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2.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 118(11)2021 03 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1132174

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has changed peoples' lives in unexpected ways, especially how they allocate their time between work and other activities. Demand for online learning has surged during a period of mass layoffs and transition to remote work and schooling. Can this uptake in online learning help close longstanding skills gaps in the US workforce in a sustainable and equitable manner? We answer this question by analyzing individual engagement data of DataCamp users between October 2019 and September 2020 (n = 277,425). Exploiting the staggered adoption of actions to mitigate the spread of COVID-19 across states, we identify the causal effect at the neighborhood level. The adoption of nonessential business closures led to a 38% increase in new users and a 6% increase in engagement among existing users. We find that these increases are proportional across higher- and lower-income neighborhoods and neighborhoods with a high or low share of Black residents. This demonstrates the potential for online platforms to democratize access to knowledge and skills that are in high demand, which supports job security and facilitates social mobility.


Subject(s)
Democracy , Education, Distance/economics , COVID-19 , Data Science/education , Education, Distance/statistics & numerical data , Health Policy , Humans , Pandemics , Socioeconomic Factors
3.
Work ; 68(1): 45-67, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1058398

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The sanitary emergency due to COVID-19 virus obliged people to face up several changes in their everyday life becauseWorld Health Organisation (WHO) guidelines and countries' Health Systems imposed lockdown of activities and social distancing to flatten the infection curve. One of these rapid changes involved students and professors that had to turn the traditional "in presence" classes into online courses facing several problems for educational delivery. OBJECTIVES: This work aimed to investigate the factors that affected both teaching/learning effectiveness and general human comfort and wellbeing after the sudden transition from classrooms to eLearning platforms due to COVID-19 in Italy. METHODS: A workshop, involving students and experts of Human Factors and Ergonomics, has been performed to identify aspects/factors that could influence online learning. Then, from workshop output and literature studies, a survey composed of two questionnaires (one for students and one for teachers) has been developed and spread out among Italian universities students and professors. RESULTS: 700 people answered the questionnaires. Data have been analysed and discussed to define the most important changes due to the new eLearning approach. Absence of interactions with colleagues and the necessity to use several devices were some of the aspects coming out from questionnaires. CONCLUSIONS: The study shows an overview of factors influencing both teaching/learning effectiveness and general human comfort and wellbeing. Results could be considered as a basis for future investigation and optimization about the dependencies and correlations among identified factors and the characteristics of the products/interaction/environment during eLearning courses.


Subject(s)
Child Health/standards , Education, Distance/standards , Quarantine/trends , Students/statistics & numerical data , Transfer, Psychology/physiology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Child Health/statistics & numerical data , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Distance/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Italy , Male , Middle Aged , Quarantine/methods , Students/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Universities/organization & administration , Universities/statistics & numerical data
4.
Front Public Health ; 8: 595874, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1058474

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a contagious disease that affects the respiratory system. In addition to the severe effects of the disease on health, the pandemic caused a negative impact on basic needs and services, employment, education, and economy worldwide. In Jordan, the whole country locked down, and quarantine was enforced by the military forces, which successfully controlled the spread of the disease. This research aims to study the influence of the COVID-19 pandemic and its associated quarantine on university students' beliefs about online learning practice in Jordan. An online descriptive survey involved questions that covered students' demographic information, student's basic and advanced knowledge about COVID-19, students' online learning experience during the quarantine, and finally students' views on the enforced quarantine practice in Jordan. Results showed that students have a good knowledge (>50%) about the COVID-19 basic information and a moderate knowledge (<50%) regarding COVID-19 advanced information. In general, students were pessimistic about the future of COVID-19 both locally and worldwide. Although some students acknowledged that they learned new skills in the fields of electronics, informatics, and computer software during the pandemic, most of them were unsatisfied about the quality and quantity of the given material, online exams, and the evaluation processes. Unfortunately, most of the students faced internet technical problems or challenges to electronic accessibility. The majority of the participants (>90%) supported the military-enforced quarantine implemented in the country despite the hard time the students had during the quarantine. We conclude that university students were able to protect themselves from COVID-19 through their good knowledge about the infectious disease and their commitment to follow the rules imposed by the Government of Jordan. Nevertheless, the challenges caused by the pandemic and its associated quarantine, combined with the sudden unprecedented online experience, negatively impacted students' thoughts and beliefs about the online learning experience during the quarantine. Further studies need to be performed in this context. We hope our results will help decision-makers better understand the students' attitudes and motivation toward online learning and how this will affect their future plans and decisions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Education, Distance/statistics & numerical data , Quarantine/psychology , Students/psychology , Students/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Jordan/epidemiology , Male , Pandemics , Quarantine/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Socioeconomic Factors , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
5.
JSLS ; 24(4)2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1033133

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the use of social media platforms by medical students, surgical trainees, and practicing surgeons for surgical education during the Covid-19 pandemic. METHODS: An online, 15-question survey was developed and posted on Facebook and WhatsApp closed surgeon groups. RESULTS: The online survey was completed by 219 participants from South America (87%), North America (7%), Europe (5%), Central America, and Asia. Respondents included medical students (6.4%), surgical residents/fellows (24.2%), and practicing surgeons (69.4%). The most common age group was 35-44 years. When asked which social media platforms they preferred, the video sharing site YouTube (33.3%), the messaging app WhatsApp (21%), and "other" (including videoconferencing sites) (22.3%) were most popular. Respondents reported using social media for surgical education either daily (38.4%) or weekly (45.2%), for an average of 1-5 hours/week. Most (85%) opined that surgical conferences that were cancelled during the pandemic should be made available online, with live discussions. CONCLUSION: Social media use for surgical education during Covid-19 appears to be increasing and evolving.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Medical/methods , General Surgery/education , Social Media/trends , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Americas/epidemiology , Asia/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Education, Distance/statistics & numerical data , Education, Medical/trends , Europe/epidemiology , Female , General Surgery/trends , Global Health , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
6.
Front Public Health ; 8: 609347, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1005863

ABSTRACT

Internet use in the youth has increased manifold during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) generally have a higher risk of problematic internet use. The aim of this study is to investigate the differences in internet and related digital media use between children with ASD and their typically developing counterparts during the COVID-19 pandemic. In this online survey in Japan conducted from April 30 to May 8, 2020, we analyzed digital media time of 84 children with ASD and 361 age- and gender-matched controls before and after school closure. Digital media use duration was significantly longer in the ASD group than in the control group before the pandemic. The increase of media use time was more prominent in the control group than in the ASD group. We observed excessive Internet use among children with ASD and without ASD, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic. It is necessary to establish strategies to prevent excessive internet use in not only children and adolescents with ASD but also without ASD in the post-pandemic world.


Subject(s)
Autism Spectrum Disorder/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communications Media/statistics & numerical data , Education, Distance/statistics & numerical data , Internet Use/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Students/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Autism Spectrum Disorder/epidemiology , Child , Female , Humans , Japan/epidemiology , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , Schools , Surveys and Questionnaires
7.
Surg Radiol Anat ; 43(4): 531-535, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1002073

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: COVID 19 pandemic has brought crucial changes in the field of medical education. Ad mist university examinations in India medical schools have switched to online assessment methods to avoid student gatherings. In this context, we conducted online anatomy practical evaluation and we have aimed at quantifying the students' experience on virtual assessment. METHODS: A total of 250 first year MBBS students appeared for online anatomy practical examinations. Immediately after the completion of exams electronic feedback about their experience, in questionnaire format was obtained after getting informed consent. Their feedback was analysed and quantified. RESULTS: Completed feedback forms were submitted by 228 students. More than 50% of students favoured online anatomy spotter examinations. Only 32.8% of students were comfortable with soft parts discussion using images. For image based viva voce 61.4%, 80% & 82% of students responded that the features and orientation of osteology, radiology and embryology images, respectively, were good. For surface marking 55% of the participants preferred online verbal evaluation. Finally, more than 60% of the students preferred the conventional over online assessment methods. CONCLUSIONS: The inclination of students' preference for traditional anatomy examination methods mandates adequate training of both students and teachers for virtual examination. The superiority of conventional anatomy practical examination methods is unbiased but pandemic situations warrant adequate preparedness. In the future the anatomy teaching and evaluation methodology in Indian medical schools have to be drastically reviewed in equivalence with global digitalization.


Subject(s)
Anatomy/education , COVID-19/prevention & control , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/methods , Educational Measurement/methods , Anatomy/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Communicable Disease Control/standards , Consumer Behavior/statistics & numerical data , Curriculum , Education, Distance/standards , Education, Distance/statistics & numerical data , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/standards , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/statistics & numerical data , Educational Measurement/statistics & numerical data , Humans , India/epidemiology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Schools, Medical/standards , Students, Medical/psychology , Students, Medical/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires/statistics & numerical data
8.
Am Psychol ; 75(9): 1376-1388, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1003293

ABSTRACT

In today's world of global migration and urbanization, millions of children are separated from parents. Their mental health and future competences as citizens depend on the quality of care from foster parents and group home staff in nonparental care settings. Caregivers are challenged by poor work conditions, too many children, and a lack of knowledge about care for traumatized children. How can our profession match this challenge by upscaling interventions? Digital designs for applications of psychology are growing, recently accelerated by the COVID-19 crisis. From 2008, the author developed a blended learning intervention. In partnerships with nongovernmental organizations and government agencies, care recommendations from an international network of researchers are transformed into start-up seminars for staff, followed by a 6-month online classroom education. Students learn and practice how to train local caregiver groups in attachment-based care, using training sessions developed in local languages, adjusted to culture. At present, the author's Fairstart Foundation educated 500 staff from partners in 26 countries, who have trained the caregivers of some 40,000 children. The theoretical, logistic and technical steps from research to daily caregiver-child practices are described, to inspire discussions of how online designs and international partnerships may benefit underserved populations. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2020 APA, all rights reserved).


Subject(s)
Caregivers/education , Child Care , Child, Abandoned , Education, Distance , Foster Home Care , Group Homes , Program Development , Psychological Trauma/nursing , Teacher Training , Adult , COVID-19 , Child , Child Care/methods , Child Care/organization & administration , Child Care/standards , Child Care/statistics & numerical data , Child, Abandoned/statistics & numerical data , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Education, Distance/statistics & numerical data , Foster Home Care/methods , Foster Home Care/organization & administration , Foster Home Care/statistics & numerical data , Group Homes/organization & administration , Group Homes/statistics & numerical data , Humans , International Cooperation , Intersectoral Collaboration , Program Development/methods , Program Development/standards , Program Development/statistics & numerical data , Teacher Training/methods , Teacher Training/organization & administration , Teacher Training/statistics & numerical data
9.
J Surg Res ; 260: 516-519, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-997219

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has presented unique challenges to medical education. With the lack of in-person away rotations for the 2020-2021 residency application cycle, virtual rotations have surfaced as an alternative. The virtual rotations that the authors participated in allowed for active participation in various resident educational activities such as journal club, grand rounds, and morning conferences. One critical aspect of virtual rotations was the one-on-one meetings with the program leadership. In addition to a virtual tour of the hospital and campus, many programs offered virtual social hours with the residents to converse about the program, the city, and the match process. A few programs even allowed applicants to attend virtually live-streamed surgeries. These rotations offer students, especially those without a corresponding home program, an invaluable opportunity to express their interest in a particular program and gain foundational knowledge about the specialty. Virtual rotations also provide underrepresented minorities and international medical graduates with clinical exposure, mentorship, and networking opportunities, mitigating some of the challenges presented by COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Cultural Diversity , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Internship and Residency/organization & administration , Pandemics/prevention & control , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Distance/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Internship and Residency/methods , Internship and Residency/statistics & numerical data , Mentors , Personnel Selection/organization & administration , Personnel Selection/statistics & numerical data , Physical Distancing , Teaching Rounds/methods , Teaching Rounds/organization & administration , Teaching Rounds/statistics & numerical data
10.
Indian Pediatr ; 57(12): 1177-1178, 2020 Dec 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-976762

ABSTRACT

We conducted this online survey to assess the parental perspectives on remote learning, the associated stress, and school reopening during the COVID-19 pandemic. Of 2694 responses, 2032 (75.4%) parents perceived remote learning to be stressful for the child and 1902 (70.6%) for the family. The mean (SD) duration of remote learning was 3.2 (2.1) hours/day and 5.3 (1.0) days/week. Parents from 1637 (61.7%) families reported headaches and eye strain in children. Starting regular school was not acceptable to 1946 (72.2%) parents.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance/statistics & numerical data , Parents/psychology , Attitude , Child , Humans , India , Physical Distancing , SARS-CoV-2 , Schools , Stress, Psychological , Surveys and Questionnaires
11.
Surg Radiol Anat ; 43(4): 515-521, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-932513

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: During this forced down-time of COVID-19 pandemic, shift to virtual anatomy education is the solitary solution to support the learning of students. The purpose of this study was to understand the visible and invisible potential challenges being faced by the 1st year medical and dental students while attending digital anatomy classes. METHODS: The present study was conducted on 81st year medical and dental students who were admitted to their respective college in August 2019 and were willing to participate in the study. A multiple choice close-ended questionnaire regarding their opinion on virtual classes was designed and feedback was taken from the students. RESULTS: Majority (65%) of the students agreed that they missed their traditional anatomy learning i.e., dissection courses, face to face lectures and interaction with mentors. The students strongly felt the lack of confidence and difficulty in the topics completed without dissections, models, microscopic slides and other modalities. 83% felt lack of proper gadgets, high-band width and strong internet connections, a potential barrier in their digital learning. Lack of self-motivation was felt by 69% students. CONCLUSIONS: The current situation of anatomy education is not intentional, and is not the long term silver bullet solution for a visual subject like anatomy. Though learners face a lot of challenges, however, a shift to online must be supported at this time of health crisis. As the digital learning may go for indefinite period, the feedback of students may be helpful for relevant and timely modifications in digital anatomy education.


Subject(s)
Anatomy/education , COVID-19/prevention & control , Education, Dental/methods , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/methods , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Communicable Disease Control/standards , Curriculum/statistics & numerical data , Dissection/education , Education, Dental/standards , Education, Dental/statistics & numerical data , Education, Distance/standards , Education, Distance/statistics & numerical data , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/standards , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/statistics & numerical data , Humans , India/epidemiology , Learning , Pandemics/prevention & control , Personal Satisfaction , Students, Dental/psychology , Students, Dental/statistics & numerical data , Students, Medical/psychology , Students, Medical/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires/statistics & numerical data
12.
Rev Bras Enferm ; 73(Suppl 2): e20200499, 2020.
Article in English, Portuguese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-934355

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: to report the experience of developing pedagogical mediations in a Virtual Learning Environment implemented in a nursing faculty during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: an experience report on the construction of a distance course aimed at graduates and residents of a nursing faculty at a public university located in the city of Rio de Janeiro. RESULTS: the course's conception, operationalization and implementation were the result of a collective work that culminated in a non-formal, virtual and problematic teaching process, which reached a participation rate of 82% of enrolled students. FINAL CONSIDERATIONS: even in times of social isolation, the course promoted collaborative learning of knowledge about COVID-19 and strengthened the relationship between professors and students. The possibility of carrying out distance activities based on solid methodological proposals that contradict the content logic often observed in distance learning is emphasized.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Education, Nursing/organization & administration , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Schools, Nursing/organization & administration , Brazil , COVID-19 , Curriculum , Education, Distance/statistics & numerical data , Education, Nursing/methods , Education, Nursing/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Students, Nursing/statistics & numerical data
13.
BMC Med Educ ; 20(1): 400, 2020 Nov 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-901866

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID - 19 pandemic pressured medical schools globally to shift to Distance learning (DL) as an alternative way to ensure that the content delivered is satisfactory for student progression. AIM OF THE WORK: This work aims at mapping priorities for post-COVID planning for better balance between distance learning and face to face learning. METHODS: This qualitative study aimed to develop a model for utilizing DL using The Polarity Approach for Continuity and Transformation (PACT)™. A virtual mapping session was held with 79 faculty from 19 countries. They worked in small groups to determine upsides and downsides of face-to-face and DL subsequently. An initial polarity map was generated identifying five tension areas; Faculty, Students, Curriculum, Social aspects and Logistics. A 63-item assessment tool was generated based on this map, piloted and then distributed as a self-administered assessment. The outcomes of this assessment were utilized for another mapping session to discuss warning signs and action steps to maintain upsides and avoid downsides of each pole. RESULTS: Participants agreed that face-to-face teaching allows them to inspire students and have meaningful connections with them. They also agreed that DL provides a good environment for most students. However, students with financial challenges and special needs may not have equal opportunities to access technology. As regards social issues, participants agreed that face-to-face learning provides a better chance for professionalism through enhanced team-work. Cognitive, communication and clinical skills are best achieved in face-to-face. Participants agreed that logistics for conducting DL are much more complicated when compared to face-to-face learning. Participants identified around 10 warning signs for each method that need to be continuously monitored in order to minimize the drawbacks of over focusing on one pole at the expense of the other. Action steps were determined to ensure optimized use of in either method. CONCLUSION: In order to plan for the future, we need to understand the dynamics of education within the context of polarities. Educators need to understand that the choice of DL, although was imposed as a no-alternative solution during the COVID era, yet it has always existed as a possible alternative and will continue to exist after this era. The value of polarity mapping and leveraging allows us to maximize the benefit of each method and guide educators' decisions to minimize the downsides for the good of the learning process.


Subject(s)
Clinical Competence , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Distance/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , COVID-19 , Communicable Disease Control/organization & administration , Cross-Sectional Studies , Curriculum , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/organization & administration , Female , Humans , Male , Organizational Innovation , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Qualitative Research , Schools, Medical/organization & administration , Students, Medical/psychology
14.
BMC Med Educ ; 20(1): 392, 2020 Oct 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-895001

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has become a global health issue and has had a major impact on education. Consequently, half way through the second semester of the academic year 2019/2020, learning methods were delivered through distance learning (DL). We aimed to evaluate the student perspective of DL compared to classroom learning (CL) in the undergraduate dentistry study program at the Faculty of Dentistry Universitas Indonesia. METHODS: An online questionnaire was sent at the end of the semester. A total of 301 students participated in the study. RESULTS: Duration of study influenced student preference. Higher number of first-year students preferred DL compared to their seniors (p < 0.001). Students preferred CL for group discussion, as DL resulted in more difficult communication and gave less learning satisfaction. Only 44.2% students preferred DL over CL, although they agreed that DL gave a more efficient learning method (52.6%), it provided more time to study (87.9%) and to review study materials (87.3%). Challenges during DL included external factors such as unstable internet connection, extra financial burden for the internet quota and internal factors such as time management and difficulty to focus while learning online for a longer period of time. CONCLUSION: Despite some challenges, dental students could adapt to the new learning methods of full DL and the majorities agreed blended learning that combined classroom and distance learning can be implemented henceforth. This current COVID-19 pandemic, changes not only the utilization of technology in education but the pedagogy strategies in the future.


Subject(s)
Computer-Assisted Instruction/methods , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Education, Dental/methods , Education, Distance/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Students, Dental/statistics & numerical data , Adult , COVID-19 , Curriculum , Educational Measurement , Female , Humans , Indonesia , Male , Pandemics , Peer Group , Students, Dental/psychology
15.
J Med Imaging Radiat Sci ; 51(4): 610-616, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-882627

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Online open book assessment has been a common alternative to a traditional invigilated test or examination during the COVID-19 pandemic. However, its unsupervised nature increases ease of cheating, which is an academic integrity concern. This study's purpose was to evaluate the integrity of two online open book assessments with different formats (1. Tightly time restricted - 50 min for mid-semester and 2. Take home - any 4 h within a 24-h window for end of semester) implemented in a radiologic pathology unit of a Bachelor of Science (Medical Radiation Science) course during the pandemic. METHODS: This was a retrospective study involving a review and analysis of existing information related to the integrity of the two radiologic pathology assessments. Three integrity evaluation approaches were employed. The first approach was to review all the Turnitin plagiarism detection software reports with use of 'seven-words-in-a-row' criterion to identify any potential collusion. The second approach was to search for highly irrelevant assessment answers during marking for detection of other cheating types. Examples of highly irrelevant answers included those not addressing question requirements and stating patients' clinical information not from given patient histories. The third approach was an assessment score statistical analysis through descriptive and inferential statistics to identify any abnormal patterns that might suggest cheating occurred. An abnormal pattern example was high assessment scores. The descriptive statistics used were minimum, maximum, range, first quartile, median, third quartile, interquartile range, mean, standard deviation, fail and full mark rates. T-test was employed to compare mean scores between the two assessments in this year (2020), between the two assessments in the last year (2019), between the two mid-semester assessments in 2019 and 2020, and between this and last years' end of semester assessments. A p-value of less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. RESULTS: No cheating evidence was found in all Turnitin reports and assessment answers. The mean scores of the end of semester assessments in 2019 (88.2%) and 2020 (90.9%) were similar (p = 0.098). However, the mean score of the online open book mid-semester assessment in 2020 (62.8%) was statistically significantly lower than that of the traditional invigilated mid-semester assessment in 2019 (71.8%) with p < 0.0001. CONCLUSION: This study shows the use of the online open book assessments with tight time restrictions and the take home formats in the radiologic pathology unit did not have any academic integrity issues. Apparently, the strict assessment time limit played an important role in maintaining their integrity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Education, Distance/standards , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/standards , Educational Measurement/standards , Plagiarism , Radiology/education , Students, Medical/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Australia , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Distance/statistics & numerical data , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/methods , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/statistics & numerical data , Educational Measurement/methods , Educational Measurement/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Male , Medical Oncology/education , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , Software , Time Factors , Young Adult
17.
World Neurosurg ; 144: e164-e177, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-800041

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Neurosurgery departments worldwide have been forced to restructure their training programs because of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. In this study, we describe the impact of COVID-19 on neurosurgical training in Southeast Asia. METHODS: We conducted an online survey among neurosurgery residents in Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore, and Thailand from May 22 to 31, 2020 using Google Forms. The 33-item questionnaire collected data on elective and emergency neurosurgical operations, ongoing learning activities, and health worker safety. RESULTS: A total of 298 of 470 neurosurgery residents completed the survey, equivalent to a 63% response rate. The decrease in elective neurosurgical operations in Indonesia and in the Philippines (median, 100% for both) was significantly greater compared with other countries (P < 0.001). For emergency operations, trainees in Indonesia and Malaysia had a significantly greater reduction in their caseload (median, 80% and 70%, respectively) compared with trainees in Singapore and Thailand (median, 20% and 50%, respectively; P < 0.001). Neurosurgery residents were most concerned about the decrease in their hands-on surgical experience, uncertainty in their career advancement, and occupational safety in the workplace. Most of the residents (n = 221, 74%) believed that the COVID-19 crisis will have a negative impact on their neurosurgical training overall. CONCLUSIONS: An effective national strategy to control COVID-19 is crucial to sustain neurosurgical training and to provide essential neurosurgical services. Training programs in Southeast Asia should consider developing online learning modules and setting up simulation laboratories to allow trainees to systematically acquire knowledge and develop practical skills during these challenging times.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Education, Distance/statistics & numerical data , Education, Medical, Graduate/statistics & numerical data , Elective Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Neurosurgery/education , Neurosurgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Occupational Health , Asia, Southeastern/epidemiology , Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19 Testing/statistics & numerical data , Emergencies , Humans , Indonesia/epidemiology , Internship and Residency , Malaysia/epidemiology , Neurosurgical Procedures/education , Personal Protective Equipment/supply & distribution , Philippines/epidemiology , Research/statistics & numerical data , Singapore/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Thailand/epidemiology
19.
Int Orthop ; 44(9): 1611-1619, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-660016

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: This study aimed to evaluate the impact of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic on orthopaedic and trauma surgery training in Europe by conducting an online survey among orthopaedic trainees. METHODS: The survey was conducted among members of the Federation of Orthopaedic and Trauma Trainees in Europe (FORTE). It consisted of 24 questions (single-answer, multiple-answer, Likert scales). Orthopaedic trainees' demographic data (six questions), clinical role changes (four questions), institutional changes due to the COVID-19 pandemic (nine questions), and personal considerations (five questions) were examined. RESULTS: Three hundred and twenty-seven trainees from 23 European countries completed the survey. Most trainees retained their customary clinical role (59.8%), but a significant number was redeployed to COVID-19 units (20.9%). A drastic workload decrease during the pandemic was reported at most institutions. Only essential activities were performed at 57.1% of institutions and drastic disruptions were reported at 36.0%. Of the respondents, 52.1% stated that faculty-led education was restricted and 46.3% pursued self-guided learning, while 58.6% stated that surgical training was significantly impaired. Concerns about the achievement of annual training goals were expressed by 58.2% of the participants, while 25.0% anticipated the need for an additional year of training. CONCLUSIONS: The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic significantly affected orthopaedic and trauma training in Europe. Most trainees felt the decrease in clinical, surgical, and educational activities would have a detrimental effect on their training. Many of them consulted remote learning options to compensate training impairment, stating that after the COVID-19 pandemic electronic educational approaches may become more relevant in future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Clinical Competence/standards , Internship and Residency/standards , Orthopedics/education , Pandemics , Traumatology/education , Adult , Education, Distance/statistics & numerical data , Education, Medical, Graduate/standards , Education, Medical, Graduate/statistics & numerical data , Europe/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Internet , Internship and Residency/statistics & numerical data , Male , Orthopedics/standards , Orthopedics/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires/statistics & numerical data , Traumatology/standards , Traumatology/statistics & numerical data , Workload/standards , Workload/statistics & numerical data
20.
Clin Neuropsychol ; 35(1): 115-132, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-629215

ABSTRACT

Objective: The Covid-19 pandemic disrupted instructional activity in neuropsychology training programs. In response, the Association of Postdoctoral Programs in Clinical Neuropsychology (APPCN) launched a multisite didactic initiative (MDI). This manuscript describes the development and implementation of the MDI and presents findings from a recently conducted online survey concerning MDI participation.Methods: Faculty and trainees at APPCN member programs were recruited to complete the MDI survey, administered using the Qualtrics platform, through email announcements and via website link and on-screen quick response code shared at online didactic sessions. The MDI survey instrument was designed to capture basic demographics and professional role; information regarding level of site participation, benefits of participation, barriers to participation, online conference platform(s) used, and interest in continued participation; as well as anxiety and work engagement ratings.Results: The response rate was estimated to be 21-29%. Transition to videoconferencing for didactics was noted by 80% due to Covid-19, with 17% of respondents experiencing cancellation or reduction in didactic activities. About 79% endorsed that participation in MDI activities was always or nearly always beneficial. Barriers to participation included not having time, difficulty accessing didactic information, and not knowing about the MDI. Interestingly, trainees at nonparticipating sites reported greater anxiety than trainees at participating sites.Conclusion: It is hoped that these findings will inform future efforts to develop and implement online training activities. The benefits reported by respondents suggest that this work is warranted, while reported barriers to participation identify areas for improvement.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance , Neuropsychology/education , Telecommunications , Adult , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Education, Distance/standards , Education, Distance/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Neuropsychology/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telecommunications/organization & administration , Telecommunications/standards , Telecommunications/statistics & numerical data
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