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1.
Kardiologiia ; 62(3): 16-20, 2022 Mar 31.
Article in English, English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1789752

ABSTRACT

Aim      To study the relationship of echocardiographic right ventricular (RV) structural and functional parameters and indexes of pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) in patients 3 months after COVID-19 pneumonia.Material and methods  This cross-sectional, observational study included 96 patients aged 46.7±15.2 years. The inclusion criteria were documented diagnosis of COVID-19-associated pneumonia and patient's willing to participate in the observation. Patients were examined upon hospitalization and during the control visit (at 3 months after discharge from the hospital). Images and video loops were processed, including the assessment of myocardial longitudinal strain (LS) by speckle tracking, according to the effective guidelines. The equation [tricuspid regurgitation velocity/ time-velocity integral of the RV outflow tract × 10 + 0.16] was used to determine PRV. Patients were divided into group 1 (n=31) with increased PRV ≥1.5 Wood units and group 2 (n=65) with PRV <1.5 Wood units.Results At baseline, groups did not differ in main clinical functional characteristics, including severity of lung damage by computed tomography (32.7±22.1 and 36.5±20.4 %, respectively. р=0.418). Echocardiographic linear, planimetric and volumetric parameters did not significantly differ between the groups. In group 1 at the control visit, endocardial LS of the RV free wall (FW) (-19.3 [-17.9; -25.8] %) was significantly lower (р=0.048) than in group 2 (-23.4 [-19.8; -27.8] %), and systolic pulmonary artery pressure (sPAP) according to C. Otto (32.0 [26.0; 35.0] mm Hg and 23.0 [20.0; 28.0] mm Hg) was significantly higher than in group 2 (р<0.001). According to the logistic regression, only endocardial RV FW LS (odds ratio, OR, 0.859; 95 % confidence interval, CI, 0.746-0.989; р=0.034) and sPAP (OR, 1.248; 95 % CI, 1.108-1405; р<0.001) were independently related with the increase in PVR. Spearman correlation analysis detected a moderate relationship between PVR and mean PAP according to G. Mahan (r=0.516; p=0.003) and between PVR and the index of right heart chamber functional coupling with the PA system (r=-0.509; p=0.007) in group 1 at the control visit.Conclusion      In patients 3 months after COVID-19 pneumonia, hidden RV systolic dysfunction defined as depressed endocardial RV FW LS to -19.3% is associated with increased PVR ≥1.5 Wood units.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiomyopathies , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right , COVID-19/complications , Cross-Sectional Studies , Echocardiography/methods , Heart Ventricles/diagnostic imaging , Humans , Vascular Resistance , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right/diagnostic imaging , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right/etiology
2.
Respir Res ; 23(1): 68, 2022 Mar 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1759751

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Patient hospitalized for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pulmonary infection can have sequelae such as impaired exercise capacity. We aimed to determine the frequency of long-term exercise capacity limitation in survivors of severe COVID-19 pulmonary infection and the factors associated with this limitation. METHODS: Patients with severe COVID-19 pulmonary infection were enrolled 3 months after hospital discharge in COVulnerability, a prospective cohort. They underwent cardiopulmonary exercise testing, pulmonary function test, echocardiography, and skeletal muscle mass evaluation. RESULTS: Among 105 patients included, 35% had a reduced exercise capacity (VO2peak < 80% of predicted). Compared to patients with a normal exercise capacity, patients with reduced exercise capacity were more often men (89.2% vs. 67.6%, p = 0.015), with diabetes (45.9% vs. 17.6%, p = 0.002) and renal dysfunction (21.6% vs. 17.6%, p = 0.006), but did not differ in terms of initial acute disease severity. An altered exercise capacity was associated with an impaired respiratory function as assessed by a decrease in forced vital capacity (p < 0.0001), FEV1 (p < 0.0001), total lung capacity (p < 0.0001) and DLCO (p = 0.015). Moreover, we uncovered a decrease of muscular mass index and grip test in the reduced exercise capacity group (p = 0.001 and p = 0.047 respectively), whilst 38.9% of patients with low exercise capacity had a sarcopenia, compared to 10.9% in those with normal exercise capacity (p = 0.001). Myocardial function was normal with similar systolic and diastolic parameters between groups whilst reduced exercise capacity was associated with a slightly shorter pulmonary acceleration time, despite no pulmonary hypertension. CONCLUSION: Three months after a severe COVID-19 pulmonary infection, more than one third of patients had an impairment of exercise capacity which was associated with a reduced pulmonary function, a reduced skeletal muscle mass and function but without any significant impairment in cardiac function.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Exercise Tolerance/physiology , Pneumonia/physiopathology , Aged , COVID-19/physiopathology , Cohort Studies , Echocardiography/methods , Echocardiography/statistics & numerical data , Exercise Test/methods , Exercise Test/statistics & numerical data , Exercise Tolerance/immunology , Female , Follow-Up Studies , France , Humans , Lung/physiopathology , Male , Middle Aged , Pneumonia/etiology , Prospective Studies , Respiratory Function Tests/methods , Respiratory Function Tests/statistics & numerical data , Respiratory Insufficiency/etiology , Respiratory Insufficiency/physiopathology
6.
Wien Klin Wochenschr ; 133(23-24): 1298-1309, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1748480

ABSTRACT

Hundreds of millions got infected, and millions have died worldwide and still the number of cases is rising.Chest radiographs and computed tomography (CT) are useful for imaging the lung but their use in infectious diseases is limited due to hygiene and availability.Lung ultrasound has been shown to be useful in the context of the pandemic, providing clinicians with valuable insights and helping identify complications such as pleural effusion in heart failure or bacterial superinfections. Moreover, lung ultrasound is useful for identifying possible complications of procedures, in particular, pneumothorax.Associations between coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and cardiac complications, such as acute myocardial infarction and myocarditis, have been reported. As such, point of care echocardiography as well as a comprehensive approach in later stages of the disease provide important information for optimally diagnosing and treating complications of COVID-19.In our experience, lung ultrasound in combination with echocardiography, has a great impact on treatment decisions. In the acute state as well as in the follow-up setting after a severe or critical state of COVID-19, ultrasound can be of great impact to monitor the progression and regression of disease.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Critical Illness , Echocardiography , Humans , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Point-of-Care Systems , SARS-CoV-2 , Ultrasonography
7.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 101(8): e28971, 2022 Feb 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1713783

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Background: This systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to assess whether tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE) could be used as a prognostic tool in patients with coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19). METHODS: Studies on the relationship between TAPSE and COVID-19 since February 2021. Standardized mean difference (SMD) and 95% confidence intervals were used to assess the effect size. The potential for publication bias was assessed using a contour-enhanced funnel plot and Egger test. A meta-regression was performed to assess if the difference in TAPSE between survivors and nonsurvivors was affected by age, sex, hypertension or diabetes. RESULTS: Sixteen studies comprising 1579 patients were included in this meta-analysis. TAPSE was lower in nonsurvivors (SMD -3.24 (-4.23, -2.26), P < .00001; I2 = 71%), and a subgroup analysis indicated that TAPSE was also lower in critically ill patients (SMD -3.85 (-5.31, -2.38,), P < .00001; I2 = 46%). Heterogeneity was also significantly reduced, I2 < 50%. Pooled results showed that patients who developed right ventricular dysfunction had lower TAPSE (SMD -5.87 (-7.81, -3.92), P = .004; I2 = 82%). There was no statistically significant difference in the TAPSE of patients who sustained a cardiac injury vs those who did not (SMD -1.36 (-3.98, 1.26), P = .31; I2 = 88%). No significant publication bias was detected (P = .8147) but the heterogeneity of the included studies was significant. A meta-regression showed that heterogeneity was significantly greater when the incidence of hypertension was <50% (I2 = 91%) and that of diabetes was <30% (I2 = 85%). CONCLUSION: Low TAPSE levels are associated with poor COVID-19 disease outcomes. TAPSE levels are modulated by disease severity, and their prognostic utility may be skewed by pre-existing patient comorbidities. TRIAL RETROSPECTIVELY REGISTERED FEBRUARY ,: PROSPERO CRD42021236731.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Echocardiography/methods , Tricuspid Valve/diagnostic imaging , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right , Humans , Hypertension/complications , SARS-CoV-2 , Tricuspid Valve/physiopathology , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right/etiology , Ventricular Function, Right/physiology
11.
Echocardiography ; 39(2): 339-370, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1697847

ABSTRACT

Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) provides advanced cardiopulmonary life support for patients in cardiac and/or respiratory failure. Echocardiography provides essential diagnostic and anatomic information prior to ECMO initiation, allows for safe and efficient ECMO cannula positioning, guides optimization of flow, provides a modality for rapid troubleshooting and patient evaluation, and facilitates decision-making for eventual weaning of ECMO support. Currently, guidelines for echocardiographic assessment in this clinical context are lacking. In this review, we provide an overview of echocardiographic considerations for advanced imagers involved in the care of these complex patients. We focus predominately on new cannulas and complex cannulation techniques, including a special focus on double lumen cannulas and a section discussing indirect left ventricular venting. Echocardiography is tremendously valuable in providing optimal care in these challenging clinical situations. It is imperative for imaging physicians to understand the pertinent anatomic considerations, the often complicated physiological and hemodynamic context, and the limitations of the imaging modality.


Subject(s)
Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation , Respiratory Insufficiency , Cannula , Catheterization/methods , Echocardiography , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation/methods , Humans
12.
Microcirculation ; 29(3): e12750, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1697657

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-c) is associated with severe cardiovascular impairment and eventually death. Pathophysiological mechanisms involved in myocardial injury were scarcely investigated, and cardiovascular outcomes are uncertain. Autopsy studies suggested that microvascular dysfunction may be relevant to LV impairment. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to evaluate segmental LV longitudinal strain by 2DST echocardiography and myocardial flow reserve (MFR) by 13 N-ammonia PET-CT, in six surviving MIS-c patients. METHODS: Each patient generated 34 LV segments for combined 2DST and MRF analysis. MFR was considered abnormal when <2, borderline when between 2 and 2.5 and normal when >2.5. RESULTS: From July 2020 to February 2021, six patients were admitted with MIS-c: three males, aged 9.3 (6.6-15.7) years. Time from admission to the follow-up visit was 6.05 (2-10.3) months. Although all patients were asymptomatic and LV EF was ≥55%, 43/102 (42.1%) LV segments showed MFR <2.5. There was a modest positive correlation between segmental peak systolic longitudinal strain and MFR: r = .36, p = .03 for basal segments; r = .41, p = .022 for mid segments; r = .42, p = .021 for apical segments. Median peak systolic longitudinal strain was different among MRF categories: 18% (12%-24%) for abnormal, 18.5% (11%-35%) for borderline, and 21% (12%-32%) for normal MFR (p = .006). CONCLUSION: We provided preliminary evidence that surviving MIS-c patients may present subclinical impairment of myocardial microcirculation. Segmental cardiac strain assessment 2DST seems useful for MIS-c cardiovascular follow-up, given its good correlation with 13 N-ammonia PET-CT derived MFR.


Subject(s)
Positron Emission Tomography Computed Tomography , Ventricular Dysfunction, Left , Ammonia , Child , Echocardiography/methods , Humans , Male , Microcirculation , Myocardium , Ventricular Dysfunction, Left/diagnostic imaging
13.
Rheumatol Int ; 42(2): 341-348, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1694596

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The association between COVID-19 infection and the development of autoimmune diseases is currently unknown, but there are already reports presenting induction of different autoantibodies by SARS-CoV-2 infection. Kikuchi-Fuimoto disease (KFD) as a form of histiocytic necrotizing lymphadenitis of unknown origin. OBJECTIVE: Here we present a rare case of KFD with heart involvement after COVID-19 infection. To our best knowledge only a few cases of COVID-19-associated KFD were published so far. Based on presented case, we summarize the clinical course of KFD and its association with autoimmune diseases, as well we discuss the potential causes of perimyocarditis in this case. METHODS: We reviewed the literature regarding cases of "Kikuchi-Fujimoto disease (KFD)" and "COVID-19" and then "KFD" and "heart" or "myocarditis" by searching medical journal databases written in English in PubMed and Google Scholar. RESULTS: Only two cases of KFD after COVID infection have been described so far. CONCLUSION: SARS-CoV-2 infection can also be a new, potential causative agent of developing KFD.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/physiopathology , Hepatomegaly/physiopathology , Histiocytic Necrotizing Lymphadenitis/physiopathology , Myocarditis/physiopathology , Splenomegaly/physiopathology , Ventricular Dysfunction, Left/physiopathology , Adult , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing , COVID-19 Serological Testing , Echocardiography , Hepatomegaly/diagnostic imaging , Hepatomegaly/etiology , Histiocytic Necrotizing Lymphadenitis/etiology , Histiocytic Necrotizing Lymphadenitis/pathology , Humans , Male , Myocarditis/diagnostic imaging , Myocarditis/etiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Splenomegaly/diagnostic imaging , Splenomegaly/etiology , Stroke Volume , Ventricular Dysfunction, Left/diagnostic imaging , Ventricular Dysfunction, Left/etiology
14.
BMC Pulm Med ; 22(1): 52, 2022 Feb 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1690928

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 has inflicted the world for over two years. The recent mutant virus strains pose greater challenges to disease prevention and treatment. COVID-19 can cause acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and extrapulmonary injury. Dynamic monitoring of each patient's condition is necessary to timely tailor treatments, improve prognosis and reduce mortality. Point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) is broadly used in patients with ARDS. POCUS is recommended to be performed regularly in COVID-19 patients for respiratory failure management. In this review, we summarized the ultrasound characteristics of COVID-19 patients, mainly focusing on lung ultrasound and echocardiography. Furthermore, we also provided the experience of using POCUS to manage COVID-19-related ARDS.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , Echocardiography , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Point-of-Care Testing , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/diagnostic imaging , Respiratory Therapy/methods , COVID-19/therapy , Humans , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/virology
15.
Kardiologiia ; 62(1): 13-23, 2022 Jan 31.
Article in Russian, English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1689682

ABSTRACT

Aim    To study changes in clinical and echocardiographic parameters in patients after documented COVID-19 pneumonia at 3 months and one year following discharge from the hospital. Material and methods    The study included 116 patients who have had documented COVID-19 pneumonia. Patients underwent a comprehensive clinical evaluation at 3 months ± 2 weeks (visit 1) and at one year ± 3 weeks after discharge from the hospital (visit 2). Mean age of the patients was 49.0±14.4 years (from 19 to 84 years); 49.6 % were women. Parameters of global and segmentary longitudinal left ventricular (LV) myocardial strain were studied with the optimal quality of visualization during visit 1 in 99 patients and during visit 2 in 80 patients.Results    During the follow-up period, the incidence rate of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) increased primarily due to development of arterial hypertension (AH) (58.6 vs. 64.7 %, р=0.039) and chronic heart failure (CHF) (35.3% vs. 40.5 %, р=0.031). Echocardiography (EchoCG) showed decreases in values of end-diastolic dimension and volume, LV end-systolic and stroke volumes (25.1±2.6 vs. 24.5±2.2 mm /m2, p<0.001; 49.3±11.3 vs. 46.9±9.9 ml /m2, p=0.008; 16.0±5.6 vs. 14.4±4.1 ml /m2, p=0.001; 36.7±12.8 vs. 30.8±8.1 ml /m2, p<0.001, respectively). LV external short-axis area (37.1 [36.6-42.0] vs. 38.7 [35.2-43.1] cm2, р=0.001) and LV myocardial mass index calculated with the area-length formula (70.0 [60.8-84.0] vs. 75.4 [68.2-84.9] g /m², р=0.024) increased. LV early diastolic filling velocity (76.7±17.9 vs. 72.3±16.0 cm /sec, р=0.001) and lateral and septal early diastolic mitral annular velocities decreased (12,10±3,9 vs. 11.5±4.1 cm /sec, р=0.004 and 9.9±3.3 vs. 8.6±3.0 cm /sec, р<0.001, respectively). The following parameters of LV global longitudinal (-20.3±2.2 vs. -19.4±2.7 %, р=0.001) and segmental strain were impaired: apical segments (anterior, from -22.3±5.0 to -20.8±5.2 %, р=0.006; inferior, from -24.6±4.9 to -22.7±4.6, р=0.003; lateral, from -22.7±4.5 to -20.4±4.8 %, р<0.001; septal, from -25.3±4.2 to -23.1±4.4 %, р<0.001; apical, from -23.7±4.1 to -21.8±4.1 %, р<0.001), mid-cavity (anteroseptal, from -21.1±3.3 to -20.4±4.1 %, р=0.039; inferior, from -21.0±2.7 to -20.0±2.9 %, р=0.039; lateral, from -18.4±3.7 to -17.6±4.4 %, р=0.021). RV basal and mid-cavity sphericity indexes increased (0.44±0.07 vs. 0.49±0.07 and 0.37±0.07 vs. 0.41±0.07, respectively, р<0.001 for both). A tendency for increased calculated pulmonary arterial systolic pressure (22.5±7.1 and 23.3±6.3 mm Hg, р=0.076) was observed. Right ventricular outflow tract velocity integral decreased (18.1±4.0 vs. 16.4±3.7 cm, р<0.001).Conclusion    Patients after COVID-19 pneumonia one year after discharge from the hospital, compared to the follow-up data 3 months after the discharge, had an increased incidence of CVD, primarily due to the development of AH and CHF. EchoCG revealed changes in ventricular geometry associated with impairment of LV diastolic and systolic function evident as decreases in LV global longitudinal strain and LV myocardial apical and partially mid-cavity strain.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Patient Discharge , Adult , Echocardiography , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Stroke Volume , Ventricular Function, Left
17.
Eur J Appl Physiol ; 122(2): 515-522, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1669793

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Data regarding decompression stress after deep closed-circuit rebreather (CCR) dives are scarce. This study aimed to monitor technical divers during a wreck diving expedition and provide an insight in venous gas emboli (VGE) dynamics. METHODS: Diving practices of ten technical divers were observed. They performed a series of three consecutive daily dives around 100 m. VGE counts were measured 30 and 60 min after surfacing by both cardiac echography and subclavian Doppler graded according to categorical scores (Eftedal-Brubakk and Spencer scale, respectively) that were converted to simplified bubble grading system (BGS) for the purpose of analysis. Total body weight and fluids shift using bioimpedancemetry were also collected pre- and post-dive. RESULTS: Depth-time profiles of the 30 recorded man-dives were 97.3 ± 26.4 msw [range: 54-136] with a runtime of 160 ± 65 min [range: 59-270]. No clinical decompression sickness (DCS) was detected. The echographic frame-based bubble count par cardiac cycle was 14 ± 13 at 30 min and 13 ± 13 at 60 min. There is no statistical difference neither between dives, nor between time of measurements (P = 0.07). However, regardless of the level of conservatism used, a high incidence of high-grade VGE was detected. Doppler recordings with the O'dive were highly correlated with echographic recordings (Spearman r of 0.81, P = 0.008). CONCLUSION: Although preliminary, the present observation related to real CCR deep dives questions the precedence of decompression algorithm over individual risk factors and pleads for an individual approach of decompression.


Subject(s)
Decompression Sickness/prevention & control , Diving/physiology , Equipment and Supplies , Adult , Echocardiography , Electric Impedance , Embolism, Air/prevention & control , Helium , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Nitrogen , Oxygen , Risk Factors
19.
Can J Cardiol ; 38(3): 338-346, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1654182

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Strict isolation precautions limit formal echocardiography use in the setting of COVID-19 infection. Information on the importance of handheld focused ultrasound for cardiac evaluation in these patients is scarce. This study investigated the utility of a handheld echocardiography device in hospitalised patients with COVID-19 in diagnosing cardiac pathologies and predicting the composite end point of in-hospital death, mechanical ventilation, shock, and acute decompensated heart failure. METHODS: From April 28 through July 27, 2020, consecutive patients diagnosed with COVID-19 underwent evaluation with the use of handheld ultrasound (Vscan Extend with Dual Probe; GE Healthcare) within 48 hours of admission. The patients were divided into 2 groups: "normal" and "abnormal" echocardiogram, as defined by biventricular systolic dysfunction/enlargement or moderate/severe valvular regurgitation/stenosis. RESULTS: Among 102 patients, 26 (25.5%) had abnormal echocardiograms. They were older with more comorbidities and more severe presenting symptoms compared with the group with normal echocardiograms. The prevalences of the composite outcome among low- and high-risk patients (oxygen saturation < 94%) were 3.1% and 27.1%, respectively. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that an abnormal echocardiogram at presentation was independently associated with the composite end point (odds ratio 6.19, 95% confidence interval 1.50-25.57; P = 0.012). CONCLUSIONS: An abnormal echocardiogram in COVID-19 infection settings is associated with a higher burden of medical comorbidities and independently predicts major adverse end points. Handheld focused echocardiography can be used as an important "rule-out" tool among high-risk patients with COVID-19 and should be integrated into their routine admission evaluation. However, its routine use among low-risk patients is not recommended.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Echocardiography/instrumentation , Heart Diseases/diagnostic imaging , Lung Diseases/diagnostic imaging , Ultrasonography/instrumentation , Aged , Echocardiography/standards , Female , Heart Diseases/etiology , Hospitalization , Humans , Lung Diseases/etiology , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Ultrasonography/standards
20.
J Am Heart Assoc ; 11(3): e023251, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1642967

ABSTRACT

Background In multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children, there is paucity of longitudinal data on cardiac outcomes. We analyzed cardiac outcomes 3 to 4 months after initial presentation using echocardiography and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. Methods and Results We included 60 controls and 60 cases of multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children. Conventional echocardiograms and deformation parameters were analyzed at 4 time points: (1) acute phase (n=60), (2) subacute phase (n=50; median, 3 days after initial echocardiography), (3) 1-month follow-up (n=39; median, 22 days), and (4) 3- to 4-month follow-up (n=25; median, 91 days). Fourteen consecutive cardiac magnetic resonance imaging studies were reviewed for myocardial edema or fibrosis during subacute (n=5) and follow-up (n=9) stages. In acute phase, myocardial injury was defined as troponin-I level ≥0.09 ng/mL (>3 times normal) or brain-type natriuretic peptide >800 pg/mL. All deformation parameters, including left ventricular global longitudinal strain, peak left atrial strain, longitudinal early diastolic strain rate, and right ventricular free wall strain, recovered quickly within the first week, followed by continued improvement and complete normalization by 3 months. Median time to normalization of both global longitudinal strain and left atrial strain was 6 days (95% CI, 3-9 days). Myocardial injury at presentation (70% of multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children cases) did not affect short-term outcomes. Four patients (7%) had small coronary aneurysms at presentation, all of which resolved. Only 1 of 9 patients had residual edema but no fibrosis by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. Conclusions Our short-term study suggests that functional recovery and coronary outcomes are good in multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children. Use of sensitive deformation parameters provides further reassurance that there is no persistent subclinical dysfunction after 3 months.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Heart , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome , Echocardiography , Heart/diagnostic imaging , Heart/virology , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/complications
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