Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 267
Filter
1.
Sci Rep ; 12(1): 19944, 2022 Nov 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2133605

ABSTRACT

Due to the shortage of personal protective equipment (PPE) during the COVID-19 pandemic, the interest and demand for sterilization devices to reuse PPE has increased. For reuse of face masks, they must be effectively decontaminated of potential infectious agents without compromising its filtration ability during sterilization. In this study, we utilized an atmospheric pressure pulsed dielectric barrier discharge (DBD), combined with nebulized liquid microdroplets to generate plasma-activated mist (PAM). MS2 and T4 bacteriophages were used to conduct the decontamination tests on two types of N95 respirators. Results showed at least a 2-log reduction of MS2 and T4 on N95 respirators treated in one cycle with 7.8% hydrogen peroxide PAM and at least a 3-log reduction treated in 10% hydrogen peroxide PAM. In addition, it was found that there was no significant degradation in filtration efficiency of N95 respirators (3M 1860 and 1804) treated in 10% hydrogen peroxide PAM found after 20 cycles. In terms of re-useability of masks after treatment as determined, it was shown that the elastic straps of 3M 1804 were fragmented after 20 treatment cycles rendering them unusable, while the straps of 3M 1860 were not negatively affected even after 20 disinfection cycles.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Respiratory Protective Devices , Viruses , Humans , N95 Respirators , Disinfection/methods , Water , Bacteriophage T4 , Hydrogen Peroxide , Pandemics
2.
PLoS One ; 17(11): e0268863, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2112689

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The reprocessing of daily used medical devices is often inadequate, making them a potential source of infection. In addition, there are usually no consistent and technically standardized procedures available for this purpose. Hence, the aim of this study is to analyze the bacterial contamination and the effectiveness of Ultraviolet light-based (UV light-based) reprocessing of daily used medical devices. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Six different everyday medical devices (20 each; stethoscopes, tourniquets, bandage scissors, reflex hammers, tuning forks, and nystagmus glasses) were tested for bacterial contamination. All medical devices were then exposed to UV-C light for 25 seconds. Medical devices with a smooth surface were pre-cleaned with a water-based wipe. Contact samples were taken before and after reprocessing. RESULTS: Immediately after clinical use, 104 of 120 contact samples showed an average bacterial contamination of 44.8±64.3 colony forming units (CFU) (0-300 CFU), also including potentially pathogenic bacteria. Two further culture media were completely overgrown with potentially pathogenic bacteria. The stethoscopes were found to have the highest average contamination of 90±91.6 CFU. After reprocessing, 118 of 120 samples were sterile, resulting in an average residual contamination of 0.02±0.1 CFU in two samples, whereby only bacteria of the ordinary skin flora were found. CONCLUSION: The present study shows the potentially clinically relevant bacterial contamination of everyday used medical devices. The reprocessing method tested here using UV light appears to be a suitable method for disinfection, especially for objects that up to now have been difficult to disinfect or cannot be disinfected in a standardized manner.


Subject(s)
Equipment Contamination , Ultraviolet Rays , Equipment Contamination/prevention & control , Disinfection/methods , Bacteria , Drug Contamination
3.
Sci Rep ; 12(1): 18640, 2022 Nov 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2106472

ABSTRACT

Disinfection eliminates pathogenic microorganisms and ensures a biosafe environment for human beings. The rapid spread of COVID-19 is challenging traditional disinfection methods in terms of reducing harmful side effects and conducting faster processes. Spraying large-scale chemical disinfectants is harmful to individuals and the environment, while UV lamp and light-emitting diode (LED) disinfection still requires a long exposure time due to the low irradiance and highly divergent beam characteristics. Given that a laser maintains a high irradiance over a long distance, we studied the effectiveness of lasers as a new disinfection method, and the results show the capability for ultrafast inactivation of SARS-CoV-2 virus with a 266 nm laser. This work confirms UV lasers as a good candidate for disinfection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Humans , Ultraviolet Rays , Disinfection/methods , Lasers , Virus Inactivation
7.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(21)2022 Oct 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2081863

