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2.
Clin Immunol ; 232: 108852, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1401324

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The majority of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) non-survivors meet the criteria for disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). Although timely monitoring of clotting hemorrhagic development during the natural course of COVID-19 is critical for understanding pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of the disease, however, limited data are available on the dynamic processes of inflammation/coagulopathy/fibrinolysis (ICF). METHODS: We monitored the dynamic progression of ICF in patients with moderate COVID-19. Out of 694 COVID-19 inpatients from 10 hospitals in Wenzhou, China, we selected 293 adult patients without comorbidities. These patients were divided into different daily cohorts according to the COVID-19 onset-time. Furthermore, data of 223 COVID-19 patients with comorbidities and 22 critical cases were analyzed. Retrospective data were extracted from electronic medical records. RESULTS: The virus-induced damages to pre-hospitalization patients triggered two ICF fluctuations during the 14-day course of the disease. C-reactive protein (CRP), fibrinogen, and D-dimer levels increased and peaked at day 5 (D) 5 and D9 during the 1st and 2nd fluctuations, respectively. The ICF activities were higher during the 2nd fluctuation. Although 12-day medication returned high CRP concentrations to normal and blocked fibrinogen increase, the D-dimer levels remained high on days 17 ±â€¯2 and 23 ±â€¯2 days of the COVID-19 course. Notably, although the oxygenation index, prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time were within the normal range in critical COVID-19 patients at administration, 86% of these patients had a D-dimer level > 500 µg/L. CONCLUSION: COVID-19 is linked with chronic DIC, which could be responsible for the progression of the disease. Understanding and monitoring ICF progression during COVID-19 can help clinicians in identifying the stage of the disease quickly and accurately and administering suitable treatment.


Subject(s)
Blood Coagulation/physiology , COVID-19/complications , Fibrinolysis/physiology , Inflammation/etiology , Inflammation/virology , Adult , Anticoagulants/pharmacology , Blood Coagulation/drug effects , Blood Coagulation Disorders/etiology , Blood Coagulation Disorders/metabolism , Blood Coagulation Disorders/pathology , Blood Coagulation Disorders/virology , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/pathology , China , Disease Progression , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/etiology , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/metabolism , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/pathology , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/virology , Female , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/metabolism , Fibrinogen/metabolism , Hemorrhage/etiology , Hemorrhage/pathology , Hemorrhage/virology , Humans , Inflammation/pathology , Male , Middle Aged , Prothrombin Time , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
3.
Front Immunol ; 12: 687534, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1295639

ABSTRACT

The clinical significance of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) in the context of infections has attracted attention since their first discovery in patients with syphilis. In fact, the recognition of aPL in patients with infections has been described in parallel to the understating of the syndrome. Since the first description of aPL-positive tests in three patients with COVID-19 diagnosed in January 2020 in Wuhan, China, a large number of studies took part in the ongoing debate on SARS-2-Cov 2 induced coagulopathy, and many following reports speculated a potential role for aPL. In order to get further insights on the effective role of detectable aPL in the pro-thrombotic status observed in COVID-19 patients, we performed an observational age-sex controlled study to compare the aPL profile of hospitalized patients with COVID with those observed in a) patients with thrombotic APS and b) patients with cultural/serologically-proved infections. Our data showed positive aPL testing in about half of the patients (53%) with COVID-19 and patients with other viral/bacterial infections (49%). However, aPL profile was different when comparing patients with overt APS and patients with aPL detected in the contest of infections. Caution is therefore required in the interpretation and generalization of the role of aPL s in the management of patients with COVID-19. Before introducing aPL testing as a part of the routine testing in patients with COVID-19, larger well-designed clinical studies are required. While the pro-thrombotic status in patients with COVID-19 is now unquestionable, different mechanisms other than aPL should be further investigated.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Antiphospholipid/blood , Antiphospholipid Syndrome/pathology , Bacterial Infections/pathology , COVID-19/pathology , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/pathology , Virus Diseases/pathology , Aged , Antibodies, Antiphospholipid/immunology , Antiphospholipid Syndrome/complications , Antiphospholipid Syndrome/immunology , Bacterial Infections/complications , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/immunology , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/virology , Female , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Virus Diseases/complications
4.
Virol J ; 18(1): 117, 2021 06 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1259206

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: To date, specific cytokines associated with development of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and extrapulmonary multiple organ dysfunction (MOD) in COVID-19 patients have not been systematically described. We determined the levels of inflammatory cytokines in patients with COVID-19 and their relationships with ARDS and extrapulmonary MOD. METHODS: The clinical and laboratory data of 94 COVID-19 patients with and without ARDS were analyzed. The levels of inflammatory cytokines (interleukin 6 [IL-6], IL-8, IL-10, and tumor necrosis factor α [TNF-α]) were measured on days 1, 3, and 5 following admission. Seventeen healthy volunteers were recruited as controls. Correlations in the levels of inflammatory cytokines with clinical and laboratory variables were analyzed, furthermore, we also explored the relationships of different cytokines with ARDS and extrapulmonary MOD. RESULTS: The ARDS group had higher serum levels of all 4 inflammatory cytokines than the controls, and these levels steadily increased after admission. The ARDS group also had higher levels of IL-6, IL-8, and IL-10 than the non-ARDS group, and the levels of these cytokines correlated significantly with coagulation parameters and disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). The levels of IL-6 and TNF-α correlated with the levels of creatinine and urea nitrogen, and were also higher in ARDS patients with acute kidney injury (AKI). All 4 inflammatory cytokines had negative correlations with PaO2/FiO2. IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α had positive correlations with the APACHE-II score. Relative to survivors, non-survivors had higher levels of IL-6 and IL-10 at admission, and increasing levels over time. CONCLUSIONS: The cytokine storm apparently contributed to the development of ARDS and extrapulmonary MOD in COVID-19 patients. The levels of IL-6, IL-8, and IL-10 correlated with DIC, and the levels of IL-6 and TNF-α were associated with AKI. Relative to survivors, patients who died within 28 days had increased levels of IL-6 and IL-10.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , Cytokine Release Syndrome/blood , Cytokines/blood , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/blood , Acute Kidney Injury/diagnosis , Aged , Blood Urea Nitrogen , COVID-19/pathology , Creatinine/blood , Cytokine Release Syndrome/diagnosis , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/blood , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/pathology , Female , Humans , Interleukin-10/blood , Interleukin-6/blood , Interleukin-8/blood , Male , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/pathology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/blood
5.
Biomolecules ; 11(5)2021 05 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1223942

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 is a member of the family of coronaviruses associated with severe outbreaks of respiratory diseases in recent decades and is the causative agent of the COVID-19 pandemic. The recognition by and activation of the innate immune response recruits neutrophils, which, through their different mechanisms of action, form extracellular neutrophil traps, playing a role in infection control and trapping viral, bacterial, and fungal etiological agents. However, in patients with COVID-19, activation at the vascular level, combined with other cells and inflammatory mediators, leads to thrombotic events and disseminated intravascular coagulation, thus leading to a series of clinical manifestations in cerebrovascular, cardiac, pulmonary, and kidney disease while promoting severe disease and mortality. Previous studies of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 have shown that elevated levels of markers specific for NETs, such as free DNA, MPO, and H3Cit, are strongly associated with the total neutrophil count; with acute phase reactants that include CRP, D-dimer, lactate dehydrogenase, and interleukin secretion; and with an increased risk of severe COVID-19. This study analyzed the interactions between NETs and the activation pathways involved in immunothrombotic processes in patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Extracellular Traps/metabolism , Thrombosis/immunology , Thrombosis/pathology , Biomarkers/metabolism , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Complement System Proteins/metabolism , Cytokine Release Syndrome/etiology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/pathology , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/etiology , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/pathology , Humans , Neutrophils/cytology , Neutrophils/immunology , Neutrophils/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Thrombosis/metabolism
6.
Exp Biol Med (Maywood) ; 246(6): 688-694, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-971191

ABSTRACT

Acute respiratory disease caused by a novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) has spread all over the world, since its discovery in 2019, Wuhan, China. This disease is called COVID-19 and already killed over 1 million people worldwide. The clinical symptoms include fever, dry cough, dyspnea, headache, dizziness, generalized weakness, vomiting, and diarrhea. Unfortunately, so far, there is no validated vaccine, and its management consists mainly of supportive care. Venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism are highly prevalent in patients suffering from severe COVID-19. In fact, a prothrombotic state seems to be present in most fatal cases of the disease. SARS-CoV-2 leads to the production of proinflammatory cytokines, causing immune-mediated tissue damage, disruption of the endothelial barrier, and uncontrolled thrombogenesis. Thrombin is the key regulator of coagulation and fibrin formation. In severe COVID-19, a dysfunctional of physiological anticoagulant mechanisms leads to a progressive increase of thrombin activity, which is associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome development and a poor prognosis. Protease-activated receptor type 1 (PAR1) is the main thrombin receptor and may represent an essential link between coagulation and inflammation in the pathophysiology of COVID-19. In this review, we discuss the potential role of PAR1 inhibition and regulation in COVID-19 treatment.


Subject(s)
Blood Coagulation/physiology , COVID-19/pathology , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/pathology , Receptor, PAR-1/metabolism , Thrombin/metabolism , Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , Blood Coagulation/drug effects , Blood Coagulation Factors/metabolism , COVID-19/drug therapy , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/drug therapy , Humans , Pulmonary Embolism/pathology , Pulmonary Embolism/prevention & control , Receptor, PAR-1/antagonists & inhibitors , Receptors, Cell Surface/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2 , Venous Thrombosis/pathology , Venous Thrombosis/prevention & control
7.
Biofactors ; 46(6): 927-933, 2020 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-966303

ABSTRACT

Recent articles report elevated markers of coagulation, endothelial injury, and microthromboses in lungs from deceased COVID-19 patients. However, there has been no discussion of what may induce intravascular coagulation. Platelets are critical in the formation of thrombi and their most potent trigger is platelet activating factor (PAF), first characterized by Demopoulos and colleagues in 1979. PAF is produced by cells involved in host defense and its biological actions bear similarities with COVID-19 disease manifestations. PAF can also stimulate perivascular mast cell activation, leading to inflammation implicated in severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). Mast cells are plentiful in the lungs and are a rich source of PAF and of inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-1ß and IL-6, which may contribute to COVID-19 and especially SARS. The histamine-1 receptor antagonist rupatadine was developed to have anti-PAF activity, and also inhibits activation of human mast cells in response to PAF. Rupatadine could be repurposed for COVID-19 prophylaxis alone or together with other PAF-inhibitors of natural origin such as the flavonoids quercetin and luteolin, which have antiviral, anti-inflammatory, and anti-PAF actions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Cyproheptadine/analogs & derivatives , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/prevention & control , Platelet Activating Factor/antagonists & inhibitors , Pulmonary Embolism/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/prevention & control , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Blood Platelets/drug effects , Blood Platelets/pathology , Blood Platelets/virology , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Cyproheptadine/therapeutic use , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/blood , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/pathology , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/virology , Gene Expression Regulation , Humans , Inflammation , Interleukin-1beta/genetics , Interleukin-1beta/metabolism , Interleukin-6/genetics , Interleukin-6/metabolism , Lung/drug effects , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , Luteolin/therapeutic use , Mast Cells/drug effects , Mast Cells/pathology , Mast Cells/virology , Platelet Activating Factor/genetics , Platelet Activating Factor/metabolism , Pulmonary Embolism/blood , Pulmonary Embolism/pathology , Pulmonary Embolism/virology , Quercetin/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/blood , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/pathology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/virology
8.
Front Immunol ; 11: 583373, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-902402

ABSTRACT

Coronaviruses (CoVs) are members of the genus Betacoronavirus and the Coronaviridiae family responsible for infections such as severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS), and more recently, coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19). CoV infections present mainly as respiratory infections that lead to acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). However, CoVs, such as COVID-19, also present as a hyperactivation of the inflammatory response that results in increased production of inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-1ß and its downstream molecule IL-6. The inflammasome is a multiprotein complex involved in the activation of caspase-1 that leads to the activation of IL-1ß in a variety of diseases and infections such as CoV infection and in different tissues such as lungs, brain, intestines and kidneys, all of which have been shown to be affected in COVID-19 patients. Here we review the literature regarding the mechanism of inflammasome activation by CoV infection, the role of the inflammasome in ARDS, ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI), and Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation (DIC) as well as the potential mechanism by which the inflammasome may contribute to the damaging effects of inflammation in the cardiac, renal, digestive, and nervous systems in COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
Caspase 1/metabolism , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/pathology , Inflammasomes/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Betacoronavirus/immunology , COVID-19 , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/pathology , Humans , Inflammation/pathology , Interleukin-1beta/metabolism , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/pathology , Ventilator-Induced Lung Injury/pathology
9.
Rev Med Virol ; 31(3): e2180, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-815926

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coagulopathy and thromboembolic events are common in Covid-19 patients and are poor prognostic factors. Controversy exists regarding the potential of anticoagulation (AC) to reduce mortality and incidence of thromboembolic events in Covid-19 patients. The current systematic review and meta-analysis investigated the association between anticoagulants and mortality in adult hospitalized COVID-19 patients using the available published non-randomized studies. METHODS: Google Scholar, PubMed, Scopus, the Cochrane Library and Clinical Trials.gov were searched for relevant studies. A meta-analysis of adjusted and unadjusted estimates was performed. The relative risk was used as a measure of effect. The random-effects model was used to pool estimates using the generic inverse variance method. RESULTS: Sixteen studies were included in the quantitative data synthesis. Results showed a statistically significant association between AC and mortality (RR = 0.56, 95% CI 0.36; 0.92, p = 0.02). Both therapeutic (Relative risk [RR] = 0.4, 95% CI 0.27; 0.57) and prophylactic AC (RR = 0.54, 95% CI 0.41; 0.71) were associated with lower risk of mortality. Pre-admission AC was not associated with mortality (RR = 0.84, 95% CI 0.49; 1.43, p > 0.05) while prophylactic AC was associated with higher risk of mortality compared to therapeutic AC (RR = 1.58, 95% CI 1.34; 1.87, p < 0.001). CONCLUSION: Findings support the association of AC with mortality in Covid-19 patients. The results, synthesized from mostly low-quality studies, show that prophylactic and therapeutic AC might reduce mortality in Covid-19 patients. Findings suggest that therapeutic doses might be associated with better survival compared to prophylactic doses.


Subject(s)
Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/drug therapy , Pulmonary Embolism/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/pathology , Case-Control Studies , Cohort Studies , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/blood , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/mortality , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/pathology , Drug Administration Schedule , Hospitalization , Humans , Odds Ratio , Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis/methods , Pulmonary Embolism/blood , Pulmonary Embolism/mortality , Pulmonary Embolism/pathology , Risk , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Survival Analysis , Treatment Outcome
10.
Rev Med Virol ; 31(3): e2177, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-815925

ABSTRACT

The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is a novel human respiratory viral infection that has rapidly progressed into a pandemic, causing significant morbidity and mortality. Blood clotting disorders and acute respiratory failure have surfaced as the major complications among the severe cases of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by SARS-CoV-2 infection. Remarkably, more than 70% of deaths related to COVID-19 are attributed to clotting-associated complications such as pulmonary embolism, strokes and multi-organ failure. These vascular complications have been confirmed by autopsy. This study summarizes the current understanding and explains the possible mechanisms of the blood clotting disorder, emphasizing the role of (1) hypoxia-related activation of coagulation factors like tissue factor, a significant player in triggering coagulation cascade, (2) cytokine storm and activation of neutrophils and the release of neutrophil extracellular traps and (3) immobility and ICU related risk factors.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , Cytokine Release Syndrome/genetics , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/genetics , Hypoxia/genetics , Pulmonary Embolism/genetics , Respiratory Insufficiency/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/blood , Cytokine Release Syndrome/pathology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/virology , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/blood , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/pathology , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/virology , Extracellular Traps/metabolism , Extracellular Traps/virology , Gene Expression Regulation , Humans , Hypoxia/blood , Hypoxia/pathology , Hypoxia/virology , Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1, alpha Subunit/blood , Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1, alpha Subunit/genetics , Interleukin-6/blood , Interleukin-6/genetics , Neutrophils/pathology , Neutrophils/virology , Pulmonary Embolism/blood , Pulmonary Embolism/pathology , Pulmonary Embolism/virology , Respiratory Insufficiency/blood , Respiratory Insufficiency/pathology , Respiratory Insufficiency/virology , SARS-CoV-2/growth & development , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Signal Transduction , Thromboplastin/genetics , Thromboplastin/metabolism
11.
Rev Med Virol ; 31(3): e2176, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-815924

ABSTRACT

The novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) has turned into a life-threatening pandemic disease (Covid-19). About 5% of patients with Covid-19 have severe symptoms including septic shock, acute respiratory distress syndrome, and the failure of several organs, while most of them have mild symptoms. Frequently, the kidneys are involved through direct or indirect mechanisms. Kidney involvement mainly manifests itself as proteinuria and acute kidney injury (AKI). The SARS-CoV-2-induced kidney damage is expected to be multifactorial; directly it can infect the kidney podocytes and proximal tubular cells and based on an angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) pathway it can lead to acute tubular necrosis, protein leakage in Bowman's capsule, collapsing glomerulopathy and mitochondrial impairment. The SARS-CoV-2-driven dysregulation of the immune responses including cytokine storm, macrophage activation syndrome, and lymphopenia can be other causes of the AKI. Organ interactions, endothelial dysfunction, hypercoagulability, rhabdomyolysis, and sepsis are other potential mechanisms of AKI. Moreover, lower oxygen delivery to kidney may cause an ischaemic injury. Understanding the fundamental molecular pathways and pathophysiology of kidney injury and AKI in Covid-19 is necessary to develop management strategies and design effective therapies.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/pathology , COVID-19/physiopathology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/pathology , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/pathology , Lymphopenia/pathology , Necrosis/pathology , Proteinuria/pathology , Sepsis/pathology , Acute Kidney Injury/immunology , Acute Kidney Injury/virology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/virology , Cytokines/genetics , Cytokines/immunology , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/immunology , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/virology , Host-Pathogen Interactions/genetics , Host-Pathogen Interactions/immunology , Humans , Kidney Tubules, Proximal/immunology , Kidney Tubules, Proximal/physiopathology , Lymphopenia/immunology , Lymphopenia/virology , Necrosis/immunology , Necrosis/virology , Podocytes/immunology , Podocytes/pathology , Proteinuria/immunology , Proteinuria/virology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Sepsis/immunology , Sepsis/virology , Serine Endopeptidases/genetics , Serine Endopeptidases/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology
12.
Int J Mol Med ; 46(3): 903-912, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-750592

ABSTRACT

The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS­CoV­2) is a novel ß coronavirus that is the etiological agent of the pandemic coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID­19) that at the time of writing (June 16, 2020) has infected almost 6 million people with some 450,000 deaths. These numbers are still rising daily. Most (some 80%) cases of COVID­19 infection are asymptomatic, a substantial number of cases (15%) require hospitalization and an additional fraction of patients (5%) need recovery in intensive care units. Mortality for COVID­19 infection appears to occur globally between 0.1 and 0.5% of infected patients although the frequency of lethality is significantly augmented in the elderly and in patients with other comorbidities. The development of acute respiratory distress syndrome and episodes of thromboembolism that may lead to disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) represent the primary causes of lethality during COVID­19 infection. Increasing evidence suggests that thrombotic diathesis is due to multiple derangements of the coagulation system including marked elevation of D­dimer that correlate negatively with survival. We propose here that the thromboembolic events and eventually the development of DIC provoked by SARS­CoV­2 infection may represent a secondary anti­phospholipid antibody syndrome (APS). We will apply both Baconian inductivism and Cartesian deductivism to prove that secondary APS is likely responsible for coagulopathy during the course of COVID­19 infection. Diagnostic and therapeutic implications of this are also discussed.


Subject(s)
Antiphospholipid Syndrome/pathology , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/pathology , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Thromboembolism/pathology , Thrombosis/pathology , Antiphospholipid Syndrome/immunology , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Betacoronavirus , Blood Coagulation/physiology , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/immunology , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/metabolism , Humans , Pandemics , Phospholipids/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , SARS-CoV-2 , Thromboembolism/immunology
13.
Platelets ; 31(8): 1085-1089, 2020 Nov 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-733448

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a global public health emergency with many clinical facets, and new knowledge about its pathogenetic mechanisms is deemed necessary; among these, there are certainly coagulation disorders. In the history of medicine, autopsies and tissue sampling have played a fundamental role in order to understand the pathogenesis of emerging diseases, including infectious ones; compared to the past, histopathology can be now expanded by innovative techniques and modern technologies. For the first time in worldwide literature, we provide a detailed postmortem and biopsy report on the marked increase, up to 1 order of magnitude, of naked megakaryocyte nuclei in the bone marrow and lungs from serious COVID-19 patients. Most likely related to high interleukin-6 serum levels stimulating megakaryocytopoiesis, this phenomenon concurs to explain well the pulmonary abnormal immunothrombosis in these critically ill patients, all without molecular or electron microscopy signs of megakaryocyte infection.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Bone Marrow/pathology , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/pathology , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/pathology , Lung/pathology , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Thrombosis/pathology , Adult , Aged , Autopsy , Betacoronavirus/immunology , Bone Marrow/immunology , Bone Marrow/virology , COVID-19 , Cell Nucleus/immunology , Cell Nucleus/pathology , Cell Nucleus/virology , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Critical Illness , Cytokine Release Syndrome/complications , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/virology , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/complications , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/immunology , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/virology , Fatal Outcome , Host-Pathogen Interactions/immunology , Humans , Interleukin-6/biosynthesis , Interleukin-6/immunology , Lung/immunology , Lung/virology , Male , Megakaryocytes/immunology , Megakaryocytes/pathology , Megakaryocytes/virology , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Thrombopoiesis/immunology , Thrombosis/complications , Thrombosis/immunology , Thrombosis/virology
14.
Infection ; 49(1): 15-28, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-734048

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Covid-19 is a global threat that pushes health care to its limits. Since there is neither a vaccine nor a drug for Covid-19, people with an increased risk for severe and fatal courses of disease particularly need protection. Furthermore, factors increasing these risks are of interest in the search of potential treatments. A systematic literature review on the risk factors of severe and fatal Covid-19 courses is presented. METHODS: The review is carried out on PubMed and a publicly available preprint dataset. For analysis, risk factors are categorized and information regarding the study such as study size and location are extracted. The results are compared to risk factors listed by four public authorities from different countries. RESULTS: The 28 records included, eleven of which are preprints, indicate that conditions and comorbidities connected to a poor state of health such as high age, obesity, diabetes and hypertension are risk factors for severe and fatal disease courses. Furthermore, severe and fatal courses are associated with organ damages mainly affecting the heart, liver and kidneys. Coagulation dysfunctions could play a critical role in the organ damaging. Time to hospital admission, tuberculosis, inflammation disorders and coagulation dysfunctions are identified as risk factors found in the review but not mentioned by the public authorities. CONCLUSION: Factors associated with increased risk of severe or fatal disease courses were identified, which include conditions connected with a poor state of health as well as organ damages and coagulation dysfunctions. The results may facilitate upcoming Covid-19 research.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/epidemiology , Hypertension/epidemiology , Obesity/epidemiology , Pandemics , Tuberculosis, Pulmonary/epidemiology , Age Factors , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Comorbidity , Diabetes Mellitus/mortality , Diabetes Mellitus/pathology , Diabetes Mellitus/virology , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/mortality , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/pathology , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/virology , Heart/physiopathology , Heart/virology , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Hypertension/mortality , Hypertension/pathology , Hypertension/virology , Kidney/pathology , Kidney/virology , Liver/pathology , Liver/virology , Obesity/mortality , Obesity/pathology , Obesity/virology , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Severity of Illness Index , Survival Analysis , Tuberculosis, Pulmonary/mortality , Tuberculosis, Pulmonary/pathology , Tuberculosis, Pulmonary/virology
15.
Nat Rev Rheumatol ; 16(10): 581-589, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-690837

ABSTRACT

Reports of widespread thromboses and disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) in patients with coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19) have been rapidly increasing in number. Key features of this disorder include a lack of bleeding risk, only mildly low platelet counts, elevated plasma fibrinogen levels, and detection of both severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and complement components in regions of thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA). This disorder is not typical DIC. Rather, it might be more similar to complement-mediated TMA syndromes, which are well known to rheumatologists who care for patients with severe systemic lupus erythematosus or catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome. This perspective has critical implications for treatment. Anticoagulation and antiviral agents are standard treatments for DIC but are gravely insufficient for any of the TMA disorders that involve disorders of complement. Mediators of TMA syndromes overlap with those released in cytokine storm, suggesting close connections between ineffective immune responses to SARS-CoV-2, severe pneumonia and life-threatening microangiopathy.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Thrombosis/immunology , Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19 , Complement System Proteins/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Cytokines/immunology , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/drug therapy , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/immunology , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/pathology , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/virology , Fibrinogen/analysis , Humans , Immunoglobulins, Intravenous/therapeutic use , Immunosuppressive Agents/therapeutic use , Pandemics , Plasma Exchange/methods , Platelet Count/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Thrombosis/drug therapy , Thrombosis/pathology , Thrombosis/virology , Thrombotic Microangiopathies/drug therapy , Thrombotic Microangiopathies/immunology , Thrombotic Microangiopathies/pathology , Thrombotic Microangiopathies/virology
16.
Rev Med Virol ; 30(5): e2130, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-641059

ABSTRACT

The SARS-Cov-2 is a single-stranded RNA virus composed of 16 non-structural proteins (NSP 1-16) with specific roles in the replication of coronaviruses. NSP3 has the property to block host innate immune response and to promote cytokine expression. NSP5 can inhibit interferon (IFN) signalling and NSP16 prevents MAD5 recognition, depressing the innate immunity. Dendritic cells, monocytes, and macrophages are the first cell lineage against viruses' infections. The IFN type I is the danger signal for the human body during this clinical setting. Protective immune responses to viral infection are initiated by innate immune sensors that survey extracellular and intracellular space for foreign nucleic acids. In Covid-19 the pathogenesis is not yet fully understood, but viral and host factors seem to play a key role. Important points in severe Covid-19 are characterized by an upregulated innate immune response, hypercoagulopathy state, pulmonary tissue damage, neurological and/or gastrointestinal tract involvement, and fatal outcome in severe cases of macrophage activation syndrome, which produce a 'cytokine storm'. These systemic conditions share polymorphous cutaneous lesions where innate immune system is involved in the histopathological findings with acute respiratory distress syndrome, hypercoagulability, hyperferritinemia, increased serum levels of D-dimer, lactic dehydrogenase, reactive-C-protein and serum A amyloid. It is described that several polymorphous cutaneous lesions similar to erythema pernio, urticarial rashes, diffuse or disseminated erythema, livedo racemosa, blue toe syndrome, retiform purpura, vesicles lesions, and purpuric exanthema or exanthema with clinical aspects of symmetrical drug-related intertriginous and flexural exanthema. This review describes the complexity of Covid-19, its pathophysiological and clinical aspects.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/immunology , Erythema/immunology , Exanthema/immunology , Host-Pathogen Interactions/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 , Betacoronavirus/immunology , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/pathology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/virology , Disease Progression , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/pathology , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/virology , Erythema/pathology , Erythema/virology , Exanthema/pathology , Exanthema/virology , Gene Expression Regulation , Host-Pathogen Interactions/genetics , Humans , Immunity, Innate , Lymphocytes/immunology , Lymphocytes/pathology , Lymphocytes/virology , Macrophages/immunology , Macrophages/pathology , Macrophages/virology , Pandemics , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/genetics , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Receptors, Virus/genetics , Receptors, Virus/immunology , SARS-CoV-2 , Serine Endopeptidases/genetics , Serine Endopeptidases/immunology , Severity of Illness Index , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology
17.
Lancet Haematol ; 7(9): e671-e678, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-639270

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 is an ongoing global pandemic. Changes in haematological characteristics in patients with COVID-19 are emerging as important features of the disease. We aimed to explore the haematological characteristics and related risk factors in patients with COVID-19. METHODS: This retrospective cohort study included patients with COVID-19 admitted to three designated sites of Wuhan Union Hospital (Wuhan, China). Demographic, clinical, laboratory, treatment, and outcome data were extracted from electronic medical records and compared between patients with moderate, severe, and critical disease (defined according to the diagnosis and treatment protocol for novel coronavirus pneumonia, trial version 7, published by the National Health Commission of China). We assessed the risk factors associated with critical illness and poor prognosis. Dynamic haematological and coagulation parameters were investigated with a linear mixed model, and coagulopathy screening with sepsis-induced coagulopathy and International Society of Thrombosis and Hemostasis overt disseminated intravascular coagulation scoring systems was applied. FINDINGS: Of 466 patients admitted to hospital from Jan 23 to Feb 23, 2020, 380 patients with COVID-19 were included in our study. The incidence of thrombocytopenia (platelet count <100 × 109 cells per L) in patients with critical disease (42 [49%] of 86) was significantly higher than in those with severe (20 [14%] of 145) or moderate (nine [6%] of 149) disease (p<0·0001). The numbers of lymphocytes and eosinophils were significantly lower in patients with critical disease than those with severe or moderate disease (p<0·0001), and prothrombin time, D-dimer, and fibrin degradation products significantly increased with increasing disease severity (p<0·0001). In multivariate analyses, death was associated with increased neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (≥9·13; odds ratio [OR] 5·39 [95% CI 1·70-17·13], p=0·0042), thrombocytopenia (platelet count <100 × 109 per L; OR 8·33 [2·56-27·15], p=0·00045), prolonged prothrombin time (>16 s; OR 4·94 [1·50-16·25], p=0·0094), and increased D-dimer (>2 mg/L; OR 4·41 [1·06-18·30], p=0·041). Thrombotic and haemorrhagic events were common complications in patients who died (19 [35%] of 55). Sepsis-induced coagulopathy and International Society of Thrombosis and Hemostasis overt disseminated intravascular coagulation scores (assessed in 12 patients who survived and eight patients who died) increased over time in patients who died. The onset of sepsis-induced coagulopathy was typically before overt disseminated intravascular coagulation. INTERPRETATION: Rapid blood tests, including platelet count, prothrombin time, D-dimer, and neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio can help clinicians to assess severity and prognosis of patients with COVID-19. The sepsis-induced coagulopathy scoring system can be used for early assessment and management of patients with critical disease. FUNDING: National Key Research and Development Program of China.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Hemorrhagic Disorders/pathology , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Adult , Aged , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/classification , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/complications , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/pathology , Eosinophils/cytology , Female , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/analysis , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/metabolism , Hemorrhagic Disorders/complications , Humans , Linear Models , Lymphocytes/cytology , Male , Middle Aged , Odds Ratio , Pandemics/classification , Pneumonia, Viral/classification , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Prothrombin Time , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Thrombocytopenia/complications , Thrombocytopenia/pathology
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