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1.
Cell Death Dis ; 11(8): 656, 2020 08 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-725491

ABSTRACT

The current epidemic of coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) calls for the development of inhibitors of viral replication. Here, we performed a bioinformatic analysis of published and purported SARS-CoV-2 antivirals including imatinib mesylate that we found to suppress SARS-CoV-2 replication on Vero E6 cells and that, according to the published literature on other coronaviruses is likely to act on-target, as a tyrosine kinase inhibitor. We identified a cluster of SARS-CoV-2 antivirals with characteristics of lysosomotropic agents, meaning that they are lipophilic weak bases capable of penetrating into cells. These agents include cepharentine, chloroquine, chlorpromazine, clemastine, cloperastine, emetine, hydroxychloroquine, haloperidol, ML240, PB28, ponatinib, siramesine, and zotatifin (eFT226) all of which are likely to inhibit SARS-CoV-2 replication by non-specific (off-target) effects, meaning that they probably do not act on their 'official' pharmacological targets, but rather interfere with viral replication through non-specific effects on acidophilic organelles including autophagosomes, endosomes, and lysosomes. Imatinib mesylate did not fall into this cluster. In conclusion, we propose a tentative classification of SARS-CoV-2 antivirals into specific (on-target) versus non-specific (off-target) agents based on their physicochemical characteristics.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/physiology , Coronavirus Infections/metabolism , Drug Evaluation, Preclinical/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/metabolism , Virus Replication/drug effects , Animals , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Cell Death/drug effects , Chlorocebus aethiops , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Hydroxychloroquine/pharmacology , Imatinib Mesylate/pharmacology , Lysosomes/drug effects , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/pharmacology , RNA, Viral/drug effects , Vero Cells , Viral Load/drug effects
3.
ACS Chem Neurosci ; 11(15): 2137-2144, 2020 08 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-636269
4.
Cell ; 182(3): 685-712.e19, 2020 08 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-624826

ABSTRACT

The causative agent of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), has infected millions and killed hundreds of thousands of people worldwide, highlighting an urgent need to develop antiviral therapies. Here we present a quantitative mass spectrometry-based phosphoproteomics survey of SARS-CoV-2 infection in Vero E6 cells, revealing dramatic rewiring of phosphorylation on host and viral proteins. SARS-CoV-2 infection promoted casein kinase II (CK2) and p38 MAPK activation, production of diverse cytokines, and shutdown of mitotic kinases, resulting in cell cycle arrest. Infection also stimulated a marked induction of CK2-containing filopodial protrusions possessing budding viral particles. Eighty-seven drugs and compounds were identified by mapping global phosphorylation profiles to dysregulated kinases and pathways. We found pharmacologic inhibition of the p38, CK2, CDK, AXL, and PIKFYVE kinases to possess antiviral efficacy, representing potential COVID-19 therapies.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/metabolism , Coronavirus Infections/metabolism , Drug Evaluation, Preclinical/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/metabolism , Proteomics/methods , A549 Cells , Animals , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Caco-2 Cells , Casein Kinase II/antagonists & inhibitors , Casein Kinase II/metabolism , Chlorocebus aethiops , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Cyclin-Dependent Kinases/antagonists & inhibitors , Cyclin-Dependent Kinases/metabolism , HEK293 Cells , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Pandemics , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/genetics , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/metabolism , Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases/metabolism , Phosphoinositide-3 Kinase Inhibitors/pharmacology , Phosphorylation , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/pharmacology , Proto-Oncogene Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , Proto-Oncogene Proteins/metabolism , Receptor Protein-Tyrosine Kinases/antagonists & inhibitors , Receptor Protein-Tyrosine Kinases/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Vero Cells , p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases/antagonists & inhibitors , p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases/metabolism
5.
Biochem Pharmacol ; 178: 114123, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-614389

ABSTRACT

Commonly used drugs for treating many conditions are either natural products or derivatives. In silico modelling has identified several natural products including quercetin as potential highly effective disruptors of the initial infection process involving binding to the interface between the SARS-CoV-2 (Covid-19) Viral Spike Protein and the epithelial cell Angiotensin Converting Enzyme-2 (ACE2) protein. Here we argue that the oral route of administration of quercetin is unlikely to be effective in clinical trials owing to biotransformation during digestion, absorption and metabolism, but suggest that agents could be administered directly by alternative routes such as a nasal or throat spray.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/drug effects , Biological Products/pharmacology , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/metabolism , Quercetin/pharmacology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Betacoronavirus/metabolism , Betacoronavirus/physiology , Biological Products/administration & dosage , Biological Products/chemistry , Clinical Trials as Topic/methods , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Drug Evaluation, Preclinical/methods , Epithelial Cells/drug effects , Epithelial Cells/metabolism , Epithelial Cells/virology , Host-Pathogen Interactions/drug effects , Humans , Molecular Structure , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Protein Binding/drug effects , Quercetin/administration & dosage , Quercetin/chemistry , Virus Internalization/drug effects
6.
Curr Protoc Microbiol ; 58(1): e108, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-614201

ABSTRACT

The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) emerged in the city of Wuhan, Hubei Province, China, in late 2019. Since then, the virus has spread globally and caused a pandemic. Assays that can measure the antiviral activity of antibodies or antiviral compounds are needed for SARS-CoV-2 vaccine and drug development. Here, we describe in detail a microneutralization assay, which can be used to assess in a quantitative manner if antibodies or drugs can block entry and/or replication of SARS-CoV-2 in vitro. © 2020 Wiley Periodicals LLC. Basic Protocol 1: Microneutralization assay to test inhibition of virus by antibodies (purified antibodies or serum/plasma) Basic Protocol 2: Screening of anti-SARS-CoV-2 compounds in vitro Support Protocol: SARS-CoV-2 propagation.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Betacoronavirus/immunology , Drug Evaluation, Preclinical/methods , Neutralization Tests/methods , Animals , Chlorocebus aethiops , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Humans , Mice , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Vero Cells , Virus Internalization/drug effects , Virus Replication/drug effects
8.
Cell ; 182(3): 734-743.e5, 2020 08 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-592236

ABSTRACT

COVID-19, caused by SARS-CoV-2, is a virulent pneumonia, with >4,000,000 confirmed cases worldwide and >290,000 deaths as of May 15, 2020. It is critical that vaccines and therapeutics be developed very rapidly. Mice, the ideal animal for assessing such interventions, are resistant to SARS-CoV-2. Here, we overcome this difficulty by exogenous delivery of human ACE2 with a replication-deficient adenovirus (Ad5-hACE2). Ad5-hACE2-sensitized mice developed pneumonia characterized by weight loss, severe pulmonary pathology, and high-titer virus replication in lungs. Type I interferon, T cells, and, most importantly, signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) are critical for virus clearance and disease resolution in these mice. Ad5-hACE2-transduced mice enabled rapid assessments of a vaccine candidate, of human convalescent plasma, and of two antiviral therapies (poly I:C and remdesivir). In summary, we describe a murine model of broad and immediate utility to investigate COVID-19 pathogenesis and to evaluate new therapies and vaccines.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Disease Models, Animal , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Vaccination , Animals , Chlorocebus aethiops , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Drug Evaluation, Preclinical/methods , Female , Humans , Interferon-gamma/genetics , Interferon-gamma/metabolism , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , Male , Mice , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Mice, Knockout , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/genetics , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/metabolism , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Receptor, Interferon alpha-beta/genetics , Receptor, Interferon alpha-beta/metabolism , STAT1 Transcription Factor/genetics , STAT1 Transcription Factor/metabolism , Specific Pathogen-Free Organisms , Transduction, Genetic , Vero Cells , Viral Load , Virus Replication
9.
Cell ; 182(3): 713-721.e9, 2020 08 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-549043

