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1.
BMJ Open Qual ; 11(2)2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1784844

ABSTRACT

Simulation-based learning (SBL) is well-established in medical education and has gained popularity, particularly during the COVID-19 pandemic when in-person teaching is infeasible. SBL replicates real-life scenarios and provides a fully immersive yet safe learning environment to develop clinical competency. Simulation via Instant Messaging - Birmingham Advance (SIMBA) is an exemplar of SBL, which we previously showed to be effective in endocrinology and diabetes. Previous studies reported the efficacy of SBL in acute medicine. We studied SIMBA as a learning intervention for healthcare professionals interested in acute medicine and defined our aims using the Kirkpatrick model: (i) develop an SBL tool to improve case management; (ii) evaluate experiences and confidence before and after; and (iii) compare efficacy across training levels.Three sessions were conducted, each representing a PDSA cycle (Plan-Do-Study-Act), consisting of four cases and advertised to healthcare professionals at our hospital and social media. Moderators facilitated progression through 25 min simulations and adopted patient and clinical roles as appropriate. Consultants chaired discussion sessions using relevant guidelines. Presimulation and postsimulation questionnaires evaluated self-reported confidence, feedback and intended changes to clinical practice.Improvements were observed in self-reported confidence managing simulated cases across all sessions. Of participants, 93.3% found SIMBA applicable to clinical practice, while 89.3% and 88.0% felt SIMBA aided personal and professional development, respectively. Interestingly, 68.0% preferred SIMBA to traditional teaching methods. Following participant feedback, more challenging cases were included, and we extended the time for simulation and discussion. The transcripts were amended to facilitate more participant-moderator interaction representing clinical practice. In addition, we refined participant recruitment over the three sessions. In cycle 1, we advertised incentives: participation counted towards teaching requirements, certificates and feedback. To rectify the reduction in participants in cycle 2, we implemented new advertisement methods in cycle 3, including on-site posters, reminder emails and recruitment of the defence deanery cohort.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Medical , Clinical Competence , Humans , Learning , Pandemics
3.
Front Public Health ; 10: 838106, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1776042

ABSTRACT

In the spring semester of 2020, online flipped classroom was used to replace offline face-to-face teaching of the physiology course at Xiangya School of Medicine. In order to analyze the preferences and utilization of different teaching resources by students, registered questionnaire was applied to investigate the preference divergence of the students on the duration of different teaching videos used in the online flipped classroom model. One hundred forty-seven students of clinical medicine in grade 2018 of Xiangya School of Medicine were selected as the research objects. Three formal surveys were conducted in total. The results showed that there were significant divergences in preference of students for different durations in the first two surveys. 56.43 and 50.00% of the students preferred 15 min mini-video, whereas 43.57 and 50.00% preferred 45 min complete video. Meanwhile, students showed a significant preference for mini-video in active learning before class, with 65.00 and 59.29% watched only mini-video, 17.14 and 25.71% watched only complete videos, and 17.86 and 15.00% watched both mini and complete videos. Although most students preferred to watch mini-video in active learning before class, there was a significant proportion of students who watched complete video before class. The results suggested that the individualization of student in the online flipped classroom is prominent. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that the selection of videos with different durations at different time points (before, in and after class) was significantly associated with the characteristics of the videos themselves. Therefore, the construction of online teaching resources and the application of teaching methods should consider the requirements of different student groups and provide a variety of online curriculum resources.


Subject(s)
Audiovisual Aids , Curriculum , Education, Distance , China , Education, Medical , Humans , Problem-Based Learning/methods , Students , Surveys and Questionnaires , Teaching Materials
4.
BMC Med Educ ; 22(1): 212, 2022 Mar 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1770525

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 pandemic has affected all dimensions of day to day life across the world and medical education was no exception. With this study, we aimed to understand the effect of nationwide restrictions on medical education in Qatar, the models of education adopted during this period and perceptions of participants to the same. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional study utilizing an online questionnaire distributed via convenience sampling between April-October 2020. Study participants were faculty and trainees in governmental undergraduate and postgraduate medical education institutes. Two sets of questionnaires were designed for each group. They were asked a series of questions to assess pre- and post-COVID pandemic educational practices, their preferred teaching methods, and their familiarity with electronic teaching platforms. Faculty respondents were asked about their perceived barriers to delivery of medical education during the pandemic and their agreement on a 5-point Likert scale on specific elements. Trainees were asked a series of multiple-choice questions to characterize their pre- and post-COVID pandemic educational experiences. Both groups were asked open-ended questions to provide qualitative insights into their answers. Data were analysed using STATA software version 12.0. RESULTS: Majority of trainees (58.5%) responded that the pandemic has adversely affected medical education at both the undergraduate and postgraduate levels. Trainees (58.5%) and faculty (35.7%) reported an increased reliance on e-learning. Trainees preferred face-to-face education, while faculty preferred a combination of models of education delivery (33.5% versus 37.1%, p = 0.38). Although 52.5% of the faculty had no previous experience of delivering education through e-learning modalities, 58.9% however felt confident in using e-learning software. CONCLUSIONS: Faculty and trainees agree that the COVID-19 pandemic has had a significant impact on the provision of medical education and training in Qatar, with an increased dependence on e-learning. As trainee's prefer face-to-face models of education, we may have to consider restructuring of medical curricula in order to ensure that optimum learning is achieved via e-learning, while at the same time enhancing our use, knowledge and understanding of the e -learning methods. Further research is warranted to assess if these changes have influenced objective educational outcomes like graduation rates or board scores.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Medical , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Pandemics , Qatar/epidemiology
5.
BMC Med Educ ; 22(1): 218, 2022 Mar 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1770524

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic required a transformation of medical education in Egypt. Public health measures necessitated a rapid shift from traditional face to face lectures to largely online platforms following campus closures. The aim of this study is to characterize medical student use and perception of online medical education in Egypt as well as exploring the efficacy of different e-learning modalities. Additionally, many barriers and opportunities as perceived by students are reviewed to inform future educational improvements. METHODS: A 29-item online survey was created on google forms and distributed by social media to medical students across 26 Egyptian medical schools. The survey was administered from August 20th, 2021, to September 5th, 2021. The survey consisted of a mixture of questions style. The medical students were asked about their experiences with online medical education during the COVID-19 pandemic as well as medical students' anxiety, perceived academic performance, and obstacles related to online education. RESULTS: Of the 4935 responses collected, 43.4% (n = 2140) of respondents were women; 56.6% (n = 2795) were men. Medical students from private medical schools were 13.0% (n = 644), whereas 87.0% (n = 4291) were from public medical schools. 54.6% of students reported that online education is not as effective as face-to-face education. There was a significant rise in hours spent by medical students on online medical education compared to before COVID-19 pandemic. More than half of students (63%) agreed that online recorded video tutorials (e.g., YouTube) were the most effective form of online medical education. CONCLUSION: The shift to online education has significantly impacted medical students in Egypt. Medical students reported various limitations and challenges of online medical education, which must be addressed considering the potential benefits of online platforms over traditional face to face learning. The results of this nationwide study provide a framework for potential areas to implement change to improve the accessibility and structure of online medical education in Egypt.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance , Education, Medical , Students, Medical , COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Distance/methods , Egypt/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Schools, Medical
6.
Arch Gynecol Obstet ; 305(4): 1041-1053, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1767489

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The onset of the COVID-19 pandemic posed an eminent challenge for medical teachers worldwide. Face-to-face lectures and seminars were no longer possible, and alternatives had to be found. E-learning concepts quickly emerged as the only practicable solutions and also offered the opportunity to evaluate whether traditional face-to-face lectures could be translated into an online format, independent of the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: We offered an e-learning program consisting of lecture notes, screencasts with audio narration, and online webinars that covered topics normally taught in traditional lectures and seminars. To evaluate the learning behavior and quality of our e-learning program, we drafted a questionnaire that students completed at the end of the 2020 summer semester that had been designed to enable a comparative analysis of the different e-learning modules. RESULTS: Voluntary participation in the online courses was high. Survey analysis revealed high satisfaction with and a distinctive preference for the format, even under regular, COVID-19-independent conditions. In general, a positive appraisal of e-learning-especially as a substitute for regular lectures-was found. Students also reported higher studying efficiency. Exam results were equal to those of previous semesters. CONCLUSION: Both acceptance of and satisfaction with our e-learning modules were high, and students displayed increased demand for this kind of e-learning format. We, therefore, conclude that e-learning offerings could serve as reasonable, efficient, student-orientated substitutes for certain medical courses, especially lectures. These curricular adaptations would correlate with the high digitalization seen in students' everyday lives. This correlation may also hold true independent of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Medical , Gynecology , Obstetrics , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Students
7.
Front Public Health ; 10: 619769, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1753413

