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2.
Front Public Health ; 9: 747725, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1775922

ABSTRACT

Prevention programs often are directed at either parents or children separately, thereby ignoring the intergenerational aspect of health and well-being. Engaging the family is likely to improve both the uptake and long-term impact of health behavior change. We integrated an intergenerational approach into a frequently used shared assessment tool for children's care needs. The current study's aim was 2-fold: to monitor this family-engagement tool's effects on both children and their parents' health behaviors and well-being, and to examine the different dynamics of health behavioral change within a family. Method: We followed 12 children ages 10-14 years and their parents for 12 weeks using an explanatory mixed-methods design comprising interviews, questionnaires, and an n-of-1 study. During home visits at the beginning and end of the study, we interviewed children and their parents about their expectations and experiences, and measured their height and weight. Furthermore, we collected secondary data, such as notes from phone and email conversations with parents, as well as evaluation forms from professionals. In the n-of-1 study, families were prompted three times a week to describe their day and report on their vegetable intake, minutes of exercise, health behavior goals, and psychosomatic well-being. The interviews, notes, and evaluation forms were analyzed using qualitative content analyses. For the n-of-1 study, we performed multi-level time-series analyses across all families to assess changes in outcomes after consulting the family-engagement tool. Using regression analyses with autocorrelation correction, we examined changes within individual families. Results: Five child-mother dyads and three child-mother-father triads provided sufficient pre- and post-data. The mean minutes of children's physical activity significantly increased, and mothers felt more energetic, but other outcomes did not change. In consultations related to overweight, the family-engagement tool often was used without setting specific or family goals. Conclusions: The family-engagement approach elicited positive effects on some families' health and well-being. For multifaceted health problems, such as obesity, family-engagement approaches should focus on setting specific goals and strategies in different life domains, and for different family members.


Subject(s)
Diet, Healthy , Adolescent , Child , Exercise , Family/psychology , Humans , Parents/psychology
3.
PLoS One ; 17(3): e0266016, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1765539

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 related lockdown made it much more difficult for people to control their eating behaviours and body weight with the methods and means they had used before. This is reflected in reports that show that eating behaviours deteriorated significantly during the COVID-19 pandemic (including in Poland). Therefore, it is important to determine what factors may be conducive to healthy eating behaviours among people with different BMI. As previous studies show, the use of healthy eating related-apps and training programs may be a protective factor against the development of unhealthy eating behaviours. Therefore, it is worth checking whether their action will be a protective factor during COVID-19. The aim of this cross sectional study was to analyse whether the current use of healthy eating-related apps and previous participation in training in this field (educational activities) as well as body mass index may play a role in eating motives and behaviours among women during COVID-19. Our final sample included 1,447 women (age: M = 31.34 ± 11.05). Participants completed: the Eating Motivation Survey, the Emotional Overeating Questionnaire, the Mindful Eating Questionnaire, socio-demographic survey and questions about healthy eating-related apps and training (educational activities). Referring to the selected significant results, our study shows that during COVID-19, the use of healthy eating-related apps alone, as well as the use of apps and prior training participation promote healthy eating motives and behaviours. It suggests that promoting the use of healthy eating applications and the acquisition of knowledge and skills in this field could be one way of shaping resources that can be effectively used to deal with crisis situations.


Subject(s)
Body Mass Index , COVID-19/psychology , Diet, Healthy , Feeding Behavior/psychology , Mobile Applications , Motivation , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Diet, Healthy/psychology , Diet, Healthy/statistics & numerical data , Female , Health Education , Health Surveys , Humans , Middle Aged , Poland/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
4.
Public Health Nutr ; 25(3): 528-537, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1740384

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To compare the cost and affordability of two fortnightly diets (representing the national guidelines and current consumption) across areas containing Australia's major supermarkets. DESIGN: The Healthy Diets Australian Standardised Affordability and Pricing protocol was used. SETTING: Price data were collected online and via phone calls in fifty-one urban and inner regional locations across Australia. PARTICIPANTS: Not applicable. RESULTS: Healthy diets were consistently less expensive than current (unhealthy) diets. Nonetheless, healthy diets would cost 25-26 % of the disposable income for low-income households and 30-31 % of the poverty line. Differences in gross incomes (the most available income metric which overrepresents disposable income) drove national variations in diet affordability (from 14 % of the median gross household incomes in the Australian Capital Territory and Northern Territory to 25 % of the median gross household income in Tasmania). CONCLUSIONS: In Australian cities and regional areas with major supermarkets, access to affordable diets remains problematic for families receiving low incomes. These findings are likely to be exacerbated in outer regional and remote areas (not included in this study). To make healthy diets economically appealing, policies that reduce the (absolute and relative) costs of healthy diets and increase the incomes of Australians living in poverty are required.


