Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 94
Filter
1.
Physiol Rep ; 10(4): e15197, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1699962

ABSTRACT

Reduced exercise capacity and several limiting symptoms during exercise have been reported following severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. From clinical observations, we hypothesized that an abnormal breathing pattern (BrP) during exercise may be common in these patients and related to reduced exercise capacity. We aimed to (a) evaluate a method to classify the BrP as normal/abnormal or borderline in terms of inter-rater agreement; (b) determine the occurrence of an abnormal BrP in patients with post-COVID; and (c) compare characteristics of post-COVID patients with normal and abnormal BrP. In a retrospective, cross-sectional study of patients referred for CPET due to post-COVID April 2020-April 2021, we selected subjects without a history of intensive care and with available medical records. Three raters independently categorized patients' BrP as normal, abnormal, or borderline, using four traditional CPET plots (respiratory exchange ratio, tidal volume over ventilation, ventilatory equivalent for oxygen, and ventilation over time). Out of 20 patients (11 male), 10 were categorized as having a normal, 7 an abnormal, and three a borderline BrP. Inter-rater agreement was good (Fleiss' kappa: 0.66 [0.66-0.67]). Subjects with an abnormal BrP had lower peak ventilation, lower exercise capacity, similar ventilatory efficiency and a similar level of dyspnea at peak exercise, as did subjects with a normal BrP. Patients' BrP was possible to classify with good agreement between observers. A third of patients had an abnormal BrP, associated with lower exercise capacity, which could possibly explain exercise related symptoms in some patients with post-COVID syndrome.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Dyspnea/etiology , Exercise Tolerance/physiology , Respiration , Adult , COVID-19/physiopathology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Dyspnea/physiopathology , Exercise Test , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Respiratory Function Tests , Retrospective Studies
2.
Appl Physiol Nutr Metab ; 46(7): 753-762, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1571437

ABSTRACT

We sought to determine the impact of wearing cloth or surgical masks on the cardiopulmonary responses to moderate-intensity exercise. Twelve subjects (n = 5 females) completed three, 8-min cycling trials while breathing through a non-rebreathing valve (laboratory control), cloth, or surgical mask. Heart rate (HR), oxyhemoglobin saturation (SpO2), breathing frequency, mouth pressure, partial pressure of end-tidal carbon dioxide (PetCO2) and oxygen (PetO2), dyspnea were measured throughout exercise. A subset of n = 6 subjects completed an additional exercise bout without a mask (ecological control). There were no differences in breathing frequency, HR or SpO2 across conditions (all p > 0.05). Compared with the laboratory control (4.7 ± 0.9 cmH2O [mean ± SD]), mouth pressure swings were smaller with the surgical mask (0.9 ± 0.7; p < 0.0001), but similar with the cloth mask (3.6 ± 4.8 cmH2O; p = 0.66). Wearing a cloth mask decreased PetO2 (-3.5 ± 3.7 mm Hg) and increased PetCO2 (+2.0 ± 1.3 mm Hg) relative to the ecological control (both p < 0.05). There were no differences in end-tidal gases between mask conditions and laboratory control (both p > 0.05). Dyspnea was similar between the control conditions and the surgical mask (p > 0.05) but was greater with the cloth mask compared with laboratory (+0.9 ± 1.2) and ecological (+1.5 ± 1.3) control conditions (both p < 0.05). Wearing a mask during short-term moderate-intensity exercise may increase dyspnea but has minimal impact on the cardiopulmonary response. Novelty: Wearing surgical or cloth masks during exercise has no impact on breathing frequency, tidal volume, oxygenation, and heart rate However, there are some changes in inspired and expired gas fractions that are physiologically irrelevant. In young healthy individuals, wearing surgical or cloth masks during submaximal exercise has few physiological consequences.


Subject(s)
Exercise/physiology , Heart Rate , Masks , Oxyhemoglobins/metabolism , Respiratory Rate , Adult , COVID-19/prevention & control , Carbon Dioxide/physiology , Dyspnea/physiopathology , Equipment Design , Exercise Test , Face , Female , Humans , Male , Mouth/physiology , Oxygen/physiology , Partial Pressure , Pressure , Skin Temperature , Tidal Volume , Young Adult
3.
Arch Iran Med ; 24(10): 733-740, 2021 10 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1535137

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Clinical manifestations of COVID-19 are different. There are some risk factors for COVID-19. This study aimed to describe the epidemiological features, symptoms and mortality of the patients with COVID-19 in Iran. METHODS: This were a cohort study performed on 103,179 patients with COVID-19. The demographic and clinical data were collected in selected provinces. The required data of all patients was extracted from the COVID registry system and analyzed using STATA version 14 and Excel 2016. RESULTS: The mean age was 52.40 years for men and 52.41 years for women. About 55.2% of the study population were male and 44.8% were female. Totally, 60.9% (5085) of deaths happened in men and 39.1% (3263) in women. The mean time from onset of symptoms to hospitalization in men and women were 3.47 and 3.48 days, respectively. The mean time from onset of symptoms to isolation was 2.81 days in men and was 2.87 days in women, from onset of symptoms to death was 9.29 and 9.54 days, respectively, from onset of symptoms to discharge was 7.47 and 7.39 days, and from hospitalization to death was 6.76 and 7.05 days. Cough and shortness of breath were the most common symptoms in the patients. CONCLUSION: According to the results, the overall mortality rate was higher in men than women. Women with cardiovascular disease and diabetes were more likely to die. The mean time from onset of symptoms to hospitalization, isolation, and discharge was similar in men and women.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Cough/physiopathology , Dyspnea/physiopathology , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , Age Distribution , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/physiopathology , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Child , Child, Preschool , Comorbidity , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Iran/epidemiology , Length of Stay , Male , Middle Aged , Registries , SARS-CoV-2 , Sex Factors , Time Factors , Young Adult
4.
Radiology ; 301(1): E353-E360, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1430241

ABSTRACT

Background SARS-CoV-2 targets angiotensin-converting enzyme 2-expressing cells in the respiratory tract. There are reports of breathlessness in patients many months after infection. Purpose To determine whether hyperpolarized xenon 129 MRI (XeMRI) imaging could be used to identify the possible cause of breathlessness in patients at 3 months after hospital discharge following COVID-19 infection. Materials and Methods This prospective study was undertaken between August and December of 2020, with patients and healthy control volunteers being enrolled. All patients underwent lung function tests; ventilation and dissolved-phase XeMRI, with the mean red blood cell (RBC) to tissue or plasma (TP) ratio being calculated; and a low-dose chest CT, with scans being scored for the degree of abnormalities after COVID-19. Healthy control volunteers underwent XeMRI. The intraclass correlation coefficient was calculated for volunteer and patient scans to assess repeatability. A Wilcoxon rank sum test and Cohen effect size calculation were performed to assess differences in the RBC/TP ratio between patients and control volunteers. Results Nine patients (mean age, 57 years ± 7 [standard deviation]; six male patients) and five volunteers (mean age, 29 years ± 3; five female volunteers) were enrolled. The mean time from hospital discharge for patients was 169 days (range, 116-254 days). There was a difference in the RBC/TP ratio between patients and control volunteers (0.3 ± 0.1 vs 0.5 ± 0.1, respectively; P = .001; effect size, 1.36). There was significant difference between the RBC and gas phase spectral full width at half maximum between volunteers and patients (median ± range, 567 ± 1 vs 507 ± 81 [P = .002] and 104 ± 2 vs 122 ± 17 [P = .004], respectively). Results were reproducible, with intraclass correlation coefficients of 0.82 and 0.88 being demonstrated for patients and volunteers, respectively. Participants had normal or nearly normal CT scans (mean, seven of 25; range, zero of 25 to 10 of 25). Conclusion Hyperpolarized xenon 129 MRI results showed alveolar capillary diffusion limitation in all nine patients after COVID-19 pneumonia, despite normal or nearly normal results at CT. © RSNA, 2021 See also the editorial by Dietrich in this issue.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/physiopathology , Dyspnea/physiopathology , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Lung/physiopathology , Magnetic Resonance Imaging/methods , Xenon Isotopes , Adult , Aged , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
6.
Am Heart J ; 241: 83-86, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1384824

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 infection has been associated with cardiovascular disease in children, but which children need cardiac evaluation is unclear. We describe our experience evaluating 206 children for cardiac disease following SARS-CoV-2 infection (one of whom had ventricular ectopy) and propose a new guideline for management of these children. Routine cardiac screening after SARS-CoV-2 infection in children without any cardiac signs or symptoms does not appear to be high yield.


Subject(s)
Aftercare , COVID-19/physiopathology , Heart Diseases/diagnosis , Referral and Consultation , Adolescent , Ambulatory Care , Atrioventricular Block/diagnosis , Atrioventricular Block/etiology , Atrioventricular Block/physiopathology , Bradycardia/diagnosis , Bradycardia/etiology , Bradycardia/physiopathology , COVID-19/complications , Cardiology , Chest Pain/physiopathology , Child , Child, Preschool , Dyspnea/physiopathology , Echocardiography , Electrocardiography , Fatigue/physiopathology , Female , Heart Diseases/etiology , Heart Diseases/physiopathology , Humans , Hypertrophy, Left Ventricular/diagnosis , Hypertrophy, Left Ventricular/etiology , Hypertrophy, Left Ventricular/physiopathology , Hypertrophy, Right Ventricular/diagnosis , Hypertrophy, Right Ventricular/etiology , Hypertrophy, Right Ventricular/physiopathology , Implementation Science , Male , Pediatrics , Practice Guidelines as Topic , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Syncope/physiopathology , Ventricular Premature Complexes/diagnosis , Ventricular Premature Complexes/etiology , Ventricular Premature Complexes/physiopathology , Young Adult
7.
Respir Res ; 22(1): 222, 2021 Aug 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1344107

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in significant acute morbidity and mortality worldwide. There is now a growing recognition of the longer-term sequelae of this infection, termed "long COVID". However, little is known about this condition. Here, we describe a distinct phenotype seen in a subset of patients with long COVID who have reduced exercise tolerance as measured by the 6 min walk test. They are associated with significant exertional dyspnea, reduced health-related quality of life and poor functional status. However, surprisingly, they do not appear to have any major pulmonary function abnormalities or increased burden of neurologic, musculoskeletal or fatigue symptoms.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Dyspnea/physiopathology , Exercise Tolerance/physiology , Lung/physiology , Phenotype , Physical Exertion/physiology , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/physiopathology , Dyspnea/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Oxygen Consumption/physiology , Walk Test/methods
8.
PLoS One ; 16(7): e0255141, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1323020

ABSTRACT

The natural history of COVID-19 and predictors of mortality in older adults need to be investigated to inform clinical operations and healthcare policy planning. A retrospective study took place in 80 long-term nursing homes in Catalonia, Spain collecting data from March 1st to May 31st, 2020. Demographic and clinical data from 2,092 RT-PCR confirmed cases of SARS-CoV-2 infection were registered, including structural characteristics of the facilities. Descriptive statistics to describe the demographic, clinical, and molecular characteristics of our sample were prepared, both overall and by their symptomatology was performed and an analysis of statistically significant bivariate differences and constructions of a logistic regression model were carried out to assess the relationship between variables. The incidence of the infection was 28%. 71% of the residents showed symptoms. Five major symptoms included: fever, dyspnea, dry cough, asthenia and diarrhea. Fever and dyspnea were by far the most frequent (50% and 28%, respectively). The presentation was predominantly acute and symptomatology persisted from days to weeks (mean 9.1 days, SD = 10,9). 16% of residents had confirmed pneumonia and 22% required hospitalization. The accumulated mortality rate was 21.75% (86% concentrated during the first 28 days at onset). A multivariate logistic regression analysis showed a positive predictive value for mortality for some variables such as age, pneumonia, fever, dyspnea, stupor refusal to oral intake and dementia (p<0.01 for all variables). Results suggest that density in the nursing homes did not account for differences in the incidence of the infection within the facilities. This study provides insights into the natural history of the disease in older adults with high dependency living in long-term nursing homes during the first pandemic wave of March-May 2020 in the region of Catalonia, and suggests that some comorbidities and symptoms have a strong predictive value for mortality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dyspnea , Fever , Nursing Homes , SARS-CoV-2 , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/physiopathology , Comorbidity , Dyspnea/mortality , Dyspnea/pathology , Dyspnea/physiopathology , Female , Fever/mortality , Fever/pathology , Fever/physiopathology , Humans , Incidence , Male , Retrospective Studies , Spain/epidemiology
9.
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth ; 21(1): 505, 2021 Jul 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1308092

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Evidence on the outcome of SARS-CoV-2 infection in pregnancy is generally reassuring but yet not definitive. METHODS: To specifically assess the impact of SARS-CoV-2 infection in late pregnancy, we prospectively recruited 315 consecutive women delivering in a referral hospital located in Lombardy, Italy in the early phase of the epidemic. Restriction of the recruitment to this peculiar historical time period allowed to exclude infections occurring early in pregnancy and to limit the recall bias. All recruited subjects underwent a nasopharyngeal swab to assess the presence of Sars-Cov-2 using Real-time PCR. In addition, two different types of antibodies for the virus were evaluated in peripheral blood, those against the spike proteins S1 and S2 of the envelope and those against the nucleoprotein of the nucleocapsid. Women were considered to have had SARS-CoV-2 infection in pregnancy if at least one of the three assessments was positive. RESULTS: Overall, 28 women had a diagnosis of SARS-CoV-2 infection in pregnancy (8.9%). Women diagnosed with the infection were more likely to report one or more episodes of symptoms suggestive for Covid-19 (n = 11, 39.3%) compared to unaffected women (n = 39, 13.6%). The corresponding OR was 4.11 (95%CI: 1.79-9.44). Symptoms significantly associated with Covid-19 in pregnancy included fever, cough, dyspnea and anosmia. Only one woman necessitated intensive care. Pregnancy outcome in women with and without SARS-CoV-2 infection did not also differ. CONCLUSIONS: SARS-CoV-2 infection is asymptomatic in three out of five women in late pregnancy and is rarely severe. In addition, pregnancy outcome may not be markedly affected.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , Adult , Anosmia/physiopathology , Asymptomatic Infections , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing , COVID-19 Serological Testing , Cough/physiopathology , Dyspnea/physiopathology , Female , Fever/physiopathology , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/physiopathology , Pregnancy Outcome , Pregnancy Trimester, Third , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
11.
Ann Am Thorac Soc ; 18(6): 997-1003, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1256079

ABSTRACT

Rationale: Much is known about the acute infective process of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the causative virus of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic. The marked inflammatory response and coagulopathic state in acute SARS-CoV-2 infection may promote pulmonary fibrosis. However, little is known about the incidence and seriousness of post-COVID-19 pulmonary pathology. Objectives: To describe the respiratory recovery and self-reported health after infection at the time of outpatient attendance. Methods: Infection severity was graded into three groups: 1) not requiring admission, 2) requiring hospital admission, and 3) requiring intensive care unit care. Participants underwent chest radiography and a 6-minute walk test (6MWT). Fatigue and subjective return to health were assessed, and concentrations of CRP (C-reactive protein), IL-6 (interleukin-6), sCD25 (soluble CD25), and D-dimer were measured. The associations between initial illness and abnormal chest X-ray findings, 6MWT distance, and perception of maximal exertion were investigated. Results: A total of 487 patients were offered an outpatient appointment, of whom 153 (31%) attended for assessment at a median of 75 days after diagnosis. A total of 74 (48%) had required hospital admission during acute infection. Persistently abnormal chest X-ray findings were seen in 4%. The median 6MWT distance covered was 460 m. A reduced distance covered was associated with frailty and length of inpatient stay. A total of 95 (62%) patients believed that they had not returned to full health, whereas 47% met the case definition for fatigue. Ongoing ill health and fatigue were associated with an increased perception of exertion. None of the measures of persistent respiratory disease were associated with initial disease severity. Conclusions: This study highlights the rates of objective respiratory disease and subjective respiratory symptoms after COVID-19 and the complex multifactorial nature of post-COVID-19 ill health.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Fatigue/physiopathology , Frailty/physiopathology , Lung/physiopathology , Recovery of Function , Adult , Aged , Ambulatory Care , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/physiopathology , Dyspnea/physiopathology , Female , Health Status , Hospitalization , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Male , Middle Aged , Physical Exertion , Radiography, Thoracic , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Walk Test
15.
Chron Respir Dis ; 18: 14799731211015691, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1219161

ABSTRACT

Individuals with lasting symptoms of COVID-19 should be offered a comprehensive recovery programme. 30 individuals (mean[SD] age 58[16]) that completed a 6 week, twice supervised rehabilitation programme demonstrated statistically significant improvements in exercise capacity, respiratory symptoms, fatigue and cognition. Participants improved by 112 m on the Incremental Shuttle Walking Test and 544 seconds on the Endurance Shuttle Walking Test. There were no serious adverse events recorded, and there were no dropouts related to symptom worsening. COVID-19 rehabilitation appears feasible and significantly improves clinical outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/rehabilitation , Dyspnea/rehabilitation , Exercise Therapy/methods , Exercise Tolerance/physiology , Fatigue/rehabilitation , Walking/physiology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Dyspnea/etiology , Dyspnea/physiopathology , Fatigue/etiology , Fatigue/physiopathology , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Pandemics , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
16.
Turk J Med Sci ; 51(2): 421-427, 2021 04 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1211944

ABSTRACT

Background/aim: The COVID-19 infection, which started in Wuhan City, China, in December 2019, turned into a pandemic in a very short time, affecting mainly the elderly and those with serious chronic illnesses. COVID-19 infections have been observed to have a high mortality rate, especially in patients undergoing maintenance hemodialysis. Materials and methods: Forty-two patients over 18 years of age who underwent a maintenance hemodialysis program at our unit, who tested positive for COVID-19 by PCR from nasopharyngeal swabs, and/or who were observed to have disease-related signs in their CTs were included in the study. Results: In this study, 23 of 42 patients receiving hemodialysis support in our clinic were included. The median age was 67 years old (min: 35; max: 91 years), and all of our patients had primary hypertension and other comorbidities. Their clinical evaluation showed that dry cough (47.8%) and shortness of breath (47.8%) were the most common symptoms. Fever was less pronounced (30.4%). The median time from the onset of symptoms to hospitalization was 1 day (min: 0; max:), and the time from hospitalization to death was 18 days (min: 1; max: 22). Transfer from the inpatient ward to the ICU took a median of 7 days (min: 1; max: 13). Among the 23 patients, 3 died during follow-up, and 20 were discharged with full recovery. Baseline ferritin, procalcitonin levels, and CRP/albumin rates were higher, and neutrophil/lymphocyte levels were lower in patients who eventually died. In these patients, despite being nonsignificant, there were more diabetic patients, and the D-dimer levels were higher than 1000 ugFEU/L. Conclusion: The COVID-19 infection is associated with increased mortality in chronic kidney diseases patients. Despite being nonsignificant, there was a trend towards increased mortality in patient with diabetes, D-dimer levels >1000 ugFEU/L, higher ferritin and prokalsitonin levels, an increased CRP/albumin ratio, and a lower neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/physiopathology , Kidney Failure, Chronic/therapy , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , C-Reactive Protein/metabolism , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/mortality , Cough/physiopathology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Dyspnea/physiopathology , Female , Ferritins/metabolism , Fever/physiopathology , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Kidney Failure, Chronic/complications , Length of Stay , Leukocyte Count , Lymphocyte Count , Male , Middle Aged , Neutrophils , Procalcitonin/metabolism , Prognosis , Renal Dialysis , SARS-CoV-2 , Serum Albumin/metabolism , Time Factors
17.
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth ; 21(1): 326, 2021 Apr 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1204051

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Knowledge about SARS-CoV-2 infection in pregnancy and newborns is scarce. The objective of this study is to analyse clinical and epidemiological characteristics of a cohort of women infected with SARS-CoV-2 during pregnancy and their newborns exposed to SARS-CoV-2 during gestation. METHODS: Multicentric observational study of Spanish hospitals from the GESNEO-COVD cohort, participants in RECLIP (Spanish Network of Paediatric Clinical Assays). Women with confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection by PCR and/or serology during pregnancy, diagnosed and delivering during the period 15/03/2020-31/07/2020 were included. Epidemiological, clinical, and analytical data was collected. RESULTS: A total of 105 pregnant women with a median of 34.1 years old (IQR: 28.8-37.1) and 107 newborns were included. Globally, almost 65% of pregnant women had some COVID-19 symptoms and more than 43% were treated for SARS-COV-2. Overall, 30.8% of pregnant women had pneumonia and 5 (4.8%) women were admitted to the intensive care unit needing invasive mechanical ventilation. There was a rate of 36.2% of caesarean sections, which was associated with pneumonia during pregnancy (OR: 4.203, CI 95%: 1.473-11.995) and lower gestational age at delivery (OR: 0.724, CI 95%: 0.578-0.906). The prevalence of preterm birth was 20.6% and prematurity was associated with pneumonia during gestation (OR: 6.970, CI95%: 2.340-22.750) and having a positive SARS-CoV-2 PCR at delivery (OR: 6.520, CI95%: 1.840-31.790). All nasopharyngeal PCR in newborns were negative at birth and one positivized at 15 days of life. Two newborns died, one due to causes related to prematurity and another of unexpected sudden death during early skin-to-skin contact after delivery. CONCLUSIONS: Although vertical transmission has not been reported in this cohort, the prognosis of newborns could be worsened by SARS-CoV-2 infection during pregnancy as COVID-19 pneumonia increased the risk of caesarean section deliveries and preterm births.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Carrier State/epidemiology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , Premature Birth/epidemiology , Adult , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing , Cesarean Section/statistics & numerical data , Cohort Studies , Comorbidity , Cough/physiopathology , Diabetes, Gestational/epidemiology , Dyspnea/physiopathology , Female , Fever/physiopathology , Gestational Age , Humans , Hypertension/epidemiology , Hypothyroidism/epidemiology , Immunologic Factors/therapeutic use , Infant, Newborn , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Male , Obesity, Maternal/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnostic imaging , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications/epidemiology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/physiopathology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/therapy , Pregnancy Trimester, Second , Pregnancy Trimester, Third , Radiography, Thoracic , Respiration, Artificial , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Spain/epidemiology
18.
BMC Pulm Med ; 21(1): 126, 2021 Apr 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1191325

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Platypnea-orthodeoxia syndrome (POS) is a rare condition characterized by dyspnoea (platypnea) and arterial desaturation in the upright position resolved in the supine position (orthodeoxia). Intracardiac shunt, pulmonary ventilation-perfusion mismatch and others intrapulmonary abnormalities are involved. CASE PRESENTATION: We report a case of POS associated with two pathophysiological issues: one, cardiac POS caused by a patent foramen ovale (PFO) and second, pulmonary POS due to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) interstitial pneumonia. POS has resolved after recovery of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pneumonia. CONCLUSIONS: Right-to-left interatrial shunt and intrapulmonary shunt caused by SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia contributed to refractory hypoxemia and POS. Therefore, in case of COVID-19 patient with unexplained POS, the existence of PFO must be investigated.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dyspnea , Foramen Ovale, Patent , Hypoxia , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Pneumonia, Viral , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/physiopathology , Dyspnea/diagnosis , Dyspnea/etiology , Dyspnea/physiopathology , Echocardiography/methods , Foramen Ovale, Patent/complications , Foramen Ovale, Patent/diagnosis , Foramen Ovale, Patent/physiopathology , Hemodynamics , Humans , Hypoxia/diagnosis , Hypoxia/etiology , Hypoxia/physiopathology , Lung Diseases, Interstitial/complications , Lung Diseases, Interstitial/physiopathology , Lung Diseases, Interstitial/virology , Male , Middle Aged , Oxygen/analysis , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Posture/physiology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Syndrome , Treatment Outcome
19.
Epidemiol Infect ; 149: e92, 2021 04 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1169347

ABSTRACT

Case identification is an ongoing issue for the COVID-19 epidemic, in particular for outpatient care where physicians must decide which patients to prioritise for further testing. This paper reports tools to classify patients based on symptom profiles based on 236 severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 positive cases and 564 controls, accounting for the time course of illness using generalised multivariate logistic regression. Significant symptoms included abdominal pain, cough, diarrhoea, fever, headache, muscle ache, runny nose, sore throat, temperature between 37.5 and 37.9 °C and temperature above 38 °C, but their importance varied by day of illness at assessment. With a high percentile threshold for specificity at 0.95, the baseline model had reasonable sensitivity at 0.67. To further evaluate accuracy of model predictions, leave-one-out cross-validation confirmed high classification accuracy with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.92. For the baseline model, sensitivity decreased to 0.56. External validation datasets reported similar result. Our study provides a tool to discern COVID-19 patients from controls using symptoms and day from illness onset with good predictive performance. It could be considered as a framework to complement laboratory testing in order to differentiate COVID-19 from other patients presenting with acute symptoms in outpatient care.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care , COVID-19 Testing/methods , COVID-19/diagnosis , Abdominal Pain/physiopathology , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19/physiopathology , Case-Control Studies , Clinical Decision Rules , Cough/physiopathology , Diarrhea/physiopathology , Disease Progression , Dyspnea/physiopathology , Female , Fever/physiopathology , Headache/physiopathology , Humans , Logistic Models , Male , Middle Aged , Multivariate Analysis , Myalgia/physiopathology , Odds Ratio , Patient Selection , Pharyngitis/physiopathology , Rhinorrhea/physiopathology , SARS-CoV-2 , Sensitivity and Specificity , Severity of Illness Index , Young Adult
20.
Saudi Med J ; 42(4): 391-398, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1168263

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To determine the demographic and clinical characteristics, underlying comorbidities, and outcomes of children with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infection. METHODS: In this retrospective study, we reported 62 pediatric patients (age <14 years) with confirmed COVID-19 between March 2 and July 1, 2020, at King Abdulaziz University Hospital, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. RESULTS: Comorbid conditions, including cardiac, neurological, respiratory, and malignant disorders, were reported in 9 patients (14.5%). The most prominent presenting complaints were fever (80.6%) and cough (48.4%). Most of our patients (80.6%) had mild disease, 11.3% had moderate disease, and 8.1% exhibited severe and critical illness. Twenty-one patients (33.9%) were hospitalized, with 4 patients (6.5%) admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit, and 3 (4.8%) patients died. CONCLUSION: All pediatric age groups are susceptible to COVID-19, with no gender difference. COVID-19 infection may result in critical illness and even mortality in subsets of pediatric patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/physiopathology , Abdominal Pain/physiopathology , Adolescent , Asthma/epidemiology , Atrophy , Brain/pathology , Bronchiolitis Obliterans/epidemiology , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Child , Child, Preschool , Comorbidity , Cough/physiopathology , Diarrhea/physiopathology , Dyspnea/physiopathology , Female , Fever/physiopathology , Heart Defects, Congenital/epidemiology , Hospital Mortality , Hospitalization , Humans , Hydrocephalus/epidemiology , Infant , Intensive Care Units, Pediatric , Male , Pharyngitis/physiopathology , Respiration, Artificial , Respiratory Insufficiency/physiopathology , Respiratory Insufficiency/therapy , Retrospective Studies , Rhinorrhea/physiopathology , SARS-CoV-2 , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology , Severity of Illness Index , Vomiting/physiopathology
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL