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2.
J Drugs Dermatol ; 20(1): 10-16, 2021 01 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1006678

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus pandemic (COVID-19) has served as a call-to-arms in preparing practices for the next disaster whether it is another infectious disease or a flood, hurricane, earthquake, a sustained power outage, or something else. A group of predominantly core aesthetic physicians discussed the various aspects of their office procedures that warrant consideration in a proactive approach to the next pandemic/disaster-related event. This guide does not set a standard of practice but contains recommendations that may avoid some of the "lessons learned" with the COVID-19 pandemic. In this paper, the board-certified core aesthetic physicians classified these recommendations into four generalized areas: Practice Management; Supplies and Inventory; Office Staffing Considerations and Protocols; and Patient Management Strategies. Proactive strategies are provided in each of these categories that, if implemented, may alleviate the processes involved with an efficient office closure and reopening process including, in the case of COVID-19, methods to reduce the risk of transmission to doctors, staff, and patients. These strategies also include being prepared for emergency-related notifications of employees and patients; the acquisition of necessary equipment and supplies such as personal protective equipment; and the maintenance and accessibility of essential data and contact information for patients, vendors, financial advisors, and other pertinent entities.J Drugs Dermatol. 2021;20(1):10-16. doi:10.36849/JDD.5803.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Civil Defense/methods , Disaster Planning/methods , Disasters/prevention & control , Disease Management , Physician's Role , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Civil Defense/trends , Disaster Planning/trends , Humans , Personnel Staffing and Scheduling/trends
3.
Nurse Educ ; 46(1): 23-28, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-967019

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 has tested the capacity of every nursing school, but its impact has varied according to the size, location, and baseline infrastructure of each school. This makes the pandemic an important lens through which to study crisis management principles, such as flexibility and scalability (the ability to expand and reduce efforts based on situational demands). PURPOSE: This article provides a roadmap for academic crisis management, modeled on the National Incident Management System (NIMS). It is tailored to the unique needs of nursing schools and applies COVID-19 as a case study. METHODS: The authors explore the elements of the NIMS that were deployed within 1 top-ranked school of nursing during COVID-19. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: The article includes best practices, tips, and resources to help academic nurse leaders and educators navigate large-scale or unprecedented crises, such as COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Disaster Planning/trends , Pandemics , Schools, Nursing/organization & administration , Humans , Leadership , Models, Organizational , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
6.
J Gen Intern Med ; 35(9): 2732-2737, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-640978

ABSTRACT

Hospitalists are well poised to serve in key leadership roles and in frontline care in particular when facing a pandemic such as the SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) infection. Much of the disaster planning in hospitals around the country addresses overcrowded emergency departments and decompressing these locations; however, in the case of COVID-19, intensive care units, emergency departments, and medical wards ran the risk of being overwhelmed by a large influx of patients needing high-level medical care. In a matter of days, our Division of Hospital Medicine, in partnership with our hospital, health system, and academic institution, was able to modify and deploy existing disaster plans to quickly care for an influx of medically complex patients. We describe a scaled approach to managing hospitalist clinical operations during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Capacity Building/methods , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Disaster Planning/methods , Hospitalists , Hospitals , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , COVID-19 , Capacity Building/trends , Containment of Biohazards/methods , Containment of Biohazards/trends , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Disaster Planning/trends , Hospitalists/trends , Hospitals/trends , Humans , Intersectoral Collaboration , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
7.
J Med Microbiol ; 69(7): 920-923, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-595403

ABSTRACT

The biological motor behind the current coronavirus pandemic has placed microbiology on a global stage, and given its practitioners a role among the architects of recovery. Planning for a return to normality or the new normal is a complex, multi-agency task for which healthcare scientists may not be prepared. This paper introduces a widely used military planning framework known as the Joint Military Appreciation Process, and outlines how it can be applied to deal with the next phase of the COVID-19 pandemic. Recognition of SARS-CoV-2's critical attributes, targetable vulnerabilities, and its most likely and most dangerous effects is a necessary precursor to scoping, framing and mission analysis. From this flows course of action development, analysis, concept of operations development, and an eventual decision to act on the plan. The same planning technique is applicable to the larger scale task of setting a microbiology-centric plan in the broader context of social and economic recovery.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Disaster Planning/organization & administration , Military Science/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , COVID-19 , Clinical Laboratory Services/organization & administration , Clinical Laboratory Services/supply & distribution , Disaster Planning/methods , Disaster Planning/trends , Health , Humans , Pandemics
8.
Disaster Med Public Health Prep ; 14(5): e3-e4, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-210157

ABSTRACT

Since the first report of the 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in December 2019 in Wuhan, China, the outbreak of the disease has been continuously evolving. Until March 17, 2020, 185, 178 cases had been confirmed, including 81,134 cases in China and 104,044 cases outside of China. In this comment, we report the unexpected beneficial effect of a deployable rapid-assembly shelter hospital on the prevention and treatment of COVID-19. We describe the shelter hospital maintenance, treatment mode and primary treatment methods, which will provide a valuable experience in dealing with public health emergencies, such as COVID-19, for other countries and areas.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Emergency Shelter/methods , Hospitals/trends , COVID-19/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Disaster Planning/methods , Disaster Planning/standards , Disaster Planning/trends , Emergency Shelter/trends , Hospitals/standards , Humans , Public Health/instrumentation , Public Health/methods
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