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2.
Molecules ; 26(20)2021 Oct 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1480885

ABSTRACT

In our in vitro and in vivo studies, we used Acalypha indica root methanolic extract (AIRME), and investigated their free radical scavenging/antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Primarily, phytochemical analysis showed rich content of phenols (70.92 mg of gallic acid/g) and flavonoids (16.01 mg of rutin/g) in AIRME. We then performed HR-LC-MS and GC-MS analyses, and identified 101 and 14 phytochemical compounds, respectively. Among them, ramipril glucuronide (1.563%), antimycin A (1.324%), swietenine (1.134%), quinone (1.152%), oxprenolol (1.118%), choline (0.847%), bumetanide (0.847%) and fenofibrate (0.711%) are the predominant phytomolecules. Evidence from in vitro studies revealed that AIRME scavenges DPPH and hydroxyl radicals in a concentration dependent manner (10-50 µg/mL). Similarly, hydrogen peroxide and lipid peroxidation were also remarkably inhibited by AIRME as concentration increases (20-100 µg/mL). In vitro antioxidant activity of AIRME was comparable to ascorbic acid treatment. For in vivo studies, carrageenan (1%, sub-plantar) was injected to rats to induce localized inflammation. Acute inflammation was represented by paw-edema, and significantly elevated (p < 0.05) WBC, platelets and C-reactive protein (CRP). However, AIRME pretreatment (150/300 mg/kg bodyweight) significantly (p < 0.05) decreased edema volume. This was accompanied by a significant (p < 0.05) reduction of WBC, platelets and CRP with both doses of AIRME. The decreased activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione reductase and glutathione peroxidase in paw tissue were restored (p < 0.05 / p < 0.01) with AIRME in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, AIRME attenuated carrageenan-induced neutrophil infiltrations and vascular dilation in paw tissue. For the first time, our findings demonstrated the potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of AIRME, which could be considered to develop novel anti-inflammatory drugs.


Subject(s)
Acalypha/chemistry , Phytochemicals/chemistry , Phytochemicals/pharmacology , Plants, Medicinal/chemistry , Animals , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/chemistry , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacology , Antioxidants/chemistry , Antioxidants/pharmacology , Disease Models, Animal , Edema/drug therapy , Edema/enzymology , Edema/pathology , Free Radical Scavengers/chemistry , Free Radical Scavengers/pharmacology , In Vitro Techniques , Male , Phytotherapy , Plant Extracts/chemistry , Plant Extracts/pharmacology , Plant Roots/chemistry , Rats , Rats, Wistar
3.
Cells ; 10(8)2021 07 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1325607

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has spread over the world for more than one year. COVID-19 often develops life-threatening hypoxemia. Endothelial injury caused by the viral infection leads to intravascular coagulation and ventilation-perfusion mismatch. However, besides above pathogenic mechanisms, the role of alveolar edema in the disease progression has not been discussed comprehensively. Since the exudation of pulmonary edema fluid was extremely serious in COVID-19 patients, we bring out a hypothesis that severity of alveolar edema may determine the size of poorly-ventilated area and the blood oxygen content. Treatments to pulmonary edema (conservative fluid management, exogenous surfactant replacements and ethanol-oxygen vapor therapy hypothetically) may be greatly helpful for reducing the occurrences of severe cases. Given that late mechanical ventilation may cause mucus (edema fluid) to be blown deep into the small airways, oxygen therapy should be given at the early stages. The optimal time and blood oxygen saturation (SpO2) threshold for oxygen therapy are also discussed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Edema/pathology , Pulmonary Alveoli/pathology , Humans
4.
Lancet ; 397(10286): 1749, 2021 05 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1219082
5.
Eur J Clin Invest ; 50(7): e13259, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1084256

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The clinical features of COVID-19 pneumonia range from a mild illness to patients with a very severe illness with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure requiring ventilation and Intensive Care Unit admission. AIMS: To provide a brief overview of the existing evidence for such differences in host response and outcome, and generate hypotheses for divergent patterns and avenues for future research, by highlighting similarities and differences in histopathological appearance between COVID-19 and influenza as well as previous coronavirus outbreaks, and by discussing predisposition through genetics and underlying disease. MATERIALS AND METHOD: We assessed the available early literature for histopathological patterns of COVID-19 pneumonia and underlying risk factors. RESULT: The histopathological spectrum of COVID-19 pneumonia includes variable patterns of epithelial damage, vascular complications, fibrosis and inflammation. Risk factors for a fatal disease include older age, respiratory disease, diabetes mellitus, obesity and hypertension. DISCUSSION: While some risk factors and their potential role in COVID-19 pneumonia are increasingly recognized, little is known about the mechanisms behind episodes of sudden deterioration or the infrequent idiosyncratic clinical demise in otherwise healthy and young subjects. CONCLUSION: The answer to many of the remaining questions regarding COVID-19 pneumonia pathogenesis may in time be provided by genotyping as well careful clinical, serological, radiological and histopathological phenotyping.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Edema/pathology , Inflammation/pathology , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Respiratory Mucosa/pathology , Thrombosis/pathology , Age Factors , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/genetics , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Fibrosis , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , HLA Antigens/genetics , Humans , Hypertension/epidemiology , Inflammation/immunology , Influenza, Human/pathology , Obesity/epidemiology , Pandemics , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/genetics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/genetics , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Polymorphism, Genetic , Respiratory Mucosa/immunology , Respiratory System/pathology , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Serine Endopeptidases/genetics , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/pathology
6.
Neurology ; 95(23): e3145-e3152, 2020 12 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-966472

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To assess the physiopathology of olfactory function loss (OFL) in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), we evaluated the olfactory clefts (OC) on MRI during the early stage of the disease and 1 month later. METHODS: This was a prospective, monocentric, case-controlled study. Twenty severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV2)-infected patients with OFL were included and compared to 20 age-matched healthy controls. All infected patients underwent olfactory function assessment and 3T MRI, performed both at the early stage of the disease and at the 1-month follow-up. RESULTS: At the early stage, SARS-CoV2-infected patients had a mean olfactory score of 2.8 ± 2.7 (range 0-8), and MRI displayed a complete obstruction of the OC in 19 of 20 patients. Controls had normal olfactory scores and no obstruction of the OC on MRI. At the 1 month follow-up, the olfactory score had improved to 8.3 ± 1.9 (range 4-10) in patients, and only 7 of 20 patients still had an obstruction of the OC. There was a correlation between olfactory score and obstruction of the OC (p = 0.004). CONCLUSION: OFL in SARS-CoV2-infected patients is associated with a reversible obstruction of the OC.


Subject(s)
Anosmia/diagnosis , Anosmia/etiology , COVID-19/complications , Edema/pathology , Nasal Cavity/pathology , Nasal Obstruction/pathology , Adult , Anosmia/pathology , Anosmia/physiopathology , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/physiopathology , Case-Control Studies , Edema/diagnostic imaging , Edema/etiology , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Male , Middle Aged , Nasal Cavity/diagnostic imaging , Nasal Obstruction/diagnostic imaging , Nasal Obstruction/etiology , Young Adult
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