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1.
Mol Pharmacol ; 100(6): 548-557, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1403004

ABSTRACT

Equilibrative nucleoside transporters (ENTs) are present at the blood-testis barrier (BTB), where they can facilitate antiviral drug disposition to eliminate a sanctuary site for viruses detectable in semen. The purpose of this study was to investigate ENT-drug interactions with three nucleoside analogs, remdesivir, molnupiravir, and molnupiravir's active metabolite, ß-d-N4-hydroxycytidine (EIDD-1931), and four non-nucleoside molecules repurposed as antivirals for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The study used three-dimensional pharmacophores for ENT1 and ENT2 substrates and inhibitors and Bayesian machine learning models to identify potential interactions with these transporters. In vitro transport experiments demonstrated that remdesivir was the most potent inhibitor of ENT-mediated [3H]uridine uptake (ENT1 IC50: 39 µM; ENT2 IC50: 77 µM), followed by EIDD-1931 (ENT1 IC50: 259 µM; ENT2 IC50: 467 µM), whereas molnupiravir was a modest inhibitor (ENT1 IC50: 701 µM; ENT2 IC50: 851 µM). Other proposed antivirals failed to inhibit ENT-mediated [3H]uridine uptake below 1 mM. Remdesivir accumulation decreased in the presence of 6-S-[(4-nitrophenyl)methyl]-6-thioinosine (NBMPR) by 30% in ENT1 cells (P = 0.0248) and 27% in ENT2 cells (P = 0.0054). EIDD-1931 accumulation decreased in the presence of NBMPR by 77% in ENT1 cells (P = 0.0463) and by 64% in ENT2 cells (P = 0.0132), which supported computational predictions that both are ENT substrates that may be important for efficacy against COVID-19. NBMPR failed to decrease molnupiravir uptake, suggesting that ENT interaction is likely inhibitory. Our combined computational and in vitro data can be used to identify additional ENT-drug interactions to improve our understanding of drugs that can circumvent the BTB. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT: This study identified remdesivir and EIDD-1931 as substrates of equilibrative nucleoside transporters 1 and 2. This provides a potential mechanism for uptake of these drugs into cells and may be important for antiviral potential in the testes and other tissues expressing these transporters.


Subject(s)
Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Antiviral Agents/metabolism , Cytidine/analogs & derivatives , Equilibrative Nucleoside Transporter 1/metabolism , Equilibrative-Nucleoside Transporter 2/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Adenosine Monophosphate/administration & dosage , Adenosine Monophosphate/metabolism , Alanine/administration & dosage , Alanine/metabolism , Antiviral Agents/administration & dosage , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/metabolism , Cytidine/administration & dosage , Cytidine/metabolism , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Drug Interactions/physiology , HeLa Cells , Humans , Protein Binding/drug effects , Protein Binding/physiology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects
2.
J Clin Pharmacol ; 61 Suppl 2: S129-S141, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1355875

ABSTRACT

Use of US Food and Drug Administration-approved substances of abuse has innate risks due to pharmacologic and pharmacokinetic properties of the medications, but the risk when using nonapproved drug products is much greater. Unbeknownst to the user, the dose of active ingredients in substances of abuse can vary substantially between different products because of manufacturing practices or improper storage. Even naturally occurring substances of abuse can have extensive dosage variability because of effects of the growing season and conditions, or differences in harvesting, storage, or manufacture of the finished products. Many illicit substances are adulterated, to make up for intentional underdosing or to enhance the effect of the intended active ingredient. These adulterants can be dangerous and produce direct cardiovascular, neurologic, hematologic, or dermatologic reactions or obscure adverse effects. Finally, an illicit substance can be contaminated or substituted for another one during its manufacture, leading to differences in adverse events, adverse event severity, or the drug interaction profile. Substances can be contaminated with microbes that induce infections or heavy metals that can damage organs or cause cancer. This milieu of undisclosed substances can also induce drug interactions. For reasons that are discussed, individuals who use substances of abuse are at increased risk of morbidity or mortality if they develop coronavirus disease 2019. Health professionals who treat patients with acute, urgent events associated with substances of abuse, or those treating the chronic manifestations of addiction, need to appreciate the complex and variable composition of substances of abuse and their potential health effects.


Subject(s)
Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions/complications , Illicit Drugs/adverse effects , Substance-Related Disorders/complications , COVID-19/mortality , Drug Interactions/physiology , Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions/mortality , Humans , Substance-Related Disorders/mortality , United States , United States Food and Drug Administration
3.
Ther Drug Monit ; 43(4): 455-458, 2021 08 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1305444

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: In this article, we present a case of apixaban elimination prolonged by 450% in a patient with coronavirus disease 2019 because of multiple conditions, including drug-drug interaction, severe inflammation, and acute kidney injury. Therapeutic drug monitoring was used to explain unusual routine coagulation assays. This grand round highlights the importance of dialog between the clinician and a therapeutic drug monitoring consultant for optimal patient care.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/metabolism , COVID-19/metabolism , Drug Monitoring/methods , Pyrazoles/metabolism , Pyridones/metabolism , Renal Elimination/drug effects , Teaching Rounds/methods , Acute Kidney Injury/chemically induced , Acute Kidney Injury/prevention & control , Aged, 80 and over , Antiviral Agents/adverse effects , Antiviral Agents/metabolism , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Drug Interactions/physiology , Factor Xa Inhibitors/adverse effects , Factor Xa Inhibitors/metabolism , Factor Xa Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Humans , Inflammation/chemically induced , Inflammation/metabolism , Inflammation/prevention & control , Male , Pyrazoles/adverse effects , Pyrazoles/therapeutic use , Pyridones/adverse effects , Pyridones/therapeutic use , Renal Elimination/physiology , Severity of Illness Index , Time Factors
4.
Ther Drug Monit ; 43(4): 455-458, 2021 08 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1205884

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: In this article, we present a case of apixaban elimination prolonged by 450% in a patient with coronavirus disease 2019 because of multiple conditions, including drug-drug interaction, severe inflammation, and acute kidney injury. Therapeutic drug monitoring was used to explain unusual routine coagulation assays. This grand round highlights the importance of dialog between the clinician and a therapeutic drug monitoring consultant for optimal patient care.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/metabolism , COVID-19/metabolism , Drug Monitoring/methods , Pyrazoles/metabolism , Pyridones/metabolism , Renal Elimination/drug effects , Teaching Rounds/methods , Acute Kidney Injury/chemically induced , Acute Kidney Injury/prevention & control , Aged, 80 and over , Antiviral Agents/adverse effects , Antiviral Agents/metabolism , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Drug Interactions/physiology , Factor Xa Inhibitors/adverse effects , Factor Xa Inhibitors/metabolism , Factor Xa Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Humans , Inflammation/chemically induced , Inflammation/metabolism , Inflammation/prevention & control , Male , Pyrazoles/adverse effects , Pyrazoles/therapeutic use , Pyridones/adverse effects , Pyridones/therapeutic use , Renal Elimination/physiology , Severity of Illness Index , Time Factors
5.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(5)2021 Mar 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1129729

ABSTRACT

Depression coexists with epilepsy, worsening its course. Treatment of the two diseases enables the possibility of interactions between antidepressant and antiepileptic drugs. The aim of this review was to analyze such interactions in one animal seizure model-the maximal electroshock (MES) in mice. Although numerous antidepressants showed an anticonvulsant action, mianserin exhibited a proconvulsant effect against electroconvulsions. In most cases, antidepressants potentiated or remained ineffective in relation to the antielectroshock action of classical antiepileptic drugs. However, mianserin and trazodone reduced the action of valproate, phenytoin, and carbamazepine against the MES test. Antiseizure drug effects were potentiated by all groups of antidepressants independently of their mechanisms of action. Therefore, other factors, including brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and glial-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) modulation, should be considered as the background for the effect of drug combinations.


Subject(s)
Anticonvulsants/pharmacology , Antidepressive Agents/pharmacology , Drug Interactions/physiology , Animals , Disease Models, Animal , Electroshock/methods , Humans , Mice
6.
Curr Drug Metab ; 21(14): 1127-1135, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-968953

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In clinical practice, chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine are often co-administered with other drugs in the treatment of malaria, chronic inflammatory diseases, and COVID-19. Therefore, their metabolic properties and the effects on the activity of cytochrome P450 (P450, CYP) enzymes and drug transporters should be considered when developing the most efficient treatments for patients. METHODS: Scientific literature on the interactions of chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine with human P450 enzymes and drug transporters, was searched using PUBMED.Gov (https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/) and the ADME database (https://life-science.kyushu.fujitsu.com/admedb/). RESULTS: Chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine are metabolized by P450 1A2, 2C8, 2C19, 2D6, and 3A4/5 in vitro and by P450s 2C8 and 3A4/5 in vivo by N-deethylation. Chloroquine effectively inhibited P450 2D6 in vitro; however, in vivo inhibition was not apparent except in individuals with limited P450 2D6 activity. Chloroquine is both an inhibitor and inducer of the transporter MRP1 and is also a substrate of the Mate and MRP1 transport systems. Hydroxychloroquine also inhibited P450 2D6 and the transporter OATP1A2. CONCLUSIONS: Chloroquine caused a statistically significant decrease in P450 2D6 activity in vitro and in vivo, also inhibiting its own metabolism by the enzyme. The inhibition indicates a potential for clinical drug-drug interactions when taken with other drugs that are predominant substrates of the P450 2D6. When chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine are used clinically with other drugs, substrates of P450 2D6 enzyme, attention should be given to substrate-specific metabolism by P450 2D6 alleles present in individuals taking the drugs.


Subject(s)
Chloroquine/metabolism , Cytochrome P-450 Enzyme Inhibitors/metabolism , Cytochrome P-450 Enzyme System/metabolism , Hydroxychloroquine/metabolism , Membrane Transport Proteins/metabolism , Animals , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/metabolism , Chloroquine/therapeutic use , Cytochrome P-450 Enzyme Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Drug Interactions/physiology , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Pharmaceutical Preparations/metabolism
7.
CPT Pharmacometrics Syst Pharmacol ; 10(2): 100-107, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-932472

ABSTRACT

Many drugs that have been proposed for treatment of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) are reported to cause cardiac adverse events, including ventricular arrhythmias. In order to properly weigh risks against potential benefits, particularly when decisions must be made quickly, mathematical modeling of both drug disposition and drug action can be useful for predicting patient response and making informed decisions. Here, we explored the potential effects on cardiac electrophysiology of four drugs proposed to treat COVID-19: lopinavir, ritonavir, chloroquine, and azithromycin, as well as combination therapy involving these drugs. Our study combined simulations of pharmacokinetics (PKs) with quantitative systems pharmacology (QSP) modeling of ventricular myocytes to predict potential cardiac adverse events caused by these treatments. Simulation results predicted that drug combinations can lead to greater cellular action potential prolongation, analogous to QT prolongation, compared with drugs given in isolation. The combination effect can result from both PK and pharmacodynamic drug interactions. Importantly, simulations of different patient groups predicted that women with pre-existing heart disease are especially susceptible to drug-induced arrhythmias, compared with diseased men or healthy individuals of either sex. Statistical analysis of population simulations revealed the molecular factors that make certain women with heart failure especially susceptible to arrhythmias. Overall, the results illustrate how PK and QSP modeling may be combined to more precisely predict cardiac risks of COVID-19 therapies.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/administration & dosage , Antiviral Agents/adverse effects , Arrhythmias, Cardiac/chemically induced , COVID-19/drug therapy , Models, Theoretical , Therapies, Investigational/methods , Action Potentials/drug effects , Action Potentials/physiology , Arrhythmias, Cardiac/diagnosis , Arrhythmias, Cardiac/physiopathology , Azithromycin/administration & dosage , Azithromycin/adverse effects , COVID-19/metabolism , Chloroquine/administration & dosage , Chloroquine/adverse effects , Drug Combinations , Drug Interactions/physiology , Drug Therapy, Combination , Female , Humans , Lopinavir/administration & dosage , Lopinavir/adverse effects , Male , Myocytes, Cardiac/drug effects , Myocytes, Cardiac/metabolism , Risk Factors , Ritonavir/administration & dosage , Ritonavir/adverse effects
8.
Eur J Pharmacol ; 891: 173694, 2021 Jan 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-893746

ABSTRACT

In the context of the current SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, associations of drugs which interfere with specific steps of the viral infectious cycle are currently being exploited as therapeutic strategies since a specific treatment by vaccination is still unavailable. A widespread association of repurposed agents is the combination of the antimalarial drug Hydroxychloroquine and the macrolide antibiotic Azithromycin in the setting of clinical trials. But a closer analysis of their mechanism of action suggests that their concomitant administration may be impractical, and this is supported by experimental data with other agents of the same classes. However a sequential administration of the lysosomotropic antimalarial with the addition of the macrolide proton pump inhibitor after the first has reached a certain threshold could better exploit their antiviral potential.


Subject(s)
Azithromycin/pharmacology , COVID-19 , Drug Repositioning , Hydroxychloroquine/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2 , Anti-Bacterial Agents/pharmacology , Antimalarials/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/virology , Drug Interactions/physiology , Drug Repositioning/methods , Drug Repositioning/trends , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
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