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1.
Rev Endocr Metab Disord ; 23(2): 205-213, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2174759

ABSTRACT

Diabetes mellitus and/or hyperglycemia are highly prevalent medical conditions in patients hospitalized for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and are associated with adverse outcomes. In addition, COVID-19 itself can provoke fluctuating and high glucose levels that can be difficult to manage upon hospitalization. Hospitalized patients with COVID-19 are at high risk of malnutrition due to an increase in nutritional requirements and a severe acute inflammatory response. The management of patients with diabetes/hyperglycemia and COVID-19 is challenging and requires a specific nutritional approach, the purpose of which is to fulfill the nutritional requirements while maintaining an optimal glycemic control. In this study, an expert group of nutritional endocrinologists carried out a qualitative literature review and provided recommendations based on evidence and guidelines, when available, or on their own experience. The optimal care based on these recommendations was compared with the routine bedside care as reported by a panel of physicians (mainly, endocrinologists, geriatricians, and internists) treating patients with diabetes/hyperglycemia and COVID-19 in their daily practice. Early screening and diagnosis, a diabetes-specific therapeutic approach, and a close malnutrition monitoring are essential to improve the clinical outcomes of these patients. In conclusion, the proposed recommendations are intended to provide a useful guide on the clinical management of malnutrition in patients with COVID-19 and diabetes/hyperglycemia, in order to improve their outcomes and accelerate their recovery. The comparison of the recommended optimal care with routine clinical practice could aid to identify gaps in knowledge, implementation difficulties, and areas for improvement in the management of malnutrition in this population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus , Hyperglycemia , Malnutrition , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/therapy , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/therapy , Humans , Hyperglycemia/complications , Hyperglycemia/therapy , Malnutrition/therapy , SARS-CoV-2
3.
J Diabetes Complications ; 36(11): 108336, 2022 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2117652

ABSTRACT

The raging COVID-19 pandemic is in its third year of global impact. The SARS CoV 2 virus has a high rate of spread, protean manifestations, and a high morbidity and mortality in individuals with predisposing risk factors. The pathophysiologic mechanisms involve a heightened systemic inflammatory state, cardiometabolic derangements, and varying degrees of glucose intolerance. The latter can be evident as significant hyperglycemia leading to new-onset diabetes or worsening of preexisting disease. Unfortunately, the clinical course beyond the acute phase of the illness may persist in the form of a variety of symptoms that together form the so-called "Long COVID" or "Post-COVID Syndrome". It is thought that a chronic, low-grade inflammatory and immunologic state persists during this phase, which may last for weeks or months. Although numerous insights have been gained into COVID-related hyperglycemia and diabetes, its prediction, course, and management remain to be fully elucidated.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus , Hyperglycemia , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Pandemics , COVID-19/complications , RNA, Viral , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/therapy , Hyperglycemia/complications , Inflammation/complications
5.
Diabetes ; 70(8): 1623-1633, 2021 08 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2114268

ABSTRACT

Women are broadly underrepresented in scientific leadership positions and their accomplishments are not provided equal recognition compared with those of men, but the imbalance in the field of diabetes is unknown. Hence, we analyzed multiple aspects of historical and present-day female representation in the diabetes field.We quantified gender representation at annual American Diabetes Association (ADA) meetings; editorial board service positions for ADA and the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) journals; principal investigators for ADA, JDRF, and National Institutes of Health National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases P30 grant funding; and ADA, JDRF, and EASD award recipients. There are many women in the field of diabetes: registration for the ADA Scientific Sessions has been 43% female since 2016, and for over five decades, women comprised 83% of ADA Presidents of Health Care and Education. Yet, only 9% of ADA Presidents of Medicine and Science have been women. Women were well represented on editorial boards for journals focused on diabetes education (Diabetes Spectrum, 89% female) and primary care (Clinical Diabetes, 49% female) but not for the more academically targeted Diabetes Care (34% female), Diabetes (21% female), and Diabetologia (30% female). Only one-third of ADA Pathway to Stop Diabetes and JDRF grants have been awarded to women, and females only lead 2 of 18 (11%) of the P30-supported Diabetes Research Centers. Finally, only 2-12% of major ADA, JDRF, and EASD awards were given to women, without significant change over time. Despite increasing recognition of gender imbalance in research and medicine, many disparities in the field of diabetes persist. We call for decreasing barriers for advancement of female investigators and creating environments that promote their retention and equitable recognition for their contributions to the field.


Subject(s)
Awards and Prizes , Diabetes Mellitus , Diabetes Mellitus/therapy , Female , Humans , Leadership , Male , National Institutes of Health (U.S.) , Societies, Medical , United States
6.
Lancet Diabetes Endocrinol ; 10(12): 890-900, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2106223

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has disproportionately affected certain groups, such as older people (ie, >65 years), minority ethnic populations, and people with specific chronic conditions including diabetes, cardiovascular disease, kidney disease, and some respiratory diseases. There is now evidence of not only direct but also indirect adverse effects of COVID-19 in people with diabetes. Recurrent lockdowns and public health measures throughout the pandemic have restricted access to routine diabetes care, limiting new diagnoses, and affecting self-management, routine follow-ups, and access to medications, as well as affecting lifestyle behaviours and emotional wellbeing globally. Pre-pandemic studies have shown that short-term delays in delivery of routine care, even by 12 months, are associated with adverse effects on risk factor control and worse microvascular, macrovascular, and mortality outcomes in people with diabetes. Disruptions within the short-to-medium term due to natural disasters also result in worse diabetes outcomes. However, the true magnitude of the indirect effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on long-term outcomes and mortality in people with diabetes is still unclear. Disasters tend to exacerbate existing health disparities; as we recover ambulatory diabetes services in the aftermath of the pandemic, there is an opportunity to prioritise those with the greatest need, and to target resources and interventions aimed at improving outcomes and reducing inequality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus , Disasters , Humans , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Communicable Disease Control , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/therapy
7.
ANS Adv Nurs Sci ; 45(4): 351-370, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2097470

ABSTRACT

Schools play a critical role in students' diabetes management and ensure their safety and well-being. We conducted key informant interviews with 11 school nurses in Missouri to assess determinants for diabetes care implementation. Five themes and 29 subthemes were identified concerning school nurses, schools, external stakeholders, government, and the COVID-19 pandemic. A social-ecological model was developed to elucidate each level's barriers, facilitators, and resources, and their interplay. School nurses should lead diabetes management, emergency planning, and health education for students/staff. Multiple gray areas existed regarding school nurses' specific roles/responsibilities. Lacking funding, insurance, and communication with parents/physicians further challenged diabetes care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus , Nurses , Humans , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Students , Parents , Diabetes Mellitus/therapy
8.
Cardiovasc Diabetol ; 21(1): 216, 2022 10 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2079423

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: It is not clear whether pre-existing macrovascular complications (ischemic heart disease, stroke or peripheral artery disease) are associated with health outcomes in people with diabetes mellitus hospitalized for COVID-19. METHODS: We conducted cohort studies of adults with pre-existing diabetes hospitalized for COVID-19 infection in the UK, France, and Spain during the early phase of the pandemic (between March 2020-October 2020). Logistic regression models adjusted for demographic factors and other comorbidities were used to determine associations between previous macrovascular disease and relevant clinical outcomes: mortality, intensive care unit (ICU) admission and use of invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV) during the hospitalization. Output from individual logistic regression models for each cohort was combined in a meta-analysis. RESULTS: Complete data were available for 4,106 (60.4%) individuals. Of these, 1,652 (40.2%) had any prior macrovascular disease of whom 28.5% of patients died. Mortality was higher for people with compared to those without previous macrovascular disease (37.7% vs 22.4%). The combined crude odds ratio (OR) for previous macrovascular disease and mortality for all four cohorts was 2.12 (95% CI 1.83-2.45 with an I2 of 60%, reduced after adjustments for age, sex, type of diabetes, hypertension, microvascular disease, ethnicity, and BMI to adjusted OR 1.53 [95% CI 1.29-1.81]) for the three cohorts. Further analysis revealed that ischemic heart disease and cerebrovascular disease were the main contributors of adverse outcomes. However, proportions of people admitted to ICU (adjOR 0.48 [95% CI 0.31-0.75], I2 60%) and the use of IMV during hospitalization (adjOR 0.52 [95% CI 0.40-0.68], I2 37%) were significantly lower for people with previous macrovascular disease. CONCLUSIONS: This large multinational study of people with diabetes mellitus hospitalized for COVID-19 demonstrates that previous macrovascular disease is associated with higher mortality and lower proportions admitted to ICU and treated with IMV during hospitalization suggesting selective admission criteria. Our findings highlight the importance correctly assess the prognosis and intensive monitoring in this high-risk group of patients and emphasize the need to design specific public health programs aimed to prevent SARS-CoV-2 infection in this subgroup.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus , Myocardial Ischemia , Adult , Humans , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/therapy , Respiration, Artificial , SARS-CoV-2 , Risk Factors , Hospitalization , Critical Care , Diabetes Mellitus/diagnosis , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/therapy
9.
JAMA Netw Open ; 5(10): e2231633, 2022 10 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2059196

