Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 31
Filter
1.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(12)2022 Jun 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1884164

ABSTRACT

We investigated whether people with disabilities-cognition, vision, hearing, mobility, or at least one of these disabilities-report more COVID-19-related negative lifestyle changes than those without disabilities, and whether psychological distress (MHI-5) mediates the association between disabilities and negative lifestyle changes. Information about COVID-related lifestyle changes among people with disabilities is scarce. We analyzed population-based data from the 2020 FinSote survey carried out between September 2020 and February 2021 in Finland (n = 22,165, aged 20+). Logistic regressions were applied to investigate the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic and related restrictions on negative lifestyle changes-sleeping problems or nightmares, daily exercise, vegetable consumption, and snacking. To test for a mediation effect of psychological distress, the Karlson-Holm-Breen method was used. People with all disability types reported increased sleeping problems or nightmares, and decreased vegetable consumption during the pandemic more frequently than those without. People with mobility and cognitive disabilities more frequently reported decreased daily exercise. People with cognitive disabilities more often reported increased snacking. Psychological distress mediated associations between disabilities and negative lifestyle changes, with the highest association between cognitive disabilities and increased sleeping problems or nightmares (B = 0.60), and the lowest between mobility disabilities and decreased daily exercise (B = 0.08). The results suggest that strategies to promote healthy lifestyles should consider people with disabilities. Alleviating their psychological distress during crisis situations could be one approach.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Disabled Persons , Psychological Distress , Sleep Wake Disorders , COVID-19/epidemiology , Disabled Persons/psychology , Finland/epidemiology , Humans , Life Style , Mental Health , Pandemics , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/psychology
2.
PLoS One ; 16(12): e0260435, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1560860

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: There is a paucity of data on the impact of COVID-19 pandemic on girls and young women. The study examines the prevalence and correlates of violence and sexual and reproductive health (SRH) service disruption among girls and young women during COVID-19 restrictions and lockdown. METHODS: An interactive voice response survey was conducted among girls and women aged 18-24 years between 10th March to 24th April 2021. The survey enrolled 1314 participants. Descriptive analysis was used to assess prevalence of violence and SRH service disruption. Two sampled test of proportion was used to asses difference in prevalence of violence before and after the pandemic. Logistic regression was used to examine relationship between the outcome variables and socio demographic predictors. RESULTS: The study did not find significant difference in prevalence of violence before and after the pandemic. Education was found to be protective against experience of both physical and sexual violence after the pandemic. Dalit participants were four times more likely to report physical violence after the pandemic than Brahmin/Chhetri participants (OR:3.80; CI:1.41-10.24). Participants from 22-24-year age group were twice as likely to experience sexual violence compared to girls and participants from 18-21year age group (OR:2.25; CI:1.04-4.84). Participants from urban municipalities were 29% less likely to report SRH services disruption than participants from rural municipalities (OR-0.71, 95% CI: 0.55-0.91). Participants with disability were twice as likely to report disruption than participants without disability (OR-2.35, 95% CI: 1.45-3.82). CONCLUSIONS: To reduce violence against girls and women due to the pandemic, interventions should focus on Dalit women and on preventing education discontinuation among girls and women. SRH service during the pandemic needs to be improved for girls and women with focus on girls and women from rural municipalities and girls and women with disability.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Physical Abuse/statistics & numerical data , Reproductive Health Services/statistics & numerical data , Sex Offenses/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , COVID-19/virology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Disabled Persons/psychology , Female , Humans , Nepal/epidemiology , Pandemics , Rural Population , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Surveys and Questionnaires , Urban Population , Young Adult
4.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 70(34): 1142-1149, 2021 Aug 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1406893

ABSTRACT

Adults with disabilities, a group including >25% of U.S. adults (1), experience higher levels of mental health and substance use conditions and lower treatment rates than do adults without disabilities* (2,3). Survey data collected during April-September 2020 revealed elevated adverse mental health symptoms among adults with disabilities (4) compared with the general adult population (5). Despite disproportionate risk for infection with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, and COVID-19-associated hospitalization and mortality among some adults with disabilities (6), information about mental health and substance use in this population during the pandemic is limited. To identify factors associated with adverse mental health symptoms and substance use among adults with disabilities, the COVID-19 Outbreak Public Evaluation (COPE) Initiative† administered nonprobability-based Internet surveys to 5,256 U.S. adults during February-March 2021 (response rate = 62.1%). Among 5,119 respondents who completed a two-item disability screener, nearly one third (1,648; 32.2%) screened as adults with disabilities. These adults more frequently experienced symptoms of anxiety or depression (56.6% versus 28.7%, respectively), new or increased substance use (38.8% versus 17.5%), and suicidal ideation (30.6% versus 8.3%) than did adults without disabilities. Among all adults who had received a diagnosis of mental health or substance use conditions, adults with disabilities more frequently (42.6% versus 35.3%; p <0.001) reported that the pandemic made it harder for them to access related care or medication. Enhanced mental health and substance use screening among adults with disabilities and improved access to medical services are critical during public health emergencies such as the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Disabled Persons/psychology , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Pandemics , Substance-Related Disorders/epidemiology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Disabled Persons/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , United States/epidemiology , Young Adult
6.
J Trauma Stress ; 34(4): 701-710, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1303282

ABSTRACT

As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, many individuals have experienced disruptions in social, occupational, and daily life activities. Individuals with mental health difficulties, particularly those with elevated posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS), may be especially vulnerable to increased impairment as a result of COVID-19. Additionally, demographic factors, such as age, gender, and race/ethnicity, may impact individual difficulties related to the pandemic. The current study examined the concurrent and prospective associations between posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, broader anxiety and depression symptoms, and COVID-19-related disability. Participants recruited through Amazon's Mechanical Turk (N = 136) completed questionnaire batteries approximately 1 month apart during the COVID-19 pandemic (i.e., Wave 1 and Wave 2). The results indicated that PTSD, anxiety, and depressive symptoms were all associated with increased COVID-19-related disability across assessment points, rs = .44-.68. PTSD symptoms, specifically negative alterations in cognition and mood, significantly predicted COVID-19-related disability after accounting for anxiety and depressive symptoms as well as demographic factors, ßs = .31-.38. Overall, these findings suggest that individuals experiencing elevated PTSS are particularly vulnerable to increased functional impairment as a result of COVID-19 and suggest a need for additional outreach and clinical care among individuals with elevated PTSD symptoms during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Disabled Persons/psychology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/psychology , Adult , Anxiety/diagnosis , Anxiety/etiology , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Crowdsourcing/methods , Depression/diagnosis , Depression/etiology , Depression/psychology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/diagnosis , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/etiology , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States/epidemiology
7.
Sex Transm Infect ; 97(4): 276-281, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1232365

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: 1.5 million people in the UK have mild to moderate learning disabilities. STIs and bloodborne viruses (BBVs) are over-represented in people experiencing broader health inequalities, which include those with mild learning disabilities. Self-managed care, including self-sampling for STIs/BBVs, is increasingly commonplace, requiring agency and health literacy. To inform the development of a partner notification trial, we explored barriers and facilitators to correct use of an STI/BBV self-sampling pack among people with mild learning disabilities. METHODS: Using purposive and convenience sampling we conducted four interviews and five gender-specific focus groups with 25 people (13 women, 12 men) with mild learning disabilities (July-August 2018) in Scotland. We balanced deductive and inductive thematic analyses of audio transcripts to explore issues associated with barriers and facilitators to correct use of the pack. RESULTS: All participants found at least one element of the pack challenging or impossible, but welcomed the opportunity to undertake sexual health screening without attending a clinic and welcomed the inclusion of condoms. Reported barriers to correct use included perceived overly complex STI/BBV information and instructions, feeling overwhelmed and the manual dexterity required for blood sampling. Many women struggled interpreting anatomical diagrams depicting vulvovaginal self-swabbing. Facilitators included pre-existing STI/BBV knowledge, familiarity with self-management, good social support and knowing that the service afforded privacy. CONCLUSION: In the first study to explore the usability of self-sampling packs for STI/BBV in people with learning disabilities, participants found it challenging to use the pack. Limiting information to the minimum required to inform decision-making, 'easy read' formats, simple language, large font sizes and simpler diagrams could improve acceptability. However, some people will remain unable to engage with self-sampling at all. To avoid widening health inequalities, face-to-face options should continue to be provided for those unable or unwilling to engage with self-managed care.


