology , Lymphocytes/metabolism , Metformin/pharmacology , Mortality/trends , T-Lymphocytes, Regulatory/drug effects , T-Lymphocytes, Regulatory/immunology , T-Lymphocytes, Regulatory/metabolism , TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases/antagonists & inhibitors , TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases/immunology , TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases/metabolism
3.
Trends Endocrinol Metab ; 32(11): 842-845, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1349597

ABSTRACT

The widespread extrapulmonary complications of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) have gained momentum; the pancreas is another major target for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Here, we take a closer look into potential pathological interactions. We provide an overview of the current knowledge and understanding of SARS-CoV-2 infection of the pancreas with a special focus on pancreatic islets and propose direct, indirect, and systemic mechanisms for pancreas injury as result of the COVID-19-diabetes fatal bidirectional relationship.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , Diabetes Mellitus/metabolism , Insulin-Secreting Cells/metabolism , Acinar Cells/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Glucagon-Secreting Cells/metabolism , Humans , Islets of Langerhans/metabolism , Pancreas/metabolism , Receptors, Coronavirus/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Serine Endopeptidases/metabolism , Viral Tropism
4.
Cell Metab ; 33(8): 1565-1576.e5, 2021 08 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1343160

ABSTRACT

Emerging evidence points toward an intricate relationship between the pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and diabetes. While preexisting diabetes is associated with severe COVID-19, it is unclear whether COVID-19 severity is a cause or consequence of diabetes. To mechanistically link COVID-19 to diabetes, we tested whether insulin-producing pancreatic ß cells can be infected by SARS-CoV-2 and cause ß cell depletion. We found that the SARS-CoV-2 receptor, ACE2, and related entry factors (TMPRSS2, NRP1, and TRFC) are expressed in ß cells, with selectively high expression of NRP1. We discovered that SARS-CoV-2 infects human pancreatic ß cells in patients who succumbed to COVID-19 and selectively infects human islet ß cells in vitro. We demonstrated that SARS-CoV-2 infection attenuates pancreatic insulin levels and secretion and induces ß cell apoptosis, each rescued by NRP1 inhibition. Phosphoproteomic pathway analysis of infected islets indicates apoptotic ß cell signaling, similar to that observed in type 1 diabetes (T1D). In summary, our study shows SARS-CoV-2 can directly induce ß cell killing.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/virology , Diabetes Mellitus/virology , Insulin-Secreting Cells/virology , Neuropilin-1/metabolism , Receptors, Virus/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Virus Internalization , A549 Cells , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Antigens, CD/metabolism , Apoptosis , Apoptosis Regulatory Proteins/metabolism , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , Case-Control Studies , Diabetes Mellitus/diagnosis , Diabetes Mellitus/metabolism , Female , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Insulin/metabolism , Insulin-Secreting Cells/metabolism , Male , Middle Aged , Receptors, Transferrin/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Serine Endopeptidases/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism
5.
Cardiol Rev ; 29(6): 292-295, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1310959

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has presented many new challenges to the healthcare community with the sheer number of individuals affected and the range of symptoms at presentation. Early findings have shown that increased age is an independent risk factor for COVID-19 severity. Diabetes and hypertension were also found to be strong independent risk factors for severe COVID-19. It was later discovered that obesity is a strong risk factor for severe disease as well. Possible mechanisms for the increased risk associated with metabolic disease include the increased prevalence of acute respiratory syndrome, immune cell dysfunction, and chronic inflammatory states associated with obesity and diabetes. Acknowledging these risk factors has consequences for addressing vaccination strategies as well as healthcare disparities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Hypertension/epidemiology , Obesity/epidemiology , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/physiopathology , Comorbidity , Diabetes Mellitus/metabolism , Diabetes Mellitus/physiopathology , Humans , Hypertension/metabolism , Hypertension/physiopathology , Inflammation/metabolism , Obesity/metabolism , Obesity/physiopathology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/epidemiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/physiopathology , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index
6.
Islets ; 13(3-4): 66-79, 2021 07 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1310869