ABSTRACT

In the last two decades there has been an enormous growth in the use of clinical simulation. This teaching-learning methodology is currently the main tool used in the training of healthcare professionals. Clinical simulation is in tune with new paradigms in education and is consistent with educational theories that support the use of experiential learning. It promotes the development of psychomotor skills and strengthens executive functions. This pedagogical approach can be applied in many healthcare topics and is particularly relevant in the context of restricted access to clinical settings. This is particularly relevant considering the current crisis caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, or when trying to reduce the frequency of accidents attributed to errors in clinical practice. This mini-review provides an overview of the current literature on healthcare simulation methods, as well as prospects for education and public health benefits. A literature search was conducted in order to find the most current trends and state of the art in medical education simulation. Presently, there are many areas of application for this methodology and new areas are constantly being explored. It is concluded that medical education simulation has a solid theoretical basis and wide application in the training of health professionals at present. In addition, it is consolidated as an unavoidable methodology both in undergraduate curricula and in continuing medical education. A promising scenario for medical education simulation is envisaged in the future, hand in hand with the development of technological advances.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Medical , COVID-19/epidemiology , Computer Simulation , Curriculum , Humans , Pandemics
8.
Med Educ Online ; 27(1): 2040192, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1751977

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted medical education worldwide. Universities were forced to rapidly adapt to the evolving situation and develop methods of delivering curricula and assessments online. The purpose of this scoping review was to assess the impact of COVID-19 on medical education and investigate how this effect varies in different income countries. The methodology adhered to PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) extension for scoping reviews. Key terms were searched in six electronic databases. Inclusion criteria included studies describing the effect of COVID-19 on undergraduate medical education in university and clinical settings, studies published post 1 December 2019 and studies published in English. A modified Johanna Briggs Institute data charting tool was used to extract data concerning study characteristics and outcomes. The initial search returned 298 articles. Following duplicate removal and article screening, 33 studies were included. The literature indicated that the pandemic had a negative effect on medical student education worldwide, in both high-income countries (HICs) and low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). A range of factors impacted students and educators, including new curriculum and assessment design, reduced patient contact, use of new technology and lack of infrastructure. However, LMICs encountered more arduous barriers such as lack of access to information technology infrastructure and support from national governments. COVID-19 has impeded medical education worldwide. Future research is needed to address barriers to providing medical education during a pandemic. LMICs need particular support as they have fewer resources and face greater challenges regarding this matter.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Medical , COVID-19/epidemiology , Curriculum , Developing Countries , Humans , Pandemics
9.
J Surg Educ ; 79(2): 426-430, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1747725

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Prior to 2015 residents in our Accreditation Council for Graduation Medical Education (ACGME) colon and rectal surgery training program were in charge of managing, with faculty oversight, the outpatient anorectal clinic at our institution. Starting in 2015 advanced practice providers (APPs) working in the division assumed management of the clinic. The effect of APPs on ACGME resident index diagnostic case volumes has not been explored. Herein we examine ACGME case log graduate statistics to determine if the inclusion of APPs into our anorectal clinic practice has negatively affected resident index diagnostic anorectal case volumes. DESIGN: ACGME year-end program reports were obtained for the years 2011 to 2019. Program anorectal diagnostic index volumes were recorded and compared to division volumes. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) and analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) tests were conducted to assess whether the number of cases per year (for each respective case type) prior to the introduction of APPs into the anorectal clinic (2011-2014) differed from the number of cases per year with the APP clinic in place (2015-2018). A p-value <0.05 was considered statistically significant. SETTING: Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (quaternary referral center). PARTICIPANTS: Colon and rectal surgery resident year-end ACGME reports (2011-2019). RESULTS: ANOVAs revealed a marginally significant (p = 0.007) downtrend for hemorrhoid diagnostic codes, and a significant uptrend (p = 0.000) for fistula cases. Controlling for overall division volume, ANCOVA only reveled significance for fistula cases (p = 0.004) with the involvement of APPs. CONCLUSIONS: At our institution we found the inclusion of APPs into our anorectal clinic practice did not negatively affect colon and rectal surgery resident ACGME index diagnostic anorectal case volumes. Inclusion of APPs into a multidisciplinary practice can promote resident education by allowing trainees to pursue other educational opportunities without hindering ACGME index case volumes.


Subject(s)
Education, Medical , General Surgery , Internship and Residency , Accreditation , Clinical Competence , Colon , Education, Medical, Graduate , General Surgery/education , Humans
10.
PLoS One ; 17(3): e0265356, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1742023

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic forced many educational institutions to turn to electronic learning to allow education to continue under the stay-at-home orders/requests that were commonly instituted in early 2020. In this cross-sectional study, we evaluated the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on medical education in terms of students' attitudes toward online classes and their online accessibility; additionally, we examined the impacts of any disruption caused by the pandemic on achievement test performance based on the test results. The participants were 674 students (412 in pre-clinical, 262 in clinical) at Juntendo University Faculty of Medicine; descriptive analysis was used to examine the respondents' characteristics and responses. The majority of respondents (54.2%) preferred asynchronous classes. Mann-Whitney U tests revealed that while pre-clinical students preferred asynchronous classes significantly more than clinical students (39.6%, p < .001), students who preferred face-to-face classes had significantly higher total achievement test scores (U = 1082, p = .021, r = .22). To examine the impacts of pandemic-induced changes in learning, we conducted Kruskal-Wallis tests and found that the 2020 and 2021 scores were significantly higher than those over the last three years. These results suggest that while medical students may have experienced challenges adapting to electronic learning, the impact of this means of study on their performance on achievement tests was relatively low. Our study found that if possible, face-to-face classes are preferable in an electronic learning environment. However, the benefit of asynchronous classes, such as those that allow multiple viewings, should continue to be recognized even after the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Medical/methods , Students, Medical/psychology , Adult , COVID-19/psychology , Computer-Assisted Instruction , Cross-Sectional Studies , Educational Status , Female , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Japan , Male , Young Adult
11.
BMJ ; 376: o657, 2022 03 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1741615
12.
Perspect Med Educ ; 11(2): 115-120, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1739455

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted the international medical education community in unprecedented ways. The restrictions imposed to control the spread of the virus have upended our routines and forced us to reimagine our work structures, educational programming and delivery of patient care in ways that will likely continue to change how we live and work for the foreseeable future. Yet, despite these interruptions, the pandemic has additionally sparked a transformative impulse in some to actively engage in critical introspection around the future of their work, compelling us to consider what changes could (and perhaps should) occur after the pandemic is over. Drawing on key concepts associated with scholar Paulo Freire's critical pedagogy, this paper serves as a call to action, illuminating the critical imaginings that have come out of this collective moment of struggle and instability, suggesting that we can perhaps create a more just, compassionate world even in the wake of extraordinary hardship.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Medical , Humans , Pandemics
13.
BMC Med Educ ; 22(1): 158, 2022 Mar 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1736409

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: As the field of education was adapting to virtual learning during the COVID-19 pandemic, a need quickly emerged for a course to prepare medical students for future clinical practice. This call to action was answered by creating an innovative Fundamentals of COVID-19 course at the Indiana University School of Medicine (IUSM). As a group of medical student leaders at IUSM, we developed this online course in order to support our fellow students and the community. METHODS: The study examined the educational effects of completing the Fundamentals of COVID-19 course. In order to examine these effects, the study asked enrolled students to complete both a pre- and post-course self-assessment survey. Students were asked an identical set of questions on each survey about their knowledge, skills, and abilities (KSA) regarding COVID-19. Composite scores were created for each KSA learning domain. Responses were provided using a five-point Likert scale ranging from 1 = strongly disagree to 5 = strongly agree. RESULTS: Out of the 724 students enrolled, 645 students completed both the pre- and post-course assessment surveys. Findings show that there were both meaningful and statistically significant differences in students' responses to the pre- and post-course surveys. Results show 1.) a significant mean increase in the knowledge composite score of 1.01, 95% CI [0.95, 1.06], t(644) = 36.4, p < .001, d = 1.43; 2.) a significant mean increase in the skills composite score of .55, 95% CI [0.50, 0.60], t(644) = 20.70, p < .001, d = 0.81. and 3.) a significant mean increase of the abilities composite score of 1.02, 95% CI [.97, 1.07], t(644) = 36.56, p < .001, d = 1.44. CONCLUSIONS: These findings demonstrate that the student-developed, online Fundamentals of COVID-19 course resulted in notable and statistically significant educational effects. The increase in students' self-reported ratings, especially in the knowledge and abilities domains, indicate that meaningful learning occurred within the course. These findings have notable implications for medical student training during healthcare emergencies, such as a pandemic, as well as within modern clerkship environments. Overall, our findings provide evidence that student-led curricular design and virtual delivery of course content can be effective tools in undergraduate medical education.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Medical, Undergraduate , Education, Medical , Students, Medical , COVID-19/epidemiology , Curriculum , Education, Medical/methods , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
14.
15.
Med Teach ; 44(2): 187-195, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1730379

ABSTRACT

AIMS: The COVID-19 pandemic has seen a major disruption to undergraduate and postgraduate clinical medical education. The aim of this rapid review was to identify and synthesize published literature relating to the solutions, enablers and barriers to online learning implemented in clinical medical education during the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: All articles published before March 2021 in peer-reviewed journals, including MedEdPublish, that described authors' experience of online learning in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. A descriptive analysis of the solutions and a qualitative template analysis of enablers and barriers. RESULTS: 87 articles were identified for inclusion. Face to face teaching was maintained with interactive approaches between learners and/or learners and teachers. Several innovative solutions were identified. The enablers were a readiness and rapid response by institutions, with innovation by teachers. The barriers were the lack of planning and resources, usability problems and limited interactivity between teachers and students. CONCLUSIONS: Important and timely evidence was obtained that can inform future policy, practice and research. The findings highlighted the urgent need to use rapid design and implementation methods with greater explicit descriptions in published articles to ensure applicability to other contexts.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance , Education, Medical , COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Education, Medical/methods , Education, Medical/organization & administration , Humans , Pandemics
16.
BMC Med Educ ; 22(1): 144, 2022 Mar 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1724474

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has caused medical colleges worldwide to suspend in-person classes and clinical clerkships. This fluid situation urgently required educators and learners to make a paradigm shift from traditional medical education. However, descriptions of how leaders manage policy decisions, especially considering cultural contexts, are limited. This study explores how the deans of medical colleges in Japan addressed the situations in which face-to-face contact is difficult and interacted with various stakeholders during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: The study employed a nationwide online survey by sending individual e-mails to the director of medical education at each of the 82 medical colleges in Japan. Responses were collected between May 26 and June 12, 2020 from the deans or directors of medical education. The survey questions were developed based on a literature review and consultations with international research collaborators. The survey asked what difficulties and opportunities were encountered through curriculum adjustments during the COVID-19 pandemic and what lessons could be shared with medical educators worldwide. Survey responses were analyzed using thematic analysis. The themes were categorized by stakeholder and then analyzed using the domains of sensemaking theory. RESULTS: A total of 48 medical colleges in Japan completed the survey, yielding a response rate of 58.5%. The levels of participation in the study were 42.9%, 77.8%, and 74.2% among national, public, and private medical colleges, respectively, with responses from public and private medical colleges tending to be higher than those from national medical colleges. Japanese deans' decisions for actions in adapting to COVID-19 involve perceiving cues from multiple stakeholder groups, including medical students, parents of medical students, medical faculties, and government officials. Thematic analysis of survey data reveals that Japanese deans' actions in adapting to COVID-19 reflect characteristics of Japanese culture, with Japanese deans tending to emphasize in-depth introspection and collaboration with diverse stakeholders. CONCLUSIONS: Despite a lack of clear national guidelines for decision making, Japanese deans adapted to COVID-19 challenges by learning from one another and seeking the perspectives of a diverse group of stakeholders, aligned with local cultural context. Their approach offers important lessons for global medical educators.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Medical , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Japan/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
17.
S Afr Fam Pract (2004) ; 64(1): e1-e2, 2022 02 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1715886
18.
Int J Med Educ ; 13: 35-46, 2022 Feb 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1716000

ABSTRACT

Objectives: To investigate students' experience with medical education alongside their mental and physical health since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic across nine countries. Methods: A cross-sectional online survey was distributed by local collaborators to 2,280 medical students across 148 medical schools in Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Germany, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Spain, and Venezuela using non-probability convenience sampling from June 22 to July 24, 2020. Students answered questions regarding teaching, internet use, COVID-19, physical and mental well-being. A multivariate logistic regression examined factors associated with depressed mood, insomnia, and headache. Results: Academic teaching shifted to a virtual (67%, n=1,534) or hybrid environment (23%, n=531), whilst bedside teaching was suspended or cancelled (93%, n=2,120). Across all countries students were equally satisfied with the teaching modality, quantity, quality, and the evaluation system of in-person, hybrid, and online curricula. Negative changes in mental (40% (n=912) insomnia, 57% (n=1,300) emotional irritability, 47% (n=1,072) emotional instability, 41% (n=935) anhedonia, 40% (n=912) depressed mood) and physical (36% (n=821) headache, 57% (n=1,299) ocular tiredness, 49% (n=1,117) backache) health symptoms were frequently observed. Positive associations between the number of daily screen hours and depressed mood (adjusted odds ratio (AOR)=1.09, 95%CI: 1.05-1.12, p<.001), insomnia (AOR=1.08, 95%CI: 1.05-1.11, p<.001), and headache (AOR=1.11, 95%CI: 1.07-1.14, p<.001) were identified. Conclusions: Students' experience with digital and hybrid medical curricula was diverse during the pandemic. Education modality, quantity, and quality were positively evaluated. However, students' mental and physical health worsened. Besides bedside teaching, faculties ought to digitalize and strengthen social communities and extend support services for students.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Medical , Students, Medical , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Mental Health , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
19.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(5)2022 Feb 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1715368

ABSTRACT

(1) Introduction: Most educational institutions around the world have shifted from traditional face-to-face to online education amid COVID-19. This change may particularly impact medical students, whose education is heavily influenced by clinical learning experiences. Accordingly, we investigated medical students' perceptions about positive and negative aspects of online medical education in Japan and overseas during the COVID-19 pandemic. (2) Methods: In-depth online interviews were conducted among 13 Japanese medical students and five medical students from Slovakia, Norway, and Hungary. Interviews were conducted from 23rd September to 3rd October 2020 using the snowball sampling method. Questions were focused on five main areas: Q1 the type of online education; Q2 advantages and disadvantages of online education; Q3 any changes in the relationship with teachers, friends, and family; Q4 any opinions about further improvements in online education; and Q5 any needs for affiliation with a particular university. Then thematic analysis was conducted. (3) Results: The results of the thematic analysis revealed the following four themes that represent the positive and negative aspects of online medical education; Theme 1: Timesaving and Flexibility; Theme 2: Technical problems and lack of digital skills; Theme 3: Unstandardized teaching skills; Theme 4: Lack of experience beyond medical school lectures. (4) Conclusions: While online education was found useful in terms of saving time and creating a flexible learning environment, many important drawbacks were noted such as internet and computer problems and unstandardized teaching skills, and lack of quality assurance. In addition, experiences outside the classroom such as making relationships with faculty and friends, conducting research and participating in extracurricular activities were missed, which they normally enjoy in college life.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance , Education, Medical , Students, Medical , COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Distance/methods , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
20.
Health Informatics J ; 28(1): 14604582221075554, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1709325

ABSTRACT

Digital transformation has become inseparable from education, and its implementation has broadly increased due to the increased adoption of e-learning during the COVID-19 pandemic. The present study evaluated the levels and influence of computer anxiety and digital readiness for academic engagement among undergraduate students. A cross-sectional study was conducted on 272 medical students enrolled in a medicine program. Two previously validated instruments were adopted. We examined the association between students' sociodemographic variables, internet use, and perceived academic performance during e-learning and their computer anxiety and digital readiness. The results show a significant effect of gender, age, and internet use on students' computer anxiety and digital readiness. Males' information-sharing behavior and skills outperformed those of females, and students' computer anxiety decreased with increasing age. In addition, the results indicate that the greater the students' internet use, the better their digital readiness for academic engagement. Furthermore, computer anxiety and digital readiness affect students' perceptions of their academic performance in e-learning. The rapid rate of technological advancements and the integration of e-learning into education means that careful attention must be paid to student characteristics as well as their skills. This will allow educators to create a successful, personalized learning framework.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Medical , Students, Medical , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
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