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1.
PLoS One ; 17(2): e0261114, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1793548

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19-pandemic forced many countries to close schools abruptly in the spring of 2020. These school closures and the subsequent period of distance learning has led to concerns about increasing inequality in education, as children from lower-educated and poorer families have less access to (additional) resources at home. This study analyzes differences in declines in learning gains in primary education in the Netherlands for reading, spelling and math, using rich data on standardized test scores and register data on student and parental background for almost 300,000 unique students. The results show large inequalities in the learning loss based on parental education and parental income, on top of already existing inequalities. The results call for a national focus on interventions specifically targeting vulnerable students.


Subject(s)
Education, Distance/trends , Socioeconomic Factors/history , Teaching/trends , Academic Failure/trends , Academic Success , COVID-19/psychology , Child , Educational Status , History, 21st Century , Humans , Income , Learning , Netherlands , Pandemics , Parents , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , School Teachers , Schools/trends , Students
2.
PLoS One ; 17(2): e0263388, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1793530

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: With the emergence of the COVID-19 pandemic, universities immediately responded to protect students' lives by implementing e-learning in order to stop the spread of the communicable disease within the academic population. This study aimed to describe iranian nursing students' experiences of e-learning during the COVID-19 pandemic. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The current study used a qualitative descriptive study. Ten nursing undergraduate students from a single Iranian university identified using purposive sampling methods. Face-to-face semi-structured interview conducted from May to July 2021 and analyzed through thematic analysis. Lincoln and Goba criteria were used to obtain data validity and reliability. RESULTS: Four themes emerged including"novelty of e-learning","advantages of e-learning", "disadvantages of e-learning"and"passage of time and the desire to return to face education". Participants evaluated e-learning as a novel method without proper infrastructure, it was initially confusing but became the new normal as their knowledge of the way to use it improved. Advantages included self-centered flexible learning and reduction in their concerns experienced with face-to-face learning. Disadvantages including changing the way they interact with teachers, decreasing interactions with classmates, problems with education files, superficial learning, hardware problems, family members' perceptions of the student role, interference of home affairs with e-learning, cheating on exams and assignments and being far away from the clinical context. CONCLUSION: The findings revealed that e-learning has been introduced as a new method for the current research participants and despite the perceived benefits, these students believed that e-learning could supplement face education but not replace it.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Education, Nursing/methods , Students, Nursing/psychology , Adult , Computer-Assisted Instruction , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Distance/trends , Female , Humans , Iran , Learning , Male , Pandemics , Qualitative Research , Reproducibility of Results , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Universities
3.
PLoS One ; 17(3): e0264947, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1736514

ABSTRACT

The outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic early in 2020 forced universities to shut down their campuses and transition to emergency remote instruction (ERI). Students had to quickly adapt to this new mode of instruction while dealing with all other distractions caused by the pandemic. This study integrates extensive data from students' institutional records at a large Historically Black College and University (HBCU) institution with data from a students' survey about the impact of COVID-19 on learning during the Spring 2020 semester to examine the impact of the transition to ERI on students' performance and identify the main factors explaining variations in students' performance. The main findings of our analysis are: (a) students' university experience was positively correlated with performance (continuing students who spent at least one academic year at the university prior to the outbreak had better performance than freshman and new transfer students), (b) students' perceived change in performance after the transition was positively associated with actual performance (students who perceived a decline in their performance after transition to ERI had significantly worse performance than other students), and (c) students' prior online learning experiences and students' emotional experiences with the COVID-19 disease were not significantly associated with performance. These results suggest that the approaches adopted by higher education institutions to support students during times of crisis should pay special attention to certain groups of students.


Subject(s)
Academic Performance/trends , COVID-19/psychology , Education, Distance/trends , Academic Performance/psychology , African Americans/psychology , Disease Outbreaks , Education, Distance/methods , Educational Status , Humans , Learning , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Schools , Students , Universities
5.
BMJ ; 376: o131, 2022 01 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1631764
7.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 22379, 2021 11 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1521772

ABSTRACT

Musculoskeletal pain is a major concern in our life due to its negative effects on our ability to perform daily functions. During COVID-19 pandemic, several countries switched their teaching programs into e-learning, where students spend long hour using electronic devices. The use of these devices was associated with several musculoskeletal complains among the students. The aim of this study is to evaluate the different body aches associated with e-learning on university students. The subjects of this study were students from An-Najah University in Palestine. 385 questionnaires were filled using Google forms questionnaire and all the subjects were using e-learning due to COVID-19 pandemic. Our study showed that a large percentage of participants used electronic devices for e-learning during the pandemic. The Duration of these devices use was correlated with duration and degree of pain, and associated with the difficulty in ability to perform several daily activities. Furthermore, most of the students used the sitting position with supine bent forward during the device usage. Thus, the university students that participated in this study had an increase in body aches during the e-learning process, and the aches duration and severity increases if the duration of electronic devices usage increase.


Subject(s)
Education, Distance/trends , Musculoskeletal Pain/etiology , Arabs/psychology , COVID-19/psychology , Computer-Assisted Instruction/methods , Education, Medical, Undergraduate , Female , Humans , Learning/physiology , Male , Musculoskeletal Pain/physiopathology , Pain/etiology , Pain/physiopathology , Physical Distancing , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Schools/trends , Students, Medical , Surveys and Questionnaires , Universities , Young Adult
8.
Can J Surg ; 64(6): E613-E614, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1511844

ABSTRACT

Most institutions have mitigated the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on residency education by transitioning to web-based educational platforms and using innovative solutions, such as surgical video libraries, telehealth clinics, online question banks via social media platforms, and procedural simulations. Here, we assess the perceived impact of COVID-19 on Canadian surgical residency education and discuss the unique challenges in adapting to a virtual format and how novel training methods implemented during the pandemic may be useful in the future of surgical education.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance , General Surgery/education , Internship and Residency , Pandemics , Canada , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Distance/trends , Forecasting , Humans , Internship and Residency/methods , Internship and Residency/trends , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
9.
PLoS One ; 16(10): e0259281, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1496535

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: E-learning is a relatively trending system of education that has been placed over conventional campus-based learning worldwide, especially since the emergence of the COVID-19 pandemic. This study aimed to assess e-learning readiness among university students of a developing country like Bangladesh and identify the independent predictors of e-learning readiness. METHODS: From 26 December 2020 to 11 January 2021, a total of 1162 university students who had enrolled for e-learning completed a semi-structured questionnaire. Data were collected online via "Google Form" following the principles of snowball sampling through available social media platforms in Bangladesh. A multivariable linear regression model was fitted to investigate the association of e-learning readiness with perceived e-learning stress and other independent predictor variables. RESULTS: A total of 1162 university students participated in this study. The results indicated that with the increase of students' perceived e-learning stress score, the average e-learning readiness score was significantly decreased (ß = -0.43, 95% CI: -0.66, -0.20). The students did not seem ready, and none of the e-learning readiness scale items reached the highest mean score (5.0). The age, gender, divisional residence, preference of students and their parents, devices used, and having any eye problems were significantly associated with the students' e-learning readiness. CONCLUSION: During the prolonged period of the COVID-19 pandemic, e-learning implication strategies are needed to be assessed systematically with the level of readiness and its' impacts among students for the continuation of sound e-learning systems. The study findings recommend evaluating the e-learning readiness of university students and the mental health outcomes during the COVID-19 catastrophe in Bangladesh.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Education, Distance/trends , Students, Medical/psychology , Adult , Bangladesh , Computer-Assisted Instruction , Education, Distance/methods , Female , Forecasting/methods , Humans , Learning , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
10.
Arch Pathol Lab Med ; 145(11): 1350-1354, 2021 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1485407

ABSTRACT

CONTEXT.­: The main focus of education in most pathology residency and subspecialty pathology fellowships is the light microscopic examination of pathology specimens. Classes with multiheaded scopes are the most popular among pathology trainees. Until recently, it was difficult to imagine that this educational approach could change. In the beginning of March 2020, our country faced a serious challenge, which all of us now know as the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. The rules of social distancing and work from home were applied. These types of restrictions were implemented in almost all parts of our life, including work and pathology education. OBJECTIVE.­: To share our experience in the Department of Hematopathology at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center during the COVID-19 pandemic. We describe our experience in modifying our approaches to education. We show how we overcame many obstacles to learning by building one of the largest virtual hematopathology educational platforms via Cisco WebEx and using social media, in particular Twitter. These tools facilitated the learning of hematopathology by medical students, pathology trainees, and practicing pathologists from all over the world. DATA SOURCES.­: During the first 3 months of the pandemic (April, May, and June, 2020), we evaluated the visitor attendance to the MD Anderson Cancer Center Hematopathology Virtual Educational Platform using data collected by the Cisco WebEx Web site. To determine the impact that the platform had on medical education for the hematopathology community on Twitter, the analytic metrics obtained from Symplur LLC (www.symplur.com, April 27, 2020) were used via its Symplur Signals program. CONCLUSIONS.­: Our experience using the MD Anderson Hematopathology Virtual Platform showed that there is substantial global interest and desire for virtual hematopathology education, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Medical/methods , Hematology/education , Pathology/education , Social Media , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Education, Distance/trends , Education, Medical/organization & administration , Education, Medical/trends , Humans , Texas
11.
Ghana Med J ; 54(4 Suppl): 113-116, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1436204

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak in the Hubei province of China has rapidly transformed into a global pandemic. In response to the first few reported cases of COVID-19, the government of Ghana implemented comprehensive social and public health interventions aimed at containing the disease, albeit its effect on medical education is less clear. Undoubtedly, the COVID-19 has brought changes that may impact the plan of career progression for both students and faculty. Hitherto, medical education had students getting into contact with patients and faculty in a facility setting. Their physical presence in both in-and outpatients' settings has been a tradition of early clinical immersion experiences and the clerkship curriculum. Rotating between departments makes the students potential vectors and victims for COVID-19. COVID-19 has the potential to affect students throughout the educational process. The pandemic has led to a complete paradigm shift in the mode of instruction in a clinical care setting. Inperson training has either been reduced or cancelled in favour of virtual forms of pedagogy. The clinics have also seen a reduction in a variety of surgical and medical cases. This situation may result in potential gaps in their training. Outpatient clinics have transitioned mainly to telemedicine, thus minimizing students' exposure to clinic encounters. Faced with this pandemic, medical educators are finding ways to best ensure rigorous training that will produce competent physicians. This article discusses the status of medical education and the effect of COVID-19 and explores potential future effects in a resource-limited country. FUNDING: None declared.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Curriculum/trends , Education, Distance/trends , Education, Medical/methods , Students, Medical , Educational Status , Forecasting , Ghana , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
13.
Plast Reconstr Surg ; 148(3): 462e-474e, 2021 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1371774

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease of 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has had a profound effect on surgical training programs, reflecting decreases in elective surgical cases and emergency restructuring of clinical teams. The effect of these measures on U.S. plastic surgery resident education and wellness has not been characterized. METHODS: An institutional review board-exempted anonymous survey was developed through expert panel discussion and pilot testing. All current U.S. plastic surgery trainees were invited to complete a cross-sectional 28-question survey in April of 2020. Respondents were queried regarding demographic information, educational experiences, and wellness during the COVID-19 pandemic. RESULTS: A total of 668 residents responded to the survey, corresponding to a 56.1 percent response rate. Sex, training program type, postgraduate year, and region were well represented within the sample. Nearly all trainees (97.1 percent) reported restructuring of their clinical teams. One-sixth of respondents were personally redeployed to assist with the care of COVID-19 patients. A considerable proportion of residents felt that the COVID-19 pandemic had a negative impact on their education (58.1 percent) and wellness (84.8 percent). Residents found virtual curriculum effective and meaningful, and viewed an average of 4.2 lectures weekly. Although most residents did not anticipate a change in career path, some reported negative consequences on job prospects or fellowship. CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic had a considerable impact on U.S. plastic surgery education and wellness. Although reductions in case volume may be temporary, this may represent a loss of critical, supervised clinical experience. Some effects may be positive, such as the development of impactful virtual lectures that allow for cross-institutional curriculum.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19 , Health Status , Internship and Residency , Students, Medical/psychology , Surgery, Plastic/education , Adult , Career Choice , Cross-Sectional Studies , Curriculum , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Education, Distance/trends , Female , Humans , Internship and Residency/methods , Internship and Residency/organization & administration , Internship and Residency/trends , Male , Mental Health , Physical Distancing , Social Support , Stress, Psychological , Surgery, Plastic/organization & administration , Surgery, Plastic/trends , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States
15.
J Surg Oncol ; 124(2): 174-180, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1303279

ABSTRACT

Electronic resources have changed surgical education in the 21st century. Resources spanning from digital textbooks to multiple choice question banks, online society meetings, and social media can facilitate surgical education. The COVID pandemic drastically changed the paradigm for education. The ramifications of Zoom lectures and online surgical society meetings will last into the future. Educators and learners can be empowered by the many available electronic resources to enhance surgical training and education.


Subject(s)
Education, Distance/trends , Education, Medical, Graduate/trends , General Surgery/education , Internet/trends , Audiovisual Aids , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Congresses as Topic/trends , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Medical, Graduate/methods , General Surgery/trends , Humans , Models, Educational , Social Media/trends , Societies, Medical/trends , United States/epidemiology , Videoconferencing/trends
17.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 25(12): 4426-4434, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1296355

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This study aims to provide medical educators with insights into the current status and prospects of undergraduate medical education, which has been affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We conducted a database search of PubMed, Embase, and ERIC and identified articles on COVID-19-related undergraduate medical education. We independently reviewed titles and abstracts and extracted data on the geographic location of the study, area of specialty, phase in medical school (preclinical year, clerkship year, etc.), type of paper, and the main content of the study. RESULTS: A total of 49 articles published across multiple countries were included in this study. These were categorized as dealing with either (1) curriculum changes in undergraduate medical education due to COVID-19 or (2) student-led educational activities related to COVID-19. The 41 articles in the first category showed two main trends: replacing in-person lectures with online classes in the preclinical years and adopting various remote educational methods to compensate for the discontinued or truncated clerkship in the clinical years. The eight articles in the second category showcased various student educational activities that were conducted to meet the public's medical needs during the pandemic. CONCLUSIONS: This review summarized the essential changes in undergraduate medical education worldwide and reflected on the various teaching methods adopted by medical schools. In preparation for the post-COVID era, a comprehensive online curriculum and evaluation tools are needed, which require the development of necessary infrastructure and adequate resources. Education aimed at helping students be more socially aware and responsible as medical professionals must be promoted.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Curriculum , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/methods , Students, Medical , COVID-19/prevention & control , Curriculum/trends , Education, Distance/trends , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/trends , Humans , Students, Medical/psychology
18.
Eur J Pediatr Surg ; 31(4): 319-325, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1281760

ABSTRACT

The novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has impacted our way of living in an unprecedented manner. Medical professionals at all levels have been forced to adapt to the novel virus. The delivery of surgical services and the subsequent learning opportunities for surgical residents have especially been disrupted and the pediatric surgical community has not been exempted by this. This article highlights the challenges imposed by the pandemic and outlines the various learning modalities that can be implemented to ensure continued learning opportunities throughout the pandemic and beyond. Furthermore, it aims to show how the utilization and expansion of technologies maintain and further increase the communication, as well as the exchange of and access to knowledge among peers. Virtual education-, application-, and simulation-based learning and social media, as well as telemedicine and online conferences, will play a considerable role in the future of surgical specialties and surgical education.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance/trends , Pediatrics/education , Specialties, Surgical/education , Child , Humans , Pandemics , Professional Competence , Simulation Training , Social Media , Telemedicine
20.
Inquiry ; 58: 469580211018293, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1262472

ABSTRACT

The present work suggests research and innovation on the topic of dental education after the COVID-19 pandemic, is highly justified and could lead to a step change in dental practice. The challenge for the future in dentistry education should be revised with the COVID-19 and the possibility for future pandemics, since in most countries dental students stopped attending the dental faculties as there was a general lockdown of the population. The dental teaching has an important curriculum in the clinic where patients attend general dentistry practice. However, with SARS-CoV-2 virus, people may be reluctant having a dental treatment were airborne transmission can occur in some dental procedures. In preclinical dental education, the acquisition of clinical, technical skills, and the transfer of these skills to the clinic are extremely important. Therefore, dental education has to adapt the curriculum to embrace new technology devices, instrumentations systems, haptic systems, simulation based training, 3D printer machines, to permit validation and calibration of the technical skills of dental students.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Dental/trends , Education, Distance/trends , Practice Patterns, Dentists'/trends , Curriculum/trends , Dentistry/trends , Economics, Dental/trends , Humans
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