ABSTRACT

The link between COVID-19 infection and diabetes has been explored in several studies since the start of the pandemic, with associations between comorbid diabetes and poorer prognosis in patients infected with the virus and reports of diabetic ketoacidosis occurring with COVID-19 infection. As such, significant interest has been generated surrounding mechanisms by which the virus may exert effects on the pancreatic ß cells. In this review, we consider possible routes by which SARS-CoV-2 may impact ß cells. Specifically, we outline data that either support or argue against the idea of direct infection and injury of ß cells by SARS-CoV-2. We also discuss ß cell damage due to a "bystander" effect in which infection with the virus leads to damage to surrounding tissues that are essential for ß cell survival and function, such as the pancreatic microvasculature and exocrine tissue. Studies elucidating the provocation of a cytokine storm following COVID-19 infection and potential impacts of systemic inflammation and increases in insulin resistance on ß cells are also reviewed. Finally, we summarize the existing clinical data surrounding diabetes incidence since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Insulin-Secreting Cells/physiology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Bystander Effect/physiology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/physiopathology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/complications , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/metabolism , Cytokine Release Syndrome/virology , Diabetes Mellitus/immunology , Diabetes Mellitus/metabolism , Diabetes Mellitus/virology , Humans , Inflammation/complications , Inflammation/metabolism , Inflammation/virology , Insulin Resistance/physiology , Insulin-Secreting Cells/virology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
7.
Cell Metab ; 32(6): 1028-1040.e4, 2020 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1310646

ABSTRACT

Isolated reports of new-onset diabetes in individuals with COVID-19 have led to the hypothesis that SARS-CoV-2 is directly cytotoxic to pancreatic islet ß cells. This would require binding and entry of SARS-CoV-2 into ß cells via co-expression of its canonical cell entry factors, angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) and transmembrane serine protease 2 (TMPRSS2); however, their expression in human pancreas has not been clearly defined. We analyzed six transcriptional datasets of primary human islet cells and found that ACE2 and TMPRSS2 were not co-expressed in single ß cells. In pancreatic sections, ACE2 and TMPRSS2 protein was not detected in ß cells from donors with and without diabetes. Instead, ACE2 protein was expressed in islet and exocrine tissue microvasculature and in a subset of pancreatic ducts, whereas TMPRSS2 protein was restricted to ductal cells. These findings reduce the likelihood that SARS-CoV-2 directly infects ß cells in vivo through ACE2 and TMPRSS2.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19/metabolism , Diabetes Mellitus/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Serine Endopeptidases/metabolism , Virus Internalization , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/analysis , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Animals , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/genetics , Cells, Cultured , Diabetes Complications/genetics , Diabetes Complications/metabolism , Diabetes Mellitus/genetics , Gene Expression , Humans , Insulin-Secreting Cells/metabolism , Mice , Microvessels/metabolism , Pancreas/metabolism , RNA, Messenger/analysis , RNA, Messenger/genetics , Serine Endopeptidases/analysis , Serine Endopeptidases/genetics
8.
Biol Futur ; 72(3): 291-297, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1261840

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is a disease-causing current pandemic. It prevails in patients with pre-existing conditions such as diabetes and hypertension. Renin-angiotensin system was identified as a center of COVID-19 pathophysiology. There is a current controversy concerning the usage of ACE inhibitors and AR blockers in patients with COVID-19. Multiple clinical trials are on the way to determine the effect of RAS blockers in patients with COVID-19. ACE2 receptor is thought to be the point of entry utilized by a coronavirus. However, other factors have been identified which potentially facilitate SARS-CoV-2 entry into the cell. ADAM17 could facilitate viral entry in hyperglycemic and diabetic patients. Insulin is an ADAM17 inhibitor. Heme oxygenase (HO)-1 level is reduced in diabetic patients, contributing to the worst outcome for patients with poor glycemic control. The combined therapy of glycemic control and antioxidant response to oxidative stress could be explored in patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
ADAM17 Protein/metabolism , COVID-19/complications , Diabetes Mellitus/metabolism , Hyperglycemia , SARS-CoV-2 , ADAM17 Protein/genetics , Humans , Virus Internalization
9.
Stem Cells Dev ; 30(15): 758-772, 2021 08 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1254367