Subject(s)
Diet, Healthy , Diet , Australia , Costs and Cost Analysis , Humans , Income
5.
Nutrients ; 14(5)2022 Feb 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1725909

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic and subsequent social distancing orders may have changed health behaviors adversely. This study aims to examine changes in physical activity, diet, and sleep patterns during the pandemic in South Korea and to identify the factors influencing adverse changes in these behavioral indicators. Data from the Community Health Survey conducted in 2020 with a total of 229,269 adults were used, employing multivariate logistic regression and a classification and regression tree model. Participants reported decreased physical activity (49.6%), an increase in unhealthy diet (17.0%), and decreased sleep time (9.4%). Changes in adverse health behaviors were significantly related to being female, being in poor subjective health, not having hypertension or diabetes, engaging in other unhealthy behaviors, and complying with COVID-19 prevention guidelines. While those with adverse physical activity and unhealthy diet changes were younger and concerned about COVID-19 infection, the participants with adverse sleep changes were older, experienced economic stress (unemployed or recipients of basic living benefits), and had other unhealthy behaviors (obesity, severe stress, current smoking, and binge alcohol consumption). Public health efforts to intervene in these adverse health behaviors during the COVID-19 pandemic should target the variables shown to be significant in this study.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Diet, Healthy , Exercise , Female , Humans , Pandemics , Republic of Korea/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep
6.
Brain Behav Immun ; 87: 4-5, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1719331

ABSTRACT

The worldwide outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) raises concerns of widespread panic and anxiety in individuals subjected to the real or perceived threat of the virus. Compared to general populations, patients who are institutionalized in a closed unit are also very vulnerable to COVID-19 infection and complications. This crisis touched on difficult issues of not only psychiatric care and ethics, but also psychological impacts to psychiatric care givers. In this Viewpoint, we address both physical and biopsychosocial aspects of this infection, as well as the psychoneuroimmunity of preventive strategies of healthy lifestyle, regular exercise, balanced nutrition, quality sleep and a strong connection with people. Social distancing and wearing masks might help us from pathogen exposure, yet such these measures also prevent us from expressing compassion and friendliness. Therefore, all forms of psychological support should be routinely implemented not only to consider psychological resilience but also to enhance psychoneuroimmunity against COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Mental Disorders/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Psychoneuroimmunology , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Diet, Healthy , Exercise , Healthy Lifestyle , Humans , Masks , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Resilience, Psychological , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep , Social Behavior , Social Support , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology
7.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(4)2022 02 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1715319

ABSTRACT

Eating healthily and being physically active during pregnancy are important for maternal and offspring health. Maternity healthcare is a key arena for health promotion; however, 20% of pregnant women in Sweden are foreign-born, which may reduce reach due to language and cultural barriers. The aims of this study were to explore healthcare professionals' perceptions about (a) promoting health behaviors (i.e., healthy diet, physical activity, and weight gain) among Arabic- and Somali-speaking pregnant women and (b) how a translated version of the previously evaluated Swedish app (HealthyMoms) can be tailored and used as a tool in their clinical work. Healthcare professionals in Swedish maternity care (n = 14) were interviewed. Data were analyzed using inductive thematic analysis. Healthcare professionals expressed challenges in health promotion work, including cultural and educational aspects and low awareness of health behaviors among women themselves and their social environment. Further, a lack of resources within the clinical practice and a need for cultural awareness among healthcare professionals were highlighted. Finally, it was perceived that a translated app has potential to provide basic and culturally adjusted information, facilitate communication and thus has potential to become a helpful tool in maternity care to support healthy lifestyle behaviors in Arabic- and Somali-speaking pregnant women.


Subject(s)
Maternal Health Services , Pregnant Women , Delivery of Health Care , Diet, Healthy , Female , Humans , Pregnancy , Qualitative Research
8.
Int J Mol Sci ; 23(3)2022 Feb 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1686812

ABSTRACT

Flavonols are a subclass of natural flavonoids characterized by a remarkable number of biotechnological applications and health-promoting properties. They attract researchers' attention due to many epidemiological studies supporting their usage. They are phytochemicals commonly present in our diet, being ubiquitous in the plant kingdom and, in particular, relatively very abundant in fruits and vegetables. All these aspects make flavonols candidates of choice for the valorization of products, based on the presence of a remarkable number of different chemical structures, each one characterized by specific chemical features capable of influencing biological targets inside the living organisms in very different manners. In this review, we analyzed the biochemical and physiological characteristics of flavonols focalizing our attention on the most promising compounds to shed some light on their increasing utilization in biotechnological applications in processing industries, as well as their suitable employment to improve the overall wellness of the humankind.


Subject(s)
Diet, Healthy , Flavonols/metabolism , Flavonols/pharmacology , Food Industry , Fruit/chemistry , Functional Food , Humans , Vegetables/chemistry
9.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(3)2022 01 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1649792

ABSTRACT

The establishment and implementation of a healthy lifestyle is fundamental to public health and is an important issue for working-aged people, as it affects not only them but also the future generations. However, due to the COVID-19 pandemic and associated behavioural restrictions, lifestyles have altered, and, in certain environments, significantly worsened. In the present study, we conducted a project to improve the intestinal environment by focussing on the dietary habits of participants, utilising the living laboratory as a social technology to explore how to adapt to this drastic environmental change. We held eight workshops for voluntary participants and implemented a self-monitoring process of recording dietary behaviours (n = 78) and testing the intestinal environment (n = 14). Through this initiative, we developed a personalised wellness enhancement programme based on collaboration with multiple stakeholders and a framework for using personal data for research and practical purposes. These results provide an approach for promoting voluntary participation and behavioural changes among people, especially under the COVID-19 pandemic, as well as a practical basis for the government, academia, and industry to intervene effectively in raising people's awareness of health and wellness.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Aged , Diet, Healthy , Humans , Laboratories , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2
11.
Nutrients ; 13(12)2021 Dec 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1622630

ABSTRACT

Culinary medicine is an evidence-based approach that blends the art of cooking with the science of medicine to inculcate a healthy dietary pattern. Food prescription programs are gaining popularity in the Unites States, as a means to improve access to healthy foods among patient populations. The purpose of this paper is to describe the implementation and preliminary impact of A Prescription for Healthy Living (APHL) culinary medicine curriculum on biometric and diet-related behavioral and psychosocial outcomes among patients with diabetes participating in a clinic-led food prescription (food Rx) program. We used a quasi-experimental design to assess APHL program impact on patient biometric outcome data obtained from electronic health records, including glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), body mass index (BMI), and blood pressure (n = 33 patients in the APHL group, n = 75 patients in the food Rx-only group). Pre-post surveys were administered among those in the APHL group to monitor program impact on psychosocial and behavioral outcomes. Results of the outcome analysis showed significant pre-to-post reduction in HbA1c levels among participants within the APHL group (estimated mean difference = -0.96% (-1.82, -0.10), p = 0.028). Between-group changes showed a greater decrease in HbA1c among those participating in APHL as compared to food Rx-only, albeit these differences were not statistically significant. Participation in APHL demonstrated significant increases in the consumption of fruits and vegetables, fewer participants reported that cooking healthy food is difficult, increased frequency of cooking from scratch, and increased self-efficacy in meal planning and cooking (p < 0.01). In conclusion, the results of our pilot study suggest the potential positive impact of a virtually-implemented culinary medicine approach in improving health outcomes among low-income patients with type 2 diabetes, albeit studies with a larger sample size and a rigorous study design are needed.


Subject(s)
Curriculum , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/diet therapy , Feeding Behavior , Nutritional Sciences , Biometry , COVID-19 , Cooking/methods , Diet Therapy , Diet, Healthy , Health Education , Humans , Pilot Projects , Psychiatric Rehabilitation , SARS-CoV-2
12.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 71(1): 1-9, 2022 Jan 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1606062

ABSTRACT

The 2020-2025 Dietary Guidelines for Americans* advise incorporating more fruits and vegetables into U.S. residents' diets as part of healthy dietary patterns. Adults should consume 1.5-2 cup-equivalents of fruits and 2-3 cup-equivalents of vegetables daily.† A healthy diet supports healthy immune function (1) and helps to prevent obesity, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and some cancers (2); having some of these conditions can predispose persons to more severe illness and death from COVID-19 (3). CDC used the most recent 2019 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance system (BRFSS) data to estimate the percentage of states' adult population who met intake recommendations overall and by sociodemographic characteristics for 49 states and the District of Columbia (DC). Overall, 12.3% of adults met fruit recommendations, ranging from 8.4% in West Virginia to 16.1% in Connecticut, and 10.0% met vegetable recommendations, ranging from 5.6% in Kentucky to 16.0% in Vermont. The prevalence of meeting fruit intake recommendations was highest among Hispanic adults (16.4%) and lowest among males (10.1%); meeting vegetable intake recommendations was highest among adults aged ≥51 years (12.5%) and lowest among those living below or close to the poverty level (income to poverty ratio [IPR] <1.25) (6.8%). Additional policies§ and programs that will increase access to fruits and vegetables in places where U.S. residents live, learn, work, and play, might increase consumption and improve health.


Subject(s)
Diet, Healthy/statistics & numerical data , Fruit , Nutrition Policy , Recommended Dietary Allowances , Vegetables , Adult , Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , United States
14.
Br J Nutr ; 127(1): 123-132, 2022 Jan 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1603433

ABSTRACT

Only a few studies have investigated the association between psychological stress and the healthfulness of plant-based diets while accounting for variances in age groups and regions. In light of this, this study aimed to identify the food groups that contribute the most to the relationship between the healthfulness of plant-based diets and psychological stress in female students in Saudi Arabia. This cross-sectional study, which included 401 female college students aged 19-35 years, collected data on blood, anthropometric indices, the perceived stress scale-10 (PSS-10) and diet using the Saudi food frequency questionnaire. An overall plant-based diet index (PDI), healthy PDI, and an unhealthy PDI (uPDI) were defined. Multiple linear regression analyses were applied to examine the associations between PSS-10 and PDI and hPDI and uPDI. No associations between the PSS-10 score and the overall PDI or uPDI scores were found; however, a six-point higher hPDI score was associated with a 0·16-point lower PSS-10 score (95 % CI, -0·24, -0·08) after controlling for lifestyle factors. Moreover, adjustments for healthy food groups, including vegetables and fruits, attenuated the association between the hPDI and PSS-10. In conclusion, healthy plant-based diets are associated with lower psychological stress in young Saudi women. This finding highlights the importance, especially for female students, of following diets that are not only plant-based but are also healthy and rich in fruits and vegetables.


Subject(s)
Diet, Vegetarian , Diet , Cross-Sectional Studies , Diet, Healthy , Female , Humans , Students , Vegetables
15.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(24)2021 12 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1595299

ABSTRACT

Few Australians consume diets consistent with the Australian Dietary Guidelines. A major problem is high intake of discretionary food and drinks (those not needed for health and high in saturated fat, added sugar, salt and/or alcohol). Low socioeconomic groups (SEGs) suffer particularly poor diet-related health. Surprisingly, detailed quantitative dietary data across SEGs was lacking. Analysis of the most recent national nutrition survey data produced habitual intakes of a reference household (two adults and two children) in SEG quintiles of household income. Cost and affordability of habitual and recommended diets for the reference household were determined using methods based on the Healthy Diets Australian Standardised Affordability and Pricing protocol. Low SEGs reported significantly lower intakes of healthy food and drinks yet similarly high intakes of discretionary choices to high SEGs (435 serves/fortnight). Total habitual diets of low SEGs cost significantly less than those of high SEGs (AU$751/fortnight to AU$853/fortnight). Results confirmed low SEGs cannot afford a healthy diet. Lower intakes of healthy choices in low SEGs may help explain their higher rates of diet-related disease compared to higher SEGs. The findings can inform potential policy actions to improve affordability of healthy foods and help drive healthier diets for all Australians.


Subject(s)
Diet, Healthy , Nutrition Policy , Adult , Australia , Child , Costs and Cost Analysis , Diet , Eating , Energy Intake , Humans , Socioeconomic Factors
16.
Nutrients ; 13(12)2021 Dec 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1580554

ABSTRACT

We identified associations between self-reported olfactory dysfunction (OD) and dietary attributes in participants aged ≥40 years (n = 6,356) from the nationally representative 2011-2014 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). The chemosensory questionnaire and 24-h dietary recalls were administered by trained interviewers. OD was defined as self-report of either smell problems in the last year, worse smell relative to age 25, or perceiving phantom odors. Dietary outcomes included Healthy Eating Index 2015 score (HEI) with adequacy and moderation components (higher scores indicated higher diet quality), dietary diversity, energy density, and intake of major food groups. Survey-weighted linear regression models estimated OD-diet associations, adjusting for socio-demographic, lifestyle, and clinical factors. Adjusted mean difference (95% CI) between those with versus without OD, showed that adults with OD had significantly lower HEI moderation score (-0.67 (-1.22, -0.11)) and diets higher in energy density (0.06 (0.00, 0.11)), and percent energy from saturated fat (0.47 (0.12, 0.81)), total fat (0.96 (0.22, 1.70)), and added sugar (1.00 (0.33, 1.66)). Age and sex-stratified analyses showed that younger females (40-64 years) primarily accounted for the associations with diet quality and total/saturated fat intake. These findings inform dietary screening and recommendations for adults who report OD, including those experiencing transient or persistent smell loss with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Diet, Healthy , Feeding Behavior , Olfaction Disorders/epidemiology , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Nutrition Surveys , SARS-CoV-2 , Self Report
17.
Nutrients ; 14(1)2021 Dec 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1580544

ABSTRACT

There are many ways to regulate emotions. People use both adaptive (e.g., regulation by music) and maladaptive (e.g., regulation by food) strategies to do this. We hypothesized that participants with a high level of food-based regulatory strategies and a low level of music-based regulatory strategies (a group with the least adaptive form of emotion regulation) would have significantly greater levels of unhealthy eating behaviours, depression, anxiety and stress, as well as a significantly lower level of healthy eating behaviours than those with a low level of food-based regulatory strategies and a high level of music-based regulatory strategies (a group with the greatest adaptive form of emotion regulation). Participants (N = 410; Mage = 31.77, SD = 13.53) completed: the Brief Music in Mood Regulation Scale, the Emotional Overeating Questionnaire, the Healthy and Unhealthy Eating Behavior Scale, the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale and a socio-demographic survey. The four clusters were identified: (a) Cluster 1 (N = 148): low food-based regulatory strategies and high music-based regulatory strategies; (b) Cluster 2 (N = 42): high food-based regulatory strategies and high music-based regulatory strategies; (c) Cluster 3 (N = 70): high food-based regulatory strategies and low music-based regulatory strategies; (d) Cluster 4 (N = 150): low food-based regulatory strategies and low music-based regulatory strategies. Overall, our outcomes partially support our hypothesis, as higher levels of unhealthy eating behaviours, depression, anxiety and stress were observed in participants with high food-based and low music-based regulatory strategies as compared with adults with low food-based and high music-based regulatory strategies. To sum up, the results obtained indicate that during the COVID-19 pandemic the group of people regulating their emotional state and unhealthy eating predominantly with food is potentially characterized by worse functioning than the group of people regulating with music. Therefore, it can be concluded that people who regulate their functioning using food should be included in preventive measures by specialists. During the visit, psychologists and primary care physicians can ask patients about their daily strategies and based on this information specialists can estimate the potential risk of developing high levels of stress and anxiety, depressive disorders and unhealthy eating habits and provide specific (match) intervention.


Subject(s)
Anxiety Disorders/therapy , COVID-19/psychology , Depressive Disorder/therapy , Diet, Healthy/statistics & numerical data , Feeding and Eating Disorders/therapy , Music/psychology , Stress, Psychological/therapy , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Anxiety Disorders/complications , Anxiety Disorders/psychology , Cluster Analysis , Depressive Disorder/complications , Depressive Disorder/psychology , Emotional Regulation , Feeding and Eating Disorders/complications , Feeding and Eating Disorders/psychology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Acuity , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological/complications , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
18.
Nutrients ; 13(2)2021 Jan 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1575167

ABSTRACT

Childhood obesity is a worldwide health emergency. In many cases, it is directly linked to inappropriate eating habits and a sedentary lifestyle. During lockdown aimed at containing the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) spread, children have been forced to stay at home. The present study aimed at investigating the lifestyles of outpatients (aged 5-17 years) with complicated obesity enrolled in the day-hospital food education program at the Children's Hospital Bambino Gesù in Rome. A survey was performed based on a structured questionnaire, investigating dietary habits and lifestyles. The questionnaire answers were rated as "yes/no/sometimes" or "often/never/sometimes". Eighty-eight families correctly completed the questionnaire between March and May 2020. The results highlighted that 85.2% (N = 75) of the patients ate breakfast regularly, and 64.3% (N = 72) consumed fruit as an afternoon snack. However, 21.6% (N = 19) did just "often" home workouts, and 50.0% (N = 44) reported an increase of feeling hungry with "sometimes" frequency. There is a significant relationship of feeling hungry with gender (p < 0.0001) and age (p = 0.048) and, also, between gender with having breakfast (p = 0.020) and cooking (p = 0.006). Living a healthy lifestyle during lockdown was difficult for the outpatients, mainly due to the increase in a sedentary lifestyle and the increase in feeling hungry, but some healthy eating habits were maintained, as advised during the food education program provided before lockdown.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Diet, Healthy , Feeding Behavior , Patient Education as Topic , Pediatric Obesity/prevention & control , Quarantine , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Adolescent , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Humans , Male , Pediatric Obesity/epidemiology
19.
Nutrients ; 13(12)2021 Dec 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1554890

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has increased food insecurity worldwide, yet there has been limited assessment of shifts in the cost and affordability of healthy, equitable and sustainable diets. This study explores the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic and income supplements provided by the Australian government on diet cost and affordability for low-income households in an Australian urban area. The Healthy Diets ASAP method protocol was applied to assess the cost and cost differential of current and recommended diets before (in 2019) and during the COVID-19 pandemic (late 2020) for households with a minimum-wage and welfare-only disposable household income, by area of socioeconomic disadvantage, in Greater Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. Data were collected between August and October, 2020, from 78 food outlets and compared with data collected in the same locations between May and October, 2019, in an earlier study. The price of most healthy food groups increased significantly during the pandemic-with the exception of vegetables and legumes, which decreased. Conversely, the price of discretionary foods and drinks did not increase during the pandemic. The cost of the current and recommended diets significantly increased throughout this period, but the latter continued to be less expensive than the former. Due to income supplements provided between May and September 2020, the affordability of the recommended diet improved greatly, by 27% and 42%, for households with minimum-wage and welfare-only disposable household income, respectively. This improvement in the affordability of the recommended diet highlights the need to permanently increase welfare support for low-income families to ensure food security.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diet, Healthy/economics , Food Insecurity/economics , Income , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , COVID-19/economics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Queensland/epidemiology
20.
J Diabetes Res ; 2021: 5266919, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1546592

ABSTRACT

Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a serious and frequent pregnancy complication that can lead to short and long-term risks for both mother and fetus. Different health organizations proposed different algorithms for the screening, diagnosis, and management of GDM. Medical Nutrition Therapy (MNT), together with physical exercise and frequent self-monitoring, represents the milestone for GDM treatment in order to reduce maternal and fetal complications. The pregnant woman should benefit from her family support and make changes in their lifestyles, changes that, in the end, will be beneficial for the whole family. The aim of this manuscript is to review the literature about the Medical Nutrition Therapy in GDM and its crucial role in GDM management.


Subject(s)
Diabetes, Gestational/diet therapy , Diet, Healthy , Nutrition Therapy , Diabetes, Gestational/diagnosis , Diabetes, Gestational/physiopathology , Exercise , Female , Humans , Nutrition Therapy/adverse effects , Pregnancy , Protective Factors , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , Risk Reduction Behavior , Treatment Outcome
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