ABSTRACT

Importance: Older Syrian refugees have a high burden of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) and economic vulnerability. Objectives: To develop and internally validate a predictive model to estimate inability to manage NCDs in older Syrian refugees, and to describe barriers to NCD medication adherence. Design, Setting, and Participants: This nested prognostic cross-sectional study was conducted through telephone surveys between September 2020 and January 2021. All households in Lebanon with Syrian refugees aged 50 years or older and who received humanitarian assistance from a nongovernmental organization were invited to participate. Refugees who self-reported having chronic respiratory disease (CRD), diabetes, history of cardiovascular disease (CVD), or hypertension were included in the analysis. Data were analyzed from November 2021 to March 2022. Main Outcomes and Measures: The main outcome was self-reported inability to manage any NCD (including CRD, CVD, diabetes, or hypertension). Predictors of inability to manage any NCD were assessed using logistic regression models. The model was internally validated using bootstrapping techniques, which gave an estimate of optimism. The optimism-adjusted discrimination is presented using the C statistic, and calibration of the model is presented using calibration slope (C slope). Results: Of 3322 older Syrian refugees, 1893 individuals (median [IQR] age, 59 [54-65] years; 1089 [57.5%] women) reported having at least 1 NCD, among whom 351 (10.6% overall; 18.6% of those with ≥1 NCD) had CRD, 781 (23.7% overall; 41.4% of those with ≥1 NCD) had diabetes, 794 (24.1% overall; 42.2% of those with ≥1 NCD) had history of CVD, and 1388 (42.3% overall; 73.6% of those with ≥1 NCD) had hypertension. Among individuals with NCDs, 387 participants (20.4%) were unable to manage at least 1 of their NCDs. Predictors for inability to manage NCDs were age, nonreceipt of cash assistance, household water insecurity, household food insecurity, and having multiple chronic diseases, with an adjusted C statistic of 0.650 (95% CI, 0.620-0.676) and C slope of 0.871 (95% CI, 0.729-1.023). The prevalence of nonadherence to medication was 9.2%, and the main reasons for nonadherence were unaffordability of medication (40.8%; 95% CI, 33.4%-48.5%) and the belief that they no longer required the medication after feeling better (22.4%; 95% CI, 16.4%-29.3%). Conclusions and Relevance: In this cross-sectional study, the predictors of inability to manage NCDs among older Syrian refugees in Lebanon were mainly related to financial barriers. Context-appropriate assistance is required to overcome financial barriers and enable equitable access to medication and health care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiovascular Diseases , Diabetes Mellitus , Hypertension , Noncommunicable Diseases , Refugees , Aged , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/therapy , Female , Humans , Hypertension/drug therapy , Hypertension/epidemiology , Lebanon/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Noncommunicable Diseases/epidemiology , Pandemics , Syria/epidemiology
10.
Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis ; 32(11): 2588-2593, 2022 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2036395

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The COVID-19 pandemic affected the processes of routine care for chronic patients due to disrupted delivery care. The aim of the present study is to verify the COVID-19 pandemic effects on diabetes control and management. METHODS AND RESULTS: The study was designed as a retrospective observational study, performed on two cohorts of patients with diabetes in 2019 and 2020. Data used for the analyses were gathered from administrative and laboratory databases, which do not include any sensible information on COVID-19. The Tuscany Regional Health Agency is data controller for current administrative databases and has been working to produce available information for policy decision-making. In 2020, in comparison with 2019, a relevant reduction of the number of patients measuring HbA1c was observed during the March-April lockdown, and again during the second pandemic wave in Autumn. A similar pattern was observed for specialist visits for diabetes, for which the introduction of televisits only partly compensated for the reduction of traditional office visits. The number of patients receiving drugs for diabetes each week in 2020 was very similar to 2019. The mean HbA1c values and the proportion of HbA1c values > 8% for each week, were higher during the 2020 Spring and Autumn lockdown. CONCLUSION: COVID-19 pandemic negatively impacts diabetes management, reducing specialist visits and HbA1c determinations during the first and second pandemic wave. Despite a satisfactory continuity in pharmacological treatment, short-term impairment of average glycemic control was detected, particularly in Autumn.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus , Blood Glucose , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Diabetes Mellitus/diagnosis , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/therapy , Glycated Hemoglobin A/analysis , Humans , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies
11.
Cien Saude Colet ; 27(9): 3583-3602, 2022 Sep.
Article in Portuguese, English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2032683

