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1.
J Health Commun ; 27(6): 375-381, 2022 06 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1996985

ABSTRACT

We sought to identify barriers to COVID-19 vaccine uptake among persons who are socially vulnerable in light of the natural cycle of innovation diffusion. Widespread adoption of a health innovation requires a cadre of opinion leaders to build on successes experienced by early adopters. One type of opinion leader in healthcare are health mavens: members of a community who maintain up-to-date health knowledge and share their knowledge others. We surveyed 139 persons who are socially vulnerable regarding their COVID-19 vaccination intention, and evaluated their responses based on psychological traits captured by two scales: innovativeness and health mavenism. Health mavenism was not strongly correlated with COVID-19 vaccine intention. Health mavens often relied on their own healthcare providers (n = 46) and health agency websites (n = 42) for vaccine information. Those who relied on their faith leaders (n = 4) reported a lower likelihood of getting vaccinated (31.5% vs. 76.0%, p < .05). The observed lack of support by health mavens represents a critical barrier to COVID-19 vaccine uptake; targeting campaigns to health mavens may increase COVID-19 vaccine uptake in socially vulnerable communities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Humans , Cross-Sectional Studies , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Vaccination/psychology , Diffusion of Innovation
2.
J Neurooncol ; 156(1): 11-13, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1995574

ABSTRACT

The Focused Ultrasound Foundation was created to improve the lives of millions of people worldwide by accelerating the development of this noninvasive technology. The Foundation works to clear the path to global adoption by organizing and funding research, fostering collaboration, and building awareness among patients and professionals. Since its establishment in 2006, the Foundation has become the largest nongovernmental source of funding for focused ultrasound research. For more information, visit http://www.fusfoundation.org .


Subject(s)
Medical Oncology , Neurology , Ultrasonic Therapy , Diffusion of Innovation , Humans , Ultrasonic Therapy/methods
3.
J Grad Med Educ ; 12(3): 254-255, 2020 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1383976
6.
Circulation ; 144(23): e461-e471, 2021 12 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1666518

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has had worldwide repercussions for health care and research. In spring 2020, most non-COVID-19 research was halted, hindering research across the spectrum from laboratory-based experimental science to clinical research. Through the second half of 2020 and the first half of 2021, biomedical research, including cardiovascular science, only gradually restarted, with many restrictions on onsite activities, limited clinical research participation, and the challenges associated with working from home and caregiver responsibilities. Compounding these impediments, much of the global biomedical research infrastructure was redirected toward vaccine testing and deployment. This redirection of supply chains, personnel, and equipment has additionally hampered restoration of normal research activity. Transition to virtual interactions offset some of these limitations but did not adequately replace the need for scientific exchange and collaboration. Here, we outline key steps to reinvigorate biomedical research, including a call for increased support from the National Institutes of Health. We also call on academic institutions, publishers, reviewers, and supervisors to consider the impact of COVID-19 when assessing productivity, recognizing that the pandemic did not affect all equally. We identify trainees and junior investigators, especially those with caregiving roles, as most at risk of being lost from the biomedical workforce and identify steps to reduce the loss of these key investigators. Although the global pandemic highlighted the power of biomedical science to define, treat, and protect against threats to human health, significant investment in the biomedical workforce is required to maintain and promote well-being.


Subject(s)
Biomedical Research/trends , COVID-19 , Cardiology/trends , Research Design/trends , Research Personnel/trends , Advisory Committees , American Heart Association , Biomedical Research/education , Cardiology/education , Diffusion of Innovation , Education, Professional/trends , Forecasting , Humans , Public Opinion , Research Personnel/education , Time Factors , United States
7.
Gastroenterology ; 161(3): 785-791, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1626143

ABSTRACT

Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma remains a major challenge in cancer medicine. Given the increase in incidence and mortality, interdisciplinary research is necessary to translate basic knowledge into therapeutic strategies improving the outcome of patients. On the 4th and 5th of February 2021, three German pancreatic cancer research centers, the Clinical Research Unit 5002 from Göttingen, the Collaborative Research Center 1321 from Munich, and Clinical Research Unit 325 from Marburg organized the 1st Virtual Göttingen-Munich-Marburg Pancreatic Cancer Meeting in order to foster scientific exchange. This report summarizes current research and proceedings presented during that meeting.


Subject(s)
Biomedical Research/trends , Pancreatic Neoplasms , Animals , Biomarkers, Tumor/genetics , COVID-19 , Cell Lineage , Diffusion of Innovation , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , Humans , Pancreatic Neoplasms/genetics , Pancreatic Neoplasms/mortality , Pancreatic Neoplasms/pathology , Pancreatic Neoplasms/therapy , Tumor Microenvironment , Videoconferencing
8.
AAPS J ; 24(1): 19, 2022 01 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1605878

ABSTRACT

Over the past decade, artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning (ML) have become the breakthrough technology most anticipated to have a transformative effect on pharmaceutical research and development (R&D). This is partially driven by revolutionary advances in computational technology and the parallel dissipation of previous constraints to the collection/processing of large volumes of data. Meanwhile, the cost of bringing new drugs to market and to patients has become prohibitively expensive. Recognizing these headwinds, AI/ML techniques are appealing to the pharmaceutical industry due to their automated nature, predictive capabilities, and the consequent expected increase in efficiency. ML approaches have been used in drug discovery over the past 15-20 years with increasing sophistication. The most recent aspect of drug development where positive disruption from AI/ML is starting to occur, is in clinical trial design, conduct, and analysis. The COVID-19 pandemic may further accelerate utilization of AI/ML in clinical trials due to an increased reliance on digital technology in clinical trial conduct. As we move towards a world where there is a growing integration of AI/ML into R&D, it is critical to get past the related buzz-words and noise. It is equally important to recognize that the scientific method is not obsolete when making inferences about data. Doing so will help in separating hope from hype and lead to informed decision-making on the optimal use of AI/ML in drug development. This manuscript aims to demystify key concepts, present use-cases and finally offer insights and a balanced view on the optimal use of AI/ML methods in R&D.


Subject(s)
Artificial Intelligence , Clinical Trials as Topic , Computational Biology , Drug Development , Machine Learning , Pharmaceutical Research , Research Design , Animals , Artificial Intelligence/trends , Computational Biology/trends , Diffusion of Innovation , Drug Development/trends , Forecasting , Humans , Machine Learning/trends , Pharmaceutical Research/trends , Research Design/trends
9.
Am J Bioeth ; 21(12): 28-31, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1541438
10.
Prog Cardiovasc Dis ; 69: 47-53, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1536982

ABSTRACT

Heart failure (HF) is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. The increasing prevalence of HF and inpatient HF hospitalization has a considerable burden on healthcare cost and utilization. The recognition that hemodynamic changes in pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) and left atrial pressure precede the signs and symptoms of HF has led to interest in hemodynamic guided HF therapy as an approach to allow earlier intervention during a heart failure decompensation. Remote patient monitoring (RPM) utilizing telecommunication, cardiac implantable electronic device parameters and implantable hemodynamic monitors (IHM) have largely failed to demonstrate favorable outcomes in multicenter trials. However, one positive randomized clinical trial testing the CardioMEMS device (followed by Food and Drug Administration approval) has generated renewed interest in PAP monitoring in the HF population to decrease hospitalization and improve quality of life. The COVID-19 pandemic has also stirred a resurgence in the utilization of telehealth to which RPM using IHM may be complementary. The cost effectiveness of these monitors continues to be a matter of debate. Future iterations of devices aim to be smaller, less burdensome for the patient, less dependent on patient compliance, and less cumbersome for health care providers with the integration of artificial intelligence coupled with sophisticated data management and interpretation tools. Currently, use of IHM may be considered in advanced heart failure patients with the support of structured programs.


Subject(s)
Arterial Pressure , Atrial Function, Left , Atrial Pressure , Heart Failure/diagnosis , Hemodynamic Monitoring/instrumentation , Pulmonary Artery/physiopathology , Remote Sensing Technology/instrumentation , Telemedicine/instrumentation , Algorithms , COVID-19 , Diffusion of Innovation , Equipment Design , Heart Failure/physiopathology , Heart Failure/therapy , Humans , Predictive Value of Tests , Prognosis , Reproducibility of Results , Signal Processing, Computer-Assisted
11.
Cardiovasc Res ; 117(9): 2045-2053, 2021 07 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526155

ABSTRACT

Although coronavirus disease 2019 seems to be the leading topic in research number of outstanding studies have been published in the field of aorta and peripheral vascular diseases likely affecting our clinical practice in the near future. This review article highlights key research on vascular diseases published in 2020. Some studies have shed light in the pathophysiology of aortic aneurysm and dissection suggesting a potential role for kinase inhibitors as new therapeutic options. A first proteogenomic study on fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) revealed a promising novel disease gene and provided proof-of-concept for a protein/lipid-based FMD blood test. The role of NADPH oxidases in vascular physiology, and particularly endothelial cell differentiation, is highlighted with potential for cell therapy development. Imaging of vulnerable plaque has been an intense field of research. Features of plaque vulnerability on magnetic resonance imaging as an under-recognized cause of stroke are discussed. Major clinical trials on lower extremity peripheral artery disease have shown added benefit of dual antithrombotic (aspirin plus rivaroxaban) treatment.


Subject(s)
Aortic Diseases , Biomedical Research/trends , Peripheral Vascular Diseases , Animals , Aortic Diseases/diagnosis , Aortic Diseases/epidemiology , Aortic Diseases/genetics , Aortic Diseases/therapy , COVID-19 , Clinical Trials as Topic , Diffusion of Innovation , Humans , Peripheral Vascular Diseases/diagnosis , Peripheral Vascular Diseases/epidemiology , Peripheral Vascular Diseases/genetics , Peripheral Vascular Diseases/therapy , Prognosis
12.
PLoS Med ; 18(9): e1003788, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1470658

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Social innovations in health are inclusive solutions to address the healthcare delivery gap that meet the needs of end users through a multi-stakeholder, community-engaged process. While social innovations for health have shown promise in closing the healthcare delivery gap, more research is needed to evaluate, scale up, and sustain social innovation. Research checklists can standardize and improve reporting of research findings, promote transparency, and increase replicability of study results and findings. METHODS AND FINDINGS: The research checklist was developed through a 3-step community-engaged process, including a global open call for ideas, a scoping review, and a 3-round modified Delphi process. The call for entries solicited checklists and related items and was open between November 27, 2019 and February 1, 2020. In addition to the open call submissions and scoping review findings, a 17-item Social Innovation For Health Research (SIFHR) Checklist was developed based on the Template for Intervention Description and Replication (TIDieR) Checklist. The checklist was then refined during 3 rounds of Delphi surveys conducted between May and June 2020. The resulting checklist will facilitate more complete and transparent reporting, increase end-user engagement, and help assess social innovation projects. A limitation of the open call was requiring internet access, which likely discouraged participation of some subgroups. CONCLUSIONS: The SIFHR Checklist will strengthen the reporting of social innovation for health research studies. More research is needed on social innovation for health.


Subject(s)
Checklist , Health Services Research , Research Design , Socioeconomic Factors , Delphi Technique , Diffusion of Innovation , Humans , Social Determinants of Health , Stakeholder Participation
13.
Nurs Outlook ; 70(1): 137-144, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1461740

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 has required nursing innovations to meet patient care needs not previously encountered. PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to describe nursing innovations conceived, implemented, and desired during the first COVID-19 surge. METHODS: The investigators invited registered nurses employed across 16 Midwest hospitals (6,207) to complete the survey. Respondents provided demographics and written descriptions of innovations they conceived, witnessed, and desired. Investigators analyzed text responses using standard content analytic procedures and summarized quantitative demographics using percentages. FINDINGS: Nurses reported seven types of innovations that would (a) improve personal protective equipment (PPE), (b) limit the need to repeatedly don and doff PPE, (c) ensure safer practice, (d) conserve and access supplies, (e) provide patient and family education and support, (f) make team member communication more efficient, and (g) improve peer support. DISCUSSION: Nurses are in a unique position to generate innovative solutions to meet patient care needs under adverse and rapidly changing situations.


Subject(s)
Communication , Diffusion of Innovation , Occupational Health , Patient Care/standards , Personal Protective Equipment/supply & distribution , Universities , Adult , COVID-19 , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Hospitals , Humans , Indiana , Male , Patient Education as Topic , Surveys and Questionnaires
14.
Biochem Cell Biol ; 99(6): 766-771, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1440839

ABSTRACT

Cell-free synthetic biology is a rapidly developing biotechnology with the potential to solve the world's biggest problems; however, this promise also has implications for global biosecurity and biosafety. Given the current situation of COVID-19 and its economic impact, capitalizing on the potential of cell-free synthetic biology from an economic, biosafety, and biosecurity perspective contributes to our preparedness for the next pandemic, and urges the development of appropriate policies and regulations, together with the necessary mitigation technologies. Proactive involvement from scientists is necessary to avoid misconceptions and assist in the policymaking process.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Synthetic Biology/economics , Synthetic Biology/legislation & jurisprudence , Biocompatible Materials , Biomedical Technology , Biotechnology , Cell-Free System , Diffusion of Innovation , Health Policy , Humans , Safety , Synthetic Biology/trends
15.
J Healthc Manag ; 66(5): 332-335, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1434537
16.
Korean J Med Educ ; 33(3): 163-170, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1395055

ABSTRACT

It is necessary to reflect on the question, "How to prepare for medical education after coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)?" Although we are preparing for the era of Education 4.0 in line with the 4th industrial revolution of artificial intelligence and big data, most measures are focused on the methodologies of transferring knowledge; essential innovation is not being addressed. What is fundamentally needed in medicine is insightful intelligence that can see the invisible. We should not create doctors who only prescribe antispasmodics for abdominal pain, or antiemetic drugs for vomiting. Good clinical reasoning is not based on knowledge alone. Insightology in medicine is based on experience through Bayesian reasoning and imagination through the theory of mind. This refers to diagnosis of the whole, greater than the sum of its parts, by looking at the invisible using the Gestalt strategy. Identifying the missing process that links symptoms is essential. This missing process can be described in one word: context. An accurate diagnosis is possible only by understanding context, which can be done by standing in someone else's shoes. From the viewpoint of medicine, Education 4.0 is worrisome because people are still clinging to methodology. The subject we should focus on is "human", not "artificial" intelligence. We should first advance the "insightology in medicine" as a new paradigm, which is the "essence" that will never change even when rare "phenomena" such as the COVID-19 outbreak occur. For this reason, we should focus on teaching insightology in medicine, rather than teaching medical knowledge.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Medical/trends , Artificial Intelligence , Diffusion of Innovation , Humans , Knowledge , Pandemics , Republic of Korea/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
18.
Implement Sci ; 16(1): 76, 2021 08 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1341470

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Since Canadian drug regulatory approval of mifepristone for medical abortion in 2015 and its market availability in January 2017, the role of pharmacists in abortion provision has changed rapidly. We sought to identify the factors that influenced the initiation and provision of medical abortion from the perspectives of Canadian pharmacists, bridging two frameworks - Diffusion of Innovation in Health Service Organizations and integrated knowledge translation. METHODS: We conducted one-on-one semi-structured interviews with pharmacists residing in Canada who intended to stock and dispense mifepristone within the first year of availability. Our data collection, analysis, and interpretation were guided by reflexive thematic analysis and supported by an integrated knowledge translation partnership with pharmacy stakeholders. RESULTS: We completed interviews with 24 participants from across Canada: 33% had stocked and 21% had dispensed mifepristone. We found that pharmacists were willing and able to integrate medical abortion care into their practice and that those who had initiated practice were satisfied with their dispensing experience. Our analysis indicated that several key Diffusion of Innovation constructs impacted the uptake of mifepristone, including: innovation (relative advantage, complexity and compatibility, technical support), system readiness (innovation-system fit, dedicated time, resources), diffusion and dissemination (expert opinion, boundary spanners, champions, social networks, peer opinions), implementation (external collaboration), and linkage. Participants' experiences suggest that integrated knowledge translation facilitated evidence-based changes to mifepristone dispensing restrictions, and communication of those changes to front line pharmacists. CONCLUSIONS: We illustrate how Diffusion of Innovation and integrated knowledge translation may work together as complimentary frameworks for implementation science research. Unlike in the USA, UK, and other highly regulated settings globally, pharmacists in Canada are permitted to dispense mifepristone for medical abortion. We contribute to literature that shows that mifepristone dispensed outside of hospitals, clinics, and medical offices is safe and acceptable to both patients and prescribers. This finding is of particular importance to the current COVID-19 pandemic response and calls for continued and equitable access to abortion care in primary practice.


Subject(s)
Abortifacient Agents, Steroidal/administration & dosage , Abortion, Induced/methods , Diffusion of Innovation , Mifepristone/administration & dosage , Pharmacists/statistics & numerical data , /methods , Canada , Humans , Interviews as Topic
19.
Br J Nurs ; 30(14): S34-S41, 2021 Jul 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1319861

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: For the student nurse, peripheral venous cannulation is one of the most stressful skills to be learned. Although some healthcare employers/establishments offer courses on vascular access and infusion nursing as part of their onboarding programs, ultimately educational institutions should share the responsibility to ensure that graduating nurses can provide safe infusion therapies. METHODS: An innovative vascular access and infusion nursing (VAIN) curriculum was created and mapped onto the entry to practice undergraduate nursing program at McGill University in Montréal, Québec, Canada. This presented an opportunity to implement new teaching approaches. RESULTS: Students experienced multiple new teaching approaches including multimedia and experiential learning and live simulation to ensure acquisition of knowledge and psychomotor skills. The teaching approaches had to be rapidly modified with the advent of the COVID-19 pandemic. CONCLUSIONS: The VAIN curriculum emphasizes simulation and directed practice, seeking to increase competence, confidence, and knowledge. The pandemic underscored the need for flexibility and creativity in content delivery.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Catheterization, Peripheral , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate , Students, Nursing , Canada/epidemiology , Catheterization, Peripheral/nursing , Curriculum , Diffusion of Innovation , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/methods , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/organization & administration , Humans , Nursing Education Research , Nursing Evaluation Research , Students, Nursing/psychology , Teaching
20.
Br J Nurs ; 30(13): 770, 2021 Jul 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1311463
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