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1.
Schweiz Arch Tierheilkd ; 164(10): 661-671, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1603045

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Three outbreaks of fatal diarrhoea occurred in bush dog (Speothos venaticus) groups at two zoological collections in the United Kingdom between 2009 and 2017. In all cases, the predominant clinical signs were diarrhoea, anorexia and severe loss of condition. Despite supportive treatment, a number of fatalities occurred during each outbreak. Common gross post mortem findings were emaciation, with erythema, mucosal haemorrhage, and ulceration of the gastrointestinal tract. Histopathological features included villus blunting and fusion, crypt epithelial loss and lymphoid depletion, supporting a viral aetiology and canine coronavirus was suspected. Diagnosis was confirmed on the basis of serology (rising antibody titres) and the detection of viral nucleic acid using polymerase chain reaction. The canine coronavirus was subtyped as type 2a, which is known to cause systemic fatal disease in immature domestic dogs. To the authors' knowledge, these are the first reported cases of fatal diarrhoea associated with canine coronavirus type 2a in bush dogs. These outbreaks suggest that adult bush dogs are highly susceptible to canine coronavirus infection and may succumb to viral enteritis.


Subject(s)
Canidae , Coronavirus, Canine , Dog Diseases , Animals , Diarrhea/epidemiology , Diarrhea/veterinary , Disease Outbreaks/veterinary , Dog Diseases/epidemiology , Dogs , United Kingdom
2.
Indian J Public Health ; 65(4): 384-386, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1607696

ABSTRACT

A nationwide lockdown was imposed from March 25, 2020, to curb the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic. The study aimed to analyze the trend, pattern of animal bite cases and to quantify the reduction in the incidence of animal bite cases due to diminution of exposure time with animals as a result of lockdown. The interrupted time series method was used to evaluate the effect of lockdown on the incidence of animal bite cases. Right after the lockdown, the mean number of reported animal bite cases decreased significantly (P = 0.04) by 8.3%. Furthermore, the month-to-month change of cases for the postlockdown period was in decreasing trend (ß3 = 0.872) and was significant (P < 0.05). Reduction in the exposure time with street animal surely reduce the incidence in animal bite cases and hence, the Government should take appropriate actions to control the intermixing of street dogs with marginal populations at the village and urban slums level.


Subject(s)
Bites and Stings , COVID-19 , Animals , Bites and Stings/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Dogs , Humans , India/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Tertiary Care Centers
3.
PLoS Biol ; 19(12): e3001510, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1592147

ABSTRACT

Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infects a broader range of mammalian species than previously predicted, binding a diversity of angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) orthologs despite extensive sequence divergence. Within this sequence degeneracy, we identify a rare sequence combination capable of conferring SARS-CoV-2 resistance. We demonstrate that this sequence was likely unattainable during human evolution due to deleterious effects on ACE2 carboxypeptidase activity, which has vasodilatory and cardioprotective functions in vivo. Across the 25 ACE2 sites implicated in viral binding, we identify 6 amino acid substitutions unique to mouse-one of the only known mammalian species resistant to SARS-CoV-2. Substituting human variants at these positions is sufficient to confer binding of the SARS-CoV-2 S protein to mouse ACE2, facilitating cellular infection. Conversely, substituting mouse variants into either human or dog ACE2 abolishes viral binding, diminishing cellular infection. However, these same substitutions decrease human ACE2 activity by 50% and are predicted as pathogenic, consistent with the extreme rarity of human polymorphisms at these sites. This trade-off can be avoided, however, depending on genetic background; if substituted simultaneously, these same mutations have no deleterious effect on dog ACE2 nor that of the rodent ancestor estimated to exist 70 million years ago. This genetic contingency (epistasis) may have therefore opened the road to resistance for some species, while making humans susceptible to viruses that use these ACE2 surfaces for binding, as does SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Disease Resistance/genetics , Epistasis, Genetic , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Amino Acids , Angiotensin II/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/chemistry , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Animals , Binding Sites , COVID-19/enzymology , COVID-19/genetics , Dogs , Evolution, Molecular , Gene Frequency , Humans , Hydrolysis , Mice , Mutation , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Virus Attachment
4.
PLoS One ; 16(12): e0260676, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1581776

ABSTRACT

Major life events, such as the COVID-19 pandemic, affect psychological and physiological health. Social support, or the lack thereof, can modulate these effects. The context of the COVID-19 pandemic offered a unique opportunity to better understand how dogs may provide social support for their owners and buffer heightened symptoms of stress, anxiety and depression and contribute to happiness during a major global crisis. Participants (768 pet dog owners and 767 potential pet dog owners) answered an online survey, including validated depression, anxiety, happiness psychometric scales, attitude to and commitment towards pet, and perceived social support. Potential pet dog owners were defined as individuals who did not own a dog at the time of the survey but would be very or extremely interested in owning one in the future. Dog owners reported having significantly more social support available to them compared to potential dog owners, and their depression scores were also lower, compared to potential dog owners. There were no differences in anxiety and happiness scores between the two groups. Dog owners had a significantly more positive attitude towards and commitment to pets. Taken together, our results suggest that dog ownership may have provided people with a stronger sense of social support, which in turn may have helped buffer some of the negative psychological impacts caused by the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Animals , Anxiety Disorders , Dogs , Pandemics , United States
5.
Viruses ; 13(12)2021 12 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1580429

ABSTRACT

Several cases of naturally infected dogs with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) have been reported despite the apparently low susceptibility of this species. Here, we document the first reported case of infection caused by the Delta (B.1.617.2) variant of concern (VOC) in a dog in Spain that lived with several household members suffering from Coronavirus Infectious Disease 2019 (COVID-19). The animal displayed mild digestive and respiratory clinical signs and had a low viral load in the oropharyngeal swab collected at the first sampling. Whole-genome sequencing indicated infection with the Delta variant, coinciding with the predominant variant during the fifth pandemic wave in Spain. The dog seroconverted, as detected 21 days after the first sampling, and developed neutralizing antibodies that cross-neutralized different SARS-CoV-2 variants. This study further emphasizes the importance of studying the susceptibility of animal species to different VOCs and their potential role as reservoirs in the context of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/veterinary , Dog Diseases/virology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19/virology , Dog Diseases/diagnosis , Dog Diseases/transmission , Dogs , Female , Genome, Viral/genetics , Pets/virology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Viral Zoonoses/diagnosis , Viral Zoonoses/transmission , Viral Zoonoses/virology
6.
Biochem J ; 478(19): 3671-3684, 2021 10 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1557441

ABSTRACT

COVID-19, the clinical syndrome caused by the SARS-CoV-2 virus, has rapidly spread globally causing hundreds of millions of infections and over two million deaths. The potential animal reservoirs for SARS-CoV-2 are currently unknown, however sequence analysis has provided plausible potential candidate species. SARS-CoV-2 binds to the angiotensin I converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) to enable its entry into host cells and establish infection. We analyzed the binding surface of ACE2 from several important animal species to begin to understand the parameters for the ACE2 recognition by the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein receptor binding domain (RBD). We employed Shannon entropy analysis to determine the variability of ACE2 across its sequence and particularly in its RBD interacting region, and assessed differences between various species' ACE2 and human ACE2. Recombinant ACE2 from human, hamster, horseshoe bat, cat, ferret, and cow were evaluated for RBD binding. A gradient of binding affinities were seen where human and hamster ACE2 were similarly in the low nanomolar range, followed by cat and cow. Surprisingly, horseshoe bat (Rhinolophus sinicus) and ferret (Mustela putorius) ACE2s had poor binding activity compared with the other species' ACE2. The residue differences and binding properties between the species' variants provide a framework for understanding ACE2-RBD binding and virus tropism.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Animals , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/metabolism , Cats , Dogs , Humans , Mice , Protein Binding , Protein Domains , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Species Specificity , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Viral Tropism
7.
Viruses ; 13(12)2021 11 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1551630

ABSTRACT

During the four pandemic waves, a total of 560,504 cases and 10,178 deaths due to COVID-19 were reported in Croatia. The Alpha variant, dominant from March 2021 (>50% of positive samples), was rapidly replaced by Delta variants (>90%) by August 2021. Several seroprevalence studies were conducted in different populations (general population, children/adolescents, professional athletes, healthcare workers, veterinarians) and in immunocompromised patients (hemodialysis patients, liver/kidney transplant recipients). After the first pandemic wave, seroprevalence rates of neutralizing (NT) antibodies were reported to be 0.2-5.5%. Significantly higher seropositivity was detected during/after the second wave, 2.6-18.7%. Two studies conducted in pet animals (February-June 2020/July-December 2020) reported SARS-CoV-2 NT antibodies in 0.76% of cats and 0.31-14.69% of dogs, respectively. SARS-CoV-2 NT antibodies were not detected in wildlife. Environmental samples taken in the households of COVID-19 patients showed high-touch personal objects as most frequently contaminated (17.3%), followed by surfaces in patients' rooms (14.6%), kitchens (13.3%) and bathrooms (8.3%). SARS-CoV-2 RNA was also detected in 96.8% affluent water samples, while all effluent water samples tested negative. Detection of SARS-CoV-2 in humans, animals and the environment suggests that the 'One Health' approach is critical to controlling COVID-19 and future pandemics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , One Health , Pandemics , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing , Antibodies, Viral , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19/veterinary , Cats , Croatia/epidemiology , Dogs , Genetic Variation , Health Personnel , Humans , Pets , Prevalence , RNA, Viral , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Seroepidemiologic Studies , Waste Water/virology
8.
Geroscience ; 43(5): 2305-2320, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1525584

ABSTRACT

The current COVID-19 pandemic, caused by the highly contagious respiratory pathogen SARS-CoV-2 (severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2), has already claimed close to three million lives. SARS-CoV-2 is a zoonotic disease: it emerged from a bat reservoir and it can infect a number of agricultural and companion animal species. SARS-CoV-2 can cause respiratory and intestinal infections, and potentially systemic multi-organ disease, in both humans and animals. The risk for severe illness and death with COVID-19 significantly increases with age, with older adults at highest risk. To combat the pandemic and protect the most susceptible group of older adults, understanding the human-animal interface and its relevance to disease transmission is vitally important. Currently high infection numbers are being sustained via human-to-human transmission of SARS-CoV-2. Yet, identifying potential animal reservoirs and potential vectors of the disease will contribute to stronger risk assessment strategies. In this review, the current information about SARS-CoV-2 infection in animals and the potential spread of SARS-CoV-2 to humans through contact with domestic animals (including dogs, cats, ferrets, hamsters), agricultural animals (e.g., farmed minks), laboratory animals, wild animals (e.g., deer mice), and zoo animals (felines, non-human primates) are discussed with a special focus on reducing mortality in older adults.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Aged , Animals , Cats , Dogs , Ferrets , Humans , Mice , SARS-CoV-2 , Zoonoses/epidemiology
9.
J Vet Med Sci ; 83(11): 1722-1725, 2021 Nov 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1518345

ABSTRACT

We investigated the seroprevalence of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) among dogs in the Tokyo area via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using the spike protein as the target antigen. Plasma samples from 494 household dogs and blood-donor dogs were tested from July 2020 to January 2021. Of these samples, three showed optical densities that were higher than the mean plus two standard deviations of the mean of the negative-control optical densities (ODs). Of these three samples, only the sample with the highest OD by ELISA was confirmed positive by virus neutralization testing. The positive dog presented no SARS-CoV-2-related symptoms. The positivity rate of SARS-CoV-2 infections among dogs in the Tokyo area was approximately 0.2%.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dog Diseases , Animals , Antibodies, Viral , COVID-19/veterinary , Dog Diseases/epidemiology , Dogs , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay/veterinary , Japan/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Seroepidemiologic Studies , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus
10.
Theranostics ; 12(1): 1-17, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1512993

ABSTRACT

Background: Administration of potent anti-receptor-binding domain (RBD) monoclonal antibodies has been shown to curtail viral shedding and reduce hospitalization in patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection. However, the structure-function analysis of potent human anti-RBD monoclonal antibodies and its links to the formulation of antibody cocktails remains largely elusive. Methods: Previously, we isolated a panel of neutralizing anti-RBD monoclonal antibodies from convalescent patients and showed their neutralization efficacy in vitro. Here, we elucidate the mechanism of action of antibodies and dissect antibodies at the epitope level, which leads to a formation of a potent antibody cocktail. Results: We found that representative antibodies which target non-overlapping epitopes are effective against wild type virus and recently emerging variants of concern, whilst being encoded by antibody genes with few somatic mutations. Neutralization is associated with the inhibition of binding of viral RBD to ACE2 and possibly of the subsequent fusion process. Structural analysis of representative antibodies, by cryo-electron microscopy and crystallography, reveals that they have some unique aspects that are of potential value while sharing some features in common with previously reported neutralizing monoclonal antibodies. For instance, one has a common VH 3-53 public variable region yet is unusually resilient to mutation at residue 501 of the RBD. We evaluate the in vivo efficacy of an antibody cocktail consisting of two potent non-competing anti-RBD antibodies in a Syrian hamster model. We demonstrate that the cocktail prevents weight loss, reduces lung viral load and attenuates pulmonary inflammation in hamsters in both prophylactic and therapeutic settings. Although neutralization of one of these antibodies is abrogated by the mutations of variant B.1.351, it is also possible to produce a bi-valent cocktail of antibodies both of which are resilient to variants B.1.1.7, B.1.351 and B.1.617.2. Conclusions: These findings support the up-to-date and rational design of an anti-RBD antibody cocktail as a therapeutic candidate against COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal/chemistry , Antibodies, Monoclonal/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Animals , Antibodies, Monoclonal/metabolism , Antibodies, Neutralizing/chemistry , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Neutralizing/pharmacology , Binding Sites , Binding, Competitive , COVID-19/virology , Cricetinae , Cryoelectron Microscopy , Crystallography, X-Ray , Dogs , Epitopes , Female , Humans , Madin Darby Canine Kidney Cells , Neutralization Tests , Protein Domains , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism
11.
Front Public Health ; 9: 647903, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1506368

ABSTRACT

The aim of the present study is to apply the canine olfactory sensitivity to detect COVID-19-positive axillary sweat samples as a One Health approach in Latin America. One hundred volunteers with COVID-like symptoms were invited to participate, and both axillary sweat samples for dog detection and nasopharynx/oropharynx swabs for qPCR were collected. Two dogs, previously trained, detected 97.4% of the samples positive for COVID-19, including a false-negative qPCR-test, and the positive predictive value was 100% and the negative predictive value was 98.2%. Therefore, we can conclude that canine olfactory sensitivity can detect a person infected with COVID-19 through axillary sweat successfully and could be used as an alternative to screen them without invasive testing.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , One Health , Animals , Dogs , Humans , RNA, Viral , SARS-CoV-2 , Smell
12.
Vet Rec ; 189(9): e944, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1499332

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Domestic pets can contract severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection; however, it is unknown whether the UK B.1.1.7 variant can more easily infect certain animal species or increase the possibility of human-to-animal transmission. METHODS: This is a descriptive case series reporting SARS-CoV-2 B.1.1.7 variant infections in a group of dogs and cats with suspected myocarditis. RESULTS: The study describes the infection of domestic cats and dogs by the B.1.1.7 variant. Two cats and one dog were positive to SARS-CoV-2 PCR on rectal swab, and two cats and one dog were found to have SARS-CoV-2 antibodies 2-6 weeks after they developed signs of cardiac disease. Many owners of these pets had developed respiratory symptoms 3-6 weeks before their pets became ill and had also tested positive for COVID-19. Interestingly, all these pets were referred for acute onset of cardiac disease, including severe myocardial disorders of suspected inflammatory origin but without primary respiratory signs. CONCLUSIONS: These findings demonstrate, for the first time, the ability for pets to be infected by the B.1.1.7 variant and question its possible pathogenicity in these animals.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cat Diseases , Dog Diseases , Myocarditis , Animals , COVID-19/veterinary , Cats , Dogs , Humans , Myocarditis/veterinary , SARS-CoV-2
13.
J Am Vet Med Assoc ; 259(10): 1140-1147, 2021 11 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1496888

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To gather and evaluate veterinarians' perspectives about the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on the use of veterinary telehealth and on cat owners' versus dog owners' attitudes toward transmission of the SARS-CoV-2 virus from their pets. SAMPLE: 93 respondent veterinarians (47 in primary care practice and 46 in specialty practice). PROCEDURES: An online survey was conducted between June 15 and July 15, 2020, and included 21 questions concerning demographics, use of telehealth before and after the onset of the pandemic (before March 15, 2020, and between March 15 and June 15, 2020, respectively), changes in caseloads, and perception of clients' concerns about potential for transmission of the SARS-CoV-2 virus from pets. Reported zip codes informed the collection of census data. RESULTS: The level of poverty was significantly lower in zip code areas for respondents who reported telehealth services were (vs were not) offered before the pandemic. The percentage of respondents who reported their practice offered telehealth services increased from 12% (11/93) before the pandemic to 38% (35/93) between March 15 and June 15, 2020. Although most respondents reported owner-expressed concerns over SARS-CoV-2 virus transmission from their pets, most also reported increased caseloads, seeing newly adopted pets, and few discussions of surrender of pets for reasons related to the SARS-CoV-2 virus. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Findings indicated that caseloads increased and telehealth services expanded during the pandemic but that there was no evidence of differences in respondent-reported owner concern for SARS-CoV-2 virus transmission from cats versus dogs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cat Diseases , Dog Diseases , Telemedicine , Veterinarians , Animals , Attitude , COVID-19/veterinary , Cat Diseases/epidemiology , Cats , Dog Diseases/epidemiology , Dogs , Humans , Ownership , Pandemics , Perception , Pets , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
14.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 118(44)2021 11 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1493339

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 spillback from humans into domestic and wild animals has been well documented, and an accumulating number of studies illustrate that human-to-animal transmission is widespread in cats, mink, deer, and other species. Experimental inoculations of cats, mink, and ferrets have perpetuated transmission cycles. We sequenced full genomes of Vero cell-expanded SARS-CoV-2 inoculum and viruses recovered from cats (n = 6), dogs (n = 3), hamsters (n = 3), and a ferret (n = 1) following experimental exposure. Five nonsynonymous changes relative to the USA-WA1/2020 prototype strain were near fixation in the stock used for inoculation but had reverted to wild-type sequences at these sites in dogs, cats, and hamsters within 1- to 3-d postexposure. A total of 14 emergent variants (six in nonstructural genes, six in spike, and one each in orf8 and nucleocapsid) were detected in viruses recovered from animals. This included substitutions in spike residues H69, N501, and D614, which also vary in human lineages of concern. Even though a live virus was not cultured from dogs, substitutions in replicase genes were detected in amplified sequences. The rapid selection of SARS-CoV-2 variants in vitro and in vivo reveals residues with functional significance during host switching. These observations also illustrate the potential for spillback from animal hosts to accelerate the evolution of new viral lineages, findings of particular concern for dogs and cats living in households with COVID-19 patients. More generally, this glimpse into viral host switching reveals the unrealized rapidity and plasticity of viral evolution in experimental animal model systems.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/virology , Evolution, Molecular , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Selection, Genetic , Animals , COVID-19/veterinary , Cats , Chlorocebus aethiops , Dogs , Ferrets , Gene Frequency , Pets/virology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Vero Cells , Viral Proteins/genetics
15.
MAbs ; 13(1): 1987180, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1483313

ABSTRACT

The global health crisis and economic tolls of COVID-19 necessitate a panoply of strategies to treat SARS-CoV-2 infection. To date, few treatment options exist, although neutralizing antibodies against the spike glycoprotein have proven to be effective. Because infection is initiated at the mucosa and propagates mainly at this site throughout the course of the disease, blocking the virus at the mucosal milieu should be effective. However, administration of biologics to the mucosa presents a substantial challenge. Here, we describe bifunctional molecules combining single-domain variable regions that bind to the polymeric Ig receptor (pIgR) and to the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein via addition of the ACE2 extracellular domain (ECD). The hypothesis behind this design is that pIgR will transport the molecule from the circulation to the mucosal surface where the ACE ECD would act as a decoy receptor for the nCoV2. The bifunctional molecules bind SARS-Cov-2 spike glycoprotein in vitro and efficiently transcytose across the lung epithelium in human tissue-based analyses. Designs featuring ACE2 tethered to the C-terminus of the Fc do not induce antibody-dependent cytotoxicity against pIgR-expressing cells. These molecules thus represent a potential therapeutic modality for systemic administration of neutralizing anti-SARS-CoV-2 molecules to the mucosa.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral , COVID-19/drug therapy , Receptors, Polymeric Immunoglobulin , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Single-Chain Antibodies , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/immunology , Animals , Antibodies, Viral/genetics , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/pharmacology , CHO Cells , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/immunology , Cricetulus , Dogs , Female , Humans , Madin Darby Canine Kidney Cells , Mice , Mouth Mucosa/immunology , Protein Domains , Receptors, Polymeric Immunoglobulin/genetics , Receptors, Polymeric Immunoglobulin/immunology , Receptors, Polymeric Immunoglobulin/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Single-Chain Antibodies/genetics , Single-Chain Antibodies/immunology , Single-Chain Antibodies/pharmacokinetics , Single-Chain Antibodies/pharmacology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/antagonists & inhibitors , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Swine
16.
Vet Rec ; 189 Suppl 1: 8, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1482179

ABSTRACT

While the Covid-19 pandemic may have reduced the numbers of people travelling abroad with their pets, the soaring numbers of dogs being imported from overseas means asking where an animal comes from is an increasingly important part of responsible parasite control.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dog Diseases , Animals , COVID-19/veterinary , Communicable Disease Control , Dogs , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Travel
17.
Viruses ; 13(10)2021 10 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1481013

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) descriptions of infection and transmission have been increasing in companion animals in the past year. Although canine susceptibility is generally considered low, their role in the COVID-19 disease cycle remains unknown. In this study, we detected and sequenced a delta variant (AY.3) from a 12-year-old Collie living with owners that previously tested positive for SARS-CoV-2. It is unclear if the dogs' symptoms were related to SARS-CoV-2 infection or underlying conditions. The whole genome sequence obtained from the dog sample had several unique consensus level changes not previously identified in a SARS-CoV-2 genome that may play a role in the rapid adaptation from humans to dogs. Within the spike coding region, 5/7 of the subconsensus variants identified in the dog sequence were also identified in the closest in-house human reference case. Taken together, the whole genome sequence, and phylogenetic and subconsensus variant analyses indicate the virus infecting the animal originated from a local outbreak cluster. The results of these analyses emphasize the importance of rapid detection and characterization of SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern in companion animals.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/veterinary , Dog Diseases/virology , Genome, Viral/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Animals , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/transmission , Disease Reservoirs/virology , Dogs , Kansas , Male , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Whole Genome Sequencing
18.
PLoS Comput Biol ; 17(9): e1009357, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1470651

ABSTRACT

Cell culture-derived defective interfering particles (DIPs) are considered for antiviral therapy due to their ability to inhibit influenza A virus (IAV) production. DIPs contain a large internal deletion in one of their eight viral RNAs (vRNAs) rendering them replication-incompetent. However, they can propagate alongside their homologous standard virus (STV) during infection in a competition for cellular and viral resources. So far, experimental and modeling studies for IAV have focused on either the intracellular or the cell population level when investigating the interaction of STVs and DIPs. To examine these levels simultaneously, we conducted a series of experiments using highly different multiplicities of infections for STVs and DIPs to characterize virus replication in Madin-Darby Canine Kidney suspension cells. At several time points post infection, we quantified virus titers, viable cell concentration, virus-induced apoptosis using imaging flow cytometry, and intracellular levels of vRNA and viral mRNA using real-time reverse transcription qPCR. Based on the obtained data, we developed a mathematical multiscale model of STV and DIP co-infection that describes dynamics closely for all scenarios with a single set of parameters. We show that applying high DIP concentrations can shut down STV propagation completely and prevent virus-induced apoptosis. Interestingly, the three observed viral mRNAs (full-length segment 1 and 5, defective interfering segment 1) accumulated to vastly different levels suggesting the interplay between an internal regulation mechanism and a growth advantage for shorter viral RNAs. Furthermore, model simulations predict that the concentration of DIPs should be at least 10000 times higher than that of STVs to prevent the spread of IAV. Ultimately, the model presented here supports a comprehensive understanding of the interactions between STVs and DIPs during co-infection providing an ideal platform for the prediction and optimization of vaccine manufacturing as well as DIP production for therapeutic use.


Subject(s)
Defective Viruses , Influenza A virus , Models, Biological , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/virology , Virus Replication/physiology , Animals , Antiviral Agents , Cell Culture Techniques , Defective Viruses/chemistry , Defective Viruses/genetics , Defective Viruses/pathogenicity , Dogs , Influenza A virus/chemistry , Influenza A virus/genetics , Influenza A virus/pathogenicity , Madin Darby Canine Kidney Cells , RNA, Viral/genetics
19.
J Am Vet Med Assoc ; 259(9): 1032-1039, 2021 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1468297

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To establish a pathoepidemiological model to evaluate the role of SARS-CoV-2 infection in the first 10 companion animals that died while infected with SARS-CoV-2 in the US. ANIMALS: 10 cats and dogs that tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 and died or were euthanized in the US between March 2020 and January 2021. PROCEDURES: A standardized algorithm was developed to direct case investigations, determine the necessity of certain diagnostic procedures, and evaluate the role, if any, that SARS-CoV-2 infection played in the animals' course of disease and death. Using clinical and diagnostic information collected by state animal health officials, state public health veterinarians, and other state and local partners, this algorithm was applied to each animal case. RESULTS: SARS-CoV-2 was an incidental finding in 8 animals, was suspected to have contributed to the severity of clinical signs leading to euthanasia in 1 dog, and was the primary reason for death for 1 cat. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE: This report provides the global community with a standardized process for directing case investigations, determining the necessity of certain diagnostic procedures, and determining the clinical significance of SARS-CoV-2 infections in animals with fatal outcomes and provides evidence that SARS-CoV-2 can, in rare circumstances, cause or contribute to death in pets.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cat Diseases , Dog Diseases , Animals , COVID-19/veterinary , Cat Diseases/diagnosis , Cat Diseases/epidemiology , Cats , Dog Diseases/diagnosis , Dog Diseases/epidemiology , Dogs , Pets , SARS-CoV-2
20.
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry ; 30(10): 1483-1484, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1465872
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