Subject(s)
Blood-Borne Infections/diagnosis , Disabled Persons/psychology , Learning Disabilities/psychology , Reagent Kits, Diagnostic/standards , Sexually Transmitted Diseases/diagnosis , Adult , Female , Health Literacy , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Qualitative Research , Scotland/epidemiology , Self Care , Specimen Handling
8.
J Gerontol Soc Work ; 64(5): 547-556, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1201351

ABSTRACT

This commentary addresses barriers to care among older adults living with neurodiversity (ND), and their aging family carers in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic in Canada. Factors contributing to inequities are described and the significant negative consequences of current policy decisions on the social and mental health of older adults with ND and their aging family carers are highlighted. The commentary calls for a collective social work response that highlights the critical role of support and advocacy necessary to redress social exclusion.


Subject(s)
Aging/psychology , Caregivers/psychology , Disabled Persons/rehabilitation , Caregivers/standards , Disabled Persons/psychology , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Social Work/methods
9.
Lancet Public Health ; 6(6): e365-e373, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1199206

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has affected mental health, psychological wellbeing, and social interactions. People with physical disabilities might be particularly likely to be negatively affected, but evidence is scarce. Our aim was to evaluate the emotional and social experience of older people with physical disabilities during the early months of the COVID-19 pandemic in England. METHODS: In this longitudinal cohort study, we analysed data from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing collected in 2018-19 and June-July, 2020, from participants aged 52 years and older and living in England. Physical disability was defined as impairment in basic and instrumental activities of daily living (ADL) and impaired mobility. Depression, anxiety, loneliness, quality of life, sleep quality, and amount of real-time and written social contact were assessed online or by computer-assisted telephone interviews. Comparisons of experiences during the COVID-19 pandemic of people with and without a physical disability were adjusted statistically for pre-pandemic outcome measures, age, sex, wealth, ethnicity, presence of a spouse or partner, number of people in the household, and chronic pain. All participants with full data available for both surveys were included in the analyses. FINDINGS: Between June 3 and July 26, 2020, 5820 participants responded, 4887 of whom had full data available for both the pre-pandemic measures and the COVID-19 survey and were included in the analysis. During the COVID-19 pandemic, significantly more people with ADL impairment had clinically significant symptoms of depression (odds ratio 1·78 [95% CI 1·44-2·19]; p<0·0001), anxiety (2·23 [1·72-2·89]; p<0·0001), and loneliness (1·52 [1·26-1·84]; p<0·0001) than people without ADL impairment. Significantly more people with ADL impairment also had impaired sleep quality (1·44 [1·20-1·72]; p<0·0001) and poor quality of life than people without ADL impairment. The results were similar when disability was defined by impaired mobility. People with ADL impairment had less frequent real-time contact (0·70 [0·55-0·89]; p=0·0037) and written social contact (0·54 [0·45-0·64]; p<0·0001) with family than people without ADL impairment. Results for social contact were similar when disability was defined by impaired mobility. INTERPRETATION: People with physical disability might be at particular risk for emotional distress, poor quality of life, and low wellbeing during the COVID-19 pandemic, highlighting the need for additional support and targeted mental health services. FUNDING: Economic and Social Research Council/UK Research and Innovation, National Institute on Aging, National Institute for Health Research.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Disabled Persons/psychology , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Social Interaction , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Disabled Persons/statistics & numerical data , England/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Middle Aged
10.
J Alzheimers Dis ; 80(2): 865-875, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1173668

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic is impacting the physical and emotional health of older adults living with dementia and their care partners. OBJECTIVE: Using a patient-centered approach, we explored the experiences and needs of people living with dementia and their care partners during the COVID-19 pandemic as part of an ongoing evaluation of dementia support services in British Columbia, Canada. METHODS: A survey instrument was developed around the priorities identified in the context of the COVID-19 and Dementia Task Force convened by the Alzheimer Society of Canada. RESULTS: A total of 417 surveys were analyzed. Overall, respondents were able to access information that was helpful for maintaining their own health and managing a period of social distancing. Care partners reported a number of serious concerns, including the inability to visit the person that they care for in long-term or palliative care. Participants also reported that the pandemic increased their levels of stress overall and that they felt lonelier and more isolated than they did before the pandemic. The use of technology was reported as a way to connect socially with their loved ones, with the majority of participants connecting with others at least twice per week. CONCLUSION: Looking at the complex effects of a global pandemic through the experiences of people living with dementia and their care partners is vital to inform healthcare priorities to restore their quality of life and health and better prepare for the future.


Subject(s)
Adaptation, Psychological , Alzheimer Disease/psychology , COVID-19/psychology , Caregivers/psychology , Disabled Persons/psychology , Aged , British Columbia , Female , Humans , Loneliness/psychology , Male , Needs Assessment , Psychosocial Support Systems , Social Isolation/psychology , Social Support , Stress, Psychological/complications , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires
11.
J Psychiatr Res ; 137: 525-533, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1164124

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Accurate threat appraisal is central to survival. In the case of the coronavirus pandemic, accurate threat appraisal is difficult due to incomplete medical knowledge as well as complex social factors (e.g., mixed public health messages). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the degree to which individuals accurately perceive COVID-19 infection rates and to explore the role of COVID-19 threat perception on emotional and behavioral responses both cross sectionally and prospectively. METHODS: A community sample (N = 249) was assessed using online crowdsourcing and followed for one month. COVID-19 threat appraisal was compared with actual COVID-19 infection rates and deaths at the time of data collection in each participant's county and state. It was predicted that actual versus perceived COVID-19 infection rates would only be modestly associated. Relative to actual infection rates, perceived infection rates were hypothesized to be a better predictor of COVID-related behaviors, distress, and impairment. RESULTS: Findings indicated that relative to actual infection, perceived infection was a better predictor of COVID-related outcomes cross sectionally and longitudinally. Interestingly, actual infection rates were negatively related to behaviors cross sectionally (e.g., less stockpiling). Prospectively, these variables interacted to predict avoidance behaviors over time such that the relationship between perceived infection and avoidance was stronger as actual infection increased. CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that perceived COVID-19 infection is significantly associated with COVID-related behaviors, distress and impairment whereas actual infection rates have a less important and perhaps even paradoxical influence on behavioral responses to the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Avoidance Learning , COVID-19/epidemiology , Disabled Persons/psychology , Health Behavior , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Pandemics , Psychological Distress , Adult , Disabled Persons/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Male
12.
Eur J Phys Rehabil Med ; 57(1): 158-165, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1136703

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: While the COVID-19 pandemic was spreading worldwide, the Italian government stated lockdown, with a drastic reorganization of healthcare systems. The psychological and social effects of the pandemic and the restrictions of freedom could have had a detrimental impact on people with physical disabilities, for whom well-being depends strongly on their social environment. AIM: Our main aim was to describe the overall impact of the pandemic on mental health, social condition and illness perception among patients with disabilities, to provide early interventions for this particularly vulnerable population. For this purpose, we performed a specific screening protocol to detect the prevalence of any psychological distress. DESIGN: Cross-sectional observational study. SETTING: Telephonic interview administered to patients and their caregivers attending the Unit of Neurorehabilitation at the University Hospital of Pisa. POPULATION: 134 patients with physical disability related to neurological disorders, who had their outpatient appointment cancelled, because of the government dispositions, were enrolled. METHODS: A specific questionnaire (COVID19-q) was designed to test patients' psycho-social state, including a section addressed to the caregiver. Moreover, a standardized psychological evaluation, using the Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation-Outcome Measure (CORE-OM), was also performed. RESULTS: Results show a different impact in our study population compared to the general population on psychological aspect. Patients did not manifest any clinically relevant distress, as assessed with CORE-OM. However, patients with higher disability degree reported a statistically lower outcome in the social function, in the well-being domains and an increase in risk behavior. Results from COVID19-q show that most of our patients reported none or mild change in their psycho-social habits and perception of illness during lockdown. However, reduction of family cohesion and lack of healthcare support are two important aspects that people with disability had to face with during the pandemic emergency. CONCLUSIONS: People with physical disabilities surprisingly shown milder effects of the pandemic on their psychological state and good coping skills in facing social isolation, manifesting resilience resources. However, the is a need to give concrete support to healthcare and social care, especially in the management of severe disability. CLINICAL REHABILITATION IMPACT: This unexpected and reassuring result may reveal a worrying scenario regarding-the social participation and quality of life of people with disabilities: were they already in lockdown?


Subject(s)
Attitude to Health , COVID-19/prevention & control , Disabled Persons/psychology , Pandemics , Physical Distancing , SARS-CoV-2 , Aged , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Surveys and Questionnaires
14.
J Intellect Disabil Res ; 65(5): 381-396, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1069406

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: As the world battles COVID-19, there is a need to study the perceptions of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) about the effects of the pandemic and associated lockdown on their lives. This work explores the perceptions of Spaniards with IDD during the lockdown with respect to four topics: access to information, emotional experiences, effects on living conditions and access to support. METHODS: The topics were explored using a subset of 16 closed-ended questions from an online survey. In total, 582 participants with IDD completed the survey. The frequencies and percentages of responses to the questions were calculated, and chi-square tests performed to explore the relationship between participants' sociodemographic characteristics and responses. Given that people differed in the way in which they completed the survey, the relationship between participants' responses and completion method was also analysed. RESULTS: Participants reported that the pandemic and subsequent lockdown have had a deleterious effect on their emotional well-being (around 60.0% of participants) and occupations (48.0% of students and 72.7% of workers). Although access to information and support was reportedly good overall, being under the age of 21 years and studying were associated with perceptions reflecting poorer access to information (V = .20 and V = .13, respectively) and well-being support (V = .15 and V = .13, respectively). Being supported by a third party to complete the survey was consistently related to perceptions of worse outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: The study yielded data on the perceptions of people with IDD regarding the effects that COVID-19 and the subsequent lockdown have had on their lives. Suggestions on how to overcome the difficulties reported and future lines of research are discussed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Developmental Disabilities/psychology , Disabled Persons/psychology , Intellectual Disability/psychology , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19/prevention & control , Consumer Health Information , Cross-Sectional Studies , Employment/psychology , Female , Humans , Male , Persons with Mental Disabilities/psychology , Qualitative Research , Social Support , Spain , Students/psychology , Young Adult
15.
Disabil Health J ; 14(2): 101062, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1064992

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Trust of information shapes adherence to recommended practices and speed of public compliance during public health crises. This is particularly important for groups with higher rates of high-risk health conditions, including those aged 65 and over and people with disabilities. OBJECTIVE: We examined trust in information sources and associated adherence to COVID-19 public health recommendations among people with disabilities living in metropolitan, micropolitan, and noncore counties. METHODS: We recruited participants using Amazon's Mechanical Turk (MTurk) and screened for disability status (n = 408). We compared sociodemographic groups with t-tests, Pearson's correlations, and Chi-square, as appropriate. We used linear regression to examine factors associated with trust in information and compliance with CDC recommended COVID-19 practices. RESULTS: Nonmetro respondents had the lowest trust ratings among all demographic groups, and reported significantly less trust in most information sources. Respondents aged 65 and over reported the highest compliance with CDC recommended practices, while those from nonmetro areas reported the lowest. A regression model for adherence to CDC recommended practices was significant (F = 11.87, P ≤ .001), and explained 33% of the variance. Specifically, increased adherence was associated with being over 65, female, and higher general trust scores. Decreased practices were associated with being nonwhite, nonmetro, higher trust scores in President Trump, and having a communication disability. CONCLUSIONS: Trust in information sources is associated with action. It is important to provide clear, consistent, and non-polarizing messages during public health emergencies to promote widespread community action.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Disabled Persons/psychology , Health Behavior , Health Communication , SARS-CoV-2 , Trust/psychology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Cross-Sectional Studies , Disabled Persons/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Young Adult
16.
Rehabil Psychol ; 65(4): 313-322, 2020 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1065810

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To inform the field of rehabilitation psychology about the impacts of the 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19) on the disability community in the United States and the additional sources of stress and trauma disabled people face during these times. METHOD: A review of the literature on disability and COVID-19 is provided, with an emphasis on sources of trauma and stress that disproportionately impact the disability community and the ways in which disability intersects with other marginalized identities in the context of trauma and the pandemic. We also reflect on the potential impacts on the field of psychology and the ways in which psychologists, led by rehabilitation psychologists, can support disabled clients and the broader disability community at both the individual client and systemic levels. RESULTS: The COVID-19 pandemic introduces unique potential sources of trauma and stress within the disability community, including concerns about health care rationing and ableism in health care, isolation, and the deaths and illnesses of loved ones and community members. CONCLUSIONS/IMPLICATIONS: Rehabilitation psychologists and other professionals should be aware of the potential for trauma and stress among disabled clients and work with them to mitigate its effects. Additionally, psychologists should also work with the disability community and disabled colleagues to address systemic and institutional ableism and its intersections with other forms of oppression. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved).


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Disabled Persons/psychology , Disabled Persons/rehabilitation , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Wounds and Injuries/psychology , COVID-19/complications , Disabled Persons/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , United States , Wounds and Injuries/complications
17.
Res Dev Disabil ; 111: 103889, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1051930

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During COVID-19 measures face-to-face contact is limited and professional carers have to find other ways to support people with intellectual disabilities. COVID-19 measures can increase stress in people with intellectual disabilities, although some people may adapt to or grow from these uncertain situations. Resilience is the process of effectively negotiating, adapting to, or managing significant sources of stress and trauma. The current study aims to provide professional carers with new insights into how they can support people with intellectual disabilities. METHOD: An online survey was shared through the social media and organizational newsletters of MEE ZHN (a non-governmental organization for people with disabilities). The resilience framework by Ungar (2019) was adapted to fit to people with intellectual disabilities during COVID-19 measures. Statistical analyses were performed in SPSS statistics version 26. RESULTS: Results show that professional carers applied diverse and distal methods to maintain contact with people with intellectual disabilities during the COVID-19 measures. Professional carers reported a significant decrease in the quality of contact with clients with intellectual disabilities, but overall high levels of resilience in the same clients. IMPLICATIONS: Online methods of communication are possibly insufficient for professionals to cover all needs of people with intellectual disabilities. During this pandemic professionals should be aware of stress but also of resilience in people with intellectual disabilities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Caregivers , Disabled Persons , Intellectual Disability , Psychosocial Support Systems , Resilience, Psychological , Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , Caregivers/psychology , Caregivers/statistics & numerical data , Disabled Persons/psychology , Disabled Persons/rehabilitation , Female , Humans , Intellectual Disability/epidemiology , Intellectual Disability/psychology , Intellectual Disability/rehabilitation , Male , Netherlands/epidemiology , Professional-Patient Relations , Quality of Health Care , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
18.
J Health Serv Res Policy ; 26(3): 189-197, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-992317

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To describe the disruptions in care experienced by persons with Multiple Sclerosis in Italy due to the COVID-19 pandemic and the self-reported impact on their health and wellbeing. METHODS: A cross-sectional online survey was completed by 2722 persons with Multiple Sclerosis, after Italy instituted a national lockdown in response to the pandemic. RESULTS: Persons with Multiple Sclerosis reported that the pandemic caused broad disruptions to usual health and social care services, which impacted on their health and wellbeing. Disruptions in care were consistently associated with negative self-reported impacts on the expected progression of the disease, on out-of-pocket expenditure and on carer's stress. Psychological consequences were associated with interruption to usual psychological support, and concerns about the safety of care delivered in person. CONCLUSIONS: The quality of life of persons with Multiple Sclerosis depends greatly on prompt access to a broad range of health and care services. Negative psychological impacts reported by persons with Multiple Sclerosis with less severe disabilities show that accessible integrated services are crucial for maintenance of their wellbeing. Most persons with Multiple Sclerosis with more severe disability experienced negative impacts on perceived health. Their carers compensating for lack of social input resulted in care overburden. As continuity of care is crucial for persons with Multiple Sclerosis, as well as for persons with chronic conditions in general, strategies must be in place to ensure it is included in future pandemic response plans.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Continuity of Patient Care/organization & administration , Multiple Sclerosis/epidemiology , Multiple Sclerosis/psychology , Adult , Caregiver Burden/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Disabled Persons/psychology , Female , Financing, Personal , Health Status , Humans , Italy , Male , Mental Health , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2 , Self Report , Severity of Illness Index , Social Work/organization & administration , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology
19.
Disabil Rehabil ; 43(7): 1022-1028, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-990316

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The worldwide COVID-19 pandemic has changed almost all aspects of our lives, and the field of childhood disability is no exception. METHODS: This article is based on an invited lecture by the first author at a conference-the eHealth Summit ("Pediatric Rehabilitation in a Digital Space")-organized by the other authors and their colleagues in May 2020. RESULTS: The first author offers his own experiences and perspectives, supplemented by comments and observations contributed by many of the 9000+ attendees at this talk, as curated by the second and third authors. The basic messages are that while life for families of children with developmental disabilities, and for service providers who work with them, is significantly altered, many important lessons are being learned. CONCLUSIONS: The comments from participants support the currency of the ideas that were presented, and encourage childhood disability professionals to reflect on what we are learning, so that we can seize the opportunities they afford to do things differently-and we believe better-moving forward.IMPLICATIONS FOR REHABILITATIONIdeas generated by colleagues and parents suggest that there may be alternatives to "business as usual" in childhood disability services after the COVID pandemic is over.People are recognizing opportunities, and benefits, to offering services virtually, including being able to see children in their natural environments, saving parents time, money and hassles to attend clinics in person, and perhaps increasing the availability of services.Many issues remain to be investigated systematically, including, among others, what services (assessments and interventions) require hands-on connections, what payment structures can accommodate new models of services, how professionals can work together in a virtual world, and what families will want.Regardless of the final answers to these issues, we believe that we should not simply "go back to normal"; rather, we should expand the range, nature and locations of our services for children with developmental disabilities and their families.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Disabled Persons/psychology , Telemedicine , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Child , Humans , Pandemics , Parents , SARS-CoV-2
20.
Eur J Phys Rehabil Med ; 57(1): 158-165, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-916615

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: While the COVID-19 pandemic was spreading worldwide, the Italian government stated lockdown, with a drastic reorganization of healthcare systems. The psychological and social effects of the pandemic and the restrictions of freedom could have had a detrimental impact on people with physical disabilities, for whom well-being depends strongly on their social environment. AIM: Our main aim was to describe the overall impact of the pandemic on mental health, social condition and illness perception among patients with disabilities, to provide early interventions for this particularly vulnerable population. For this purpose, we performed a specific screening protocol to detect the prevalence of any psychological distress. DESIGN: Cross-sectional observational study. SETTING: Telephonic interview administered to patients and their caregivers attending the Unit of Neurorehabilitation at the University Hospital of Pisa. POPULATION: 134 patients with physical disability related to neurological disorders, who had their outpatient appointment cancelled, because of the government dispositions, were enrolled. METHODS: A specific questionnaire (COVID19-q) was designed to test patients' psycho-social state, including a section addressed to the caregiver. Moreover, a standardized psychological evaluation, using the Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation-Outcome Measure (CORE-OM), was also performed. RESULTS: Results show a different impact in our study population compared to the general population on psychological aspect. Patients did not manifest any clinically relevant distress, as assessed with CORE-OM. However, patients with higher disability degree reported a statistically lower outcome in the social function, in the well-being domains and an increase in risk behavior. Results from COVID19-q show that most of our patients reported none or mild change in their psycho-social habits and perception of illness during lockdown. However, reduction of family cohesion and lack of healthcare support are two important aspects that people with disability had to face with during the pandemic emergency. CONCLUSIONS: People with physical disabilities surprisingly shown milder effects of the pandemic on their psychological state and good coping skills in facing social isolation, manifesting resilience resources. However, the is a need to give concrete support to healthcare and social care, especially in the management of severe disability. CLINICAL REHABILITATION IMPACT: This unexpected and reassuring result may reveal a worrying scenario regarding-the social participation and quality of life of people with disabilities: were they already in lockdown?


Subject(s)
Attitude to Health , COVID-19/prevention & control , Disabled Persons/psychology , Pandemics , Physical Distancing , SARS-CoV-2 , Aged , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Surveys and Questionnaires
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL