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1.
Wounds ; 34(5): 146-150, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1940057

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: As did many other nations, the Turkish government implemented precautions and lockdown measures in response to the rapid spread of the COVID-19 viral infection. The pandemic has caused millions of deaths globally, resulted in the development of comorbidities, and negatively affected national health care systems. The increased workload at hospitals and spread of the virus among health care professionals have resulted in delays in health care services delivery. The fear of COVID-19 transmission has resulted in people mostly staying at home. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to present the effects of the pandemic on the behavior of patients with diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patients with DFU were categorized into 2 groups: patients hospitalized during the COVID-19 pandemic and patients hospitalized during the same period in 2019 (prepandemic). Demographic data, length of hospital stay, place of residence, Wagner grade of DFU, comorbidities, laboratory parameters, wound duration, duration of diabetes, and treatments applied were recorded. RESULTS: During the pandemic, the length of hospital stay decreased, and patient referrals from other cities significantly decreased (P <.001). Hemoglobin A1c level was higher and Wagner grade was more advanced during the pandemic period (P =.014 and P =.033, respectively). The number of patients undergoing debridement alone decreased during the pandemic period, while those requiring amputation increased (P =.008 and P =.005, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Patients with DFU delayed seeking timely proper medical advice during the pandemic. This resulted in a significantly higher amputation rate, with physical, psychosocial, and economic consequences. Virtual techniques (eg, video consultation) can be used to identify patients who require hospitalization. Close follow-up can be provided via home nursing care and by supplying advanced wound care products for in-home use. Patients with DFU should be encouraged to seek proper medical advice and take recommended precautions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus , Diabetic Foot , Amputation , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Diabetic Foot/epidemiology , Diabetic Foot/therapy , Humans , Pandemics
2.
Eur J Epidemiol ; 37(6): 587-590, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1888919

ABSTRACT

Most studies reported reduced health care use among people with diabetes during the COVID-19 pandemic. This may be due to restricted medical services or people avoiding health care services because they fear being infected with COVID-19 in health care facilities. The aim of our study was to analyse hospitalisation and mortality in people with and without diabetes in Germany during the COVID-19 pandemic year 2020 compared to 2017-2019. The data were sourced from a German statutory health insurance company covering 3.2 million people. We estimated age-sex standardised rates of mortality, all-cause hospitalisation, hospitalisation due to coronary heart disease (CHD), acute myocardial infarction (AMI), stroke, diabetic foot syndrome (DFS), and major and minor amputations in people with and without diabetes. We predicted rates for 2020 using Poisson regression based on results from 2017-2019 and compared these with the observed rates.In people with diabetes, the hospitalisation rate for major amputation was significantly increased, while all-cause hospitalisation rate and hospitalisation due to CHD, AMI and DFS were significantly decreased compared to the previous period. Moreover, we found a significantly increased mortality and hospitalisation rate for minor amputation in people without diabetes while all-cause hospitalisation and hospitalisation due to CHD and AMI was significantly lower during the COVID-19 pandemic year 2020.We observed changes in health care utilisation and outcomes during the COVID-19 pandemic compared to previous years in people with and without diabetes. Concerning diabetes care, the increase of hospitalisations due to amputation in people with diabetes with a simultaneous reduction in DFS needs special attention.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Coronary Disease , Diabetes Mellitus , Diabetic Foot , Myocardial Infarction , Amputation , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Diabetic Foot/epidemiology , Diabetic Foot/surgery , Hospitalization , Humans , Myocardial Infarction/epidemiology , Pandemics
3.
Int J Low Extrem Wounds ; 21(2): 107-110, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1709223

ABSTRACT

Diabetic foot syndrome (DFS) is a major complication of diabetes mellitus. Coronavirus infectious disease 2019 (COVID-19) has created new necessities and priorities in DFS management. These include telemedicine and patient triage to minimise hospitalisation and visits to the clinic. Moreover, new studies will be needed to evaluate whether the lockdown in patients with DFS or in those with high risk of DFS have increased the risk of deteriorating outcomes, including limb loss. Our future challenge will lie in re-organising our world during the pandemic and after its resolution. We need more awareness of the widespread ways of the changes in taking care of patients and to improve education, skills, and behaviour of high-risk patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communicable Diseases , Diabetes Mellitus , Diabetic Foot , Communicable Disease Control , Diabetic Foot/diagnosis , Diabetic Foot/epidemiology , Diabetic Foot/therapy , Humans , Pandemics
4.
Diabetes Metab Res Rev ; 38(4): e3520, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1648801

ABSTRACT

AIMS: During the Covid-19 epidemic, many countries imposed population lockdown. This study aimed to analyse diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) evolution of outpatients between the lockdown period and 1 month after its end. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We conducted a prospective, observational, single-centre study without modification of care. All patients who followed up for a DFU in the study centre between 15 April 2020 and 11 May 2020 were included. The baseline assessment occurred 4 weeks after the beginning of lockdown and the follow-up visit 4-6 weeks after easing of lockdown. The primary analysis was based on the Site, Ischaemia, Neuropathy, Bacterial infection, Area, Depth (SINBAD) classification. RESULTS: Twenty-seven patients were included, median 69.4 years, and 25 were followed-up at easing of lockdown. The median SINBAD score was 2 (interquartile range 1; 3) at inclusion and 1 (1; 2) at easing of lockdown, with a mean change of -0.32 (95% confidence interval -0.93; 0.29). Seventy-two percent of the population had a stable or improved score between the two visits. The proportion of patients using off-loading footwear was higher among those whose SINBAD score improved compared to those whose score worsened or remained stable (72%, 44% and 28%, respectively). Diabetes type was linked to DFU prognosis. Five patients (20%) were hospitalized during the follow-up period. CONCLUSION: Lockdown appears to have had a positive effect on DFU if patients remain under the care of their expert wound centre. We believe this effect is related to better compliance with offloading. The wide use of tele-medicine seems relevant for the follow-up of DFU.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus , Diabetic Foot , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control , Diabetic Foot/epidemiology , Diabetic Foot/prevention & control , Hospitalization , Humans , Prospective Studies
5.
JAMA Netw Open ; 5(1): e2142354, 2022 01 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1604496

ABSTRACT

Importance: Deferred diabetic foot screening and delays in timely care of acute foot complications during the COVID-19 pandemic may have contributed to an increase in limb loss. Objective: To evaluate the association of the COVID-19 pandemic with diabetes-related care measures, foot complications, and amputation. Design, Setting, and Participants: This population-based cohort study included all adult residents of Ontario, Canada, with diabetes and compared the rates of selected outcomes from January 1, 2020, to February 23, 2021, vs January 1, 2019, to February 23, 2020. Main Outcomes and Measures: Comprehensive in-person diabetes care assessment, including foot examination; hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) measurement; emergency department visit or hospitalization for diabetic foot ulceration, osteomyelitis, or gangrene; lower extremity open or endovascular revascularization; minor (toe or partial-foot) amputation; and major (above-ankle) leg amputation. Rates and rate ratios (RRs) comparing 2020-2021 vs 2019-2020 for each measure were calculated for 10-week periods, anchored relative to onset of the pandemic on March 11, 2020 (11th week of 2020). Results: On March 11, 2020, the study included 1 488 605 adults with diabetes (median [IQR] age, 65 [55-74] years; 776 665 [52.2%] men), and on March 11, 2019, the study included 1 441 029 adults with diabetes (median [IQR] age, 65 [55-74] years; 751 459 [52.1%] men). After the onset of the pandemic, rates of major amputation in 2020-2021 decreased compared with 2019-2020 levels. The RR for the prepandemic period from January 1 to March 10 was 1.05 (95% CI, 0.88-1.25), with RRs in the pandemic periods ranging from 0.86 (95% CI, 0.72-1.03) in May 20 to July 28 to 0.95 (95% CI, 0.80-1.13) in October 7 to December 15. There were no consistent differences in demographic characteristics or comorbidities of patients undergoing amputation in the 2020-2021 vs 2019-2020 periods. Rates of comprehensive in-person diabetes care assessment and HbA1c measurement declined sharply and remained below 2019-2020 levels (eg, in-person assessment, March 11 to May 19: RR, 0.28; 95% CI, 0.28-0.28). The rates of emergency department visits (eg, March 11 to May 19: RR, 0.67; 95% CI, 0.61-0.75), hospitalization (eg, March 11 to May 19: RR, 0.77; 95% CI, 0.68-0.87), open revascularization (eg, March 11 to May 19: RR, 0.66; 95% CI, 0.56-0.79), endovascular revascularization (March 11 to May 19: RR, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.61-0.81), and minor amputation (March 11 to May 19: RR, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.60-0.83) initially dropped but recovered to 2019-2020 levels over the study period. Conclusions and Relevance: In this population-based cohort study, disruptions in care related to the COVID-19 pandemic were not associated with excess leg amputations among people living with diabetes. As the pandemic ends, improved prevention and treatment of diabetic foot complications will be necessary to maintain these positive results.


Subject(s)
Amputation , COVID-19 , Delivery of Health Care/methods , Diabetes Mellitus , Diabetic Foot/surgery , Pandemics , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cohort Studies , Comorbidity , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/therapy , Diabetic Foot/epidemiology , Diabetic Foot/therapy , Emergency Service, Hospital , Female , Foot/pathology , Foot/surgery , Glycated Hemoglobin A , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Ontario/epidemiology , Physical Examination , SARS-CoV-2 , Vascular Surgical Procedures
7.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(15)2021 07 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1346483

ABSTRACT

Globally, the prevalence of diabetes has risen significantly by 62% over the last ten years. A complication of unmanaged diabetes is diabetic foot ulcer (DFU), which adversely affects the quality of life of individuals with diabetes and inflicts a huge economic burden on the family, government, and health care services. However, this complication is preventable with adequate patient knowledge and practice regarding DFU and foot care. The present study was aimed at assessing the knowledge, attitude, and practice of adults with diabetes on foot ulcers and foot care in Tobago using a qualitative exploratory design. Purposeful sampling technique was used to recruit 20 participants from the lifestyle and diabetes foot clinics of Scarborough Health Centre, Tobago. Telephone interviews were conducted with the use of a semi-structured interview guide. The data obtained from participants were analyzed using thematic content analysis. Four major themes, namely foot ulcer problems, participants' knowledge on DFU, knowledge on foot care, and practice and attitude of foot care, emerged from the study. The findings from the study revealed that the majority of participants had poor knowledge regarding DFU but exhibited awareness about foot care, especially on foot cleaning and inspection, preventing irritation after washing, appropriate footwear, and not walking barefooted. The participants had good attitudes and practices of foot care despite their poor knowledge of DFU. However, participants reported inadequate health education on DFU and foot care from healthcare personnel. There should be improved health education, information, and communication on DFU and foot care centred and tailored to the understanding of people living with diabetes. This will prevent DFU and reduce the mortality arising from this complication, which is a major target of the sustainable development goals (SDG) in mitigating the burden of non-communicable diseases (NCD) such as diabetes.


Subject(s)
Diabetes Mellitus , Diabetic Foot , Adult , Diabetic Foot/epidemiology , Diabetic Foot/prevention & control , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Quality of Life , Trinidad and Tobago , Walking
8.
PLoS One ; 16(5): e0251143, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1218425

ABSTRACT

AIMS: Limb and patient outcomes in people with diabetic foot complications including diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) provided virtual triage and personalized video consultations during COVID-19 pandemic are not known. METHODS: Patients with foot complications attending the diabetic foot clinic prior to lockdown who sought teleconsultations during COVID-19 lockdown underwent virtual triage to include clinical history, visual inspection of feet, domiciliary wound care (community nurse assisted dressings) and offloading instructions. The subsequent ulcer, limb and mortality outcomes during the following 24 weeks of COVID-19 lockdown (April-September 2020, group 1) were assessed and compared with those who attended foot clinic during the same period in 2019 (April-September, group 2). RESULTS: Group 1 included 561 participants with foot complications provided with teleconsultations, median age 57 (51 to 63) years and diabetes duration of 10 (5 to 16) years. Twelve patients with severe DFU were excluded and 549 patients [357 (65%) neuropathic foot, 104 (18.9%) ischemic foot and 88 (16%) chronic Charcot foot with deformities] were evaluated. There were 227 (41.3%) participants with active DFU at start of lockdown, 32 (5.8%) with new onset ulcer during lockdown (47.1%) and 290 patients without ulcers. Group 2 included 650 participants; active foot ulcer was present in 366 patients. Wound closed or reduced in area in 78.4% of participants of group 1 compared to 76.0% (p = 0.318) in group 2. Fourteen (5.4%) patients required amputations [3 major and 11 minor] in group 1 during the study period compared to 6.8% in group 2 (p = 0.191). Twenty-one (3.8%) and 28 (4.3%) patients died (p = 0.532) during 24 weeks of follow up in group 1 and 2, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Targeted foot-care service through virtual triage and teleconsultations during COVID-19 pandemic for people with foot complications have similar ulcer and limb outcomes compared to face-to-face foot care delivery.


Subject(s)
Diabetic Foot/therapy , Telemedicine , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Diabetic Foot/epidemiology , Humans , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , Retrospective Studies , Treatment Outcome , Triage
9.
Adv Wound Care (New Rochelle) ; 10(5): 281-292, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1207238

ABSTRACT

Significance: Chronic wounds impact the quality of life (QoL) of nearly 2.5% of the total population in the United States and the management of wounds has a significant economic impact on health care. Given the aging population, the continued threat of diabetes and obesity worldwide, and the persistent problem of infection, it is expected that chronic wounds will continue to be a substantial clinical, social, and economic challenge. In 2020, the coronavirus disease (COVID) pandemic dramatically disrupted health care worldwide, including wound care. A chronic nonhealing wound (CNHW) is typically correlated with comorbidities such as diabetes, vascular deficits, hypertension, and chronic kidney disease. These risk factors make persons with CNHW at high risk for severe, sometimes lethal outcomes if infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (pathogen causing COVID-19). The COVID-19 pandemic has impacted several aspects of the wound care continuum, including compliance with wound care visits, prompting alternative approaches (use of telemedicine and creation of videos to help with wound dressing changes among others), and encouraging a do-it-yourself wound dressing protocol and use of homemade remedies/substitutions. Recent Advances: There is a developing interest in understanding how the social determinants of health impact the QoL and outcomes of wound care patients. Furthermore, addressing wound care in the light of the COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the importance of telemedicine options in the continuum of care. Future Directions: The economic, clinical, and social impact of wounds continues to rise and requires appropriate investment and a structured approach to wound care, education, and related research.


Subject(s)
Leg Ulcer/epidemiology , Pressure Ulcer/epidemiology , Wound Infection/epidemiology , Wounds and Injuries/epidemiology , Acute Disease , Bandages , COVID-19 , Chronic Disease , Delivery of Health Care , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Diabetic Foot/economics , Diabetic Foot/epidemiology , Diabetic Foot/therapy , Education, Medical , Education, Nursing , Foot Ulcer/economics , Foot Ulcer/epidemiology , Foot Ulcer/therapy , Humans , Leg Ulcer/economics , Leg Ulcer/therapy , Obesity/epidemiology , Overweight/epidemiology , Patient Education as Topic , Pressure Ulcer/economics , Pressure Ulcer/therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Self Care , Social Determinants of Health , Telemedicine , United States/epidemiology , Varicose Ulcer/economics , Varicose Ulcer/epidemiology , Varicose Ulcer/therapy , Wound Infection/economics , Wound Infection/microbiology , Wound Infection/therapy , Wounds and Injuries/economics , Wounds and Injuries/therapy
10.
Diabetes Res Clin Pract ; 175: 108797, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1179400

ABSTRACT

AIM: To investigate the rate of antibiotic resistance and its main risk factors in a population of patients with diabetic foot infection (DFI) during the COVID-19 pandemic, in comparison with the population of 2019. METHODS: Two hundred and twenty-five patients with DFI were admitted in a tertiary care center from January 2019 to December 2020. Antibiotic resistance was evaluated by microbiological examination of soft tissues' or bone's biopsy. RESULTS: Compared with 2019 group (n = 105), 2020 group (n = 120) had a significantly higher prevalence of antibiotic resistance [2019 vs 2020, 36% vs 63%, P <0.001] and more often was admitted with recent or current antibiotic therapy (18% vs 52%, P <0.001), which was frequently self-administered (5% vs 30%, P = 0.032). The risk of antibiotic resistance was also higher in 2020 group [OR 95% CI, 2.90 (1.68 to 4.99)]. Prior hospitalization, antibiotic self-administration and antibiotic prescription by general practitioners resulted as independent predictors of antibiotic resistance. CONCLUSIONS: In a population of people with DFI admitted in a tertiary care center during the COVID-19 pandemic the prevalence of antibiotic resistance was higher than 2019. Previous hospitalization, antibiotic self-administration /prescription by general practitioners were related to higher risk of antibiotic resistant infections.


Subject(s)
Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Diabetic Foot/drug therapy , Aged , COVID-19 , Diabetic Foot/epidemiology , Drug Resistance, Microbial , Female , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Tertiary Care Centers
11.
Diabet Med ; 38(7): e14577, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1165904

ABSTRACT

AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: The aim of this study was to examine the impact of the COVID-19 epidemic on the hospitalization rates for diabetic foot ulcer (DFU), osteomyelitis and lower limb revascularization procedure in people with DFU. METHODS: This nationwide retrospective cohort study included hospital data on all people hospitalized in France for diabetes in weeks 2-43 in 2020, including the COVID-19 lockdown period, compared to same period in 2019. RESULTS: The number of hospitalizations for DFU decreased significantly in weeks 12-19 (during the lockdown) (p < 10-4 ). Hospitalization for foot osteomyelitis also decreased significantly in weeks 12-19 (p < 10-4 ). The trend was the same for lower limb amputations and revascularizations associated with DFU or amputation. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: The marked drop in hospitalization rates for DFU, osteomyelitis and lower limb revascularization procedures in people with DFU observed in France during the lockdown period suggests that COVID-19 was a barrier to DFU care, and may illustrate the combined deleterious effects of hospital overload and changes in health-related behaviour.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Diabetic Foot/epidemiology , Diabetic Foot/therapy , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Quarantine , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Amputation/statistics & numerical data , Amputation/trends , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cohort Studies , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Epidemics , Female , France/epidemiology , History, 21st Century , Hospitalization/trends , Humans , Lower Extremity/surgery , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
12.
Medicina (B Aires) ; 80 Suppl 6: 30-34, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1040317

ABSTRACT

At the end of 2019 a novel coronavirus was identified as a cause of pneumonia in Wuhan, China. This emerging disease has caused an unexpected turn in the economy and in society, which has led to the necessity of social isolation and confinement. Diabetic foot consultation was affected by the ongoing situation. The aim of this study was to compare the number of medical visits and the severity of new lesions at presentation at the Diabetic Foot Unit during June 2020 compared to June 2019. Three hundred and fifty six medical visits were analyzed, resulting in a 29% reduction in the number of visits during 2020. The number of patients presenting with new lesions increased from 6.4% to 10.3% (p = ns) during pandemic. The number of visits from the patients' relatives was higher during June 2020 (16.3% vs. 1.4%) (p < 0.05). Controls of feet without active lesions (i.e.: closed wound or periodic control) decreased from 16.8% to 4.5% (p < 0.05). Consultation for medical prescription only was higher in 2020 (22.4%) than in 2019 (7.3%) (p < 0.05). In our sample, there were no significant differences in the severity of new lesions at presentation or on the days of evolution of new ones in comparison with the previous year. During 2020, telehealth consults represented a 7% of all medical visits. There were no major amputations during 2019 and 4 during 2020. Given the dynamics of confinement, further studies about this topic are required to make sound and accurate decisions.


A fines de 2019 se identificó un nuevo coronavirus como causa de neumonía, en Wuhan, China. Esta nueva enfermedad (COVID-19) causó un inesperado vuelco en la economía y en la sociedad. El aislamiento social y el confinamiento provocaron cambios en la dinámica de las consultas médicas. En este estudio se compararon la cantidad de consultas y la gravedad de las lesiones nuevas en la Unidad de Pie Diabético entre junio de 2020 y junio de 2019. Se analizaron en total 356 visitas médicas, hallando un 29% de reducción en el número de visitas en 2020. El número de consultas por lesión nueva aumentó del 6.4% a 10.3% (p = ns) durante la pandemia. Las visitas de familiares por diversos motivos en lugar del paciente aumentaron durante 2020 de 1.4% a 16.3% (p < 0.05). Los controles de pacientes sin lesión (pie de alto riesgo, control post alta), disminuyeron de 16.8% a 4.5% (p < 0.05) y también aumentaron las visitas únicamente para prescripciones médicas (7.3% a 22.4%, p < 0.05). En nuestra muestra, no hubo diferencias significativas en la gravedad de la presentación ni en los días de evolución de las lesiones nuevas en relación al año anterior. Durante 2020 las teleconsultas representaron el 7% del total. En junio de 2019 no se registraron amputaciones mayores y en 2020 se registraron 4. Dada la dinámica del confinamiento, se requiere un continuo seguimiento y nuevos estudios para evaluar las consecuencias que se producirán en los pacientes con esta enfermedad con el fin de tomar decisiones acertadas.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus , Diabetic Foot , Diabetic Foot/diagnosis , Diabetic Foot/epidemiology , Diabetic Foot/prevention & control , Humans , Pandemics , Referral and Consultation , SARS-CoV-2
13.
Wounds ; 32(10): 291-293, 2020 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-995432

ABSTRACT

A person with a diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) requires multidisciplinary care, including moist wound healing, consistent offloading of insensate areas, glycemic control, and adequate circulation. This is especially important during the COVID-19 pandemic, as patients with diabetes are at a higher risk of mortality.1 Reviewed in a 2018 installment of Evidence Corner,2 a double-blind, randomized clinical trial (RCT) reported that topical oxygen continuously diffused to DFU tissue resulted in nonhealing DFUs healing more than 20 days faster than those that were similarly treated with standard therapy and a sham device.3 More than twice the DFUs closed in patients receiving continuously diffused topical oxygen in comparison with the sham arm completely healed in 12 weeks (P = .02). It has been hypothesized that intervals of hyperbaric oxygen (HBO)-breathing 100% oxygen at atmosphere absolute (ATA) greater than the 1.0 normal at sea level-may similarly improve lower extremity ulcer healing outcomes. This month's Evidence Corner summarizes 2 studies regarding patients receiving HBO. The first study focused on patients with a DFU on a non-ischemic limb.4 The second studied the effects of HBO on lower extremity ulcers on ischemic limbs in patients with or without diabetes mellitus (DM).5 Read on to discover how informative and beneficial each of these studies can be in furthering best practice as well as which patients may experience improved lower limb ulcer healing in response to interventions that increase tissue oxygenation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Diabetic Foot/therapy , Hyperbaric Oxygenation/methods , Pandemics , Wound Healing , Comorbidity , Diabetic Foot/epidemiology , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome
15.
Diabetes Metab Syndr ; 15(1): 93-98, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-959725

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIM: Uncontrolled diabetes has emerged as one of the major risk factors for mortality in patients with coronavirus disease (COVID-19). Physical inactivity, alterations in dietary habits, and inability to seek guidance from the physician are some of the contributing factors. This study aims to assess the self-care practices and psychological distress during the pandemic among diabetic patients visiting the institute's out patient department. METHOD: A convenient sampling method was used to recruit subjects from a representative clinical sample using validated scales like the Summary of Diabetes Self-Care Activities (SDSCA) and Kessler Psychological Distress Scale (K10). RESULT: The study enrolled a total of 108 subjects with the mean age being 56.3 years. The everyday healthy eating plan was followed by 76.85% (N = 83) subjects and daily physical activity for at least 30 min performed by 50% (54) subjects. Only 12.04% (13) subjects tested their blood sugar and 6.48% (7) respondents checked their feet daily. There was no significant difference found between the SDSCA and psychological distress based on socio-demographic variables. CONCLUSION: Participants in this study typically reported a good level of self-care behavior particularly for diet followed by exercise whereas the self-care behavior was not adequate for foot care and blood-glucose testing. People were not too anxious about COVID-19. This study highlighted the fact that people with diabetes should monitor their blood sugar levels more often along with their foot care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/therapy , Psychological Distress , Self Care/methods , Adult , Aged , Blood Glucose/metabolism , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Diabetes Mellitus/psychology , Diabetic Foot/epidemiology , Diabetic Foot/prevention & control , Diabetic Foot/psychology , Exercise/physiology , Exercise/psychology , Female , Humans , India/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Self Care/psychology
16.
Int Wound J ; 17(6): 1863-1870, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-724544

ABSTRACT

When diabetes mellitus is not properly controlled with drugs and a healthy lifestyle, it exposes patients with advanced peripheral arterial disease or critical limb ischaemia (CLI) to the most serious complications, in particular lower limb ulcers. Surgical or endovascular treatments represent the first line of intervention; in addition, the adequate management of ulcers can guarantee not only a faster wound healing but also the improvement of the patient's prognosis. To speed up this process, negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT), platelet-rich plasma (PRP), and other advanced moist wound dressing have been proposed. During Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, many patients with CLI and diabetes mellitus had difficult access to advanced treatments with a significant reduction in life expectancy. We report the cases of patients with non-healing ulcers and CLI treated with an empiric multistage approach after successful endovascular revascularisation; the postoperative course was eventful in all patients, and foot ulcers are currently in an advanced state of healing. The association between adequate revascularisation, systemic anti-inflammatory, and antibiotic therapy with the multistage advanced medications ensures healing of ulcers, limb salvage, and improvement of patient prognosis.


Subject(s)
Bandages , COVID-19/epidemiology , Diabetic Foot/therapy , Negative-Pressure Wound Therapy/methods , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures/methods , Vascular Surgical Procedures/methods , Wound Healing , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Comorbidity , Diabetic Foot/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Platelet-Rich Plasma , SARS-CoV-2
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