ABSTRACT

In the context of ongoing and future pandemics, non-pharmaceutical interventions are critical in reducing viral infections and the emergence of new antigenic variants while the population reaches immunity to limit viral transmission. This study provides information on efficient and fast methods of disinfecting surfaces contaminated with different human coronaviruses (CoVs) in healthcare settings. The ability to disinfect three different human coronaviruses (HCoV-229E, MERS-CoV, and SARS-CoV-2) on dried surfaces with light was determined for a fully characterized pulsed-xenon ultraviolet (PX-UV) source. Thereafter, the effectiveness of this treatment to inactivate SARS-CoV-2 was compared to that of conventional low-pressure mercury UVC lamps by using equivalent irradiances of UVC wavelengths. Under the experimental conditions of this research, PX-UV light completely inactivated the CoVs tested on solid surfaces since the infectivity of the three CoVs was reduced up to 4 orders of magnitude by PX-UV irradiation, with a cumulated dose of as much as 21.162 mJ/cm2 when considering all UV wavelengths (5.402 mJ/cm2 of just UVC light). Furthermore, continuous irradiation with UVC light was less efficient in inactivating SARS-CoV-2 than treatment with PX-UV light. Therefore, PX-UV light postulates as a promising decontamination measure to tackle the propagation of future outbreaks of CoVs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Humans , Ultraviolet Rays , Xenon , Pandemics/prevention & control , Disinfection/methods
8.
Sci Rep ; 12(1): 16664, 2022 Oct 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2050544

ABSTRACT

The spread of SARS-CoV-2 infections and the severity of the coronavirus disease of 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic have resulted in the rapid development of medications, vaccines, and countermeasures to reduce viral transmission. Although new treatment strategies for preventing SARS-CoV-2 infection are available, viral mutations remain a serious threat to the healthcare community. Hence, medical devices equipped with virus-eradication features are needed to prevent viral transmission. UV-LEDs are gaining popularity in the medical field, utilizing the most germicidal UVC spectrum, which acts through photoproduct formation. Herein, we developed a portable and rechargeable medical device that can disinfect SARS-CoV-2 in less than 10 s by 99.9%, lasting 6 h. Using this device, we investigated the antiviral effect of UVC-LED (275 nm) against SARS-CoV-2 as a function of irradiation distance and exposure time. Irradiation distance of 10-20 cm, < 10 s exposure time, and UV doses of > 10 mJ/cm2 were determined optimal for SARS-CoV-2 elimination (≥ 99.99% viral reduction). The UVC-LED systems have advantages such as fast-stabilizing intensity and insensitivity to temperature, and may contribute to developing medical devices capable of containing SARS-CoV-2 infection. By demonstrating SARS-CoV-2 inactivation with very short-term UVC-LED irradiation, our study may suggest guidelines for securing a safer medical environment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Antiviral Agents , COVID-19/prevention & control , Disinfection/methods , Humans , Pandemics , Ultraviolet Rays , Virus Inactivation/radiation effects
9.
Appl Environ Microbiol ; 88(19): e0122122, 2022 Oct 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2038232

ABSTRACT

The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of UV technology for virus disinfection to allow FFR reuse. UV is a proven decontamination tool for microbial pathogens, including the SARS-CoV-2 virus. Research findings suggest that the impacts of UV-C treatment on FFR material degradation should be confirmed using microbial surrogates in addition to the commonly performed abiotic particle testing. This study used the surrogates, E. coli and MS-2 bacteriophage, as they bracket the UV response of SARS-CoV-2. Lower log inactivation was observed on FFRs than predicted by aqueous-based UV dose-response data for MS-2 bacteriophage and E. coli. In addition, the dose-response curves did not follow the trends commonly observed with aqueous data for E. coli and MS-2. The dose-response curves for the respirators in this study had a semicircle shape, where the inactivation reached a peak and then decreased. This decrease in UV inactivation is thought to be due to the degradation of the fibers of the FFR and allows for more viral and bacterial cells to wash through the layers of the respirator. This degradation phenomenon was observed at UV doses at and above 2,000 mJ/cm2. Results have demonstrated that FFR materials yield various results in terms of effective disinfection in experiments conducted on KN95 and N95 face respirators. The highest inactivation for both surrogates was observed with the KN95 respirator made by Purism, yielding 3 and 2.75 log inactivation for E. coli and MS-2 at UV doses of 1,500 mJ/cm2. The KN95 made by Anboruo yielded the lowest inactivation for MS-2 at 0.75 log when exposed to 1,000 mJ/cm2. To further test the degradation theory, experiments used a collimated beam device to test the hypothesis further that degradation is occurring at and above UV doses of 1,500 mJ/cm2. The experiment aimed to determine the effect of "predosing" a respirator with UV before inoculating the respirator with MS-2. In this test, quantification of the penetrated irradiance value and the ability of each layer to retain MS-2 were quantified. The results of the experiments varied from the intact FFR degradation experiments but displayed some data to support the degradation theory. IMPORTANCE Research suggests degradation of FFR materials at high UV doses is important. There appears to be a peak inactivation dose at approximately 1,500 mJ/cm2. The subsequent dose increases appear to have the reverse effect on inactivation values; these trends have shown true with both the N95 and KN95-Purism respirators.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Disinfection , COVID-19/prevention & control , Decontamination/methods , Disinfection/methods , Escherichia coli , Humans , N95 Respirators , SARS-CoV-2 , Ultraviolet Rays , Ventilators, Mechanical
10.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(17)2022 Aug 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2023688

