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1.
Arch Pathol Lab Med ; 144(9): 1027-1036, 2020 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-771247

ABSTRACT

The ongoing global pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has rapidly disrupted traditional modes of operation in health care and education. In March 2020, institutions in the United States began to implement a range of policies to discourage direct contact and encourage social distancing. These measures have placed us in an unprecedented position where education can no longer occur at close quarters-most notably, around a multiheaded microscope-but must instead continue at a distance. This guide is intended to be a resource for pathologists and pathologists-in-training who wish to leverage technology to continue collaboration, teaching, and education in this era. The article is focused mainly on anatomic pathology; however, the technologies easily lend themselves to clinical pathology education as well. Our aim is to provide curated lists of various online resources that can be used for virtual learning in pathology, provide tips and tricks, and share our personal experience with these technologies. The lists include videoconferencing platforms; pathology Web sites; free online educational resources, including social media; and whole slide imaging collections. We are currently living through a unique situation without a precedent or guidebook, and we hope that this guide will enable the community of pathology educators worldwide to embrace the opportunities that 21st century technology provides.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Medical, Graduate/methods , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pathology/education , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Humans , United States
3.
Ann Biol Clin (Paris) ; 78(4): 446-448, 2020 Aug 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-634852

ABSTRACT

Training and education are essential for medical students. During the COVID-19 outbreak, numerous schools and universities have had to close. Ensuring pedagogical continuity requires alternatives to the traditional classroom, especially in medical education. Usual distance learning tools such as videos and downloadable handouts are not sufficient to promote efficient teaching. Distance learning requires self-motivation and does not give you direct access to your instructor. Some students fear the loss of human contact with an instructor - like asking questions during and after class - which promotes learning, understanding and communication. Moreover, classical distance learning methods do not offer immediate feedback that can help students in their understanding of the lecture. In this context, interactive pedagogic tools (IPT) could be useful for medical education continuity and for maintaining human contact necessary in pedagogy. We briefly evaluated interactive pedagogic tool compared to traditionnal distancial tools on medical students. This study showed the importance to have direct contact with a teacher and feedback during a lecture and to not exclusively perform distance learning without direct interaction and feedback. Hence, in the present context, we encourage teacher to use this type of tools to maintain direct interaction with students - which is essential in pedagogy - and ensure a qualitative pedagogical continuity.


Subject(s)
Computer-Assisted Instruction/methods , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Medical, Continuing/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Simulation Training , Software , Betacoronavirus , Clinical Laboratory Services/organization & administration , Computer-Assisted Instruction/standards , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Disease Outbreaks , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Education, Distance/standards , Education, Medical, Continuing/organization & administration , Humans , Internet/organization & administration , Internet/standards , Learning , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Problem-Based Learning/methods , Problem-Based Learning/organization & administration , Problem-Based Learning/standards , Simulation Training/methods , Simulation Training/organization & administration , Simulation Training/standards , Students, Medical/psychology , Students, Medical/statistics & numerical data , Video Recording/methods , Video Recording/standards
5.
S Afr Med J ; 110(9): 864-868, 2020 08 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-745267

ABSTRACT

Reports indicate that children infected with SARS-CoV-2 have thus far presented with less severe disease than adults. Anxiety regarding a greater ability to transmit the virus is largely unfounded and has played a significant role in the decision to allow children to return to school. In some patients, however, especially in infants and in those with underlying comorbidities, severe disease must be anticipated and planned for accordingly. The most relevant severe clinical presentation in addition to the established respiratory complications, is that of a multisystem inflammatory disorder, with features resembling Kawasaki disease. The impact of the pandemic on the economic and social wellbeing of children, including food insecurity and care when parents are ill, cannot be ignored. During this pandemic, it is imperative to ensure access to routine and emergency medical services to sick children. In so doing, potentially devastating medical and socioeconomic consequences can be mitigated.


Subject(s)
Child Welfare , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Education, Distance , Food Supply , Masks , Mental Health , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Schools , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/physiopathology , Adolescent , Age Factors , Asymptomatic Infections , Betacoronavirus , Child , Child, Preschool , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Poverty , Risk Factors , Severity of Illness Index
6.
Adv Physiol Educ ; 44(4): 545-549, 2020 Dec 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-744895

ABSTRACT

It is important to reinforce physiology and pathophysiology concepts during clinical rotations, which traditionally occur after the foundational sciences in the US medical school system. We took an opportunistic approach when the COVID-19 pandemic forced our content into virtual delivery mode, as clinical medical education required a shift to nonpatient contact. We describe our experience in building a 2-wk course that consisted of online small groups during week 1 and panels and cases during week 2. The physiology content involved faculty-vetted resources, along with both discrete and open-ended focus questions for each learning objective. The course also included mechanical ventilation, and the physiologist utilized discussion points and developed a formative quiz to emphasize the physiology correlates, in addition to the very clinical aspects of mechanical ventilation. There were pathophysiology opportunities with pneumonia, acute respiratory distress syndrome, systemic inflammatory response syndrome, and multiple-organ system dysfunction among the clinical correlates. Review and recall of the foundational sciences occurred, allowing links between the pre-clerkship and clerkship years that were previously undiscovered in our institution. This virtually delivered medical curriculum related to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and COVID-19 is timely, carries high student interest, and can benefit medical students and the communities they serve.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Computer-Assisted Instruction , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Education, Distance , Education, Medical, Undergraduate , Lung/physiopathology , Physiology/education , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Host Microbial Interactions , Humans , Lung/virology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Schools, Medical
7.
Adv Physiol Educ ; 44(4): 516-519, 2020 Dec 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-744894

ABSTRACT

This paper describes the process involved in conducting an online spirometry practical through Zoom. The teacher demonstrated the practical from the medical school, and the students observed the procedure from the comfort of their own homes. Students were able to analyze the graphs captured in the teacher's laptop by remotely controlling the teacher's laptop. This method may be useful for places where face-to-face classes are suspended due to the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Computer-Assisted Instruction , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Education, Distance , Education, Medical, Undergraduate , Lung/physiology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Physiology/education , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Spirometry , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Forced Expiratory Volume , Humans , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Schools, Medical , Vital Capacity
8.
Anat Sci Educ ; 13(5): 549-555, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-743623

ABSTRACT

The move of much anatomy teaching online in response to the Covid-19 pandemic has been successfully implemented within very short time frames. This has necessitated a high degree of dependence upon the use of digitized cadaveric resources, has entailed immense workload demands on staff, and has disrupted students' studies. These educational exigencies have been accompanied by ethical uncertainties for a discipline centered on study of the dead human body. An ethical framework for anatomy is suggested based on the principles of equal concern and respect, minimization of harm, fairness, and reciprocity, in which all staff and students are to be treated with respect and as moral equals. A series of ethical obligations are proposed as a means of maintaining the ethos of anatomy, coping with the suspension of body donation, providing adequate resources, and responding to increased dependence upon external providers. Good academic practice raises more general obligations stemming from the welfare of students, the increased workload of staff, and checking on online assessment and invigilation. As anatomists respond to the educational and ethical lessons prompted by this pandemic, they should plan for future disruptions to normal work patterns by adopting a sustainable and equitable course of action.


Subject(s)
Anatomy/ethics , Coronavirus Infections , Education, Distance/ethics , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Anatomy/education , Humans
9.
Ann Glob Health ; 86(1): 103, 2020 08 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-740538

ABSTRACT

Global health trainees rely on immersive experiences to apply their classroom knowledge in real-world settings. However, during the COVID-19 pandemic travel has come to a halt and short-term experiences are no longer available in their current form. As with didactic material, global health programs have an opportunity to innovate the delivery of applied learning, providing trainees with robust, mentored experiences that promote the acquisition of core global health competencies. We provide a series of practical solutions for remote applied learning including case-based learning, pathfinder pedagogy, virtual reality simulations, and twinning. We further describe the role of these approaches in addressing common criticisms of short-term experiences and their potential for creating new win-win dynamics between institutions and trainees.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Education, Distance , Global Health/education , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Problem-Based Learning , Teaching/trends , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Education/organization & administration , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Humans , Organizational Innovation , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Problem-Based Learning/methods , Problem-Based Learning/organization & administration
10.
J Nurs Educ ; 59(9): 514-517, 2020 Sep 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-738713

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 global pandemic brought mandatory shelter-in-place orders, disrupting traditional face-to-face teaching methods for advanced practice fellowship programs nationally, creating a challenge for fellowship program directors to preserve curriculum using nontraditional methods. METHOD: Using a variety of both web-based and app-based virtual platforms, a nationally accredited fellowship program converted traditional in-seat learning modalities to elearning platforms using both synchronous and asynchronous education. RESULTS: Preliminary data indicate that knowledge acquisition and perceived fellow satisfaction are preserved despite the abrupt change to program delivery. Programmatic modifications were submitted to the American Nurse Credentialing Center for compliance and deemed as creative, innovative, and collaborative. CONCLUSION: Curriculum for advanced practice fellowship programs can be favorably converted to elearning using virtual platforms during a crisis. Through prompt reevaluation and restructuring, virtual platforms can replace in-seat didactic lectures, patient case studies, mentoring, and even simulation, while ensuring program continuation and compliance with accreditation standards. [J Nurs Educ. 2020;59(9):514-517.].


Subject(s)
Advanced Practice Nursing/education , Curriculum , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Fellowships and Scholarships/organization & administration , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Humans , Nursing Education Research , Nursing Evaluation Research , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control
11.
J Nurs Educ ; 59(9): 522-525, 2020 Sep 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-738670

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Amidst the COVID-19 pandemic, university instruction was transitioned online, including an undergraduate nursing clinical course. Charged with developing and executing virtual simulations, an online clinical course was conceived. METHOD: Simulated clinical experiences were crafted using a combination of student preassignments and video-conferencing facilitated by faculty. Each experience included the collective review of a case study and student-developed care plans before viewing and debriefing a series of videos. Students summarized their experience in a weekly written reflection. RESULTS: Student feedback was examined through their reflections and verbal responses. The videos served as catalysts for robust discussion. Feedback was overwhelmingly positive related to an interactive experience, a heightened sense of teamwork, and enhanced comprehension by sharing differing perspectives of common experiences. CONCLUSION: This educational innovation was successful in creating an engaging environment that facilitated student learning and a sense of togetherness during a global pandemic. The use of technology enabled the continuity of a productive teaching-learning experience. [J Nurs Educ. 2020;59(9):522-525.].


Subject(s)
Curriculum , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/organization & administration , Simulation Training/organization & administration , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Diffusion of Innovation , Humans , Learning , Nursing Education Research , Nursing Evaluation Research , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Students, Nursing/psychology
12.
BMC Med Educ ; 20(1): 285, 2020 Aug 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-733044

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The closure of educational activities in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic resulted in an unplanned shift from traditional learning to a setup that exclusively involves digital teaching and learning. Within this context, the present study aimed to explore undergraduate medical students' perceptions regarding the effectiveness of synchronized online learning at Unaizah College of Medicine and Medical Sciences, Qassim University, Saudi Arabia. METHODS: A qualitative study was conducted using virtual focus group discussions synchronously with the help of a discussion guide consisting of seven open-ended questions. Overall, 60 medical students were recruited using a maximum variation sampling technique; these students then participated in eight focus group discussions. All interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed for thematic contents using the standard (Mayring, Kiger. M. E. and Braun.V) content analysis framework. RESULTS: A thematic content analysis yielded four core themes: (1) educational impact, (2) time management, (3) challenges encountered, and (4) preferences for the future. The online modality was well-received, and all participants agreed that online sessions were time saving and that their performance was improved due to enhanced utility of time; however, they indicated that they encountered some challenges, including methodological, content perception, technical, and behavioral challenges during sessions and online exams. Most of the preclinical students preferred online learning for the upcoming academic years. CONCLUSION: Synchronized online classes were well-accepted by the medical students. This represents significant and promising potential for the future of medical education. The principles of the online learning model and learning outcomes should be rigorously and regularly evaluated to monitor its effectiveness.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/organization & administration , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Students, Medical/psychology , Adult , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Female , Focus Groups , Humans , Male , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Qualitative Research , Saudi Arabia , Young Adult
14.
Clin Anat ; 33(6): 927-928, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-730322

ABSTRACT

The outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection has recently spread globally and is now a pandemic. As a result, university hospitals have had to take unprecedented measures of containment, including asking nonessential staff to stay at home. Medical students practicing in the surgical departments find themselves idle, as nonurgent surgical activity has been canceled, until further notice. Likewise, universities are closed and medical training for students is likely to suffer if teachers do not implement urgent measures to provide continuing education. Thus, we sought to set up a daily medical education procedure for surgical students confined to their homes. We report a simple and free teaching method intended to compensate for the disappearance of daily lessons performed in the surgery department using the Google Hangouts application. This video conference method can be applied to clinical as well as anatomy lessons.


Subject(s)
Anatomy/education , Coronavirus Infections , Education, Distance , Education, Medical/methods , General Surgery/education , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Videoconferencing/organization & administration , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Surgery Department, Hospital , Teaching/trends
15.
ScientificWorldJournal ; 2020: 1562028, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-721220

ABSTRACT

Background: The novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) has spread globally from its epicenter in Hubei, China, and was declared a pandemic by the World Health Organization (WHO) on March 11, 2020. The most popular search engine worldwide is Google, and since March 2020, COVID-19 has been a global trending search term. Misinformation related to COVID-19 from these searches is a problem, and hence, it is of high importance to assess the quality of health information over the internet related to COVID-19. The objective of our study is to examine the quality of COVID-19 related health information over the internet using the DISCERN tool. Methods: The keywords included in assessment of COVID-19 related information using Google's search engine were "Coronavirus," "Coronavirus causes," "Coronavirus diagnosis," "Coronavirus prevention," and "Coronavirus management". The first 20 websites from each search term were gathered to generate a list of 100 URLs. Duplicate sites were excluded from this search, allowing analysis of unique sites only. Additional exclusion criteria included scientific journals, nonoperational links, nonfunctional websites (where the page was not loading, was not found, or was inactive), and websites in languages other than English. This resulted in a unique list of 48 websites. Four independent raters evaluated the websites using a 16-item DISCERN tool to assess the quality of novel coronavirus related information available on the internet. The interrater reliability agreement was calculated using the intracluster correlation coefficient. Results: Results showed variation in how the raters assigned scores to different website categories. The .com websites received the lowest scores. Results showed that .edu and .org website category sites were excellent in communicating coronavirus related health information; however, they received lower scores for treatment effect and treatment choices. Conclusion: This study highlights the gaps in the quality of information that is available on the websites related to COVID-19 and study emphasizes the need for verified websites that provide evidence-based health information related to the novel coronavirus pandemic.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections , Health Education/standards , Internet , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Education, Distance , Humans , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Search Engine
19.
JNMA J Nepal Med Assoc ; 58(227): 536-539, 2020 Jul 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-710101

ABSTRACT

The ongoing nationwide lockdown due to the global pandemic COVID-19 started from March 24, 2020, in Nepal. Lots of medical students are in dilemma about how to utilize this time to make it more productive. To live a good life, we must be able to balance our life in general so, we can use this time to discover ourselves. It is equally important to adjust to the global pandemic and help locally to combat the current situation. This difficult time demands resilience. This article focuses on some ideas to discover ourselves and develop resilience within us.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Education, Distance , Motivation , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Quarantine/psychology , Self-Directed Learning as Topic , Students, Medical , Betacoronavirus , Exercise , Humans , Meditation , Muscle Stretching Exercises , Nepal/epidemiology , Pandemics , Yoga
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