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1.
PLoS One ; 17(3): e0266016, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1765539

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 related lockdown made it much more difficult for people to control their eating behaviours and body weight with the methods and means they had used before. This is reflected in reports that show that eating behaviours deteriorated significantly during the COVID-19 pandemic (including in Poland). Therefore, it is important to determine what factors may be conducive to healthy eating behaviours among people with different BMI. As previous studies show, the use of healthy eating related-apps and training programs may be a protective factor against the development of unhealthy eating behaviours. Therefore, it is worth checking whether their action will be a protective factor during COVID-19. The aim of this cross sectional study was to analyse whether the current use of healthy eating-related apps and previous participation in training in this field (educational activities) as well as body mass index may play a role in eating motives and behaviours among women during COVID-19. Our final sample included 1,447 women (age: M = 31.34 ± 11.05). Participants completed: the Eating Motivation Survey, the Emotional Overeating Questionnaire, the Mindful Eating Questionnaire, socio-demographic survey and questions about healthy eating-related apps and training (educational activities). Referring to the selected significant results, our study shows that during COVID-19, the use of healthy eating-related apps alone, as well as the use of apps and prior training participation promote healthy eating motives and behaviours. It suggests that promoting the use of healthy eating applications and the acquisition of knowledge and skills in this field could be one way of shaping resources that can be effectively used to deal with crisis situations.


Subject(s)
Body Mass Index , COVID-19/psychology , Diet, Healthy , Feeding Behavior/psychology , Mobile Applications , Motivation , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Diet, Healthy/psychology , Diet, Healthy/statistics & numerical data , Female , Health Education , Health Surveys , Humans , Middle Aged , Poland/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
2.
Nutrients ; 13(5)2021 May 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1448904

ABSTRACT

An economic experiment was conducted in France in 2020 to evaluate consumer attitudes toward two ham products associated with different colorectal cancer risks. We focused specifically on comparing a conventional ham and a new hypothetical antioxidant-enriched ham with a reduced risk of provoking colorectal cancer. Study participants were given descriptions of the two hams before carrying out successive rounds of willingness-to-pay (WTP) assessments. The results show that WTP was higher for the antioxidant-enriched ham than for the conventional ham. WTP estimates were also impacted by providing additional information about the reduction in colorectal cancer risk associated with the antioxidant-enriched ham. Based on the participants' WTP, we came up with ex ante estimates for the social impacts of introducing the antioxidant-enriched ham onto the market, and we suggest that it would be socially optimal to promote the product. Competition arising from pre-existing product labelling and marketing assertions could greatly limit the market potential of antioxidant-enriched ham, which suggests that alternative approaches may be necessary, such as regulations mandating antioxidant enrichment. These results also concern all countries with high levels of meat consumption.


Subject(s)
Colorectal Neoplasms/prevention & control , Consumer Behavior/economics , Food Preferences/psychology , Food, Fortified/economics , Pork Meat/economics , Adult , Antioxidants , Choice Behavior , Commerce , Diet, Healthy/economics , Diet, Healthy/psychology , Female , Food, Fortified/analysis , France , Health Behavior , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pork Meat/analysis , Young Adult
3.
Nutrients ; 13(9)2021 Sep 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1430931

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Healthy eating and physical activity are effective non-pharmacological approaches to boost immune function and contain the pandemic. We aimed to explore the associations and interactions between physical activity and healthy eating behavior with COVID-19-like symptoms (Slike-CV19S). METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted on 3947 outpatients, from 14 February to 2 March 2020, at nine health facilities in Vietnam. Data collection included sociodemographic characteristics, healthy eating behavior (using the healthy eating score (HES) questionnaire), physical activity (using the short form international physical activity questionnaire), and Slike-CV19S. The associations and interactions were tested using logistic regression models. RESULTS: Frequent intake of fruits (OR = 0.84; p = 0.016), vegetables (OR = 0.72; p = 0.036), and fish (OR = 0.43; p < 0.001) were associated with a lower Slike-CV19S likelihood, as compared with infrequent intake. Patients with higher HES levels (OR = 0.84; p = 0.033 for medium HES; OR = 0.77; p = 0.006 for high HES) or being physically active (OR = 0.69; p < 0.001) had a lower Slike-CV19S likelihood, as compared to those with low HES or physical inactivity, respectively. Patients with medium HES who were physically active (OR = 0.69; p = 0.005), or with high HES and physically active (OR = 0.58; p < 0.001), had a lower Slike-CV19S likelihood, as compared to those with low HES and physical inactivity. CONCLUSIONS: Healthy eating behavior and physical activity showed single and combinative impacts on protecting people from Slike-CV19S. Strategic approaches are encouraged to improve healthy behaviors, which may further contribute to containing the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Diet, Healthy/statistics & numerical data , Exercise/psychology , Feeding Behavior/psychology , Health Behavior , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/therapy , Cross-Sectional Studies , Diet, Healthy/psychology , Female , Health Surveys , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Outpatients/psychology , Outpatients/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Vietnam , Young Adult
4.
Nutrients ; 13(8)2021 Aug 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1355019

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic restrictions sent college students online and off campus, potentially reducing access to healthy food. The objective of this cross-sectional, internet-based study was to use qualitative and quantitative survey methods to evaluate whether COVID-19 pandemic restrictions in Texas, USA affected college students' ability to buy food, how/what they shopped for, how they prepared food, what they ate, how they felt about eating, and overall dietary quality (assessed using Healthy Eating Index [HEI] scores). Survey responses from 502 students (87.5% female; 59.6% nonwhite, mean age 27.5 ± 0.4 years, >50% graduate students) were analyzed. The qualitative analysis of open-ended questions revealed 110 codes, 17 subthemes, and six themes. Almost all students experienced changes in at least one area, the most common being changes in shopping habits. Participants with low or very low food security had lower HEI scores compared to food secure students (p = 0.047). Black students were more likely to report changes in their ability to buy food (p = 0.035). The COVID-19 restrictions varied in their impact on students' ability to access sufficient healthy food, with some students severely affected. Thus, universities should establish procedures for responding to emergencies, including identifying at-risk students and mobilizing emergency funds and/or food assistance.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Diet, Healthy/statistics & numerical data , Diet/statistics & numerical data , Adult , COVID-19/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Diet/psychology , Diet/standards , Diet, Healthy/psychology , Evaluation Studies as Topic , Feeding Behavior , Female , Food Assistance , Food Security , Humans , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Students , Texas/epidemiology , Universities/statistics & numerical data
5.
Scand J Psychol ; 62(4): 586-595, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1247276

ABSTRACT

This research examines the effects of COVID-19 perceptions and negative experiences during the pandemic time on parental healthy eating behavior and whether these relationships interact with a parent's gender. We ran a survey of parents who had at least one child aged 3 to 17 years old living in the United Kingdom. We received 384 valid responses, which were analysed via a variance-based structural equation modeling approach to test our hypotheses. The results revealed that COVID-19 perceptions effects were Janus-faced. While they indirectly and negatively impact healthy eating behavior mediated by triggering negative experiences during the pandemic, COVID-19 perceptions, however, directly get parents, especially fathers, more engaged into healthy eating behavior - making COVID-19 perceptions total effects positive on healthy eating behavior. This explorative model is novel in the sense that it is the first of its kind to cast light on how parental healthy eating behavior can be shaped in pandemic time. The research is particularly timely due to the uncertain times in which the research is situated, that is, the worldwide pandemic (also termed COVID-19); the paper highlights how family eating practices can undergo dramatic shifts during acute crises.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Diet, Healthy/psychology , Family/psychology , Parents/psychology , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Child, Preschool , Emotions , Female , Humans , Male , Perception , Sex Factors , Surveys and Questionnaires , United Kingdom/epidemiology
6.
Appetite ; 157: 105002, 2021 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1125378

ABSTRACT

On March 15, 2020, the Dutch Government implemented COVID-19 lockdown measures. Although self-quarantine and social-distancing measures were implemented, restrictions were less severe compared to several other countries. The aim of this study was to assess changes in eating behavior and food purchases among a representative adult sample in the Netherlands (n = 1030), five weeks into lockdown. The results show that most participants did not change their eating behaviors (83.0%) or food purchases (73.3%). However, socio-demographic differences were observed among those that reported changes during lockdown. For example, participants with overweight (OR = 2.26, 95%CI = 1.24-4.11) and obesity (OR = 4.21, 95%CI = 2.13-8.32) were more likely to indicate to eat unhealthier during lockdown compared to participants with a healthy weight. Those with a high educational level (OR = 2.25, 95%-CI = 1.03-4.93) were also more likely to indicate to eat unhealthier during lockdown compared to those with a low educational level. Older participants were more likely to indicate to experience no differences in their eating behaviors compared to those of younger age, who were more likely to indicate that they ate healthier (OR = 1.03, 95%CI = 1.01-1.04) as well as unhealthier (OR = 1.04, 95%CI = 1.02-1.06) during lockdown. Participants with obesity were more likely to indicate to purchase more chips/snacks (OR = 2.79, 95%CI = 1.43-5.45) and more nonalcoholic beverages (OR = 2.74, 95%CI = 1.36-5.50) during lockdown in comparison with those with a healthy weight. Of those that used meal delivery services before, 174 (29.5%) indicated to use meal delivery services more frequently during lockdown. Although the results confirm the persistence of dietary routines, profound socio-demographic differences were observed for those that did report changes. Especially for individuals with overweight and obesity, the lockdown has taken its toll on healthy dietary choices. Further research should unravel underlying mechanisms for these observations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Consumer Behavior , Diet, Healthy/psychology , Feeding Behavior/psychology , Quarantine/psychology , Adult , Commerce/statistics & numerical data , Cross-Sectional Studies , Diet, Healthy/economics , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Netherlands/epidemiology , Obesity/epidemiology , Obesity/psychology , Overweight/epidemiology , Overweight/psychology , SARS-CoV-2
7.
Public Health Nutr ; 24(5): 1088-1094, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1065760

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a respiratory disease and a major global health-related issue. Knowledge, attitude and behaviours associated with this disease are being developed. Infected animals and consumption of contaminated foods are probably the main sources of this viral infection. Adhering to a healthy diet is effective in preventing patient affliction and recovery. Thus, the present research aims to determine the nutritional knowledge, attitude and behaviours associated with COVID-19 among Residents of Gonabad, Iran. DESIGN: The present online cross-sectional survey was conducted in March 2020 on 389 people selected through convenient sampling method. The data collection instrument was a questionnaire developed by the present researchers comprising four sections: demographic information, knowledge, attitude and nutritional behaviour. The collected data were analysed statistically in SPSS. SETTING: Gonabad city in Khorasan Razavi in the Northeast of Iran. PARTICIPANTS: All people at or above 18 years of age. RESULTS: The present results revealed that the mean age of the participants was 37·3 ± 11·3 years. The mean scores for knowledge, attitude and nutritional behaviour were, respectively, 9·7 ± 1·4, 14·3 ± 3·5 and 29·6 ± 4·2. The mean scores for nutritional knowledge and attitude showed no statistically significant correlation with age, education, occupation, marital status and economic status. However, the mean nutritional behaviour score was significantly higher among women than men (P = 0·004). CONCLUSIONS: Participants' nutritional attitude and behaviour regarding COVID-19, at its early stage in Iran, were average and above average. The public education provided with this regard can have affected this result.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Diet, Healthy/psychology , Feeding Behavior/psychology , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Adolescent , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Educational Status , Female , Humans , Iran , Male , Marital Status , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Socioeconomic Factors , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
8.
Health Informatics J ; 27(1): 1460458220976719, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1030278

ABSTRACT

Healthy eating is an important issue affecting a large part of the world population, so human diets are becoming increasingly popular, especially with the devastating consequences of Coronavirus Disease (Covid-19). A realistic and sustainable diet plan can help us to have a healthy eating habit since it considers most of the expectations from a diet without any restriction. In this study, the classical diet problem has been extended in terms of modelling, data sets and solution approach. Inspired by animals' hunting strategies, it was re-modelled as a many-objective optimisation problem. In order to have realistic and applicable diet plans, cooked dishes are used. A well-known many-objective evolutionary algorithm is used to solve the diet problem. Results show that our approach can optimise specialised daily menus for different user types, depending on their preferences, age, gender and body index. Our approach can be easily adapted for users with health issues by adding new constraints and objectives. Our approach can be used individually or by dietitians as a decision support mechanism.


Subject(s)
Algorithms , COVID-19/epidemiology , Diet, Healthy/methods , Energy Intake , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , Behavioral Sciences , Body Mass Index , Cooking/economics , Cooking/methods , Diet, Healthy/psychology , Feeding Behavior/psychology , Female , Food Preferences , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , Sex Factors , Time Factors , Vegetarians
9.
Nutrients ; 12(10)2020 Sep 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-982806

ABSTRACT

Emotional eating (EE) is prevalent among women and is associated with obesity. The coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic and mandatory quarantine increased the risk of mental symptoms and, inferentially, emotional eating (EE). We investigated the EE prevalence and predictors during this pandemic. Overall, 638 women, ages 18-39, completed an online survey incorporating the Emotional Eating Scale, Perceived Stress Scale, Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 Scale, Patient Health Questionnaire-9, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, and Global Physical Activity Questionnaire. We asked about nutrition and collected data on weight, height, and pandemic responses. Most respondents (47.2%) reported low EE; 40.4% were "moderate" and 12.4% "high" emotional eaters; 42.8% reported depression, 27% anxiety, 71% moderate stress, and 12.5% severe stress. The main EE indicators/predictors were fat intake (ß = 0.192, p = 0.004), number of meals (ß = 0.187, p < 0.001), sugar consumption (ß = 0.150, p < 0.001), body mass index (ß = 0.149, p < 0.001), stress (ß = 0.143, p = 0.004), energy intake (ß = 0.134, p = 0.04), and fast food intake frequency (ß = 0.111, p < 0.01). EE score correlated negatively with increased family income (ß = -0.081, p = 0.049). Higher stress correlated with worse sleep, less sleep, and less physical activity. Emotional eating is common among young Saudi women during the pandemic. We recommend healthy food choices and increased physical activity to improve sleep and mitigate stress.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Diet, Healthy/psychology , Emotions , Feeding and Eating Disorders/epidemiology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Quarantine/psychology , Adolescent , Adult , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Diet Surveys , Eating/psychology , Feeding Behavior/psychology , Feeding and Eating Disorders/psychology , Female , Humans , Prevalence , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Young Adult
10.
Nutrients ; 12(11)2020 Nov 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-927137

ABSTRACT

Pulses (e.g., lentil, common bean, chickpea, and dry pea) are linked to a myriad of positive human and environmental health impacts, making them an ideal food for wise and conscientious global citizens. In addition, pulses are affordable and shelf-stable. The combination of these factors, an elevated consumer interest in plant-based diets, and the COVID-19 pandemic resulted in increased purchasing of pulses and even empty grocery store shelves. Although pulses have many associated benefits, some consumers are hesitant to regularly eat pulses, claiming concerns of abdominal discomfort or a lack of knowledge on how to best prepare pulses. To capitalize on increased consumer interest and purchasing of pulses, now is the time for outreach efforts that address these concerns and the positive outcomes associated with pulses, thereby promoting public and environmental health. Consumers must actively decide to add pulses to their grocery lists and incorporate them into their regular eating patterns. Motivation to adopt new eating habits is essential because knowledge alone does not result in behavior change. Thus, to mitigate perceived barriers and drive consumption, we suggest application of the Information-Motivation-Behavioral Skills Model and emphasis of three main benefits of pulses as motivators: (1) culinary versatility, (2) sustainability, and (3) healthfulness.


Subject(s)
Consumer Behavior/statistics & numerical data , Diet, Healthy/psychology , Fabaceae , Feeding Behavior/psychology , Motivation , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections , Diet, Healthy/methods , Humans , Pneumonia, Viral , SARS-CoV-2
11.
Aging (Albany NY) ; 12(21): 20968-20981, 2020 11 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-914883

ABSTRACT

To investigate the associations between subjective perception of impacts and willingness to change dietary habits in China after experiencing the outbreak of the 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19), an online questionnaire survey was carried out and 22,459 respondents in mainland China participated in the study, with an average age of 27.9±7.8 years old. Of them, 84.5% self-reported epidemic concern (middle or above), and 60.2%, 66.3% and 66.8% self-reported impact (middle or above) on psychology, life, work respectively. 31.9%, 46.0% and 41.0% of respondents reported their willingness to reduce their dietary intakes of salt, fried foods, and sugary foods, respectively. The stratified analysis of multinomial logistic regression models showed that, respondents with higher psychological impact were more likely to increase their dietary intake of salt, fried foods, sugary foods. Except as aforesaid, most respondents with higher epidemic concerns and higher impacts on psychology, life, work were more likely to reduce eating salt, fried foods, sugary foods. After the epidemic, early stage of positive improvement to a proper diet was observed, whereas the opposite tendency was also found in some respondents with higher impact on psychology. Thus, there is an urgent need for health care and lifestyle intervention policies for different subgroups.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diagnostic Self Evaluation , Diet, Healthy , Disease Outbreaks , Feeding Behavior/psychology , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Diet, Healthy/psychology , Diet, Healthy/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Male , Psychology , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Perception , Surveys and Questionnaires
12.
Obesity (Silver Spring) ; 28(10): 1802-1805, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-616697

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to examine the impact of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic on patronage to unhealthy eating establishments in populations with obesity. METHODS: Anonymized movement data accounting for roughly 10% of devices in the United States at 138,989 unhealthy eating locations from December 1, 2019, through April 2020 and the percentage of adults with obesity, the poverty rate, and the food environment index in 65% of United States counties were collected and merged. A cluster corrected Poisson spline regression was performed predicting patronage by day, the percentage of adults with obesity in the establishment's county, the county's poverty rate, and its food environment index, as well as their interactions. RESULTS: Patronage to unhealthy eating establishments was higher where there was a higher percentage of the adult population with obesity. A similar pattern was observed for counties with a lower food environment index. These disparities appear to have increased as the COVID-19 pandemic spread. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest unhealthy eating patterns during the COVID-19 pandemic are higher in already at-risk populations. Policy makers can use these findings to motivate interventions and programs aimed at increasing healthy food intake in at-risk communities during crises.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Diet, Healthy/statistics & numerical data , Feeding Behavior/psychology , Obesity/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Quarantine/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Cluster Analysis , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Diet, Healthy/psychology , Female , Food Supply/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Obesity/epidemiology , Obesity/virology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Poisson Distribution , Poverty/psychology , Poverty/statistics & numerical data , Quarantine/psychology , Regression Analysis , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology , Young Adult
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