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1.
Schweiz Arch Tierheilkd ; 164(10): 661-671, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1603045

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Three outbreaks of fatal diarrhoea occurred in bush dog (Speothos venaticus) groups at two zoological collections in the United Kingdom between 2009 and 2017. In all cases, the predominant clinical signs were diarrhoea, anorexia and severe loss of condition. Despite supportive treatment, a number of fatalities occurred during each outbreak. Common gross post mortem findings were emaciation, with erythema, mucosal haemorrhage, and ulceration of the gastrointestinal tract. Histopathological features included villus blunting and fusion, crypt epithelial loss and lymphoid depletion, supporting a viral aetiology and canine coronavirus was suspected. Diagnosis was confirmed on the basis of serology (rising antibody titres) and the detection of viral nucleic acid using polymerase chain reaction. The canine coronavirus was subtyped as type 2a, which is known to cause systemic fatal disease in immature domestic dogs. To the authors' knowledge, these are the first reported cases of fatal diarrhoea associated with canine coronavirus type 2a in bush dogs. These outbreaks suggest that adult bush dogs are highly susceptible to canine coronavirus infection and may succumb to viral enteritis.


Subject(s)
Canidae , Coronavirus, Canine , Dog Diseases , Animals , Diarrhea/epidemiology , Diarrhea/veterinary , Disease Outbreaks/veterinary , Dog Diseases/epidemiology , Dogs , United Kingdom
2.
Dig Dis ; 39(6): 622-625, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574067

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIMS: The COVID-19 disease, which was declared epidemic by the WHO, is a global emergency public health problem. Patients with extrapulmonary symptoms are the group of patients who should be considered for person-to-person transmission in the community. In our study, it was aimed to investigate the characteristics of patients with COVID-19-related diarrhea symptoms. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study was conducted retrospectively in CO-VID-19 rtRT-PCR-positive patients in 5 medical centers. Three or more loose/liquid stools per day or increased number of defecations compared to normal defecation were defined as diarrhea. The patients were analyzed in 2 groups as those with and without diarrhea. RESULTS: One thousand eighty-six patients were included in the study. Seventy-eight (7.2%) of the patients had diarrhea. Diarrhea was watery in 54 (69.2%) patients while with blood and mucus in 18 (23.1%) patients. Diarrhea continued for an average of 5.2 ± 1.6 (2-11) days. The clinical and laboratory findings of patients with diarrhea were more serious than those without diarrhea. Diarrhea is more common in the elderly and people with comorbid disease, and patients with diarrhea had higher CMI score and CRP and higher complaints of fever, cough, shortness of breath, myalgia, and fatigue. CONCLUSIONS: The presence of diarrhea should indicate a suspected COVID-19 infection and suggest testing for early diagnosis of the disease. It should be kept in mind that the course of the disease may be more severe in these patients, and precautions should also be taken in terms of fecal transmission during discharge.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Aged , Diarrhea/epidemiology , Diarrhea/etiology , Feces , Humans , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
3.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(41): e27528, 2021 Oct 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1501205

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Diarrhea is one of the manifestations of the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19), but it also develops as a complication of massive antibiotic therapy in this disease. This study aimed to compare these types of diarrhea.We included patients with COVID-19 in a cohort study and excluded patients with chronic diarrhea, laxative use, and those who died during the first day of hospitalization.There were 89 (9.3%), 161 (16.7%), and 731 (75.7%) patients with early viral, late antibiotic-associated, and without diarrhea, respectively. Late diarrhea lasted longer (6 [4-10] vs 5 [3-7] days, P < .001) and was more severe. Clostridioides difficile was found in 70.5% of tested patients with late diarrhea and in none with early diarrhea. Presence of late diarrhea was associated with an increased risk of death after 20 days of disease (P = .009; hazard ratio = 4.7). Patients with late diarrhea had a longer hospital stay and total disease duration, and a higher proportion of these patients required intensive care unit admission. Oral amoxicillin/clavulanate (odds ratio [OR] = 2.23), oral clarithromycin (OR = 3.79), and glucocorticoids (OR = 4.41) use was a risk factor for the development of late diarrhea, while ceftriaxone use (OR = 0.35) had a protective effect. Before the development of late diarrhea, decrease in C-reactive protein levels and increase in lymphocyte count stopped but the white blood cell and neutrophil count increased. An increase in neutrophils by >0.6 × 109 cells/L predicted the development of late diarrhea in the coming days (sensitivity 82.0%, specificity 70.8%, area under the curve = 0.791 [0.710-0.872]).Diarrhea in COVID-19 is heterogeneous, and different types of diarrhea require different management.


Subject(s)
Anti-Bacterial Agents/adverse effects , COVID-19/epidemiology , Diarrhea/chemically induced , Diarrhea/virology , Aged , Diarrhea/classification , Diarrhea/epidemiology , Humans , Length of Stay , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Rural Remote Health ; 21(3): 6630, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1478860

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: On 15 June 2020, the National Public Health Organization was informed about the identification of two cases of Escherichia coli Ο157 infection in a small town in the Peloponnese Region in Greece and we suspected an outbreak. METHODS: We asked the local pharmacist to assist us to verify the outbreak by providing the daily number of over-the-counter anti-diarrheal drugs sold from 20 May 2020 onwards. The pharmacist asked customers with gastroenteritis to submit stool samples at the local hospital. Samples were tested for 22 pathogens. We conducted a 1 : 1 case-control study. Cases and controls were retrieved from the pharmacy client list. Chlorination records of the water supply system were retrieved, and water samples were tested for microbiological indicators and viruses. RESULTS: The increased number of sales of anti-diarrheal drugs verified the outbreak. Overall, 58 cases and 57 controls were recruited for the study. Tap water consumption (odds ratio (OR)=10.9, 95% confidence interval (CI)=3.1-38.0, p<0.001) and consumption of ice cubes made from tap water (OR=39.3, 95%CI=10.3-150.9, p<0.001) were independently associated with gastroenteritis occurrence. Eleven stool samples were tested; one was positive for shigatoxin-producing E. coli, one for enteropathogenic E. coli, four for E. coli Ο157 and one for Salmonella spp. Four samples tested negative. Five water samples collected on 18 June tested negative. The residual chlorine on 5 and 14 June ranged from 0.12 mg/L to 0.14 mg/L. CONCLUSION: This was the first investigation of a waterborne outbreak in Greece performed with the collaboration of a local pharmacy. The COVID-19 pandemic favored the use of alternative resources and channels of communication with the local population, which can also be used in the future, especially in remote areas of the country.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diarrhea/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks , Escherichia coli/isolation & purification , Water Supply , Waterborne Diseases/epidemiology , Adult , Case-Control Studies , Female , Greece/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Rural Population , SARS-CoV-2 , Waterborne Diseases/physiopathology
5.
PLoS One ; 16(10): e0258391, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1463319

ABSTRACT

In France, social distancing measures have been adopted to contain the spread of COVID-19, culminating in national Lockdowns. The use of hand washing, hydro-alcoholic rubs and mask-wearing also increased over time. As these measures are likely to impact the transmission of many communicable diseases, we studied the changes in common infectious diseases incidence in France during the first year of COVID-19 circulation. We examined the weekly incidence of acute gastroenteritis, chickenpox, acute respiratory infections and bronchiolitis reported in general practitioner networks since January 2016. We obtained search engine query volume for French terms related to these diseases and sales data for relevant drugs over the same period. A periodic regression model was fit to disease incidence, drug sales and search query volume before the COVID-19 period and extrapolated afterwards. We compared the expected values with observations made in 2020. During the first lockdown period, incidence dropped by 67% for gastroenteritis, by 79% for bronchiolitis, by 49% for acute respiratory infection and 90% for chickenpox compared to the past years. Reductions with respect to the expected incidence reflected the strength of implemented measures. Incidence in children was impacted the most. Reduction in primary care consultations dropped during a short period at the beginning of the first lockdown period but remained more than 95% of the expected value afterwards. In primary care, the large decrease in reported gastroenteritis, chickenpox or bronchiolitis observed during the period where many barrier measures were implemented imply that the circulation of common viruses was reduced and informs on the overall effect of these measures.


Subject(s)
Bronchiolitis/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Chickenpox/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Communicable Diseases/epidemiology , Diarrhea/epidemiology , Gastroenteritis/epidemiology , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19/virology , Child , Child, Preschool , Communicable Diseases/virology , Female , France/epidemiology , Hospitalization , Humans , Incidence , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , Referral and Consultation , Seasons , Young Adult
8.
East Mediterr Health J ; 27(7): 665-671, 2021 Jul 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1348835

ABSTRACT

Background: Under-5 mortality remains high in developing nations despite decades of multilateral cooperation to reduce it. Diarrhoea contributes up to 15% of all mortality in this age group. Frequently reported barriers include poor hygiene, lack of sanitation facilities, and negligible public health education on the issue. Interventions such as Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene (WASH) could complement modern public health approaches with renewed vigour in wake of SARS-CoV-II (COVID-19). Aims: We sought to assess maternal hand hygiene and ability to prepare oral rehydration solution at home. Methods: In addition to the ability to prepare oral rehydration solution at home, this cross-sectional study, carried out at the Sughra Shafi Medical Complex, Narowal during 2017, compared knowledge, attitudes and behaviours of mothers of children with diarrhoea to those shoes children did not have diarrhoea. Results: 511 (48%) children < 5 years were diagnosed with diarrhoea irrespective of household location. Among 1065 accompanying mothers recruited for this study, only 130 (12%) were able to prepare ORS at home and 288 (27%) qualified as regular hand-washers according to the criteria. Just over half of the respondents consumed untreated water supplied via a nearby canal. Almost 80% of neighbourhoods lacked waste collection. Conclusion: These findings informed management of frequent child diarrhoea cases presented at the hospital with locally relevant preventive knowledge. They are also expected to be useful in educating mothers on regular handwashing and the preparation of ORS as home-based interventions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hand Disinfection , Child , Cross-Sectional Studies , Diarrhea/epidemiology , Diarrhea/prevention & control , Female , Hospitals, Rural , Humans , Infant , Pakistan , SARS-CoV-2 , Sanitation , Self Report
9.
Environ Res ; 200: 111748, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1322096

ABSTRACT

The present study reports data on a 20 months campaign monitoring enteric viruses (hepatitis A, norovirus, rotavirus, astrovirus, sapovirus, and aichivirus) and bacteria (Salmonella spp.) in seawater. The aim of this work was to assess the potential correlation among the presence of viruses/bacteria and different environmental factors like seasonality, water discharge sources (treated and untreated wastewater, mixed waters and raw water) as well as influence of the Italian lockdown measure against COVID-19 pandemic. Results showed different prevalence of the investigated viruses with values equal to 16 % for norovirus GI, 15.1 % for norovirus GII, followed by 13.8 % for astrovirus, and 13.3 % for sapovirus. Rotavirus was detected in the 8.4 % of samples and aichivirus was detected with the lowest prevalence of 3.5 %. Hepatitis A virus was never identified in the monitoring campaign. Salmonella spp. was detected with a prevalence of 36.6 %. Statistical analysis displayed a high correlation for the two noroviruses simultaneous detection (NGI and NGII) while a lower correlation was found for co-presence of noroviruses with astrovirus, sapovirus or Salmonella spp. A significant decrease of enteric pathogens in seawater was observed during the restrictions period. Results on seasonality highlighted a higher viral prevalence correlated to the wet season for all the pathogens but rotavirus and aichivirus, which instead showed an opposite trend and a higher incidence in the dry season. With respect to discharge typology, some viruses displayed a higher prevalence in treated waters (astrovirus, rotavirus, sapovirus and aichivirus) while the other investigated pathogens (noroviruses and Salmonella spp.) showed a higher prevalence in mixed waters. The main observations of this work were used to define a potential monitoring strategy that could be useful for sanitary Authorities to implement surveillance plans aimed at preventing possible sanitary outbreaks and/or environmental quality deterioration.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Communicable Disease Control , Diarrhea/epidemiology , Feces , Humans , Risk Assessment , SARS-CoV-2
10.
J Infect ; 83(4): 496-522, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1313249
11.
Arch Virol ; 166(9): 2461-2468, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1292555