ABSTRACT

In dental clinics, the infections may be acquired through contaminated devices, air, and water. Aerosolized water may contain bacteria, grown into the biofilm of dental unit waterlines (DUWLs). We evaluated a disinfection method based on water osmosis and chlorination with chlorine dioxide (O-CD), applied to DUWL of five dental clinics. Municipal water was chlorinated with O-CD device before feeding all DUWLs. Samplings were performed on water/air samples in order to research total microbial counts at 22-37 °C, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Legionella spp., and chlorine values. Water was collected from the taps, spittoons, and air/water syringes. Air was sampled before, during, and after 15 min of aerosolizing procedure. Legionella and P. aeruginosa resulted as absent in all water samples, which presented total microbial counts almost always at 0 CFU/mL. Mean values of total chlorine ranged from 0.18-0.23 mg/L. Air samples resulted as free from Legionella spp. and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Total microbial counts decreased from the pre-aerosolizing (mean 2.1 × 102 CFU/m3) to the post-aerosolizing samples (mean 1.5 × 10 CFU/m3), while chlorine values increased from 0 to 0.06 mg/L. O-CD resulted as effective against the biofilm formation in DUWLs. The presence of residual activity of chlorine dioxide also allowed the bacteria reduction from air, at least at one meter from the aerosolizing source.


Subject(s)
Disinfection , Legionella , Bacteria , Biofilms , Chlorine/pharmacology , Chlorine Compounds , Colony Count, Microbial , Dental Equipment , Disinfection/methods , Equipment Contamination/prevention & control , Osmosis , Oxides , Pseudomonas aeruginosa , Water , Water Microbiology
11.
Lett Appl Microbiol ; 75(6): 1639-1644, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2019532

ABSTRACT

This study aimed to evaluate the performance of accelerated hydrogen peroxide® wipes (HPW) for decontamination of the chimpanzee adenovirus AZD1222 vaccine strain used in the production of recombinant COVID-19 vaccine in a pharmaceutical industry. Two matrices were tested on stainless-steel (SS) and low-density-polyethylene (LDP) surfaces: formulated recombinant COVID-19 vaccine (FCV) and active pharmaceutical ingredient (API). The samples were spiked, dried and the initial inoculum, possible residue effect (RE) and titre reduction after disinfection with HPW were determined. No RE was observed. The disinfection procedure with HPW resulted in complete decontamination the of AZD1222 adenovirus strain in FCV (≥7·46 and ≥7·49 log10 infectious unit [IFU] ml-1 for SS and LDP carriers respectively) and API (≥8·79 and ≥8·78 log10 IFU ml-1 for SS and LDP carriers respectively). In conclusion, virucidal activity of HPW was satisfactory against the AZD1222 adenovirus strain and can be a good option for disinfection processes of SS and LPD surfaces in pharmaceutical industry facilities during recombinant COVID-19 vaccine production. This procedure is simple and can be also applied on safety unit cabins and sampling bags made of LDP as well.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Disinfectants , Humans , Hydrogen Peroxide/pharmacology , Disinfectants/pharmacology , ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 , COVID-19 Vaccines , Adenoviridae/genetics , Decontamination/methods , COVID-19/prevention & control , Disinfection/methods , Stainless Steel , Drug Industry
12.
Sci Rep ; 12(1): 14545, 2022 08 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2016826

ABSTRACT

There is an urgent need for evidence-based engineering controls to reduce transmission of SARS-CoV-2, which causes COVID-19. Although ultraviolet (UV) light is known to inactivate coronaviruses, conventional UV lamps contain toxic mercury and emit wavelengths (254 nm) that are more hazardous to humans than krypton chlorine excimer lamps emitting 222 nm (UV222). Here we used culture and molecular assays to provide the first dose response for SARS-CoV-2 solution exposed to UV222. Culture assays (plaque infectivity to Vero host) demonstrated more than 99.99% disinfection of SARS-CoV-2 after a UV222 dose of 8 mJ/cm2 (pseudo-first order rate constant = 0.64 cm2/mJ). Immediately after UV222 treatment, RT-qPCR assays targeting the nucleocapsid (N) gene demonstrated ~ 10% contribution of N gene damage to disinfection kinetics, and an ELISA assay targeting the N protein demonstrated no contribution of N protein damage to disinfection kinetics. Molecular results suggest other gene and protein damage contributed more to disinfection. After 3 days incubation with host cells, RT-qPCR and ELISA kinetics of UV222 treated SARS-CoV-2 were similar to culture kinetics, suggesting validity of using molecular assays to measure UV disinfection without culture. These data provide quantitative disinfection kinetics which can inform implementation of UV222 for preventing transmission of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Disinfection , COVID-19/prevention & control , Chlorine , Disinfection/methods , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Ultraviolet Rays
13.
J Virol Methods ; 309: 114610, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2007918

ABSTRACT

Inactivation of human respiratory viruses in air and on surfaces is important to control their spread. Exposure to germicidal ultraviolet (UV-C) light damages viral nucleic acid rendering them non-infectious. Most of the recent viral inactivation studies have not considered potential artifacts caused by interactions between UV-C light and culture media used to suspend and deposit virus on surfaces. We show that the reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS) form when commonly used virus culture media is exposed to 265 nm irradiation from light emitting diodes (LEDs) at UV-C doses (4 or 40 mJ/cm2) commonly considered to achieve multiple log-inactivation of virus. Surface viral inactivation values were enhanced from 0.49 to 2.92 log10 of viruses in DMEM, EMEM or EMEM-F as compared to absence of culture media (only suspended in Tris-buffer). The mechanisms responsible for the enhanced surface inactivate is hypothesized to involve photo-activation of vitamins and dyes present in the culture media, deposited with the virus on surfaces to be disinfected, which produce ROS and RNS. Given the rapidly growing research and commercial markets for UV-C disinfecting devices, there is a need to establish surface disinfecting protocols that avoid viral inactivation enhancement artifacts associated with selection and use of common cell culture media in the presence of UV-C light. This study addresses this weak link in the literature and highlights that inadequate selection of virus suspension media may cause a bias (i.e., over-estimation) for the UV-C dosages required for virus inactivation on surfaces.


Subject(s)
Nucleic Acids , Viruses , Bias , Cell Culture Techniques , Coloring Agents , Culture Media , Disinfection/methods , Humans , Nitrogen , Oxygen , Reactive Oxygen Species , Ultraviolet Rays , Virus Inactivation/radiation effects , Vitamins
14.
Int J Biol Macromol ; 221: 71-82, 2022 Nov 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2007741

ABSTRACT

The spreading of coronavirus from contacting surfaces and aerosols created a pandemic around the world. To prevent the transmission of SARS-CoV-2 virus and other contagious microbes, disinfection of contacting surfaces is necessary. In this study, a disinfection box equipped with infrared (IR) radiation heating and ultraviolet-C (UV-C) radiation is designed and tested for its disinfection ability against pathogenic bacteria and SARS-CoV-2 spike protein. The killing of a Gram-positive, namely, S. aureus and a Gram-negative namely, S. typhi bacteria was studied followed by the inactivation of the spike protein. The experimental parameters were optimized using a statistical tool. For the broad-spectrum antibacterial activity, the optimum condition was holding at 65.61 °C for 13.54 min. The killing of the bacterial pathogen occurred via rupturing the cell walls as depicted by electron microscopy. Further, the unfolding of SARS-CoV-2 spike protein and RNase A was studied under IR and UV-C irradiations at the aforesaid optimized condition. The unfolding of both the proteins was confirmed by changes in the secondary structure, particularly an increase in ß-sheets and a decrease in α-helixes. Remarkably, the higher penetration depth of IR waves up to subcutaneous tissue resulted in lower optimum disinfection temperature, <70 °C in vogue. Thus, the combined UV-C and IR radiation is effective in killing the pathogenic bacteria and denaturing the glycoproteins.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus , Humans , Disinfection/methods , SARS-CoV-2 , Staphylococcus aureus , Respiratory Aerosols and Droplets , Ultraviolet Rays
15.
PLoS One ; 17(8): e0273394, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2002332

ABSTRACT

The amount of medical waste, especially infusion bottles, is a problem for environmental pollution. Improper management of infusion bottle waste can have an impact on disease transmission. The medical waste treatment used high technology and high costs will be a financial burden, so simple and effective treatment innovations is needed. This study uses an experimental method of removing bacteria from infusion bottles using a mixture of water and Andoso soil as a solution for washing infusion bottle waste. The soil solution concentration used in washing was 45% with a contact time of 2 minutes. The experiment was carried out with two repetitions. The treatment effect on decreasing the number of bacteria using a multiple linear regression mathematical model. The results showed that the disinfection process of bacterial-contaminated infusion bottles using water required rinsing up to six times, whereas using 45% andosol soil solution only rinsed once. The effectiveness of the disinfection of infusion bottles contaminated with bacteria using soil solution reduces the number of bacteria by 98%.


Subject(s)
Medical Waste , Soil , Bacteria , Conservation of Natural Resources , Disinfection/methods , Water
16.
Sci Rep ; 12(1): 14438, 2022 08 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2000930

ABSTRACT

The lack of therapeutic options to fight Covid-19 has contributed to the current global pandemic. Despite the emergence of effective vaccines, development of broad-spectrum antiviral treatment remains a significant challenge, in which antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) may play a role, especially at early stages of infection. aPDT of the nares with methylene blue (MB) and non-thermal light has been successfully utilized to inactivate both bacterial and viral pathogens in the perioperative setting. Here, we investigated the effect of MB-aPDT to inactivate human betacoronavirus OC43 and SARS-CoV-2 in vitro and in a proof-of-principle COVID-19 clinical trial to test, in a variety of settings, the practicality, technical feasibility, and short-term efficacy of the method. aPDT yielded inactivation of up to 6-Logs in vitro, as measured by RT-qPCR and infectivity assay. From a photo-physics perspective, the in vitro results suggest that the response is not dependent on the virus itself, motivating potential use of aPDT for local destruction of SARS-CoV-2 and its variants. In the clinical trial we observed variable effects on viral RNA in nasal-swab samples as assessed by RT-qPCR attributed to aPDT-induced RNA fragmentation causing falsely-elevated counts. However, the viral infectivity in clinical nares swabs was reduced in 90% of samples and undetectable in 70% of samples. This is the first demonstration based on quantitative clinical viral infectivity measurements that MB-aPDT is a safe, easily delivered and effective front-line technique that can reduce local SARS-CoV-2 viral load.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Disinfection , Nose , Photochemotherapy , Anti-Infective Agents/adverse effects , Anti-Infective Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Disinfection/methods , Feasibility Studies , Humans , Methylene Blue/adverse effects , Methylene Blue/pharmacology , Nose/virology , Pandemics , RNA, Viral/analysis , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Treatment Outcome , Viral Load/drug effects
17.
Am J Infect Control ; 50(8): 906-908, 2022 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2000223

ABSTRACT

Using the Murine Hepatitis Virus (MHV) A59 coronavirus as a SARS-CoV-2 animal surrogate, we validated that methylene blue (MB) in combination with sunlight exposure is a robust, fast, and low-cost decontamination method for PPE that should be added to the toolbox of practical pandemic preparedness.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Methylene Blue , Animals , COVID-19/prevention & control , Disinfection/methods , Mice , Personal Protective Equipment , SARS-CoV-2 , Sunlight
18.
Am J Infect Control ; 50(8): 947-953, 2022 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2000206

