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2.
Lancet Respir Med ; 9(9): 1010-1020, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1331331

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Doxycycline is often used for treating COVID-19 respiratory symptoms in the community despite an absence of evidence from clinical trials to support its use. We aimed to assess the efficacy of doxycycline to treat suspected COVID-19 in the community among people at high risk of adverse outcomes. METHODS: We did a national, open-label, multi-arm, adaptive platform randomised trial of interventions against COVID-19 in older people (PRINCIPLE) across primary care centres in the UK. We included people aged 65 years or older, or 50 years or older with comorbidities (weakened immune system, heart disease, hypertension, asthma or lung disease, diabetes, mild hepatic impairment, stroke or neurological problem, and self-reported obesity or body-mass index of 35 kg/m2 or greater), who had been unwell (for ≤14 days) with suspected COVID-19 or a positive PCR test for SARS-CoV-2 infection in the community. Participants were randomly assigned using response adaptive randomisation to usual care only, usual care plus oral doxycycline (200 mg on day 1, then 100 mg once daily for the following 6 days), or usual care plus other interventions. The interventions reported in this manuscript are usual care plus doxycycline and usual care only; evaluations of other interventions in this platform trial are ongoing. The coprimary endpoints were time to first self-reported recovery, and hospitalisation or death related to COVID-19, both measured over 28 days from randomisation and analysed by intention to treat. This trial is ongoing and is registered with ISRCTN, 86534580. FINDINGS: The trial opened on April 2, 2020. Randomisation to doxycycline began on July 24, 2020, and was stopped on Dec 14, 2020, because the prespecified futility criterion was met; 2689 participants were enrolled and randomised between these dates. Of these, 2508 (93·3%) participants contributed follow-up data and were included in the primary analysis: 780 (31·1%) in the usual care plus doxycycline group, 948 in the usual care only group (37·8%), and 780 (31·1%) in the usual care plus other interventions group. Among the 1792 participants randomly assigned to the usual care plus doxycycline and usual care only groups, the mean age was 61·1 years (SD 7·9); 999 (55·7%) participants were female and 790 (44·1%) were male. In the primary analysis model, there was little evidence of difference in median time to first self-reported recovery between the usual care plus doxycycline group and the usual care only group (9·6 [95% Bayesian Credible Interval [BCI] 8·3 to 11·0] days vs 10·1 [8·7 to 11·7] days, hazard ratio 1·04 [95% BCI 0·93 to 1·17]). The estimated benefit in median time to first self-reported recovery was 0·5 days [95% BCI -0·99 to 2·04] and the probability of a clinically meaningful benefit (defined as ≥1·5 days) was 0·10. Hospitalisation or death related to COVID-19 occurred in 41 (crude percentage 5·3%) participants in the usual care plus doxycycline group and 43 (4·5%) in the usual care only group (estimated absolute percentage difference -0·5% [95% BCI -2·6 to 1·4]); there were five deaths (0·6%) in the usual care plus doxycycline group and two (0·2%) in the usual care only group. INTERPRETATION: In patients with suspected COVID-19 in the community in the UK, who were at high risk of adverse outcomes, treatment with doxycycline was not associated with clinically meaningful reductions in time to recovery or hospital admissions or deaths related to COVID-19, and should not be used as a routine treatment for COVID-19. FUNDING: UK Research and Innovation, Department of Health and Social Care, National Institute for Health Research.


Subject(s)
Anti-Bacterial Agents/administration & dosage , COVID-19/drug therapy , Doxycycline/administration & dosage , Age Factors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Anti-Bacterial Agents/adverse effects , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/virology , Doxycycline/adverse effects , Female , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Intention to Treat Analysis , Male , Middle Aged , Minimal Clinically Important Difference , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Self Report/statistics & numerical data , Treatment Outcome , United Kingdom/epidemiology
3.
JAMA ; 325(18): 1841-1851, 2021 05 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1237391

ABSTRACT

Importance: Alteration in lung microbes is associated with disease progression in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Objective: To assess the effect of antimicrobial therapy on clinical outcomes. Design, Setting, and Participants: Pragmatic, randomized, unblinded clinical trial conducted across 35 US sites. A total of 513 patients older than 40 years were randomized from August 2017 to June 2019 (final follow-up was January 2020). Interventions: Patients were randomized in a 1:1 allocation ratio to receive antimicrobials (n = 254) or usual care alone (n = 259). Antimicrobials included co-trimoxazole (trimethoprim 160 mg/sulfamethoxazole 800 mg twice daily plus folic acid 5 mg daily, n = 128) or doxycycline (100 mg once daily if body weight <50 kg or 100 mg twice daily if ≥50 kg, n = 126). No placebo was administered in the usual care alone group. Main Outcomes and Measures: The primary end point was time to first nonelective respiratory hospitalization or all-cause mortality. Results: Among the 513 patients who were randomized (mean age, 71 years; 23.6% women), all (100%) were included in the analysis. The study was terminated for futility on December 18, 2019. After a mean follow-up time of 13.1 months (median, 12.7 months), a total of 108 primary end point events occurred: 52 events (20.4 events per 100 patient-years [95% CI, 14.8-25.9]) in the usual care plus antimicrobial therapy group and 56 events (18.4 events per 100 patient-years [95% CI, 13.2-23.6]) in the usual care group, with no significant difference between groups (adjusted HR, 1.04 [95% CI, 0.71-1.53; P = .83]. There was no statistically significant interaction between the effect of the prespecified antimicrobial agent (co-trimoxazole vs doxycycline) on the primary end point (adjusted HR, 1.15 [95% CI 0.68-1.95] in the co-trimoxazole group vs 0.82 [95% CI, 0.46-1.47] in the doxycycline group; P = .66). Serious adverse events occurring at 5% or greater among those treated with usual care plus antimicrobials vs usual care alone included respiratory events (16.5% vs 10.0%) and infections (2.8% vs 6.6%); adverse events of special interest included diarrhea (10.2% vs 3.1%) and rash (6.7% vs 0%). Conclusions and Relevance: Among adults with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, the addition of co-trimoxazole or doxycycline to usual care, compared with usual care alone, did not significantly improve time to nonelective respiratory hospitalization or death. These findings do not support treatment with these antibiotics for the underlying disease. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02759120.


Subject(s)
Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Doxycycline/therapeutic use , Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis/drug therapy , Trimethoprim, Sulfamethoxazole Drug Combination/therapeutic use , Aged , Anti-Bacterial Agents/adverse effects , Doxycycline/adverse effects , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis/mortality , Lung/microbiology , Male , Middle Aged , Respiratory Function Tests , Respiratory Tract Infections/prevention & control , Treatment Outcome , Trimethoprim, Sulfamethoxazole Drug Combination/adverse effects
4.
BMJ Case Rep ; 14(2)2021 Feb 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1083872

ABSTRACT

Doxycycline is a commonly prescribed antibiotic with growing evidence suggesting a possible linkage with drug-induced acute pancreatitis. We present an elderly female presenting with severe acute pancreatitis likely secondary to doxycycline therapy after thorough investigation. We reviewed the evidence linking doxycycline-inducing acute pancreatitis and signs and symptoms for severe disease. Early recognition and intervention are critical for positive patient outcomes.


Subject(s)
Anti-Bacterial Agents/adverse effects , Doxycycline/adverse effects , Pancreatitis/chemically induced , Aged , Female , Fluid Therapy , Humans , Renal Replacement Therapy
5.
Expert Rev Anti Infect Ther ; 19(8): 1001-1008, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-978558

ABSTRACT

Introduction: COVID-19 infection with no known-specific drugs or vaccines has impacted mankind and has become beyond precedence. Currently, re-purposing of existing drugs is the only therapeutic option for managing COVID-19 symptoms and associated co-infections to reduce mortality. Antimicrobials as varied as antiparasitic, antiviral, and antibiotics are under various stages of evaluation.Areas covered: Recently, doxycycline, a broad-spectrum antibiotic that has also reported antiviral and anti-inflammatory properties was widely investigated in clinical trials, either alone or in combination with other drugs, and repurposed for COVID-19 treatment. In the review, the potential therapeutic applications of doxycycline in COVID-19 treatment and its potential adverse implications with respect to antimicrobial resistance bestowed by repurposing the antibiotic have been expounded.Expert opinion: 'Fighting disease with already existing antibiotics' and 'antimicrobial resistance progression' are like two arms of a balance that has to be carefully equilibrated. Any imbalance by the inappropriate or indiscriminate use of the repurposed drugs would cause a disastrous increase in antimicrobial resistance (AMR). Hence, cautious parallel assessment of potential long-term consequences of AMR is of great importance to mankind as its impacts would prevail even after the current pandemic.


Subject(s)
Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Doxycycline/therapeutic use , Drug Repositioning , Anti-Bacterial Agents/adverse effects , Antiviral Agents/adverse effects , Doxycycline/adverse effects , Humans , Pandemics
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