ABSTRACT

This article aims to present a proposal for making the instruments used in the three cycles of the PMAQ-AB compatible and to analyze the information on access, coverage, structure, organization and provision of services in PHC related to care for DM in Brazil, according to regions, from the perspective of family health professionals and users. We performed an analysis of the degree of compatibility of the PMAQ-AB questions (2012, 2014 and 2017). To analyze the temporal evolution of the components, we performed a proportion difference test. We calculated the percentage difference between the perspective of professionals and users, per year analyzed, for Brazil. In general, there was an improvement in the quality of care and examinations, except for the diabetic foot. Worse results were found for the North region in relation to the other regions. Despite the structural improvement and the quality of care reported by professionals, there are significant gaps in the quality of care for patients with DM in the SUS. In the scenario of scarce investment added to the growing prevalence of DM, obstacles become progressively more challenging. Therefore, monitoring and evaluating the quality of services provided are essential tasks of the Brazilian Health System.


Este artigo tem o objetivo de apresentar uma proposta de compatibilização dos instrumentos utilizados nos três ciclos do PMAQ-AB e analisar as informações de acesso, cobertura, estrutura, organização e oferta de serviços na APS relacionadas ao cuidado para DM no Brasil, segundo regiões, a partir da perspectiva das equipes de saúde da família e dos usuários. Foi realizada uma análise do grau de compatibilidade das questões do PMAQ-AB (2012, 2014 e 2017). Para análise da evolução temporal dos componentes realizou-se teste de diferença de proporção. Calculou-se a diferença percentual entre a perspectiva das Equipes e dos Usuários, por ano analisado, para Brasil. Em geral, houve melhora da qualidade do cuidado e realização de exames, com exceção do pé diabético. Foram encontrados resultados piores para o Norte em relação às demais regiões. Apesar da melhora estrutural e na qualidade da atenção reportada pelas equipes, foram evidenciadas lacunas significativas na qualidade do cuidado ao paciente com DM no SUS. No cenário de investimento escasso e crescente prevalência de DM, os obstáculos tornam-se cada vez mais desafiadores e, por isso, o monitoramento e avaliação da qualidade dos serviços prestados são tarefas precípuas do SUS.


Subject(s)
Diabetes Mellitus , Quality of Health Care , Brazil , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/therapy , Health Services Accessibility , Humans , Primary Health Care
13.
Rev Med Suisse ; 18(792): 1552-1555, 2022 Aug 24.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2026888

ABSTRACT

We will briefly review the history of telemedicine. Then we will look at its various applications, including teleconsultation, which is only one part of telemedicine. Belgium had not evolved much in the field of teleconsultation. It was only during the COVID-19 pandemic that this possibility was quickly made available to caregivers, and therefore to patients. We will discuss how the Belgian authorities were able to speed up the possibility of using this branch of telemedicine. We will focus more specifically on the care of diabetic patients, particularly in our institution, the University Hospital of Liège in Belgium. Finally, we will discuss the limits and prospects of telemedicine, particularly in the field of diabetology.


Nous allons revoir brièvement l'historique de la télémédecine. Ensuite nous aborderons ses différentes applications, dont fait partie la téléconsultation, qui est une partie de la télémédecine. La Belgique n'avait que peu évolué en matière de téléconsultation. Il a fallu que la pandémie de Covid-19 arrive pour que cette possibilité soit rapidement offerte aux soignants, et donc aux patients. Nous aborderons comment les autorités belges ont pu accélérer la possibilité d'avoir recours à cette branche de la télémédecine. Nous nous focaliserons plus spécifiquement sur la prise en charge des patients diabétiques, en particulier dans notre institution, à savoir le CHU de Liège en Belgique. Enfin, nous aborderons les limites et les perspectives de la télémédecine, en particulier dans le domaine de la diabétologie.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus , Telemedicine , Belgium/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/therapy , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
15.
PLoS One ; 17(8): e0273074, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2021905

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Diabetes Mellitus (DM), a chronic metabolic disorder that caused about 4.2 million deaths and at least 760 billion dollars' expenditure in 2019, has been targeted for action by leaders of WHO member countries. In Ethiopia deaths, due to DM reached 34,262 in 2013. Studies show effective lifestyle interventions; particularly medical nutrition therapy reduces HbA1c by 0.5 to 2%. However, practicing recommended diet is reported to be difficult. Not only Knowledge and practice but also perception studies are therefore necessary to design future health programs. OBJECTIVE: To assess diabetic self-care, dietary practice and associated factors among diabetes patients. METHOD: Institution-basedbased cross-sectional study design was employed from february15-May15, 2020 in Jimma university medical Centre (JUMC). Systematic sampling of every other patient (K = 2.7) was employed to interview 371 participants. A previously validated tool was used to collect data through a face-to-face interview. A path analysis was used to fit the structural model and tests the hypothesized Health Belief Model (HBM) relationships. RESULT: Response rate was 95.4% (354). Around 52% of the participants were male and 76.8% follow diabetic education at least some times. 42.4% and 48% of respondents have good dietary and general self-care practices respectively. With unstandardized coefficient (standard error) self-efficacy0.10 (0.01) being the strongest cues to action0.10 (0.02), perceived threat0.02 (0.01), and perceived barrier-0.08(0.01) constructs of HBM have a significant effect on dietary practice. Knowledge, social support and diabetes distress exert a significant indirect effect on dietary practice through health belief constructs with unstandardized path coefficient (standard error) of 0.22(0.03), 0.02(0.01), and -0.03(0.004) respectively. CONCLUSION: In this study, the proportion of good practice is found to be lower for both dietary as well as general self-care. HBM can best fit to explain variability in dietary self-care practice; therefore, future interventions should be designed to address the vast perception and psychosocial factors influencing dietary self-care practices.


Subject(s)
Diabetes Mellitus , Self Care , Academic Medical Centers , Cross-Sectional Studies , Diabetes Mellitus/psychology , Diabetes Mellitus/therapy , Diet , Ethiopia , Female , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Male , Self Care/psychology
16.
Medicina (Kaunas) ; 58(8)2022 Jul 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2023896

ABSTRACT

Background and Objectives: Telemedicine solutions have proven their value and efficacy in augmenting diabetes care. In addition to the availability of tools needed to implement telemedicine solutions for patients with diabetes, the patients' desirability, acceptance, and adherence represent major burdens in implementing them. The main aim of this research is to evaluate which factors are influencing the desirability, acceptance, and adherence of patients with diabetes to telemedicine interventions in diabetes care. Materials and Methods: QTelemeDiab, a previously validated instrument for assessing patients' desirability, acceptance, and adherence to telemedicine in diabetes care, was used on 114 enrolled patients with diabetes mellitus, in parallel with demographic, socio-economic, disease history, and psychometric data from all patients. Results: Left-skewed score distributions were observed for the QTelemeDiab total score (median = 166; skewness = -1.738), as well as all its components, thus denoting a high desirability, acceptance, and adherence towards telemedicine use. The presence of severe depression was associated with significant decreases in the QTelemeDiab score (148 vs. 167; p < 0.001), as well as on the desirability sub-score (101 vs. 115; p < 0.001) and adherence sub-score (30 vs. 35; p < 0.001). The presence of severe anxiety was associated with significant decreases in QTelemeDiab score (150 vs. 166), as well as the desirability sub-score (104 vs. 114; p = 0.008) and adherence sub-score (30 vs. 34; p = 0.012). Conclusions: There is a high desirability, acceptance, and adherence to the use of telemedicine interventions in patients with diabetes, both in special and in normal epidemiological settings. The presence of severe anxiety decreases the patient's desirability, acceptance, and adherence, while the presence of severe depression decreases the patient's desirability and adherence to the use of telemedicine interventions in diabetes care.


Subject(s)
Diabetes Mellitus , Telemedicine , Diabetes Mellitus/therapy , Humans , Psychometrics
17.
Front Endocrinol (Lausanne) ; 13: 974540, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2022682