ABSTRACT

Bovine coronavirus (BCoV) can be spread by animal activity. Although cattle farming is widespread in Turkey, there are few studies of BCoV. The aim of this study was to evaluate the current situation regarding BCoV in Turkey. This is the first study reporting the full-length nucleotide sequences of BCoV spike (S) genes in Turkey. Samples were collected from 119 cattle with clinical signs of respiratory (n = 78) or digestive tract (n = 41) infection on different farms located across widely separated provinces in Turkey. The samples were screened for BCoV using RT-nested PCR targeting the N gene, which identified BCoV in 35 samples (9 faeces and 26 nasal discharge). RT-PCR analysis of the S gene produced partial/full-length S gene sequences from 11 samples (8 faeces and 3 nasal discharge samples). A phylogenetic tree of the S gene sequences was made to analyze the genetic relationships among BCoVs from Turkey and other countries. The results showed that the local strains present in faeces and nasal discharge samples had many different amino acid changes. Some of these changes were shown in previous studies to be critical for tropism. This study provides new data on BCoV in Turkey that will be valuable in designing effective vaccine approaches and control strategies.


Subject(s)
Cattle Diseases/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/veterinary , Coronavirus, Bovine/genetics , Diarrhea/veterinary , RNA, Viral/genetics , Respiratory Tract Infections/veterinary , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Agriculture , Amino Acid Substitution , Animals , Cattle , Cattle Diseases/virology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Coronavirus, Bovine/classification , Diarrhea/epidemiology , Diarrhea/virology , Epidemiological Monitoring/veterinary , Evolution, Molecular , Feces/virology , Humans , Mutation , Nasal Cavity/virology , Phylogeny , Respiratory Tract Infections/epidemiology , Respiratory Tract Infections/virology , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction , Sequence Analysis, DNA , Turkey/epidemiology
12.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol ; 182(10): 989-996, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1282178

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: There are a limited number of studies about the clinical findings of coronavirus infection in pediatric patients with asthma. We aimed to evaluate the clinical and laboratory characteristics of pediatric patients with asthma and healthy children without chronic disease who infected with SARS-CoV-2. METHODS: This is a retrospective, case-control study comparing the asthma diagnosed and healthy children who were diagnosed as COVID-19 in our hospital between March 11 and November 10, 2020. RESULTS: During the study period, 6,205 children were diagnosed with CO-VID-19 in our hospital. Only 54 (0.87%) patients had a diagnosis of asthma. The mean of the age was 10.5 years and 53.7% (n:29) of the patients with asthma were male. Cough, shortness of breath, emesis, and diarrhea were found to be significantly higher in asthma group than in the control group (respectively p = 0.002, 0.000, 0.002, 0.019, 0.015). Patients who were given SABA was significantly higher in asthma diagnosed patients (p = 0.000). Hospitalization was significantly higher in asthma group (p = 0.025), and the duration of hospitalization was significantly higher in control group (p = 0.034). There was no significant difference between the 2 groups in terms of requiring oxygen treatment and in laboratory findings between groups. CONCLUSION: This study revealed that pediatric patients diagnosed with asthma were in a mild clinic. According to these findings, asthma may not affect the course of the COVID-19 in children.


Subject(s)
Asthma/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Adolescent , Adrenergic beta-Agonists/therapeutic use , Anti-Asthmatic Agents/therapeutic use , Asthma/diagnosis , Asthma/therapy , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/therapy , Child , Cough/diagnosis , Cough/epidemiology , Cough/therapy , Diarrhea/diagnosis , Diarrhea/epidemiology , Diarrhea/therapy , Dyspnea/diagnosis , Dyspnea/epidemiology , Dyspnea/therapy , Female , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Oxygen Inhalation Therapy , Retrospective Studies , Vomiting/diagnosis , Vomiting/epidemiology , Vomiting/therapy
13.
J Trop Pediatr ; 67(2)2021 05 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1246757

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Data on the gastrointestinal (GI) manifestations of Pediatric Corona Virus Disease (COVID-19) are conflicting and the relationship between GI involvement and the severity of COVID-19 disease has not been evaluated. The objectives of this systematic review were to determine the GI manifestations of pediatric COVID-19 and to evaluate their role as risk factors for a severe clinical course. METHODS: : A systematic literature search was carried out in PubMed and Scopus for studies published before 31 December 2020 with information about the GI manifestations of pediatric COVID-19. Patients with a severe and nonsevere clinical course were compared using the inverse variance heterogeneity model and odds ratio (OR) as the effect size. A sensitivity analysis was performed if the heterogeneity was high among studies. RESULTS: A total of 811 studies were identified through a systematic search of which 55 studies (4369 patients) were included in this systematic review. The commonest GI symptoms were diarrhea-19.08% [95% confidence interval (CI) 10.6-28.2], nausea/vomiting 19.7% (95% CI 7.8-33.2) and abdominal pain 20.3% (95% CI 3.7-40.4). The presence of diarrhea was significantly associated with a severe clinical course with a pooled OR of 3.97 (95% CI 1.80-8.73; p < 0.01). Abdominal pain and nausea/vomiting were not associated with disease severity. CONCLUSIONS: Diarrhea, nausea/vomiting or abdominal pain are present in nearly one-fifth of all children with COVID-19. The presence of diarrhea portends a severe clinical course.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Gastrointestinal Diseases , Child , Diarrhea/epidemiology , Diarrhea/etiology , Gastrointestinal Diseases/epidemiology , Gastrointestinal Diseases/etiology , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Vomiting/epidemiology , Vomiting/etiology
15.
Turk J Gastroenterol ; 32(2): 148-154, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1220242

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Patients infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), which causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), have fever, dry cough, dyspnea, and fatigue. The disease has now become a global pandemic. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between COVID-19 and gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms. METHODS: We collected and analyzed data on patients with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 by high-throughput sequencing or reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. We reviewed electronic medical records of 405 hospitalized COVID-19 patients in the Third Hospital of Wuhan. RESULTS: Among the 405 confirmed patients, 210 had no GI symptoms, 195 had GI symptoms, and the first symptom of 155 patients was GI. The prevalence of vascular and digestive diseases in the group with GI symptoms was significantly higher than in the group without GI symptoms. In patients with GI symptoms, the proportion with fever, cough, dysphoria, chest tightness, poor appetite, chest pain, and pharyngeal pain was significantly higher than in those without GI symptoms. There was no significant difference in imaging between the 2 groups. In patients with GI symptoms, the proportion with increased procalcitonin (PCT) level and decreased lymphocyte count was significantly higher than in those without GI symptoms. CONCLUSION: COVID-19 patients with GI symptoms had significantly more vascular and digestive system diseases and were more likely to have clinical manifestations of fever, cough, poor appetite, chest tightness, chest pain, insomnia, and pharyngeal pain. There were more patients with diarrhea, nausea, and vomiting. Patients with GI symptoms were more likely to have increased PCT and decreased lymphocyte count.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Gastrointestinal Diseases/epidemiology , Gastrointestinal Diseases/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/virology , China/epidemiology , Diarrhea/blood , Diarrhea/epidemiology , Diarrhea/virology , Female , Humans , Lymphocyte Count , Male , Middle Aged , Nausea/blood , Nausea/epidemiology , Nausea/virology , Procalcitonin/blood , Vomiting/blood , Vomiting/epidemiology , Vomiting/virology
16.
J Med Virol ; 93(5): 2740-2768, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1196532

ABSTRACT

A meta-analysis was performed to identify patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) presenting with gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms during the first and second pandemic waves and investigate their association with the disease outcomes. A systematic search in PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science, ScienceDirect, and EMBASE was performed up to July 25, 2020. The pooled prevalence of the GI presentations was estimated using the random-effects model. Pairwise comparison for the outcomes was performed according to the GI manifestations' presentation and the pandemic wave of infection. Data were reported as relative risk (RR), or odds ratio and 95% confidence interval. Of 125 articles with 25,252 patients, 20.3% presented with GI manifestations. Anorexia (19.9%), dysgeusia/ageusia (15.4%), diarrhea (13.2%), nausea (10.3%), and hematemesis (9.1%) were the most common. About 26.7% had confirmed positive fecal RNA, with persistent viral shedding for an average time of 19.2 days before being negative. Patients presenting with GI symptoms on admission showed a higher risk of complications, including acute respiratory distress syndrome (RR = 8.16), acute cardiac injury (RR = 5.36), and acute kidney injury (RR = 5.52), intensive care unit (ICU) admission (RR = 2.56), and mortality (RR = 2.01). Although not reach significant levels, subgroup-analysis revealed that affected cohorts in the first wave had a higher risk of being hospitalized, ventilated, ICU admitted, and expired. This meta-analysis suggests an association between GI symptoms in COVID-19 patients and unfavorable outcomes. The analysis also showed improved overall outcomes for COVID-19 patients during the second wave compared to the first wave of the outbreak.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/physiopathology , Gastroenterology/methods , Ageusia/epidemiology , Anorexia/epidemiology , Databases, Factual , Diarrhea/epidemiology , Dysgeusia/epidemiology , Feces/virology , Hematemesis/epidemiology , Hospitalization , Humans , Nausea/epidemiology , Pandemics , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2 , Virus Shedding
17.
Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol ; 33(5): 691-694, 2021 05 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1159992

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Infection due to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 is typically associated with a respiratory syndrome, but gastrointestinal symptoms have been described in early reports from China. However, data from European centres are scarce. OBJECTIVES: We aimed to characterise the gastrointestinal manifestations of patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and their disease course. METHODS: Patients admitted at our centre between March and April 2020 with diagnosis of COVID-19 were included. Asymptomatic patients or those without symptom information were excluded. Clinical features, laboratory data and disease severity (mechanical ventilation, intensive care admission or death) were analysed. RESULTS: Two-hundred one patients were included (median age 71 years; 56.2% male). Digestive symptoms were reported by 60 (29.9%) patients during the disease course, being part of the disease presentation in 34 (16.9%). The most frequent were diarrhoea in 36 patients (17.9%). Patients with gastrointestinal symptoms were younger (P = 0.032), had higher haemoglobin levels (P = 0.002) and lower C-reactive protein (P = 0.045) and potassium levels (P = 0.004). Patients with digestive symptoms had less severe disease (28.3 vs. 44.0%; P = 0.038). Regarding liver damage, aspartate aminotransferase (AST) was elevated in 65.2% of patients and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) in 62.7%, but these patients did not present a more severe disease (elevated AST P = 0.062; elevated ALT P = 0.276). CONCLUSION: A significant portion of COVID-19 patients have digestive symptoms, mostly at presentation. This should be taken into account in order to keep a high level of suspicion to reach an early diagnosis and setup infection control measures to control the transmission rate. This subgroup of patients appears to have a less severe disease course.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/physiopathology , Diarrhea/physiopathology , Vomiting/physiopathology , Abdominal Pain/epidemiology , Abdominal Pain/metabolism , Abdominal Pain/physiopathology , Adolescent , Adult , Age Distribution , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Ageusia/epidemiology , Ageusia/metabolism , Ageusia/physiopathology , Alanine Transaminase/metabolism , Aspartate Aminotransferases/metabolism , C-Reactive Protein/metabolism , COVID-19/metabolism , Diarrhea/epidemiology , Diarrhea/metabolism , Female , Hemoglobins/metabolism , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Nausea/epidemiology , Nausea/metabolism , Nausea/physiopathology , Portugal/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Vomiting/epidemiology , Vomiting/metabolism , Young Adult
18.
BMJ Glob Health ; 6(3)2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1148159

ABSTRACT

We have worked to develop a Clinical Information Network (CIN) in Kenya as an early form of learning health systems (LHS) focused on paediatric and neonatal care that now spans 22 hospitals. CIN's aim was to examine important outcomes of hospitalisation at scale, identify and ultimately solve practical problems of service delivery, drive improvements in quality and test interventions. By including multiple routine settings in research, we aimed to promote generalisability of findings and demonstrate potential efficiencies derived from LHS. We illustrate the nature and range of research CIN has supported over the past 7 years as a form of LHS. Clinically, this has largely focused on common, serious paediatric illnesses such as pneumonia, malaria and diarrhoea with dehydration with recent extensions to neonatal illnesses. CIN also enables examination of the quality of care, for example that provided to children with severe malnutrition and the challenges encountered in routine settings in adopting simple technologies (pulse oximetry) and more advanced diagnostics (eg, Xpert MTB/RIF). Although regular feedback to hospitals has been associated with some improvements in quality data continue to highlight system challenges that undermine provision of basic, quality care (eg, poor access to blood glucose testing and routine microbiology). These challenges include those associated with increased mortality risk (eg, delays in blood transfusion). Using the same data the CIN platform has enabled conduct of randomised trials and supports malaria vaccine and most recently COVID-19 surveillance. Employing LHS principles has meant engaging front-line workers, clinical managers and national stakeholders throughout. Our experience suggests LHS can be developed in low and middle-income countries that efficiently enable contextually appropriate research and contribute to strengthening of health services and research systems.


Subject(s)
Child Health Services/standards , Delivery of Health Care/standards , Health Services Accessibility/standards , Health Services Research , Quality Improvement , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Child , Child, Preschool , Developing Countries , Diarrhea/epidemiology , Diarrhea/prevention & control , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Kenya/epidemiology , Malaria/epidemiology , Malaria/prevention & control , Pandemics , Pneumonia/epidemiology , Pneumonia/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2
19.
J Gastroenterol ; 56(5): 409-420, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1147593

ABSTRACT

Although primarily a respiratory illness, several studies have shown that COVID-19 causes elevation of liver enzymes and various gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms. The aim of this study was to undertake a systematic review and meta-analysis to determine whether the presence of gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms contributed toward COVID-19 severity, and identify the GI symptoms characteristic of severe COVID-19. We conducted a literature search of PubMed from December 1, 2019, to June 30, 2020, and identified all reports with GI symptoms reported. A meta-analysis comparing the severity of COVID-19 with the presence of liver enzyme elevation and GI symptoms was performed using RevMan version 5.4. Pooled data from 15,305 unique reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction positive COVID-19 patients from 44 studies were analyzed. We found that the severe COVID-19 patients significantly had abdominal pain compared to the non-severe COVID-19 patients (OR = 2.70, 95% CI 1.17-6.27, Z = 2.32, p = 0.02, I2 = 0%) by analyzed 609 patients of 4 studies who reported both abdominal pain and COVID-19 severity. However, there was no significant difference in the incidence of diarrhea, nausea, or vomiting between the two groups. Thus, this systematic review and meta-analysis demonstrated that abdominal pain could be characteristic of severe COVID-19 infections. Compared with other viral infections that primarily infect the respiratory system, patients with COVID-19 have a slightly lower frequency of diarrheal symptoms with abdominal pain. However, to confirm this, further studies with COVID-19 patients across various countries and ethnicities are required.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Gastrointestinal Diseases/epidemiology , Liver/enzymology , Abdominal Pain/etiology , COVID-19/physiopathology , Diarrhea/epidemiology , Diarrhea/virology , Gastrointestinal Diseases/virology , Humans , Liver/virology , Nausea/epidemiology , Nausea/virology , Severity of Illness Index , Vomiting/epidemiology , Vomiting/virology
20.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(11): e24897, 2021 Mar 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1138016

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: The prevalence of children exhibiting coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) with digestive system involvement remains unknown. Therefore, we aimed to quantify the impact of COVID-19 on the digestive system of children.In this meta-analysis, we searched PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science from January 1, 2020, to June 31, 2020. We also searched for COVID-19 publications in specific journals for more comprehensive results. We included studies that reported the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of COVID-19, and we excluded duplicate publications, reviews, animal studies, case reports, publications without the full text, studies with incomplete information, and studies from which data extraction was impossible.We conducted a meta-analysis of the incidence of gastrointestinal symptoms and changes in liver function involving 19 studies. The pooled prevalence of diarrhea was 10% (95% CI: 7-14; I2  = 84%), that of nausea or vomiting was 7% (95% CI: 5-11; I2  = 77%), and that of abdominal pain was 4% (95% CI: 2-9; I2  = 79%). In addition, the pooled incidence of increased alanine aminotransferase was 8% (95% CI: 5-15; I2  = 46%), and the pooled incidence of increased AST was 15% (95% CI: 9-26; I2  = 66%). The pooled rate of recovery was 97% (95% CI: 94-100; I2  = 86%), and the pooled rate of death, which was 1% (95% CI: 1-4; I2  = 48%), was much smaller than the recovery rate.Our research shows that digestive system symptoms and function in children with COVID-19 are not uncommon. More attention should be paid to this unique group of patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Digestive System Diseases/epidemiology , Abdominal Pain/epidemiology , Adolescent , Child , Child, Preschool , Diarrhea/epidemiology , Digestive System/physiopathology , Female , Gastrointestinal Diseases/epidemiology , Humans , Incidence , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Liver Diseases/epidemiology , Male , Nausea/epidemiology , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2 , Vomiting/epidemiology
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