ABSTRACT

Cytokine storm is recognized as one of the factors contributing to organ failures and mortality in patients with COVID-19. Due to chronic inflammation, COVID-19 patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) or renal disease (RD) have more severe symptoms and higher mortality. However, the factors that contribute to severe outcomes of COVID-19 patients with DM and RD have received little attention. In an effort to investigate potential treatments for COVID-19, recent research has focused on the immunomodulation functions of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). In this study, the correlation between DM and RD and the severity of COVID-19 was examined by a combined approach with a meta-analysis and experimental research. The results of a systematic review and meta-analysis suggested that the odd of mortality in patients with both DM and RD was increased in comparison to those with a single comorbidity. In addition, in the experimental research, the data showed that high glucose and uremic toxins contributed to the induction of cytokine storm in human lung adenocarcinoma epithelial cells (Calu-3 cells) in response to SARS-CoV Peptide Pools. Of note, the incorporation of Wharton's jelly MSC-derived extracellular vesicles (WJ-EVs) into SARS-CoV peptide-induced Calu-3 resulted in a significant decrease in nuclear NF-κB p65 and the downregulation of the cytokine storm under high concentrations of glucose and uremic toxins. This clearly suggests the potential for WJ-EVs to reduce cytokine storm reactions in patients with both chronic inflammation diseases and viral infection.


Subject(s)
Cytokine Release Syndrome/prevention & control , Extracellular Vesicles/physiology , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/cytology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Wharton Jelly/cytology , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/therapy , Cells, Cultured , Coculture Techniques , Cytokine Release Syndrome/genetics , Cytokine Release Syndrome/metabolism , Cytokine Release Syndrome/virology , Cytokines/genetics , Cytokines/metabolism , Diabetes Complications/blood , Diabetes Complications/metabolism , Diabetes Complications/therapy , Diabetes Complications/virology , Diabetes Mellitus/blood , Diabetes Mellitus/metabolism , Diabetes Mellitus/therapy , Diabetes Mellitus/virology , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Female , Gene Expression Regulation/drug effects , Glucose/metabolism , Glucose/pharmacology , Humans , Inflammation Mediators/metabolism , Male , Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/physiology , Pregnancy , Toxins, Biological/metabolism , Toxins, Biological/pharmacology , Umbilical Cord/cytology , Uremia/blood , Uremia/complications , Uremia/metabolism , Uremia/therapy
10.
Cardiovasc Diabetol ; 20(1): 99, 2021 05 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1219133

ABSTRACT

RATIONALE: About 50% of hospitalized coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) developed myocardial damage. The mechanisms of direct SARS-CoV-2 cardiomyocyte infection include viral invasion via ACE2-Spike glycoprotein-binding. In DM patients, the impact of glycation of ACE2 on cardiomyocyte invasion by SARS-CoV-2 can be of high importance. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the presence of SARS-CoV-2 in cardiomyocytes from heart autopsy of DM cases compared to Non-DM; to investigate the role of DM in SARS-COV-2 entry in cardiomyocytes. METHODS AND RESULTS: We evaluated consecutive autopsy cases, deceased for COVID-19, from Italy between Apr 30, 2020 and Jan 18, 2021. We evaluated SARS-CoV-2 in cardiomyocytes, expression of ACE2 (total and glycosylated form), and transmembrane protease serine protease-2 (TMPRSS2) protein. In order to study the role of diabetes on cardiomyocyte alterations, independently of COVID-19, we investigated ACE2, glycosylated ACE2, and TMPRSS2 proteins in cardiomyocytes from DM and Non-DM explanted-hearts. Finally, to investigate the effects of DM on ACE2 protein modification, an in vitro glycation study of recombinant human ACE2 (hACE2) was performed to evaluate the effects on binding to SARS-CoV-2 Spike protein. The authors included cardiac tissue from 97 autopsies. DM was diagnosed in 37 patients (38%). Fourth-seven out of 97 autopsies (48%) had SARS-CoV-2 RNA in cardiomyocytes. Thirty out of 37 DM autopsy cases (81%) and 17 out of 60 Non-DM autopsy cases (28%) had SARS-CoV-2 RNA in cardiomyocytes. Total ACE2, glycosylated ACE2, and TMPRSS2 protein expressions were higher in cardiomyocytes from autopsied and explanted hearts of DM than Non-DM. In vitro exposure of monomeric hACE2 to 120 mM glucose for 12 days led to non-enzymatic glycation of four lysine residues in the neck domain affecting the protein oligomerization. CONCLUSIONS: The upregulation of ACE2 expression (total and glycosylated forms) in DM cardiomyocytes, along with non-enzymatic glycation, could increase the susceptibility to COVID-19 infection in DM patients by favouring the cellular entry of SARS-CoV2.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/biosynthesis , COVID-19/metabolism , Diabetes Mellitus/metabolism , Myocytes, Cardiac/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Aged , Amino Acid Sequence , Autopsy , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/pathology , Cohort Studies , Diabetes Mellitus/pathology , Female , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Myocytes, Cardiac/pathology , Protein Binding/physiology , Protein Structure, Secondary
11.
Clin Immunol ; 227: 108733, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1198654

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is responsible for many pathological processes, including altered vascular disease development, dysfunctional thrombosis and a heightened inflammatory response. However, there is limited work to determine the underlying cellular responses induced by exposure to SARS-CoV-2 structural proteins. Thus, our objective was to investigate how human arterial adventitial fibroblasts inflammation, thrombosis and diabetic disease markers are altered in response to Spike, Nucleocapsid and Membrane-Envelope proteins. We hypothesized that after a short-term exposure to SARS-CoV-2 proteins, adventitial fibroblasts would have a higher expression of inflammatory, thrombotic and diabetic proteins, which would support a mechanism for altered vascular disease progression. After incubation, the expression of gC1qR, ICAM-1, tissue factor, RAGE and GLUT-4 was significantly up-regulated. In general, the extent of expression was different for each SARS-CoV-2 protein, suggesting that SARS-CoV-2 proteins interact with cells through different mechanisms. Thus, SARS-CoV-2 protein interaction with vascular cells may regulate vascular disease responses.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Cardiovascular Diseases/virology , Diabetes Mellitus/virology , Fibroblasts/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Thrombosis/virology , Aorta/cytology , Aorta/metabolism , Cardiovascular Diseases/complications , Cardiovascular Diseases/immunology , Cardiovascular Diseases/metabolism , Carrier Proteins/metabolism , Cell Survival/immunology , Cell Survival/physiology , Complement System Proteins/immunology , Coronavirus Envelope Proteins/immunology , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/immunology , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/metabolism , Diabetes Mellitus/metabolism , Glucose Transporter Type 4/metabolism , Humans , Inflammation/metabolism , Inflammation/virology , Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1/metabolism , Mitochondrial Proteins/metabolism , Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products/metabolism , Thrombosis/complications , Thrombosis/metabolism
12.
Prim Care Diabetes ; 15(4): 629-634, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1174449

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The epidemiology of COVID-19 and its association with cardiometabolic disorders is poorly understood. This is a narrative review that investigates the effects of COVID-19 infection on insulin resistance in patients with diabetes. METHODS: An online search of all published literature was done via PubMed and Google Scholar using the MeSH terms "COVID-19," "SARS-CoV-2," "coronavirus," "insulin resistance," and "diabetes." Only articles that were directly applicable to insulin resistance in COVID-19 and diabetes was reviewed. RESULTS: Current data shows an increased risk of mortality in patients with diabetes and COVID-19 compared to those without diabetes. COVID-19 triggers insulin resistance in patients, causing chronic metabolic disorders that were non-existent prior to infection. CONCLUSION: Patients with diabetes are more susceptible to COVID-19 infection than those without diabetes. ACE2 expression decreases with infection, exaggerating Ang II activity with subsequent insulin resistance development, an exaggerated immune response and severe SARS-COV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Insulin Resistance , Metabolic Syndrome/epidemiology , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Comorbidity , Diabetes Mellitus/metabolism , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Metabolic Syndrome/metabolism , Metabolic Syndrome/virology , Prognosis , Renin-Angiotensin System , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
13.
Front Immunol ; 12: 597399, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1167337

ABSTRACT

There exists increasing evidence that people with preceding medical conditions, such as diabetes and cancer, have a higher risk of infection with SARS-CoV-2 and are more vulnerable to severe disease. To get insights into the possible role of the immune system upon COVID-19 infection, 2811 genes of the gene ontology term "immune system process GO: 0002376" were selected for coexpression analysis of the human targets of SARS-CoV-2 (HT-SARS-CoV-2) ACE2, TMPRSS2, and FURIN in tissue samples from patients with cancer and diabetes mellitus. The network between HT-SARS-CoV-2 and immune system process genes was analyzed based on functional protein associations using STRING. In addition, STITCH was employed to determine druggable targets. DPP4 was the only immune system process gene, which was coexpressed with the three HT-SARS-CoV-2 genes, while eight other immune genes were at least coexpressed with two HT-SARS-CoV-2 genes. STRING analysis between immune and HT-SARS-CoV-2 genes plotted 19 associations of which there were eight common networking genes in mixed healthy (323) and pan-cancer (11003) tissues in addition to normal (87), cancer (90), and diabetic (128) pancreatic tissues. Using this approach, three commonly applicable druggable connections between HT-SARS-CoV-2 and immune system process genes were identified. These include positive associations of ACE2-DPP4 and TMPRSS2-SRC as well as a negative association of FURIN with ADAM17. Furthermore, 16 drugs were extracted from STITCH (score <0.8) with 32 target genes. Thus, an immunological network associated with HT-SARS-CoV-2 using bioinformatics tools was identified leading to novel therapeutic opportunities for COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Diabetes Mellitus/metabolism , Neoplasms/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/metabolism , Databases, Genetic , Diabetes Mellitus/genetics , Diabetes Mellitus/immunology , Diabetes Mellitus/virology , Dipeptidyl Peptidase 4/genetics , Dipeptidyl Peptidase 4/metabolism , Furin/genetics , Furin/metabolism , Gene Expression Regulation/immunology , Gene Ontology , Genome-Wide Association Study , Genomics , Humans , Lymphocytes/immunology , Lymphocytes/metabolism , Neoplasms/genetics , Neoplasms/immunology , Neoplasms/virology , Pancreas/immunology , Pancreas/metabolism , Pancreas/virology , Protein Interaction Maps/genetics , Protein Interaction Maps/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Serine Endopeptidases/genetics , Serine Endopeptidases/metabolism
14.
Kidney Blood Press Res ; 46(2): 152-161, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1146996

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Vitamin D is a hormone regulating not only calcium and phosphate homeostasis but also, at the same time, exerting many other extraskeletal functions via genomic effects (gene transcription) and probably by non-genomic effects as well. Availability is ensured by dietary intake of its precursors and by de novo production via sunlight. Yet, vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency are very common across the globe and are connected to many pathophysiological states, for example, diabetes mellitus, allergies, autoimmune diseases, pregnancy complications, and recently have also been associated with worse COVID-19 clinical outcomes. SUMMARY: In this review, we summarize current knowledge about vitamin D metabolism in general, its role in diabetes mellitus (mainly type 2) and diabetic complications (mainly diabetic kidney disease), and potential therapeutic perspectives including vitamin D signalling as a druggable target. Key Messages: Vitamin D is not only a vitamin but also a hormone involved in many physiological processes. Its insufficiency or deficiency can lead to many pathological states.


Subject(s)
Diabetes Mellitus/metabolism , Diabetic Nephropathies/metabolism , Vitamin D Deficiency/metabolism , Vitamin D/metabolism , Animals , COVID-19/metabolism , Diabetes Mellitus/drug therapy , Diabetes Mellitus/etiology , Diabetes Mellitus/physiopathology , Diabetic Nephropathies/drug therapy , Diabetic Nephropathies/etiology , Diabetic Nephropathies/physiopathology , Humans , Signal Transduction/drug effects , Vitamin D/therapeutic use , Vitamin D Deficiency/complications , Vitamin D Deficiency/drug therapy , Vitamin D Deficiency/physiopathology , Vitamins/metabolism , Vitamins/therapeutic use
15.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 25(5): 2415-2417, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1145758

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has made more awful effect on wellbeing and economy worldwide on an extraordinary scale. Angiotensin I Converting Enzyme 2 (ACE2), the principal receptor of SARS-CoV2, has been found to be communicated with Dopa decarboxylase in unwinding the connection of catecholamines with COVID-19 infection. Cardiovascular (CV) sickness, diabetes, hypertension, and related conditions cause significant risks during the current situation and the affected people are under basic observation around the world. The hypertension and diabetes are related with alterations in the degrees of catecholamines associated with renal gland. The naive form of renal dopaminergic framework is related with the expanded reabsorption of sodium resulting in downregulation of the ACE2 expression. Catecholamine biosynthesis is managed by counter-controlling angiotensin type 1R (AT1R) and angiotensin type 2R (AT2R), incitement of AT2 lessens catecholamine biosynthesis by means of a diminishing in cGMP levels likewise incitement of AT1 initiate catecholamine biosynthesis. This audit sums up the conceivable contribution of catecholamines in intense COVID-19 contamination and furthermore featured possible restorative adequacy of catecholamine flagging pathways against the incessant SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Catecholamines/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 , Diabetes Mellitus/metabolism , Hormones , Humans , Hypertension/metabolism , Pandemics , Receptors, Virus , SARS-CoV-2
16.
Trends Microbiol ; 29(10): 894-907, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1129199

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infections present with increased disease severity and poor clinical outcomes in diabetic patients compared with their nondiabetic counterparts. Diabetes/hyperglycemia-triggered endothelial dysfunction and hyperactive inflammatory and immune responses are correlated to twofold to threefold higher intensive care hospitalizations and more than twice the mortality among diabetic coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients. While comorbidities such as obesity, cardiovascular disease, and hypertension worsen the prognosis of diabetic COVID-19 patients, COVID-19 infections are also associated with new-onset diabetes, severe metabolic complications, and increased thrombotic events in the backdrop of aberrant endothelial function. While several antidiabetic medications are used to manage blood glucose levels, we discuss the multifaceted ability of metformin to control blood glucose levels and possibly attenuate endothelial dysfunction, inhibit viral entry and infection, and modify inflammatory and immune responses during SARS-CoV-2 infections. These actions make metformin a viable candidate drug to be considered for repurposing and gaining ground against the SARS-CoV-2-induced tsunami in diabetic COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Diabetes Mellitus/drug therapy , Hypoglycemic Agents/administration & dosage , Metformin/administration & dosage , Animals , Blood Glucose/metabolism , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Diabetes Mellitus/metabolism , Drug Repositioning , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
17.
Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol ; 41(2): 614-627, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1105574

ABSTRACT

The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has affected millions of people worldwide and the pandemic has yet to wane. Despite its associated significant morbidity and mortality, there are no definitive cures and no fully preventative measures to combat SARS-CoV-2. Hence, the urgency to identify the pathobiological mechanisms underlying increased risk for and the severity of SARS-CoV-2 infection is mounting. One contributing factor, the accumulation of damage-associated molecular pattern molecules, is a leading trigger for the activation of nuclear factor-kB and the IRF (interferon regulatory factors), such as IRF7. Activation of these pathways, particularly in the lung and other organs, such as the heart, contributes to a burst of cytokine release, which predisposes to significant tissue damage, loss of function, and mortality. The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) binds damage-associated molecular patterns is expressed in the lung and heart, and in priming organs, such as the blood vessels (in diabetes) and adipose tissue (in obesity), and transduces the pathological signals emitted by damage-associated molecular patterns. It is proposed that damage-associated molecular pattern-RAGE enrichment in these priming tissues, and in the lungs and heart during active infection, contributes to the widespread tissue damage induced by SARS-CoV-2. Accordingly, the RAGE axis might play seminal roles in and be a target for therapeutic intervention in SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products/metabolism , Adipocytes/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Animals , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cytokine Release Syndrome , Diabetes Complications/metabolism , Diabetes Mellitus/metabolism , Disease Models, Animal , Endothelium, Vascular/metabolism , Humans , Interferon Regulatory Factor-7/metabolism , Lung/metabolism , Myocardium/metabolism , NF-kappa B/metabolism , Obesity/complications , Obesity/metabolism , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
18.
Eur J Clin Invest ; 50(7): e13262, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1081113

ABSTRACT

The Covid-19 pandemic confronted us with unknown clinical pictures, also in diabetology and endocrinology. Sharing clinical experiences is therefore of enormous importance. Actually, information about the care given in the Covid-19 ward (in contrast to that provided in the Emergency Room/ICU) is still sparse. The last weeks we built experience and gathered knowledge while giving hospital care to patients who had a pre-existent endocrine disease (and diabetes; most patients suffered from a type two diabetes). In our contribution we presented our insights obtained from this intensive period obtained in the Covid-19 ward.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/drug therapy , Hyperglycemia/drug therapy , Hypoglycemic Agents/therapeutic use , Insulin/therapeutic use , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Adrenal Insufficiency/complications , Adrenal Insufficiency/drug therapy , Belgium , Betacoronavirus , Blood Glucose/metabolism , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/metabolism , Diabetes Complications , Diabetes Insipidus/complications , Diabetes Insipidus/therapy , Diabetes Mellitus/drug therapy , Diabetes Mellitus/metabolism , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/complications , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/metabolism , Disease Management , Glycated Hemoglobin A/metabolism , Hospital Units , Hospitalization , Humans , Hyperglycemia/etiology , Hyperglycemia/metabolism , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2
19.
Epidemiol Prev ; 44(5-6 Suppl 2): 169-182, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1068137

ABSTRACT

As the Coronavirus situation (COVID-19) continues to evolve, many questions concerning the factors relating to the diffusion and severity of the disease remain unanswered.Whilst opinions regarding the weight of evidence for these risk factors, and the studies published so far are often inconclusive or offer contrasting results, the role of comorbidities in the risk of serious adverse outcomes in patients affected with COVID-19 appears to be evident since the outset. Hypertension, diabetes, and obesity are under discussion as important factors affecting the severity of disease. Air pollution has been considered to play a role in the diffusion of the virus, in the propagation of the contagion, in the severity of symptoms, and in the poor prognosis. Accumulating evidence supports the hypothesis that environmental particulate matter (PM) can trigger inflammatory responses at molecular, cellular, and organ levels, sustaining respiratory, cardiovascular, and dysmetabolic diseases.To better understand the intricate relationships among pre-existing conditions, PM, and viral infection, we examined the response at the molecular level of T47D human breast adenocarcinoma cells exposed to different fractions of PM. T47D cells express several receptors, including the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), and ACE2, the main - but not the only - receptor for SARS-CoV-2 entry.PM samples were collected in an urban background site located in the Northern area of the City of Bologna (Emilia-Romagna Region, Northern Italy) during winter 2013. T47D cells were exposed to organic or aqueous (inorganic) extracts at the final concentration of 8 m3 for a 4-hour duration. Both the concentration and the exposure time were chosen to resemble an average outdoor exposure. RNA was extracted from cells, purified and hybridised on 66k microarray slides from Agilent.The lists of differentially expressed genes in PM organic extracts were evaluated by using Metacore, and an enrichment analysis was performed to identify pathways maps, process networks, and disease by biomarkers altered after T47D treatment.The analysis of the modulated genes gave evidence for the involvement of PM in dysmetabolic diseases, including diabetes and obesity, and hypertension through the activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) canonical pathway.On the basis of current knowledge, existing data, and exploratory experimental evidence, we tease out the likely molecular interplay that can ultimately tip the disease outcome into severity. Looking beyond ACE2, several additional key markers are identified. Disruption of these targets worsens pre-existing conditions and/or exacerbates the adverse effects induced by SARS-CoV-2 infection. Whilst appropriately designed, epidemiological studies are very much needed to investigate these associations based on our hypothesis of investigation, by reviewing recent experimental and epidemiological evidence, here we speculate and provide new insights on the possible role of environmental pollution in the exacerbation of effects by SARS-CoV-2 and other respiratory viruses. This work is intended to assist in the development of appropriate investigative approaches to protect public health.


Subject(s)
Air Pollution/adverse effects , COVID-19/epidemiology , Particulate Matter/adverse effects , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/physiology , COVID-19/etiology , Cell Line, Tumor , Comorbidity , Coronaviridae/physiology , Cytochrome P-450 CYP1A1/physiology , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/genetics , Diabetes Mellitus/metabolism , Disease Susceptibility , Gene Expression Profiling , Gene Expression Regulation/drug effects , Humans , Hypertension/epidemiology , Hypertension/genetics , Hypertension/metabolism , Inflammation/epidemiology , Inflammation/genetics , Inflammation/metabolism , Italy , Obesity/epidemiology , Obesity/genetics , Obesity/metabolism , Particulate Matter/pharmacology , Receptors, Aryl Hydrocarbon/physiology , Receptors, Virus/physiology , Risk , SARS-CoV-2/ultrastructure , Signal Transduction
20.
Diabetes Metab Syndr ; 14(6): 1927-1930, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1059522

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Diabetes is a frequent comorbidity in patients with Severe COVID-19 infection associated with a worse prognosis. Hypercoagulability with elevation in D-dimer levels has been demonstrated in patients with COVID-19. This study aims to study D-dimer levels in people with diabetes compared to those without diabetes among patients with COVID-19 infection. METHODS: In this observational study 98 moderate and severely ill patients with COVID-19 infection were included at a dedicated COVID hospital. The study group was divided into patients with diabetes and without diabetes. Peak D-dimer was measured in both the groups and compared using appropriate statistical tests. RESULTS: In our study peak D-dimer levels were 1509 ± 2420 ng/mL (Mean ± SD) in people with diabetes and 515 ± 624 ng/mL (Mean ± SD) in patients without diabetes. Patients with diabetes had higher D-dimer levels which were statistically significant. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows COVID-19 patients with diabetes had significantly higher D-dimer levels. Therefore, it is possible that COVID-19 infection with diabetes is more likely to cause hypercoagulable state with a worse prognosis. However clinical implications of these findings will need to be seen in further studies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , Diabetes Mellitus/metabolism , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/metabolism , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/complications , Cross-Sectional Studies , Diabetes Complications/metabolism , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index
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