ABSTRACT

Since December 2019, a new coronavirus, called severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), has spread around the world, causing the coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. From the beginning, SARS-CoV-2 has put a strain on the health system. In fact, many patients have had severe forms of the disease with the need for hospitalization due to respiratory failure. To contain the pandemic, the most widely used approach has been lockdowns. Social restrictions have been reduced thanks to the development of vaccines and targeted therapies. However, fatal events still occur among people at high risk of serious infection, such as patients with concomitant diabetes. Different mechanisms have been proposed to explain the poor prognosis of patients with diabetes and COVID-19, but the specific cause is unclear. It is now known that insulin resistance, inflammation, and cytokine storm are involved. Moreover, SARS-CoV-2 uses the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 receptors to enter cells. This receptor is expressed on pancreatic beta cells and, during infection, it appears that receptor involvement may induce hyperglycemia in patients with or without diabetes. In this study, we discuss the mechanisms underlying the poor prognosis in people with COVID-19 and diabetes and what may improve the outcome in these patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/therapy , Humans , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A , SARS-CoV-2
18.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 22(1): 215, 2022 Feb 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2021284

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The comorbidity of tuberculosis and diabetes mellitus (TB-DM) is a looming global co-epidemic problem. Despite the Indonesian Government's ongoing effort to impose regulation for collaborative TB-DM management, the involvement of private primary care providers (PPCs) has not been considered before the COVID-19 pandemic. This study aimed to capture the PPCs' existing practices and explore their challenges, opportunities, and potential roles in the collaborative TB-DM services and control. METHODS: A descriptive qualitative research design was used to collect data. Two Focus Group Discussions (FGDs) were conducted with 13 healthcare workers (HCWs) from different private clinics and eight private/solo general practitioners (GPs) from Yogyakarta City, Indonesia. We triangulated these data with data from FGDs of HCWs community health centers (CHCs) and in-depth interviews of three regional health regulators, five hospitals staff members, and a representative of national health insurance. The discussions were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim, and subjected to thematic analysis. RESULTS: PPCs have not been initiated into the implementation of the collaborative TB-DM programme. The themes identified in this study were health system-related barriers, knowledge and perception of HCWs, lack of implementation of bi-directional screening, and needs of multisector role. The potential roles identified for PPCs include involvement in health promotion, bi-directional screening, patient referral, and data reporting according to the TB-DM programme indicators. However, more thorough improvement of PPCs' capacity and logistic supplies are needed to provide comprehensive TB treatment. CONCLUSION: Although PPCs' involvement in implementing collaborative TB-DM services has yet to be considered, their potential role should not be neglected. Therefore, it is essential to increase their involvement by enhancing their capacity and improving the Public-Private Mix. PPCs' engagement should be initiated and maintained to ensure the sustainability of the programme.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus , Tuberculosis , Diabetes Mellitus/diagnosis , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/therapy , Humans , Pandemics , Primary Health Care , Qualitative Research , SARS-CoV-2 , Tuberculosis/epidemiology , Tuberculosis/prevention & control
19.
Am J Nurs ; 122(9): 20-22, 2022 Sep 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2018178

ABSTRACT

Despite practical and policy barriers, new technologies support the case for greater flexibility.


Subject(s)
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 , Diabetes Mellitus , Self-Management , Diabetes Mellitus/therapy , Health Behavior , Humans , Self Care
20.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(18)2022 Sep 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2010079

ABSTRACT

Prevention of diabetes mellitus is mainly based on a healthy lifestyle. The lockdown measures imposed during the COVID-19 pandemic resulted in major changes in daily life and social behavior, which may have an influence on diabetes self-management and glycemic control. The present work aims to assess the relationship between diabetic patients' knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors towards proper nutrition and lifestyles in order to plan strategies for educational intervention from a health literacy perspective. Attitudes, behaviors, and knowledge of diabetic patients attending the Diabetes and Metabolic Diseases Department of the Local Health Authority of Sassari (ASL1-SS) were assessed with a cognitive survey conducted from April to July 2022. Three hundred twenty-one questionnaires were administered during the survey period. Fifty-two percent of diabetic patients were female and 48% male, with a mean age of 61.1 ± 18.5 years and 62.0 ± 15.1 years, respectively. The overall level of knowledge about the role of food and proper nutrition with respect to the risk of diabetes and its complications appeared to be generally unsatisfactory and inadequate. Nonetheless, females showed a significantly higher level of knowledge than males (p < 0.0001). Moreover, knowledge was seen to decrease according to the age of the patients (p = 0.035). As for the possible impact played by the COVID-19 pandemic on lifestyles, it should be noted that about 70% of the respondents stated that they had maintained a reasonable dietary standard or even improved it throughout. Thus, the study underlines the need to improve the knowledge of diabetic subjects about nutrition and, in particular, their self-management, positively influencing behaviors and attitudes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/therapy , Female , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Life Style , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics/prevention & control , Surveys and Questionnaires
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