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Ultraviolet germicidal irradiation (UVGI) technologies have emerged as a promising adjunct to manual cleaning, however, their potential to shorten cleaning times remains unexplored. METHODS: A <10-minute disinfection procedure was developed using a robotic UVGI platform. The efficacy and time to perform the UVGI procedure in a CT scan treatment room was compared with current protocols involving manual disinfection using biocides. For each intervention, environmental samples were taken at 12 locations in the room before and after disinfection on seven distinct occasions. RESULTS: The mean UVC dose at each sample location was found to be 13.01 ± 4.36 mJ/cm2, which exceeded published UVC thresholds for achieving log reductions of many common pathogens. Significant reductions in microbial burden were measured after both UVGI (P≤.001) and manual cleaning (P≤.05) conditions, with the UVGI procedure revealing the largest effect size (r = 0.603). DISCUSSION: These results support the hypothesis that automated deployments of UVGI technology can lead to germicidal performance that is comparable with, and potentially better than, current manual cleaning practices. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings provide early evidence that the incorporation of automated UVGI procedures into cleaning workflow could reduce turnaround times in radiology, and potentially other hospital settings.


Subject(s)
Radiology , Robotics , Disinfection/methods , Hospitals , Humans , Ultraviolet Rays
19.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(17)2022 Aug 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1997618

ABSTRACT

The emergence of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic highlighted the importance of disinfection processes in health safety. Textiles and footwear have been identified as vectors for spreading infections. Therefore, their disinfection can be crucial to controlling pathogens' dissemination. The present work aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of a commercial disinfectant aerosolized by an ultrasonic nebulizer closet as an effective method for disinfecting textiles and footwear. The disinfection was evaluated in three steps: suspension tests; nebulization in a 0.08 m3 closet; nebulization in the upscaled 0.58 m3 closet. The disinfection process of textiles and footwear was followed by the use of bacteriophages, bacterial spores, and bacterial cells. The disinfection in the 0.58 m3 closet was efficient for textiles (4 log reduction) when bacteriophage Lambda, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Bacillus subtilis were used. The footwear disinfection was achieved (4 log reduction) in the 0.08 m3 closet for Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. Disinfection in an ultrasonic nebulization closet has advantages such as being quick, not wetting, being efficient on porous surfaces, and is performed at room temperature. Ultrasonic nebulization disinfection in a closet proves to be useful in clothing and footwear stores to prevent pathogen transmission by the items' widespread handling.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Disinfection , Disinfection/methods , Humans , Nebulizers and Vaporizers , Textiles , Ultrasonics
20.
Sci Rep ; 12(1): 13260, 2022 08 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1996870

ABSTRACT

Immersive ultraviolet disinfection provides a chemical-free technology for safer textiles, surfaces, and public spaces by inactivating communicable pathogens. This study examined immersive UV disinfection, using a disinfection cabinet, of E. coli and MS2 that was inoculated on white cotton T-shirts. The impact that porous materials have on UV disinfection is poorly understood with the majority of previous surface disinfection research focusing on hard, smooth surfaces. Several approaches were used in this study to characterize the light dynamics within the disinfection cabinet including colorimetric dosimetry coupons, biodosimetry, and spectroradiometry. Micro and macro geometry of porous surfaces are important factors to consider when using immersive UV technologies. The geometry of the cabinet impacted the distribution of emitted UV light within the disinfection cabinet and the physical properties of a porous material, such as the woven pattern of cotton, both contribute to UV disinfection efficiency. This work identified that light distribution is crucial for immersive UV technologies as the delivered fluence was highly variable within the disinfection cabinet and resulted in a difference of several logs of reduction for adjacent areas of T-shirt samples. Other inoculated areas achieved upwards of 1-log reductions values for MS2 and upwards of 2-log reductions for E. coli.


Subject(s)
Disinfection , Levivirus , Disinfection/methods , Escherichia coli , Textiles , Ultraviolet Rays
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL