Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 466
Filter
Add filters

Year range
1.
J Med Internet Res ; 23(2): e25518, 2021 02 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1076396

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 has necessitated the implementation of innovative health care models in preparation for an influx of patients. A virtual ward model delivers clinical care remotely to patients in isolation. We report on an Australian cohort of patients with COVID-19 treated in a virtual ward. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to describe and evaluate the safety and efficacy of a virtual ward model of care for an Australian cohort of patients with COVID-19. METHODS: Retrospective clinical assessment was performed for 223 patients with confirmed COVID-19 treated in a virtual ward in Brisbane, Australia, from March 25 to May 15, 2020. Statistical analysis was performed for variables associated with the length of stay and hospitalization. RESULTS: Of 223 patients, 205 (92%) recovered without the need for escalation to hospital care. The median length of stay in the virtual ward was 8 days (range 1-44 days). In total, 18 (8%) patients were referred to hospital, of which 6 (33.3%) were discharged after assessment at the emergency department. Furthermore, 12 (5.4%) patients were admitted to hospital, of which 4 (33.3%) required supplemental oxygen and 2 (16.7%) required mechanical ventilation. No deaths were recorded. Factors associated with escalation to hospital care were the following: hypertension (odds ratio [OR] 3.6, 95% CI 1.28-9.87; P=.01), sputum production (OR 5.2, 95% CI 1.74-15.49; P=.001), and arthralgia (OR 3.8, 95% CI 1.21-11.71; P=.02) at illness onset and a polymerase chain reaction cycle threshold of ≤20 on a diagnostic nasopharyngeal swab (OR 5.0, 95% CI 1.25-19.63; P=.02). CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that a virtual ward model of care to treat patients with COVID-19 is safe and efficacious, and only a small number of patients would potentially require escalation to hospital care. Further studies are required to validate this model of care.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care/methods , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Patient Isolation , Telemedicine/methods , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Australia , Cohort Studies , Disease Management , Emergency Service, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Female , Hospitals , Humans , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Nursing Assessment , Patient Discharge , Respiration, Artificial/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Severity of Illness Index , Telephone , Young Adult
2.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep ; 21(2): 8, 2021 02 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1070935

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has challenged healthcare system capacities and safety for health care workers, reshaping doctor-patient interaction favoring e-Health or telemedicine. The pandemic situation may make difficult to prioritize patients with allergies diseases (AD), face-to-face evaluation, and moreover concern about the possible COVID-19 diagnosis, since COVID-19 shared many symptoms in common with AD. Being COVID-19 a novel disease, everyone is susceptible; there are some advances on vaccine and specific treatment. We evaluate existing literature on allergic diseases (AD): allergic rhinitis, asthma, food allergy, drug allergy, and skin allergy, and potential underlying mechanisms for any interrelationship between AD and COVID-19. RECENT FINDINGS: There is inconclusive and controversial evidence of the association between AD and the risk of adverse clinical outcomes of COVID-19. AD patients should minimize hospital and face-to-face visits, and those who have used biologics and allergen immunotherapy should continue the treatment. It is essential to wear personal protective equipment for the protection of health care workers. Social distancing, rational use of facemasks, eye protection, and hand disinfection for health care workers and patients deserve further attention and promotion. Teleconsultation during COVID-19 times for AD patients is very encouraging and telemedicine platform can provide a reliable service in patient care.


Subject(s)
Asthma/therapy , Food Hypersensitivity/therapy , Infection Control/methods , Rhinitis, Allergic/therapy , Telemedicine , Asthma/immunology , Biological Products , Dermatitis, Allergic Contact/immunology , Dermatitis, Allergic Contact/therapy , Dermatitis, Atopic/immunology , Dermatitis, Atopic/therapy , Desensitization, Immunologic , Disease Management , Disease Outbreaks , Drug Hypersensitivity/immunology , Drug Hypersensitivity/therapy , Food Hypersensitivity/immunology , Health Personnel , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Personal Protective Equipment , Rhinitis, Allergic/immunology
3.
Epidemiol Prev ; 44(5-6 Suppl 2): 208-215, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1068141

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: the emergency due to SARS-CoV-2 pandemic struck the national and regional health system that needed an effort to reorganise and increase resources to cope with a sudden, uncertain, and previously unknown situation. This study was conducted in the immediate aftermath of this difficult period. OBJECTIVES: to describe clinical characteristics, short-term outcomes, and management of SARS-CoV-2 positive patients that accessed the emergency department (ED) of the San Luigi Gonzaga hospital of Orbassano (Turin district, Piedmont Region, Northern Italy) in March and April 2020. Furthermore, this study aimed at investigating if a difference in patients characteristics, clinical management, and outcomes was present during time. DESIGN: comparison of different periods in a clinical cohort. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: for each patient who accessed the ED and tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 swab, the ED medical record was collected and a descriptive analysis was performed on demographical characteristics, pre-existing comorbidities, parameters measured at triage, imaging exams results, lab tests results, separately for patients admitted at the ED in four different periods. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: discharge from ED, admission to hospital wards (low and high intensity of care), short term in-hospital mortality, hospital length of stay. The association between patients' characteristics and the main outcomes was measured using multivariable logistic models. RESULTS: age of patients increased significantly from March to April, together with female prevalence and associated comorbid conditions. A significant difference in symptoms at presentation was not observed nor it was in laboratory test results. Severity at triage and need of intensive care resources were higher in the first weeks, together with the typical clinical presentation with respiratory failure and imaging with signs of bilateral interstitial pneumonia. Accordingly, in-hospital mortality was higher in the first period. Nevertheless, nearly half of patients in the first period were discharged directly from ED showing mild COVID-19 cases. On the contrary, in April an increasing need of hospitalisation in low intensity of care beds was observed, whereas mild cases stopped to access the ED. CONCLUSIONS: the results of this study suggest that in few weeks of COVID-19 epidemic both management of the patients at the hospital level - and probably at territorial level resulting in a different population who accessed to the ED - and the clinical characteristics of the COVID-19 patients changed.


Subject(s)
/epidemiology , Emergency Service, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Age Distribution , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , /drug therapy , Comorbidity , Disease Management , Female , Hospital Mortality , Hospitals, Urban/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Mutation , Patient Discharge , Retrospective Studies , /isolation & purification , Sex Distribution , Symptom Assessment , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome , Triage
4.
Am J Med Sci ; 361(2): 208-215, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1064783

ABSTRACT

IMPORTANCE: Pneumonia due to COVID-19 can lead to respiratory failure and death due to the development of the acute respiratory distress syndrome. Tocilizumab, a monoclonal antibody targeting the interleukin-6 receptor, is being administered off-label to some patients with COVID-19, and although early small studies suggested a benefit, there are no conclusive data proving its usefulness. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate outcomes in hospitalized patients with COVID-19 with or without treatment with Tocilizumab. DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS: Retrospective study of 1938 patients with confirmed COVID-19 pneumonia admitted to hospitals within the Jefferson Health system in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, between March 25, 2020 and June 17, 2020, of which 307 received Tocilizumab. EXPOSURES: Confirmed COVID-19 pneumonia. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Outcomes data related to length of stay, admission to intensive care unit (ICU), requirement of mechanical ventilation, and mortality were collected and analyzed. RESULTS: The average age was 65.2, with 47% women; 36.4% were African-American. The average length of stay was 22 days with 26.3% of patients requiring admission to the ICU and 14.9% requiring mechanical ventilation. The overall mortality was 15.3%. Older age, admission to an ICU, and requirement for mechanical ventilation were associated with higher mortality. Treatment with Tocilizumab was also associated with higher mortality, which was mainly observed in subjects not requiring care in an ICU with estimated odds ratio (OR) of 2.9 (p = 0.0004). Tocilizumab treatment was also associated with higher likelihood of admission to an ICU (OR = 4.8, p < 0.0001), progression to requiring mechanical ventilation (OR = 6.6, p < 0.0001), and increased length of stay (OR = 16.2, p < 0.0001). CONCLUSION AND RELEVANCE: Our retrospective analysis revealed an association between Tocilizumab administration and increased mortality, ICU admission, mechanical ventilation, and length of stay in subjects with COVID-19. Prospective trials are needed to evaluate the true effect of Tocilizumab in this condition.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , Disease Management , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , /mortality , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Mortality/trends , Retrospective Studies
5.
Epidemiol Prev ; 44(5-6 Suppl 2): 104-112, 2020.
Article in Italian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1068129

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: to describe the organisation and the role of the Department of Prevention of the Local Health Unit (APSS) of Trento (Trentino-Alto Adige Region, Northern Italy) against the spread of COVID-19 in the population, in the management of possible cases (with only clinical criteria of influenza-like illness, ILI, without diagnostic swab) reported by General practitioners (GPs) and by Family paediatricians (FPs) during the initial phase of the pandemic COVID-19 in Trentino-Alto Adige Region. DESIGN: descriptive study. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: this study analysed the reports of patients with ILI sent to the Healthcare company from 17 March to 17 April 2020 by their GPs or FP and subsequently classified into: redundant reports (people already known to the healthcare company as confirmed or probable case COVID-19); reports inconsistent with ILI criteria (patients not known to APSS as probable/confirmed case; without ILI criteria); appropriate reports (patients not known to APSS as probable/confirmed case; with ILI criteria). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: proportion of GPs and FPs who participated to report system reporting at least one patient, out of the total number of GPs and FPs; frequency of patients reported as ILI; time (in days) to manage reported patients. The cumulative weekly rate of "non-redundant" (not already known to APSS as probable/confirmed case) reports per thousand inhabitants was also calculated. RESULTS: over 80% of GPs and FPs voluntary participated into the reporting system of patients with COVID-19 clinical criteria. Overall, 4,270 patients were reported; of these, 2,865 (67%) were not known to APSS as probable/confirmed case. Response time in days decrease progressively during the period of activity (from a mean of 6 days to 0.4 days during the 12th and 16th week of 2020, respectively). The cumulative weekly rate of client reports which were not already known as probable or confirmed cases (per 1,000 population) ranges from 3.54 to 6.84 cases in the 12th and 16th week, respectively. Among the 4,270 reports, 1,471 patients considered possible COVID-19 cases were identified due to the presence of ILI symptoms, even in the absence of a swab or a positive history for close contact with COVID-19 case. From the epidemiological investigation into the 1,471 possible cases, 2,514 close contacts were identified and quarantined at home. Of the 2,514 close contacts, 127 (5.05%) people developed symptoms during quarantine. CONCLUSIONS: the integration among primary care, GPs and FPS, and the Department of Prevention could be an element of success in the management of the COVID-19 emergency and in the return to a normal phase. However, further assessments are required on the effectiveness and impact of the adopted model, especially in relation to the exit from phase 1 and phase 2 of the pandemic emergency.


Subject(s)
/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control/organization & administration , Intersectoral Collaboration , Pandemics , Primary Health Care/organization & administration , Public Health Administration , Adult , Child , Contact Tracing , Disease Management , Female , General Practice , Humans , Interdisciplinary Communication , Italy , Male , Pediatrics
7.
J Pediatr Rehabil Med ; 13(4): 453-455, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1067636

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has reminded us that, if of nothing else, we live in a globalized community. Enthusiasm for evidenced-based medical knowledge is also contagious. Just as the incidence of SARS-CoV-2, the associated coronavirus, has had a borderless impact on global public health, so too neural tube defects have widespread significance. Previously, the concept of "blue marble health" was introduced as a policy framework to illustrate trends in the geographic distribution of health disparities affecting at-risk populations that live, not only in low-income countries, but also in pockets of the populace in wealthier nations. Subsequently, the Spina Bifida Association's Collaborative Care Network, through a cooperative agreement with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, recently produced the "Guidelines for the Care of People with Spina Bifida." While language differences, immigration, cultural beliefs, acculturation, local resources and social determinants of health, must be taken into account when these guidelines are implemented across the globe, they could not come at a more suitable time. The current digital age, as well as open access to this special issue, will ensure their ongoing wide distribution.


Subject(s)
/epidemiology , Disease Management , Guidelines as Topic , Longevity , Pandemics , Quality of Life , Spinal Dysraphism/epidemiology , Global Health , Humans , Spinal Dysraphism/therapy
9.
Curr Opin Ophthalmol ; 32(2): 75-82, 2021 Mar 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1062919

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The current article reviews the impact of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic on the delivery of ophthalmic, and specifically, glaucoma care. RECENT FINDINGS: Literature from the review period includes case series demonstrating the presence of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 RNA in the conjunctival secretions of patients with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19. The global ophthalmology community published reports outlining the enhanced infection control measures undertaken by different institutions around the world to mitigate transmission of the novel coronavirus. Telemedicine has been increasingly implemented in glaucoma practices to reduce in-office patient volume. New data regarding the efficacy and feasibility of tools for home monitoring of intraocular pressure, virtual visual field testing, and remote disc photography are reviewed. SUMMARY: COVID-19 has posed a global public health threat due to the severity of its contagion and associated morbidity and mortality. Glaucoma specialists have responded to the pandemic with innovative modifications to reduce viral transmission and optimize patient and staff safety in the office and operating room. The role of teleglaucoma has expanded and will continue to evolve as remote diagnostic devices undergo further refinement and validation.


Subject(s)
/epidemiology , Disease Management , Glaucoma/therapy , Ophthalmology/methods , Pandemics , Telemedicine/methods , Comorbidity , Glaucoma/epidemiology , Humans
10.
Front Immunol ; 11: 604944, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1058416

ABSTRACT

Hypoxia and inflammation often coincide in pathogenic conditions such as acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and chronic lung diseases, which are significant contributors to morbidity and mortality for the general population. For example, the recent global outbreak of Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has placed viral infection-induced ARDS under the spotlight. Moreover, chronic lung disease ranks the third leading cause of death in the United States. Hypoxia signaling plays a diverse role in both acute and chronic lung inflammation, which could partially be explained by the divergent function of downstream target pathways such as adenosine signaling. Particularly, hypoxia signaling activates adenosine signaling to inhibit the inflammatory response in ARDS, while in chronic lung diseases, it promotes inflammation and tissue injury. In this review, we discuss the role of adenosine at the interphase of hypoxia and inflammation in ARDS and chronic lung diseases, as well as the current strategy for therapeutic targeting of the adenosine signaling pathway.


Subject(s)
Adenosine/metabolism , Hypoxia/metabolism , Inflammation/metabolism , Acute Lung Injury/etiology , Acute Lung Injury/metabolism , Acute Lung Injury/pathology , Acute Lung Injury/therapy , Disease Management , Disease Susceptibility , Humans , Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1/metabolism , Inflammation/etiology , Molecular Targeted Therapy , Receptors, Purinergic P1/metabolism , /metabolism , /therapy , Signal Transduction
11.
J Med Internet Res ; 23(1): e25652, 2021 01 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1054958

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: A reduction in the number of face-to-face medical examinations conducted for patients with noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic has led to health care professionals quickly adopting different strategies to communicate with and monitor their patients. Such strategies include the increased use of digital health tools. However, patient preferences, privacy concerns, a lack of regulations, overregulation, and insufficient evidence on the efficacy of digital health tools may have hampered the potential positive benefits of using such tools to manage NCDs. OBJECTIVE: This viewpoint aims to discuss the views of an advisory board of patient and caregiver association members. Specifically, we aim to present this advisory board's view on the role of digital health tools in managing patients with NCDs during and after the COVID-19 pandemic, and to identify future directions based on patients' perspectives. METHODS: As an initiative under the NCD Partnership (PARTners in Ncds Engage foR building Strategies to improve Healthy ageing In Patients) model of Upjohn, a web-based advisory board of patient and caregiver advocates was held on July 28, 2020, to bring together key stakeholders from public and private sectors. RESULTS: The following key themes emerged: (1) technology developers should understand that the goals of patients may differ from those of health care professionals and other stakeholders; (2) patients, health care professionals, caregivers, and other end users need to be involved in the development of digital health tools at the earliest phase possible, to guarantee usability, efficacy, and adoption; (3) digital health tools must be better tailored to people with complex conditions, such as multimorbidity, older age, and cognitive or sensory impairment; and (4) some patients do not want or are unable to use digital health care tools, so adequate alternatives should always be available. CONCLUSIONS: There was consensus that public-private partnership models, such as the Upjohn NCD Partnership, can be effective models that foster innovation by integrating multiple perspectives (eg, patients' perspectives) into the design, development, and implementation of digital and nondigital health tools, with the main overall objective of improving the life of patients with NCDs.


Subject(s)
/epidemiology , Caregivers/psychology , Delivery of Health Care/methods , Disease Management , Noncommunicable Diseases/therapy , Patient Satisfaction/statistics & numerical data , Telemedicine/methods , Age Factors , Aged , Humans , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Privacy
12.
BMJ Open ; 11(1): e047016, 2021 01 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1050403

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To describe the characteristics, clinical management and outcomes of patients with COVID-19 at district hospitals. DESIGN: A descriptive observational cross-sectional study. SETTING: District hospitals (4 in metro and 4 in rural health services) in the Western Cape, South Africa. District hospitals were small (<150 beds) and led by family physicians. PARTICIPANTS: All patients who presented to the hospitals' emergency centre and who tested positive for COVID-19 between March and June 2020. PRIMARY AND SECONDARY OUTCOME MEASURES: Source of referral, presenting symptoms, demographics, comorbidities, clinical assessment and management, laboratory turnaround time, clinical outcomes, factors related to mortality, length of stay and location. RESULTS: 1376 patients (73.9% metro, 26.1% rural). Mean age 46.3 years (SD 16.3), 58.5% females. The majority were self-referred (71%) and had comorbidities (67%): hypertension (41%), type 2 diabetes (25%), HIV (14%) and overweight/obesity (19%). Assessment of COVID-19 was mild (49%), moderate (18%) and severe (24%). Test turnaround time (median 3.0 days (IQR 2.0-5.0 days)) was longer than length of stay (median 2.0 day (IQR 2.0-3.0)). The most common treatment was oxygen (41%) and only 0.8% were intubated and ventilated. Overall mortality was 11%. Most were discharged home (60%) and only 9% transferred to higher levels of care. Increasing age (OR 1.06 (95% CI 1.04 to 1.07)), male (OR 2.02 (95% CI 1.37 to 2.98)), overweight/obesity (OR 1.58 (95% CI 1.02 to 2.46)), type 2 diabetes (OR 1.84 (95% CI 1.24 to 2.73)), HIV (OR 3.41 (95% CI 2.06 to 5.65)), chronic kidney disease (OR 5.16 (95% CI 2.82 to 9.43)) were significantly linked with mortality (p<0.05). Pulmonary diseases (tuberculosis (TB), asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, post-TB structural lung disease) were not associated with increased mortality. CONCLUSION: District hospitals supported primary care and shielded tertiary hospitals. Patients had high levels of comorbidities and similar clinical pictures to that reported elsewhere. Most patients were treated as people under investigation. Mortality was comparable to similar settings and risk factors identified.


Subject(s)
/diagnosis , /therapy , Hospitals, District/statistics & numerical data , /genetics , Adult , Cause of Death , Comorbidity , Cross-Sectional Studies , Disease Management , Emergency Service, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Logistic Models , Male , Middle Aged , Oxygen Inhalation Therapy , Patient Discharge , Referral and Consultation , Respiration, Artificial , South Africa/epidemiology , Symptom Assessment , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome
13.
Iran J Kidney Dis ; 1(1): 1-9, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1044989

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease (COVID-19), declared as a pandemic has affected millions of people and caused unprecedented number of death. The disease is caused by a severe acute respiratory syndrome related coronaviruses-2 virus which enters cells by binding with the host angiotensin converting enzyme-2 and CD147 protein. Among COVID-19 patients admitted to a hospital, hypertension, diabetes and obesity are the most common co-morbidities. A majority of COVID-19 hospitalized patients are found to have proteinuria and hematuria which is associated with higher risk of in-hospital mortality. Studies have reported high incidence of acute kidney injury (AKI) among COVID-19 patients admitted to hospital (10 to 43%) and intensive care unit (43-75%). These patients with AKI have much higher need for mechanical ventilation, vasopressor use and critical care. In addition, proportion of patients with AKI who require renal replacement (RRT) therapy is greatly increased. Acute tubular injury, cytokine storm induced systemic inflammatory response, endothelial injury and dysfunction are the main mechanisms of AKI. In addition, direct viral invasion of tubules, lymphocytic infiltration and complement mediated (C5b- 9) related injury is also seen. Mortality risk among patients with AKI and those in need of RRT is greatly amplified. Appropriate timing and choice of RRT for these patients is not well defined but will need to take in account the clinical condition, anticipation of their clinical course and availability of dialysis resources. Risk of AKI and death is also increased among kidney recipients and patients with chronic kidney disease.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/epidemiology , Critical Care/methods , Disease Management , Glomerular Filtration Rate/physiology , Kidney/physiopathology , Pandemics , Acute Kidney Injury/physiopathology , Acute Kidney Injury/therapy , Humans
15.
Curr Oncol ; 27(5): e512-e515, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1024676

ABSTRACT

Sarcoma treatment during the covid-19 pandemic is a new challenge. This patient population is often immunocompromised and potentially more susceptible to viral complications. Government guidelines highlight the need to minimize patient exposure to unnecessary hospital visits. However, those guidelines lack practical recommendations on ways to manage triage and diagnosis expressly for new cancer patients. Furthermore, there are no reports on the efficiency of the guidelines. One of the main issues in treating musculoskeletal tumours is the complexity and variability of presentation. We offer a triage model, used in a quaternary-referral musculoskeletal oncology centre, that allows us to maintain an open pathway for referral of new patients while minimizing exposure risks. A multidisciplinary approach and analysis of existing investigations allow for a pre-clinic evaluation. The model identifies 3 groups of patients: ■ Patients with suspected high-grade malignancy, or benign cases with aggressive features, both in need of further evaluation in the clinic and prompt treatment■ Patients with low-grade malignancy, and benign cases whose treatment is not urgent, that are managed during the pandemic by telemedicine, with reassurance and information about their illness■ Patients who can be managed by their local medical professionals In comparison to a pre-pandemic period, that approach resulted in a higher ratio of malignant-to-benign conditions for new patients seen in the clinic (3:4 vs. 1:3 respectively), thus using available resources more efficiently and prioritizing patients with suspected high-grade malignancy. We believe that this triage system could be applied in other surgical oncology fields during a pandemic.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Bone Neoplasms/therapy , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Practice Guidelines as Topic/standards , Soft Tissue Neoplasms/therapy , Telemedicine/methods , Triage/standards , Bone Neoplasms/virology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Disease Management , Humans , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Risk Management , Soft Tissue Neoplasms/virology
16.
Curr Oncol ; 27(3): e313-e317, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1024671

ABSTRACT

Background: The emergence of covid-19 has the potential to change the way in which the health care system can accommodate various patient populations and might affect patients with non-covid-19 problems. The Quebec Lung Cancer Network, which oversees thoracic oncology services in the province of Quebec under the direction of the Ministère de la Santé et des Services sociaux, convened to develop recommendations to deal with the potential disruption of services in thoracic oncology in the province of Quebec. The summary provided here has been adapted from the original document posted on the Programme québécois du cancer Web site at: https://www.msss.gouv.qc.ca/professionnels/documents/coronavirus-2019-ncov/PJ1_Recommandations_oncologie-thoracique-200415.pdf. Methods: Plans to optimize the health care system and potentially to prioritize services were discussed with respect to various levels of activity. For each level-of-activity scenario, suggestions were made for the services and treatments to prioritize and for those that might have to be postponed, as well as for potential alternatives to care. Results: The principal recommendation is that the cancer centre executive committee and the multidisciplinary tumour board always try to find a solution to maintain standard-of-care therapy for all patients with thoracic tumours, using novel approaches to treatment and the adoption of a network approach to care, as needed. Conclusions: The effect of the covid-19 pandemic on the health care system remains unpredictable and requires that cancer teams unite and offer the most efficient and innovative therapies to all patients under the various conditions that might be forced upon them.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Agents/administration & dosage , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/therapy , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Lung Neoplasms/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Radiotherapy , Small Cell Lung Carcinoma/therapy , Thoracic Surgical Procedures , Triage , Administration, Oral , Antineoplastic Agents/therapeutic use , Betacoronavirus , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/diagnosis , Disease Management , Humans , Lung Neoplasms/diagnosis , Mediastinoscopy , Medical Oncology , Molecular Diagnostic Techniques , Neoplasm Staging , Pandemics , Quebec/epidemiology , Radiosurgery , Small Cell Lung Carcinoma/diagnosis , Thoracoscopy
20.
Endocrine ; 71(2): 273-280, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1014226

ABSTRACT

With most global healthcare resources focused on COVID-19, altered resource allocation is disrupting the continuum of care for chronic endocrine conditions, including acromegaly. In order to assess the effects of COVID-19 on care of patients with acromegaly, we conducted an international online survey of endocrinologists. The questionnaire was drafted by a Steering Committee of acromegaly experts and covered both respondent demographics, contact and communication with patients, and patient care. Respondent awareness was generated through social media campaigns and the survey completed online using Google forms. The majority of endocrinologists who responded (N = 84) were based in Europe (67.9%) and were female (58.3%). Slightly more than half of respondents worked in a specialized pituitary center (52.4%) and a large minority cared for more than 50 acromegaly patients (47.6%). Most respondents (85.7%) indicated surgery was their first-line treatment, with only 14.3% indicating medical therapy as a first-choice treatment option. One-third (33.3%) of respondents reported having delayed a planned surgery due to a lack of COVID-19 testing provision and 54.8% due to a lack of surgical provision; 19.1% indicated that a lack of personal protective equipment had reduced their ability to treat patients with acromegaly. Just 21.4% of respondents reported no negative effects from the pandemic on diagnostic practice patterns, and just 19.1% reported no negative effect on patient follow-up practices. Many respondents (55.9%) indicated that remote methods had improved their ability to communicate with their patients and 69.0% indicated that they would continue to use methods of consultation necessitated by the COVID-19 pandemic. Our data suggest the COVID-19 pandemic is substantially affecting the care of acromegaly. However, these results also suggest that endocrinologists are embracing aspects of the 'new normal' to create a novel continuum of care better suited to the presumed post-COVID-19 environment. The goal of these changes must be both to improve care while shielding patients from more severe involvement in concomitant acute illnesses such COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Acromegaly/diagnosis , Acromegaly/therapy , Communicable Disease Control , Disease Management , Health Care Surveys , Humans , Pandemics , Personal Protective Equipment
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL