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4.
J Nurs Manag ; 30(3): 622-632, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20232021

ABSTRACT

AIM: The aim of this study is to determine nurses' disaster core competency levels, compare them based on characteristics and examine the relationships with psychological resilience. BACKGROUND: Since nurses constitute a critical part in the health care services, it is important to understand the competencies and effective factors in their disaster preparedness. METHODS: The data were collected from 489 nurses between January and February 2021 with an introductory information form, the Nurses' Perceptions of Disaster Core Competencies Scale and the Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale. RESULTS: The nurses' level of disaster core competencies was above the average, and it was positively correlated with their psychological resilience. The nurses' disaster experiences made higher differences on their disaster core competencies when compared to their personal and professional characteristics. CONCLUSIONS: It is important to provide disaster training and drills to all nurses on a regular basis. However, under disaster conditions, resilience should also be considered and included in the preparation plans for nurses to support their professional competencies and qualifications. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING MANAGEMENT: Nurse managers should play a leadership role in planning disaster preparedness training for nurses, and these trainings should be addressed to cover both professional competencies and resilience for nurses to respond effectively to disasters.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Disaster Planning , Disasters , Nurse Administrators , Nurses , COVID-19/epidemiology , Clinical Competence , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Pandemics , Turkey
5.
Zhonghua Liu Xing Bing Xue Za Zhi ; 44(5): 689-693, 2023 May 10.
Article in Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20234043

ABSTRACT

A crucial lesson gained through the pandemic preparedness and response to COVID-19 is that all measures for epidemic control must be law-based. The legal system is related not only to public health emergency management per se but also to all aspects of the institutional supporting system throughout the lifecycle. Based on the lifecycle emergency management model, this article analyses the problems of the current legal system and the potential solutions. It is suggested that the lifecycle emergency management model shall be followed to establish a more comprehensive public health legal system and to gather the intelligence and consensus of experts with different expertise, including epidemiologists, sociologists, economists, jurist and others, which will collaboratively promote the science-based legislation in the field of epidemic preparedness and response for the establishment of a comprehensive legal system for public health emergency management and with Chinese characteristics.


Subject(s)
Disaster Planning , Public Health , Humans , China , Pandemics/prevention & control , Emergencies
6.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(11)2023 May 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20233633

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic exacerbated the child mental health crisis and existing disparities. Child anxiety, depression, suicide attempts and completions, and mental-health-related emergency department visits significantly increased. In response to this crisis, the Administration for Strategic Preparedness and Response (ASPR) developed behavioral health task forces associated with funded pediatric centers of disaster excellence. The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) funded the Pediatric Pandemic Network (PPN) to prepare for future endemics and pandemics, with behavioral health identified as a priority in mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery. This commentary provides insights from pediatric disaster preparedness and response behavioral health subject matter experts. Our roles have been to identify how to build behavioral health professional competencies across disciplines and various medical settings and to strengthen emergency interdisciplinary behavioral health care capability regionally and at the national level. Specific examples of interdisciplinary training and demonstration projects are included as models for enhancing behavioral health situational awareness and developing curricula to support preparedness and response for the current ongoing pandemic and future natural and biological disasters. This commentary also includes a call to action for workforce development to move beyond a boots-on-the-ground mentality for pediatric behavioral health disaster preparedness and response toward a more inclusive role for behavioral health providers of varied specialties. This means that behavioral health providers should become more informed of federal programs in this area, seek further training, and find innovative ways to collaborate with their medical colleagues and community partners.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Disaster Planning , Disasters , Humans , Child , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Professional Competence
7.
J Emerg Manag ; 21(2): 165-171, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20232804

ABSTRACT

This study examined the results of an electronic survey of residential care facilities for the elderly (RCFE) in California in 2021 to provide insight on key elements of emergency plans and facility preparedness for the COVID-19 pandemic and future emergencies. Surveys were distributed to RCFE administrators using publicly available emails found on the California Health and Human Services Open Data Portal. Responses from 150 facility administrators included data on their perception of current and future facility preparedness for COVID-19 and other emergency scenarios, items included in facility evacuation/shelter-in-place plans, and hazard vulnerability analyses and training practices of facility staff. Descriptive analyses were performed on collected data. The majority of results were from small facilities serving less than seven residents (70.7 percent). Prior to COVID-19, more than 90 percent of respondents included disaster drills, evacuation plans, and emergency transportation in their emergency preparedness plan. The majority of facilities added pandemic planning, vaccine distribution, and quarantine guidelines elements into their plans during COVID-19. Approximately half of facilities reported conducting proactive hazard vulnerability analyses. Around 75 percent of RCFEs felt well prepared for fires and infectious disease outbreaks, had mixed preparedness levels for earthquakes and floods, and felt least prepared for landslides and active shooter emergencies. During the pandemic, perceptions of preparedness rose, with 92 percent stating they felt very prepared currently and almost 70 percent felt very prepared for future pandemics. Preparedness of these essential facilities and their residents can continue to improve by conducting regular proactive hazard vulnerability analyses, improving communication lines and mutual aid agreements with local and state organizations, and preparing for critical emergencies such as landslides and active shooter scenarios. This can help to ensure adequate resources and investments are provided to care for older adults during emergencies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Civil Defense , Disaster Planning , Humans , Aged , Emergencies , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires , California
8.
ScientificWorldJournal ; 2023: 5473777, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20231737

ABSTRACT

Background: Current disaster knowledge, skills, and preparedness levels need to be evaluated to guide plans to strengthen disaster readiness. Objective: This study aimed to explore the Jordanian staff nurses' perception regarding their familiarity, attitudes, and practices for disaster preparedness (DP) to reduce the negative impacts of disasters. Methods: This is a cross-sectional, quantitative, descriptive study. The study was conducted on nurses working at governmental and private hospitals in Jordan. A convenience sample of 240 currently working nurses was recruited to participate in the study. Results: The nurses were somewhat familiar with their role in DP (2.9 ± .84). The nurses' overall attitude towards DP was 2.2 ± 0.38, indicating that respondents had medium attitude levels. A low practice level for DP (1.59 ± 0.45) was also observed. Among the studied demographic variables, there was a significant relationship between experience and prior training with improved familiarity and practices. This indicates a need for strengthening nurses' practical skills as well as their theoretical knowledge. However, there is only a significant difference between attitude scale scores and disaster preparedness training (f = 10.120; p=0.002). Conclusions: The study findings support the need for more training (academic and/or institutional) to increase and improve nursing disaster preparedness locally and globally.


Subject(s)
Disaster Planning , Disasters , Nurses , Humans , Jordan , Cross-Sectional Studies , Surveys and Questionnaires
9.
Cien Saude Colet ; 28(3): 749-759, 2023 Mar.
Article in Portuguese, English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2326470

ABSTRACT

An integrative literature review (ILR) was conducted to identify the relationship between humanitarian logistics and the development of the COVID-19 pandemic based on research in the SCOPUS, MEDLINE and ENEGEP databases in April and May 2022. In all, 61 articles were evaluated according to the following criteria: original article or review of literature published in a scientific journal; abstract and full text available; article on humanitarian logistics in relation to the COVID-19 pandemic. The resulting sample comprised eleven publications organized and analyzed through a synthesis matrix, where 72% were published in international journals and mostly in 2021 (56%). The presence of the supply chain defines the course of action of economic and social sectors, which in turn determine, by means of an interdisciplinary approach, humanitarian operations in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic. The lack of studies narrows down humanitarian logistics to mitigate the impacts caused by these disasters, both in the context of the current pandemic and in future events of the same nature. However, as a global emergency, it suggests the need to increase scientific knowledge on the subject of humanitarian logistics related to disaster events.


O objetivo do estudo é identificar na literatura a relação entre a logística humanitária e a evolução da pandemia de COVID-19. Trata-se de uma revisão integrativa de literatura (RIL), com busca nas bases de dados SCOPUS, MEDLINE e ENEGEP, de abril e maio de 2022. Um total de 61 artigos foram avaliados conforme os critérios estabelecidos: artigo original ou de revisão de literatura publicado em revista científica; resumo e texto completo disponível; artigo com objeto de investigação sobre a logística humanitária em relação à pandemia de COVID-19. Foram selecionadas 11 publicações, organizadas e analisadas por meio de matriz de síntese. Das publicações, 72% foram em periódicos internacionais, e majoritariamente no ano de 2021 (56%). A presença da cadeia de suprimentos tem determinado a dinâmica de setores econômicos e sociais, estabelecendo, por meio de um olhar interdisciplinar, as operações humanitárias frente à pandemia de COVID-19. Constatou-se escassez de estudos que analisam a logística humanitária com o intuito de amenizar os impactos causados por esses desastres, tanto no contexto da atual pandemia como em eventos futuros da mesma natureza. Contudo, o caráter mundialmente emergencial sugere a necessidade de fortalecer o conhecimento científico acerca da temática da logística humanitária relacionada a eventos de desastres.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Disaster Planning , Disasters , Humans , Pandemics
10.
Stud Health Technol Inform ; 302: 907-908, 2023 May 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2326163

ABSTRACT

The impact of Covid-19 on hospitals was profound, with many lower-resourced hospitals' information technology resources inadequate to efficiently meet the new needs. We interviewed 52 personnel at all levels in two New York City hospitals to understand their issues in emergency response. The large differences in IT resources show the need for a schema to classify hospital IT readiness for emergency response. Here we propose a set of concepts and model, inspired by the Health Information Management Systems Society (HIMSS) maturity model. The schema is designed to permit evaluation of hospital IT emergency readiness, permitting remediation of IT resources where necessary.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Disaster Planning , Humans , Concept Formation , Hospitals , New York City
11.
J Bus Contin Emer Plan ; 16(4): 320-334, 2023 Jan 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2318233

ABSTRACT

Over the last two years, agencies have experimented with new systems and tactics to reach as many people as possible with critical preparedness information. This paper describes how COVID-19 forced FEMA Region 10 to adapt its public education and outreach strategy to a fully online space in order to keep the public informed about potential disasters. The paper discusses how the Individual and Community Preparedness team at FEMA Region 10 reaches thousands of people around the world by hosting regular webinars, live events, workshops and training sessions, and publishing a monthly newsletter. The paper also argues that if preparedness and response organisations are to evolve their outreach strategies and messaging plans and extend the reach of their messages, they must continue to adapt and to meet their target audience where they are.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Disaster Planning , Disasters , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology
12.
J Bus Contin Emer Plan ; 16(4): 346-358, 2023 Jan 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2315695

ABSTRACT

With the initial disruption of COVID-19 now settling down, organisations are finding themselves in a new situation, where some of their previously onsite workforce is now fully remote or working according to a hybrid model of onsite and remote work, and some new employees have been hired as fully remote. This new model of dispersed employees presents managers, supervisors and leaders with fresh challenges when it comes to checking in on employees and providing them with the guidance, they need to perform their daily functions. This paper supplies key tips for the successful management of remote workforces. As well as how to balance the team dynamic with employees in multiple locations and differing work types, such as, fully remote, hybrid and onsite, the paper will also explore the use of various technologies and methods for ensuring employees are working to the best of their ability and continue to be content and productive in whatever environment they find themselves working.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Disaster Planning , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Workforce
13.
Disaster Med Public Health Prep ; 17: e385, 2023 04 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2315480

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: In January 2022, Fiji was hit by multiple natural disasters, including a cyclone causing flooding, an underwater volcanic eruption, and a tsunami. This study aimed to investigate perceived needs among the disaster-affected people in Fiji and to evaluate the feasibility of the Humanitarian Emergency Settings Perceived Needs Scale (HESPER Web) during the early stage after multiple natural disasters. METHODS: A cross-sectional study using a self-selected, non-representative study sample was conducted. The HESPER Web was used to collect data. RESULTS: In all, 242 people participated. The number of perceived serious needs ranged between 2 and 14 (out of a possible 26), with a mean of 6 (SD = 3). The top 3 most reported needs were access to toilets (60%), care for people in the community who are on their own (55%), and distress (51%). Volunteers reported fewer needs than the general public. CONCLUSIONS: The top 3 needs reported were related to water and sanitation and psychosocial needs. Such needs should not be underestimated in the emergency phase after natural disasters and may require more attention from responding actors. The HESPER Web was considered a usable tool for needs assessment in a sudden onset disaster.


Subject(s)
Disaster Planning , Natural Disasters , Needs Assessment , Humans , Fiji , Disaster Victims/psychology , Feasibility Studies , Cross-Sectional Studies , Floods , Tsunamis , Cyclonic Storms , Volcanic Eruptions , Male , Female , Adult , Middle Aged , Aged
14.
J Bus Contin Emer Plan ; 16(4): 335-345, 2023 Jan 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2315383

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 public health emergency severely limited the ability of emergency managers to conduct emergency exercises, particularly at the functional or full-scale level. Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic response, other emergencies continued, and local emergency management was called to respond, ensuring that local guidelines and COVID-19 restrictions were observed. This paper describes how the pandemic impacted on the City of Puyallup's emergency management training and exercise programme and how the City adapted to conduct a full-scale exercise in the autumn of 2021. Multiple delays, planning partners overwhelmed by COVID-19, and emergencies that occurred prior to the exercise were all addressed and included in the exercise scenario. The City of Puyallup and its planning partners built in contingencies in the run-up to the exercise, all the way through to the day of exercise play. Providing a safe, realistic and timely opportunity for the City of Puyallup and partners to conduct the exercise has resulted in a far-reaching after-action report and improvement plan to guide the preparedness and planning efforts of the City and its partners.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Disaster Planning , Humans , Disaster Planning/methods , Emergencies , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Public Health
15.
16.
Disaster Med Public Health Prep ; 17: e387, 2023 05 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2314349

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the change in knowledge and skill confidence after implementation of a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and explosive (CBRNE) training course during the Russia-Ukraine War. METHODS: Pre/post-test study in the Ukrainian cities of Kyiv, Dnipro, Zaporizhzhia, and Odesa. Fifteen CBRNE courses were conducted over a 3-mo period, August to October 2022. Change in knowledge and skills confidence were evaluated with pre/post-course written exams and practical skill assessments that were observed during the training exercises. Changes were analyzed based on nonparametric Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-rank testing. Pre/post self-efficacy surveys were analyzed with McNemar's test for paired data. Course evaluations were conducted with standardized questions which assessed instruction quality, teaching relevance, knowledge gained, and post-course skills confidence. RESULTS: A total of 523 participants registered and completed 1 of the 15 courses. Overall mean pre-course test score: 57.8% (SD 20.7%); mean post-course test score: 81.4% (SD 11.3%); participants with increasing test scores: 90.7%; mean difference in score (95% confidence interval) 23.6% (21.2%-25.9%), P < 0.0001. Pre/post self-efficacy surveys (4-point Likert scale) noted participants recognized signs and symptoms of a CBRNE incident, and necessary skills to manage CBRNE exposures, P < 0.0001. CONCLUSIONS: The implementation of this CBRNE course for front-line providers in Ukraine was successful. To our knowledge, it was the first implementation of a field course during the current Russian-Ukraine war. Future research should evaluate knowledge retention and impact of our innovative Train-the-Trainer model. Further iterations should emphasize expanding the quantity of training equipment and practical skill sessions.


Subject(s)
Disaster Planning , Explosive Agents , Humans , Ukraine , Surveys and Questionnaires , Russia
18.
Health Secur ; 20(4): 339-347, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2309296

ABSTRACT

The definitive care component of the National Disaster Medical System (NDMS) may not be able to effectively manage tens of thousands of casualties resulting from a catastrophic disaster incident or overseas conflict. To address this potential national security threat, Congress authorized the US Secretary of Defense to conduct the NDMS Pilot Program to improve the interoperability, special capabilities, and patient capacity of the NDMS. The pilot's first phase was the Military-Civilian NDMS Interoperability Study, designed to identify broad themes to direct further NDMS research. Researchers conducted a series of facilitated discussions with 49 key NDMS federal and civilian (private sector) stakeholders to identify and assess weaknesses and opportunities for improving the NDMS. After qualitative analysis, 6 critical themes emerged: (1) coordination, collaboration, and communication between federal and private sector NDMS partners; (2) funding and incentives for improved surge capacity and preparedness for NDMS partners; (3) staffing capacity and competencies for government and private NDMS partners; (4) surge capacity, especially at private sector healthcare facilities; (5) training, education, and exercises and knowledge sharing between federal and private sector NDMS partners; and (6) metrics, benchmarks, and modeling for NDMS partners to track their NDMS-related capabilities and performance. These findings provide a roadmap for federal-level changes and additional operations research to strengthen the NDMS definitive care system, particularly in the areas of policy and legislation, operational coordination, and funding.


Subject(s)
Disaster Planning , Disasters , Military Personnel , Carbolines , Communication , Disaster Planning/methods , Humans
19.
Kidney Int ; 103(3): 436-443, 2023 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2308955

ABSTRACT

As the rate of natural disasters and other devastating events caused by human activities increases, the burden on the health and well-being of those affected by kidney disease has been immeasurable. Health system preparedness, which involves creating a resilient system that is able to deal with the health needs of the entire community during times of unexpected disruptions to usual care, has become globally important. In the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, there is a heightened awareness of the amplification of negative effects on the renal community. Paradoxically, the complex medical needs of those who have kidney diseases are not met by systems handling crises, often compounded by an acute increase in burden via new patients as a result of the crisis itself. Disruptions in kidney care as a result of unexpected events are becoming more prevalent and likely to increase in the years to come. It is therefore only appropriate that the theme for this year's World Kidney Day will focus on Kidney Health for All: preparedness for the unexpected in supporting the vulnerable.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Disaster Planning , Kidney Diseases , Humans , Pandemics , Kidney
20.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(7)2023 04 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2298503

ABSTRACT

People impacted by disasters may have adverse non-communicable disease health effects associated with the disaster. This research examined the independent and joint impacts of federally declared disasters on the diagnosis of hypertension (HTN), diabetes (DM), anxiety, and medication changes 6 months before and after a disaster. Patients seen in zip codes that received a federal disaster declaration for Hurricanes Gustave or Ike in 2008 and who had electronic health records captured by MarketScan® were analyzed. The analysis included patients seen 6 months before or after Hurricanes Gustav and Ike in 2008 and who were diagnosed with HTN, DM, or anxiety. There was a statistically significant association between post-disaster and diagnosis of hypertension, X2 (1, n = 19,328) = 3.985, p = 0.04. There was no association post-disaster and diabetes X2 (1, n = 19,328) = 0.778, p = 0.378 or anxiety, X2 (1, n = 19,328) = 0.017, p = 0.898. The research showed that there was a change in the diagnosis of HTN after a disaster. Changes in HTN are an additional important consideration for clinicians in disaster-prone areas. Data about non-communicable diseases help healthcare disaster planners to include primary care needs and providers in the plans to prevent the long-term health impacts of disasters and expedite recovery efforts.


Subject(s)
Cyclonic Storms , Diabetes Mellitus , Disaster Planning , Disasters , Noncommunicable Diseases , Humans , Delivery of Health Care
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