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) threatens global public health. The development of a vaccine is urgently needed for the prevention and control of COVID-19. Here, we report the pilot-scale production of an inactivated SARS-CoV-2 vaccine candidate (BBIBP-CorV) that induces high levels of neutralizing antibodies titers in mice, rats, guinea pigs, rabbits, and nonhuman primates (cynomolgus monkeys and rhesus macaques) to provide protection against SARS-CoV-2. Two-dose immunizations using 2 µg/dose of BBIBP-CorV provided highly efficient protection against SARS-CoV-2 intratracheal challenge in rhesus macaques, without detectable antibody-dependent enhancement of infection. In addition, BBIBP-CorV exhibits efficient productivity and good genetic stability for vaccine manufacture. These results support the further evaluation of BBIBP-CorV in a clinical trial.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Drug Evaluation, Preclinical/methods , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Vaccines, Inactivated/therapeutic use , Viral Vaccines/therapeutic use , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Chlorocebus aethiops , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Disease Models, Animal , Female , Guinea Pigs , Immunogenicity, Vaccine , Macaca fascicularis , Macaca mulatta , Male , Mice , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Phylogeny , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Rabbits , Rats , Rats, Wistar , Vaccines, Inactivated/adverse effects , Vero Cells , Viral Vaccines/adverse effects
10.
Interdiscip Sci ; 12(3): 368-376, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-459220

ABSTRACT

A novel coronavirus, called 2019-nCoV, was recently found in Wuhan, Hubei Province of China, and now is spreading across China and other parts of the world. Although there are some drugs to treat 2019-nCoV, there is no proper scientific evidence about its activity on the virus. It is of high significance to develop a drug that can combat the virus effectively to save valuable human lives. It usually takes a much longer time to develop a drug using traditional methods. For 2019-nCoV, it is now better to rely on some alternative methods such as deep learning to develop drugs that can combat such a disease effectively since 2019-nCoV is highly homologous to SARS-CoV. In the present work, we first collected virus RNA sequences of 18 patients reported to have 2019-nCoV from the public domain database, translated the RNA into protein sequences, and performed multiple sequence alignment. After a careful literature survey and sequence analysis, 3C-like protease is considered to be a major therapeutic target and we built a protein 3D model of 3C-like protease using homology modeling. Relying on the structural model, we used a pipeline to perform large scale virtual screening by using a deep learning based method to accurately rank/identify protein-ligand interacting pairs developed recently in our group. Our model identified potential drugs for 2019-nCoV 3C-like protease by performing drug screening against four chemical compound databases (Chimdiv, Targetmol-Approved_Drug_Library, Targetmol-Natural_Compound_Library, and Targetmol-Bioactive_Compound_Library) and a database of tripeptides. Through this paper, we provided the list of possible chemical ligands (Meglumine, Vidarabine, Adenosine, D-Sorbitol, D-Mannitol, Sodium_gluconate, Ganciclovir and Chlorobutanol) and peptide drugs (combination of isoleucine, lysine and proline) from the databases to guide the experimental scientists and validate the molecules which can combat the virus in a shorter time.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Betacoronavirus/drug effects , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Deep Learning , Drug Evaluation, Preclinical/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , Amino Acid Sequence , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Catalytic Domain , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Cysteine Endopeptidases/chemistry , Cysteine Endopeptidases/genetics , Databases, Nucleic Acid , Databases, Pharmaceutical , Drug Design , Drug Evaluation, Preclinical/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Ligands , Models, Molecular , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , Oligopeptides/chemistry , Oligopeptides/pharmacology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Sequence Alignment , Structural Homology, Protein , User-Computer Interface , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/chemistry , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/genetics
11.
Biosci Rep ; 40(6)2020 06 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-459137

ABSTRACT

Due to the lack of efficient therapeutic options and clinical trial limitations, the FDA-approved drugs can be a good choice to handle Coronavirus disease (COVID-19). Many reports have enough evidence for the use of FDA-approved drugs which have inhibitory potential against target proteins of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Here, we utilized a structure-based drug design approach to find possible drug candidates from the existing pool of FDA-approved drugs and checked their effectiveness against the SARS-CoV-2. We performed virtual screening of the FDA-approved drugs against the main protease (Mpro) of SARS-CoV-2, an essential enzyme, and a potential drug target. Using well-defined computational methods, we identified Glecaprevir and Maraviroc (MVC) as the best inhibitors of SARS-CoV-2 Mpro. Both drugs bind to the substrate-binding pocket of SARS-CoV-2 Mpro and form a significant number of non-covalent interactions. Glecaprevir and MVC bind to the conserved residues of substrate-binding pocket of SARS-CoV-2 Mpro. This work provides sufficient evidence for the use of Glecaprevir and MVC for the therapeutic management of COVID-19 after experimental validation and clinical manifestations.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/enzymology , Maraviroc/pharmacology , Protease Inhibitors/pharmacology , Quinoxalines/pharmacology , Sulfonamides/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/metabolism , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Betacoronavirus/drug effects , Computer Simulation , Drug Evaluation, Preclinical/methods , Maraviroc/chemistry , Maraviroc/metabolism , Molecular Structure , Protease Inhibitors/chemistry , Protease Inhibitors/metabolism , Quinoxalines/chemistry , Quinoxalines/metabolism , Sulfonamides/chemistry , Sulfonamides/metabolism
12.
J Med Microbiol ; 69(6): 864-873, 2020 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-436403

ABSTRACT

Introduction. The emergence of SARS-CoV-2 has taken humanity off guard. Following an outbreak of SARS-CoV in 2002, and MERS-CoV about 10 years later, SARS-CoV-2 is the third coronavirus in less than 20 years to cross the species barrier and start spreading by human-to-human transmission. It is the most infectious of the three, currently causing the COVID-19 pandemic. No treatment has been approved for COVID-19. We previously proposed targets that can serve as binding sites for antiviral drugs for multiple coronaviruses, and here we set out to find current drugs that can be repurposed as COVID-19 therapeutics.Aim. To identify drugs against COVID-19, we performed an in silico virtual screen with the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs targeting the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP), a critical enzyme for coronavirus replication.Methodology. Initially, no RdRP structure of SARS-CoV-2 was available. We performed basic sequence and structural analysis to determine if RdRP from SARS-CoV was a suitable replacement. We performed molecular dynamics simulations to generate multiple starting conformations that were used for the in silico virtual screen. During this work, a structure of RdRP from SARS-CoV-2 became available and was also included in the in silico virtual screen.Results. The virtual screen identified several drugs predicted to bind in the conserved RNA tunnel of RdRP, where many of the proposed targets were located. Among these candidates, quinupristin is particularly interesting because it is expected to bind across the RNA tunnel, blocking access from both sides and suggesting that it has the potential to arrest viral replication by preventing viral RNA synthesis. Quinupristin is an antibiotic that has been in clinical use for two decades and is known to cause relatively minor side effects.Conclusion. Quinupristin represents a potential anti-SARS-CoV-2 therapeutic. At present, we have no evidence that this drug is effective against SARS-CoV-2 but expect that the biomedical community will expeditiously follow up on our in silico findings.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Betacoronavirus/drug effects , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , RNA Replicase/antagonists & inhibitors , Animals , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Betacoronavirus/enzymology , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Betacoronavirus/physiology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Drug Evaluation, Preclinical/methods , Drug Synergism , Humans , Molecular Conformation , Pandemics , Phylogeny , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , RNA Replicase/drug effects , Rifampin/pharmacology , Sequence Alignment , Sequence Analysis, Protein , Virginiamycin/analogs & derivatives , Virginiamycin/pharmacology , Virus Replication/drug effects
13.
Pharmacol Res ; 159: 104960, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-401828

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by the emerging severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is associated with a crude case fatality rate of about 0.5-10 % depending on locality. A few clinically approved drugs, such as remdesivir, chloroquine, hydroxychloroquine, nafamostat, camostat, and ivermectin, exhibited anti-SARS-CoV-2 activity in vitro and/or in a small number of patients. However, their clinical use may be limited by anti-SARS-CoV-2 50 % maximal effective concentrations (EC50) that exceeded their achievable peak serum concentrations (Cmax), side effects, and/or availability. To find more immediately available COVID-19 antivirals, we established a two-tier drug screening system that combines SARS-CoV-2 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and cell viability assay, and applied it to screen a library consisting 1528 FDA-approved drugs. Cetilistat (anti-pancreatic lipase), diiodohydroxyquinoline (anti-parasitic), abiraterone acetate (synthetic androstane steroid), and bexarotene (antineoplastic retinoid) exhibited potent in vitro anti-SARS-CoV-2 activity (EC50 1.13-2.01 µM). Bexarotene demonstrated the highest Cmax:EC50 ratio (1.69) which was higher than those of chloroquine, hydroxychloroquine, and ivermectin. These results demonstrated the efficacy of the two-tier screening system and identified potential COVID-19 treatments which can achieve effective levels if given by inhalation or systemically depending on their pharmacokinetics.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Drug Evaluation, Preclinical/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Androstenes/pharmacology , Animals , Benzoxazines/pharmacology , Betacoronavirus/drug effects , Betacoronavirus/physiology , Bexarotene/pharmacology , Caco-2 Cells , Cell Survival/drug effects , Chlorocebus aethiops , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Cytopathogenic Effect, Viral/drug effects , Databases, Pharmaceutical , Drug Approval , Drug Repositioning , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , Humans , Iodoquinol/pharmacology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , United States , United States Food and Drug Administration , Vero Cells , Viral Load/drug effects , Virus Replication/drug effects
14.
Life Sci ; 255: 117831, 2020 Aug 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-365098

ABSTRACT

A new SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) belonging to the genus Betacoronavirus has caused a pandemic known as COVID-19. Among coronaviruses, the main protease (Mpro) is an essential drug target which, along with papain-like proteases catalyzes the processing of polyproteins translated from viral RNA and recognizes specific cleavage sites. There are no human proteases with similar cleavage specificity and therefore, inhibitors are highly likely to be nontoxic. Therefore, targeting the SARS-CoV-2 Mpro enzyme with small molecules can block viral replication. The present study is aimed at the identification of promising lead molecules for SARS-CoV-2 Mpro enzyme through virtual screening of antiviral compounds from plants. The binding affinity of selected small drug-like molecules to SARS-CoV-2 Mpro, SARS-CoV Mpro and MERS-CoV Mpro were studied using molecular docking. Bonducellpin D was identified as the best lead molecule which shows higher binding affinity (-9.28 kcal/mol) as compared to the control (-8.24 kcal/mol). The molecular binding was stabilized through four hydrogen bonds with Glu166 and Thr190 as well as hydrophobic interactions via eight residues. The SARS-CoV-2 Mpro shows identities of 96.08% and 50.65% to that of SARS-CoV Mpro and MERS-CoV Mpro respectively at the sequence level. At the structural level, the root mean square deviation (RMSD) between SARS-CoV-2 Mpro and SARS-CoV Mpro was found to be 0.517 Å and 0.817 Å between SARS-CoV-2 Mpro and MERS-CoV Mpro. Bonducellpin D exhibited broad-spectrum inhibition potential against SARS-CoV Mpro and MERS-CoV Mpro and therefore is a promising drug candidate, which needs further validations through in vitro and in vivo studies.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Betacoronavirus/drug effects , Betacoronavirus/enzymology , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Plant Extracts/pharmacology , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , Amino Acid Sequence , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Betacoronavirus/metabolism , Binding Sites , Computer Simulation , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Cysteine Endopeptidases/chemistry , Cysteine Endopeptidases/metabolism , Drug Evaluation, Preclinical/methods , Humans , Molecular Docking Simulation , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Protease Inhibitors/chemistry , Protein Binding , Small Molecule Libraries/pharmacology , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/chemistry , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/metabolism , Virus Replication/drug effects
15.
Arch Toxicol ; 94(6): 2263-2272, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-343743

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19-inducing virus, SARS-CoV2, is likely to remain a threat to human health unless efficient drugs or vaccines become available. Given the extent of the current pandemic (people in over one hundred countries infected) and its disastrous effect on world economy (associated with limitations of human rights), speedy drug discovery is critical. In this situation, past investments into the development of new (animal-free) approach methods (NAM) for drug safety, efficacy, and quality evaluation can be leveraged. For this, we provide an overview of repurposing ideas to shortcut drug development times. Animal-based testing would be too lengthy, and it largely fails, when a pathogen is species-specific or if the desired drug is based on specific features of human biology. Fortunately, industry has already largely shifted to NAM, and some public funding programs have advanced the development of animal-free technologies. For instance, NAM can predict genotoxicity (a major aspect of carcinogenicity) within days, human antibodies targeting virus epitopes can be generated in molecular biology laboratories within weeks, and various human cell-based organoids are available to test virus infectivity and the biological processes controlling them. The European Medicines Agency (EMA) has formed an expert group to pave the way for the use of such approaches for accelerated drug development. This situation illustrates the importance of diversification in drug discovery strategies and clearly shows the shortcomings of an approach that invests 95% of resources into a single technology (animal experimentation) in the face of challenges that require alternative approaches.


Subject(s)
Animal Testing Alternatives , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Drug Evaluation, Preclinical/methods , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Viral Vaccines , Betacoronavirus , Drug Development , Drug Repositioning , Humans
16.
Biosci Rep ; 40(6)2020 06 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-343226

ABSTRACT

Due to the lack of efficient therapeutic options and clinical trial limitations, the FDA-approved drugs can be a good choice to handle Coronavirus disease (COVID-19). Many reports have enough evidence for the use of FDA-approved drugs which have inhibitory potential against target proteins of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Here, we utilized a structure-based drug design approach to find possible drug candidates from the existing pool of FDA-approved drugs and checked their effectiveness against the SARS-CoV-2. We performed virtual screening of the FDA-approved drugs against the main protease (Mpro) of SARS-CoV-2, an essential enzyme, and a potential drug target. Using well-defined computational methods, we identified Glecaprevir and Maraviroc (MVC) as the best inhibitors of SARS-CoV-2 Mpro. Both drugs bind to the substrate-binding pocket of SARS-CoV-2 Mpro and form a significant number of non-covalent interactions. Glecaprevir and MVC bind to the conserved residues of substrate-binding pocket of SARS-CoV-2 Mpro. This work provides sufficient evidence for the use of Glecaprevir and MVC for the therapeutic management of COVID-19 after experimental validation and clinical manifestations.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/enzymology , Maraviroc/pharmacology , Protease Inhibitors/pharmacology , Quinoxalines/pharmacology , Sulfonamides/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/metabolism , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Betacoronavirus/drug effects , Computer Simulation , Drug Evaluation, Preclinical/methods , Maraviroc/chemistry , Maraviroc/metabolism , Molecular Structure , Protease Inhibitors/chemistry , Protease Inhibitors/metabolism , Quinoxalines/chemistry , Quinoxalines/metabolism , Sulfonamides/chemistry , Sulfonamides/metabolism
17.
Virus Res ; 285: 198022, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-276868

ABSTRACT

The recent outbreak of the deadly COVID-19 disease, being caused by the novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2), has put the world on red alert as it keeps spreading and recording more fatalities. Research efforts are being carried out to curtail the disease from spreading as it has been declared as of global health emergency. Hence, there is an exigent need to identify and design drugs that are capable of curing the infection and hinder its continual spread across the globe. Herein, a computer-aided drug design tool known as the virtual screening method was used to screen a database of 44 million compounds to find compounds that have the potential to inhibit the surface glycoprotein responsible for virus entry and binding. The consensus scoring approach selected three compounds with promising physicochemical properties and favorable molecular interactions with the target protein. These selected compounds can undergo lead optimization to be further developed as drugs that can be used in treating the COVID-19 disease.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Betacoronavirus/drug effects , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Drug Design , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/antagonists & inhibitors , Antiviral Agents/metabolism , Antiviral Agents/toxicity , Betacoronavirus/physiology , Drug Evaluation, Preclinical/methods , Humans , Ligands , Machine Learning , Models, Molecular , Molecular Docking Simulation , Pandemics , Protein Binding , Protein Structure, Tertiary , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Virus Internalization/drug effects
18.
Antimicrob Agents Chemother ; 64(7)2020 06 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-191429

ABSTRACT

Drug repositioning is the only feasible option to immediately address the COVID-19 global challenge. We screened a panel of 48 FDA-approved drugs against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) which were preselected by an assay of SARS-CoV. We identified 24 potential antiviral drug candidates against SARS-CoV-2 infection. Some drug candidates showed very low 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s), and in particular, two FDA-approved drugs-niclosamide and ciclesonide-were notable in some respects.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/drug effects , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Drug Repositioning , Niclosamide/pharmacology , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pregnenediones/pharmacology , Animals , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Cell Line , Chlorocebus aethiops , Drug Evaluation, Preclinical/methods , Humans , Pandemics , Vero Cells
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