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1.
Biochem Mol Biol Educ ; 49(6): 888-903, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1469418

ABSTRACT

Active teaching methodologies have been placed as a hope for changing education at different levels, transiting from passive lecture-centered to student-centered learning. With the health measures of social distance, the COVID-19 pandemic forced a strong shift to remote education. With the challenge of delivering quality education through a computer screen, we validated and applied an online course model using active teaching tools for higher education. We incorporated published active-learning strategies into an online construct, with problem-based inquiry and design of inquiry research projects to serve as our core active learning tool. The gains related to students' science learning experiences and their attitudes toward science were assessed by applying questionnaires before, during, and after the course. The course counted on the participation of 83 students, most of them (60.8%) from postgraduate students. Our results show that engagement provided by active learning methods can improve performance both in hard and soft skills. Students' participation seems to be more relevant when activities require the interaction of information, prediction, and reasoning, such as open-ended questions and design of research projects. Therefore, our data show that, in pandemic, active learning tools benefit students and improve their critical thinking and their motivation and positive positioning in science.


Subject(s)
Attitude , COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Distance/methods , Pandemics , Students, Medical/psychology , Thinking , COVID-19/virology , Education, Distance/standards , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
2.
J Infect Dev Ctries ; 15(9.1): 3S-6S, 2021 09 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1450868

ABSTRACT

The Structured Operational Research and Training Initiative (SORT IT) model has contributed to building research capacity and has produced evidence for improving public health program performance in countries with limited research capacity. The model involves hands-on mentorship and consists of three modules/weeks. It is recognized to be an innovative research capacity building model. In a world changed by COVID-19, where bringing people together is not viable, an innovative, interactive, web-based, knowledge-transfer platform (e-SORT IT) for virtual implementation of SORT IT modules was created. The platform design imitated the residential course as closely as possible with the same lectures, plenary sessions, and breakout rooms. Despite the challenges, the platform performed well and even though participants and mentors were located in eight different time zones, the course was successful; 90% of participants achieved their milestones and 10 manuscripts were successfully completed. Participant evaluation revealed a satisfaction level that was nearly equivalent to the residential module. However, mentor evaluation indicated a number of shortcomings including capacity building, professional networking, communication, engagement, and contribution by participants, as well as overall module success. In conclusion, COVID-19 stimulated the creation of the e-SORT IT platform that provided a functional alternative to the residential version. Despite the limitations of reduced capacity building and networking, the e-SORT IT platform should be considered a success - it delivered the goods. This is an example of innovation and flexibility, two attributes that are sorely needed to maintain activities during the pandemic and beyond.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance/standards , Research/education , Mentors/psychology , Students/psychology
4.
J Nurs Educ ; 60(5): 259-264, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1278540

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Students who are more satisfied and engaged in online courses have better learning experiences and outcomes. METHOD: Survey data were collected during a 4-month period in 2019. The research team created a survey to collect demographic information and assess student satisfaction. Student engagement was measured using the 19-item Online Student Engagement Scale. RESULTS: Overall student engagement and satisfaction scores in online programs were moderately high. Generation Z participants and students from PhD programs were the most satisfied and engaged in their programs. CONCLUSION: Students who are more engaged in online coursework are more satisfied and thus are more likely to remain and successfully complete their respective programs. [J Nurs Educ. 2021;60(5):259-264.].


Subject(s)
Education, Distance , Education, Nursing , Personal Satisfaction , Curriculum , Education, Distance/standards , Education, Distance/statistics & numerical data , Education, Nursing/methods , Education, Nursing/standards , Humans , Learning , Students, Nursing/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires
6.
Adv Physiol Educ ; 45(2): 376-383, 2021 Jun 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1219395

ABSTRACT

The Corona Virus Disease 19 (COVID-19) pandemic has imposed serious restrictions for academic institutions to maintain their research and teaching practical subjects. Universities have implemented adaptive measures to maintain educational activities and achieve the learning objectives for undergraduate and postgraduate students by shifting to online teaching and learning. Although such approaches have enabled delivering the theoretical content of courses during the pandemic, universities have faced serious difficulties in running practicals with actual research experiments and teaching hand-on skills because such activities potentially override the required safety guidelines. Here, we report an adaptive measure, implemented at Monash University, to run home-based studies in cognitive neuroscience and achieve learning objectives, which are normally delivered in face-to-face practicals. We introduce two specifically designed short-term research projects and describe how different aspects of these projects, such as tutorials, experiments, and assessments, were modified to meet the required social distancing. The results of cognitive tests were closely comparable between the laboratory-based and home-based experiments indicating that students followed the guidelines and the required procedures for a reliable data collection. Our assessments of students' performance and feedback indicate that the majority of our educational goals were achieved, while all safety guidelines and distancing requirements were also met.


Subject(s)
Biomedical Research/organization & administration , COVID-19 , Cognitive Neuroscience/education , Education, Distance/standards , Pandemics , Humans , Students, Medical
7.
Surg Radiol Anat ; 43(4): 515-521, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1168968

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: During this forced down-time of COVID-19 pandemic, shift to virtual anatomy education is the solitary solution to support the learning of students. The purpose of this study was to understand the visible and invisible potential challenges being faced by the 1st year medical and dental students while attending digital anatomy classes. METHODS: The present study was conducted on 81st year medical and dental students who were admitted to their respective college in August 2019 and were willing to participate in the study. A multiple choice close-ended questionnaire regarding their opinion on virtual classes was designed and feedback was taken from the students. RESULTS: Majority (65%) of the students agreed that they missed their traditional anatomy learning i.e., dissection courses, face to face lectures and interaction with mentors. The students strongly felt the lack of confidence and difficulty in the topics completed without dissections, models, microscopic slides and other modalities. 83% felt lack of proper gadgets, high-band width and strong internet connections, a potential barrier in their digital learning. Lack of self-motivation was felt by 69% students. CONCLUSIONS: The current situation of anatomy education is not intentional, and is not the long term silver bullet solution for a visual subject like anatomy. Though learners face a lot of challenges, however, a shift to online must be supported at this time of health crisis. As the digital learning may go for indefinite period, the feedback of students may be helpful for relevant and timely modifications in digital anatomy education.


Subject(s)
Anatomy/education , COVID-19/prevention & control , Education, Dental/methods , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/methods , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Communicable Disease Control/standards , Curriculum/statistics & numerical data , Dissection/education , Education, Dental/standards , Education, Dental/statistics & numerical data , Education, Distance/standards , Education, Distance/statistics & numerical data , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/standards , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/statistics & numerical data , Humans , India/epidemiology , Learning , Pandemics/prevention & control , Personal Satisfaction , Students, Dental/psychology , Students, Dental/statistics & numerical data , Students, Medical/psychology , Students, Medical/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires/statistics & numerical data
8.
Adv Physiol Educ ; 45(1): 84-88, 2021 Mar 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1105547

ABSTRACT

Medical education has gone online because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Formative assessment is essential to facilitate the learning process in medical education. However, various challenges arise during online assessment, which include reliability, when done without monitoring and practical concerns like Internet connectivity issues. This study was done to assess the medical students' perceptions of the reliability, usefulness, and practical challenges of online tests. One hundred first-year undergraduate medical students taking up online classes and tests in the subject of physiology were enrolled in this study. A questionnaire with items regarding practical challenges, reliability, and usefulness of the online tests, in general, and about different types of online assessment methods, in particular, were sent to the students online. Each item was rated on a five-point Likert scale, and the responses were analyzed anonymously. A large percentage of students used mobile phones (81.4%) to undertake online tests. Although most students (73.2%; P < 0.001) felt that online tests helped them substantially in learning the subject, network connectivity issues were considered to be a matter of serious concern (85.5%, P < 0.001). Among the assessment methods used, viva voce by video conferencing was thought to be most reliable (83%, P < 0.001). Multiple-choice question-based assessment when done online was felt to be more practically feasible with faster feedback than classroom assessment. The results of the study suggest that medical students find online formative assessments helpful for their learning, despite their concerns about reliability and practical challenges.


Subject(s)
Education, Distance/standards , Education, Medical/standards , Educational Measurement/standards , Students, Medical/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires , COVID-19 , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Medical/methods , Educational Measurement/methods , Feasibility Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Reproducibility of Results
9.
J Surg Res ; 264: 534-543, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1078051

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Healthcare systems and surgical residency training programs have been significantly affected by the novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. A shelter-in-place and social distancing mandate went into effect in our county on March 16, 2020, considerably altering clinical and educational operations. Along with the suspension of elective procedures, resident academic curricula transitioned to an entirely virtual platform. We aimed to evaluate the impact of these modifications on surgical training and resident concerns about COVID-19. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We surveyed residents and fellows from all eight surgical specialties at our institution regarding their COVID-19 experiences from March to May 2020. Residents completed the survey via a secure Qualtrics link. A total of 38 questions addressed demographic information and perspectives regarding the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on surgical training, education, and general coping during the pandemic. RESULTS: Of 256 eligible participants across surgical specialties, 146 completed the survey (57.0%). Junior residents comprised 43.6% (n = 61), compared to seniors 37.1% (n = 52) and fellows 19.3% (n = 27). Most participants, 97.9% (n = 138), anticipated being able to complete their academic year on time, and 75.2% (n = 100) perceived virtual learning to be the same as or better than in-person didactic sessions. Participants were most concerned about their ability to have sufficient knowledge and skills to care for patients with COVID-19, and the possibility of exposure to COVID-19. CONCLUSIONS: Although COVID-19 impacted residents' overall teaching and clinical volume, residency programs may identify novel virtual opportunities to meet their educational and research milestones during these challenging times.


Subject(s)
Adaptation, Psychological , COVID-19/prevention & control , Internship and Residency/methods , Specialties, Surgical/education , Surgeons/psychology , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Clinical Competence , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Education, Distance/standards , Elective Surgical Procedures/education , Elective Surgical Procedures/standards , Female , Humans , Internship and Residency/organization & administration , Internship and Residency/standards , Internship and Residency/statistics & numerical data , Male , Pandemics/prevention & control , Physical Distancing , Surgeons/education , Surgeons/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires/statistics & numerical data , United States/epidemiology
10.
Am J Surg ; 222(2): 248-253, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1062220

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Eight novel virtual surgery electives (VSEs) were developed and implemented in April-May 2020 for medical students forced to continue their education remotely due to COVID-19. METHODS: Each VSE was 1-2 weeks long, contained specialty-specific course objectives, and included a variety of teaching modalities. Students completed a post-course survey to assess changes in their interest and understanding of the specialty. Quantitative methods were employed to analyze the results. RESULTS: Eighty-three students participated in the electives and 67 (80.7%) completed the post-course survey. Forty-six (68.7%) respondents reported "increased" or "greatly increased" interest in the course specialty completed. Survey respondents' post-course understanding of each specialty increased by a statistically significant amount (p-value = <0.0001). CONCLUSION: This initial effort demonstrated that VSEs can be an effective tool for increasing medical students' interest in and understanding of surgical specialties. They should be studied further with more rigorous methods in a larger population.


Subject(s)
Education, Distance/methods , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/methods , Specialties, Surgical/education , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Career Choice , Communicable Disease Control/standards , Curriculum , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Education, Distance/standards , Education, Distance/statistics & numerical data , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/organization & administration , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/standards , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/statistics & numerical data , Educational Measurement/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Learning , Pandemics/prevention & control , Program Evaluation , Smartphone , Students, Medical/statistics & numerical data , Videoconferencing/instrumentation
11.
Work ; 68(1): 45-67, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1058398

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The sanitary emergency due to COVID-19 virus obliged people to face up several changes in their everyday life becauseWorld Health Organisation (WHO) guidelines and countries' Health Systems imposed lockdown of activities and social distancing to flatten the infection curve. One of these rapid changes involved students and professors that had to turn the traditional "in presence" classes into online courses facing several problems for educational delivery. OBJECTIVES: This work aimed to investigate the factors that affected both teaching/learning effectiveness and general human comfort and wellbeing after the sudden transition from classrooms to eLearning platforms due to COVID-19 in Italy. METHODS: A workshop, involving students and experts of Human Factors and Ergonomics, has been performed to identify aspects/factors that could influence online learning. Then, from workshop output and literature studies, a survey composed of two questionnaires (one for students and one for teachers) has been developed and spread out among Italian universities students and professors. RESULTS: 700 people answered the questionnaires. Data have been analysed and discussed to define the most important changes due to the new eLearning approach. Absence of interactions with colleagues and the necessity to use several devices were some of the aspects coming out from questionnaires. CONCLUSIONS: The study shows an overview of factors influencing both teaching/learning effectiveness and general human comfort and wellbeing. Results could be considered as a basis for future investigation and optimization about the dependencies and correlations among identified factors and the characteristics of the products/interaction/environment during eLearning courses.


Subject(s)
Child Health/standards , Education, Distance/standards , Quarantine/trends , Students/statistics & numerical data , Transfer, Psychology/physiology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Child Health/statistics & numerical data , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Distance/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Italy , Male , Middle Aged , Quarantine/methods , Students/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Universities/organization & administration , Universities/statistics & numerical data
12.
Work ; 68(1): 33-43, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1058397

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Musculoskeletal and psychosocial problems have tended to increase during the COVID-19 pandemic. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the changes in musculoskeletal problems and psychosocial status of teachers during the COVID-19 pandemic due to online education and to investigate the effects of preventive telerehabilitation applications for musculoskeletal problems. METHODS: Forty teachers who conducted online education during the pandemic volunteered to participate in the study. All assessments were performed via online methods. The Cornell Musculoskeletal Discomfort Questionnaire (CMDQ), ProFitMap-Neck questionnaire, Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), and Upper Extremity Functional Index (UEFI) were used to evaluate musculoskeletal problems; the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) were used to evaluate anxiety and depression, respectively; and the Work-Life Balance Scale (WLBS) was used to evaluate how well individuals achieve this balance. Information about before online education, during online education, and after training was obtained with the assessments. After the first assessment, telerehabilitation, which involved presentations and brochures, was applied to 18 participants willing to participate in the training. RESULTS: The ProFitMap, UEFI, and WLBS scores during the online education decreased significantly, while the scores of the CMDQ, ODI, BDI, and BAI during the online education increased significantly compared to the pre-online education scores (p < 0.05). In addition, the total CMDQ, ProFitMap, and ODI scores improved significantly after the training (p < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Musculoskeletal and psychosocial problems increased in teachers during online education. Preventive telerehabilitation methods will be beneficial for individuals who do not have access to face-to-face physiotherapy.


Subject(s)
Education, Distance/methods , Musculoskeletal Diseases/etiology , Psychology , Telerehabilitation/standards , Adult , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Education, Distance/standards , Ergonomics/methods , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Musculoskeletal Diseases/epidemiology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Preventive Medicine/instrumentation , Preventive Medicine/methods , Psychiatric Status Rating Scales , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telerehabilitation/instrumentation , Telerehabilitation/methods , Turkey
13.
J Med Internet Res ; 23(1): e23594, 2021 01 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1034892

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has considerably altered the regular medical education curriculum while increasing the need for health care professionals. Senior medical students are being incrementally deployed to the front line to address the shortage of certified physicians. These students, some of whom will be fast-tracked as physicians, may lack knowledge regarding the initial management of time-critical emergencies such as stroke. OBJECTIVE: Our aim was to determine whether an e-learning module could improve asynchronous distance knowledge acquisition of the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) in senior medical students compared to the traditional didactic video. METHODS: A randomized, data analyst-blinded web-based trial was conducted at the University of Geneva Faculty of Medicine between April and June 2020. Fifth year medical students followed a distance learning path designed to teach the NIHSS. The control group followed the traditional didactic video created by Patrick Lyden, while the e-learning group followed the updated version of a previously tested, highly interactive e-learning module. The main outcome was the score on a 50-question quiz displayed upon completion of the learning material. The difference in the proportion of correct answers for each specific NIHSS item was also assessed. RESULTS: Out of 158 potential participants, 88 started their allocated learning path and 75 completed the trial. Participants who followed the e-learning module performed better than those who followed the video (38 correct answers, 95% CI 37-39, vs 35 correct answers, 95% CI 34-36, P<.001). Participants in the e-learning group scored better on five elements than the video group: key NIHSS concepts (P=.02), the consciousness - global item (P<.001), the facial palsy item (P=.04), the ataxia item (P=.03), and the sensory item (P=.04). CONCLUSIONS: Compared to the traditional didactic video, a highly interactive e-learning module enhances asynchronous distance learning and NIHSS knowledge acquisition in senior medical students.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Computer-Assisted Instruction/methods , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Medical/methods , Stroke/diagnosis , Education, Distance/standards , Female , Humans , Learning , Male
14.
J Laryngol Otol ; 135(4): 288-292, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1014966

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic has posed a new challenge for medical educators worldwide. While teaching and learning shifted online, assessment posed a roadblock. A pilot study was performed to check the feasibility and acceptability of online open-book examination. METHODS: A pilot study was carried out on sixth semester (fourth year) students. An online open-book examination was conducted on an ENT topic, and feedback was obtained using a pre-validated questionnaire. Two teachers scored and collated the answers, and the marks were averaged for each candidate. RESULTS: Ninety-eight students appeared for the examination: 21.4 per cent failed and 78.6 per cent passed. Eight students scored above 75 per cent correct. Only 55 students volunteered to give feedback; most agreed that the best advantage of this assessment was that it was stress-free. The disadvantage most complained of was network connectivity issues. CONCLUSION: Online open-book examination has the potential to be the new normal in the present circumstances and beyond.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/methods , Educational Measurement/methods , Students, Medical , Education, Distance/standards , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/standards , Humans , Otolaryngology/education , Pilot Projects
16.
Am J Surg ; 222(3): 473-480, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1002280

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has impacted surgical training nationwide. Our former curricula will likely not return, and training will need to adapt, so we are able to graduate residents of the same caliber as prior to the pandemic. METHODS: A survey evaluating perceptions of changes made in surgical training was conducted on surgery residents and attendings. RESULTS: Disaster medicine training has become more relevant and 85% residents and 75% attendings agreed it should be incorporated into the curriculum. Safety of family was the most significant concern of residents. Virtual curriculum was perceived to be acceptable by 82% residents and only 22% attendings (p < 0.01). Residents (37%) were less concerned than attendings (61%) of falling behind on their overall training (p = 0.04). Both groups agreed operative skills would be adversely affected (56%vs72%; p = 0.37). CONCLUSIONS: To maintain an effective surgical curriculum, programs will need to implement new educational components to better prepare residents to become surgeons of the future.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19/prevention & control , Education, Distance/methods , General Surgery/education , Internship and Residency/methods , Adult , COVID-19/psychology , California , Curriculum , Education, Distance/standards , Faculty, Medical/psychology , Family , Humans , Internship and Residency/standards , Middle Aged , Safety , Students, Medical/psychology , Surgeons/education , Surgeons/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires
17.
Surg Radiol Anat ; 43(4): 531-535, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1002073

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: COVID 19 pandemic has brought crucial changes in the field of medical education. Ad mist university examinations in India medical schools have switched to online assessment methods to avoid student gatherings. In this context, we conducted online anatomy practical evaluation and we have aimed at quantifying the students' experience on virtual assessment. METHODS: A total of 250 first year MBBS students appeared for online anatomy practical examinations. Immediately after the completion of exams electronic feedback about their experience, in questionnaire format was obtained after getting informed consent. Their feedback was analysed and quantified. RESULTS: Completed feedback forms were submitted by 228 students. More than 50% of students favoured online anatomy spotter examinations. Only 32.8% of students were comfortable with soft parts discussion using images. For image based viva voce 61.4%, 80% & 82% of students responded that the features and orientation of osteology, radiology and embryology images, respectively, were good. For surface marking 55% of the participants preferred online verbal evaluation. Finally, more than 60% of the students preferred the conventional over online assessment methods. CONCLUSIONS: The inclination of students' preference for traditional anatomy examination methods mandates adequate training of both students and teachers for virtual examination. The superiority of conventional anatomy practical examination methods is unbiased but pandemic situations warrant adequate preparedness. In the future the anatomy teaching and evaluation methodology in Indian medical schools have to be drastically reviewed in equivalence with global digitalization.


Subject(s)
Anatomy/education , COVID-19/prevention & control , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/methods , Educational Measurement/methods , Anatomy/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Communicable Disease Control/standards , Consumer Behavior/statistics & numerical data , Curriculum , Education, Distance/standards , Education, Distance/statistics & numerical data , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/standards , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/statistics & numerical data , Educational Measurement/statistics & numerical data , Humans , India/epidemiology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Schools, Medical/standards , Students, Medical/psychology , Students, Medical/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires/statistics & numerical data
18.
GMS J Med Educ ; 37(7): Doc99, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-971676

ABSTRACT

Objective: COVID-19 challenges curriculum managers worldwide to create digital substitutes for classroom teaching. Case-based teaching formats under expert supervision can be used as a substitute for practical bedside teaching, where the focus is on teaching clinical reasoning skills. Methods: For medical students of LMU and TU Munich, the interactive, case-based, and supervised teaching format of Clinical Case Discussion (CCD) was digitised and implemented as dCCD in their respective curricula. Case discussions were realised as videoconferences, led by a student moderator, and took place under the supervision of a board-certified clinician. To prevent passive participation, additional cognitive activations were implemented. Acceptance, usability, and subjective learning outcomes were assessed in dCCDs by means of a special evaluation concept. Results: With regard to acceptance, students were of the opinion that they had learned effectively by participating in dCCDs (M=4.31; SD=1.37). The majority of students also stated that they would recommend the course to others (M=4.23; SD=1.62). The technical implementation of the teaching format was judged positively overall, but findings for usability were heterogeneous. Students rated their clinical reasoning skills at the end of the dCCDs (M=4.43; SD=0.66) as being significantly higher than at the beginning (M=4.33; SD=0.69), with low effect size, t(181)=-2.352, p=.020, d=0.15. Conclusion: Our evaluation data shows that the dCCD format is well-accepted by students as a substitute for face-to-face teaching. In the next step, we plan to examine the extent to which participation in dCCDs leads to an increase in objectively measured clinical reasoning skills, analogous to a face-to-face CCD with on-site attendance.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Clinical Decision-Making/methods , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Education, Medical/organization & administration , Videoconferencing/organization & administration , Clinical Competence , Education, Distance/standards , Education, Medical/standards , Educational Measurement , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Students, Medical/psychology , Videoconferencing/standards
19.
GMS J Med Educ ; 37(7): Doc87, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-971046

ABSTRACT

Objective: Primary outcome of this retrospective study was the comparison of state examination results under simulated treatment conditions in times of Covid-19 versus patient treatment under non-pandemic conditions. Additionally, correlation analysis was performed between students' self- and examiners' assessment of the treatment results. Methods: Within 4 hours, 22 examinees each had to place a multi-surface adhesive anterior and posterior restoration, performed an endodontic treatment on a maxillary premolar and a periodontal debridement of one quadrant. All treatments were performed on a model fixed in a phantom head. Compliance with the prescribed hygiene and social distancing guidelines and self-assessment of the practical performance was part of the practical examination as well. One examiner per examination part evaluated anonymously the final results. The historical control was based on the exam results of a cohort from 2019. Mean values (standard deviation), non-parametric correlations (Spearman's Rho) and group comparisons (Mann-Whitney) were calculated for statistical analysis. Results: Examination results under simulated treatment conditions were significantly worse (p<0.05) than in the cohort that took their state exam in patients, with exception of the endodontic partial exam. The overall scores in restorative dentistry and periodontology of both groups, which include a structured theoretical examination, did not differ. The majority of the candidates rated their performance worse than the examiners, and there was no correlation between self- and third-party assessment. Conclusion: In the comparison of two years, a simulated practical examination without patients in restorative dentistry, endodontics and periodontology resulted in matchable results compared with an examination on patients. Equal conditions for the candidates resulting in better comparability and avoidance of ethical dilemmas of patient treatment under examination conditions could also be arguments towards a state examination under phantom conditions in the future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Dental/organization & administration , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Educational Measurement/statistics & numerical data , Dentists/education , Education, Dental/standards , Education, Distance/standards , Educational Measurement/standards , Endodontics/education , Humans , Models, Anatomic , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Self-Assessment , Students, Dental
20.
J Contin Educ Health Prof ; 40(4): 217-219, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-962293

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, the authors rapidly transitioned an in-person, learner-led medical education journal club (MEJC) to the virtual environment. The "interactive, no-prep" approach, using breakout rooms within a videoconferencing system, required no prior learner preparation. METHODS: From March to May 2020, learners were invited to participate in a monthly 60-minute virtual MEJC. A needs assessment survey informed article selection. Facilitators developed a presentation to provide background and describe the article's research question(s). In breakout groups, learners generated study designs to answer the research question(s). After the actual study methodology and results were revealed, learners engaged in facilitated open discussion. After the session, learners completed an electronic survey to rate perceived usefulness and suggest improvement areas. RESULTS: A total of 15 learners participated; most completed the survey (13/15; 87%). The MEJC was rated as very or extremely useful. Qualitative feedback indicated that it was convenient, allowed creativity, and enabled rich discussion without prior preparation. When possible, improvement suggestions were implemented. DISCUSSION: The authors offer an evidence-based MEJC approach that is free, interactive with virtual breakout rooms and requires no prior learner preparation. Early indicators suggest that others navigating the COVID-19 crisis may want to implement this approach.


Subject(s)
Education, Distance/methods , Health Personnel/education , Periodicals as Topic/trends , COVID-19/prevention & control , Education, Distance/standards , Health Personnel/psychology , Humans , Quarantine/methods , Quarantine/trends , Teaching
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