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1.
BMC Complement Med Ther ; 22(1): 106, 2022 Apr 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1793957

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Pediatric integrative medicine, combining conventional and complementary medical approaches for children and adolescents, is an integral part of the health care system in Switzerland. However, there is still a lack of complementary and integrative medicine topics in training and continuing educational programs. For the first time on a national level, the 2021 annual conference of the Swiss Society of Pediatrics was entirely dedicated to the topic of integrative medicine. METHODS: Using a cross-sectional online survey, this study investigated congress participants' evaluation and feedback with the aim to assess whether the program had met their objectives and to get empirical data on their attitude, expectations and needs regarding pediatric complementary and integrative medicine. Descriptive methods were used to present the results. RESULTS: Among 632 participants of the conference, 228 completed the evaluation form (response rate 36%). The overall feedback about the congress and the main theme of pediatric integrative medicine was clearly positive. The majority of respondents had achieved their educational objectives including complementary and integrative medicine issues. 82% were motivated to learn more about complementary and integrative medicine and 66% were stimulated to integrate complementary therapies into their professional practice. CONCLUSION: This study from Switzerland confirms the interest in integrative medicine among pediatricians and supports the need for pre- and postgraduate pediatric training on topics related to complementary and integrative medicine. Developing and adapting training and continuing medical education based on evaluations of participant feedback can promote professional development and improve patient care for the benefit of physicians and patients.


Subject(s)
Integrative Medicine , Pediatrics , Adolescent , Child , Cross-Sectional Studies , Education, Medical, Continuing/methods , Humans , Integrative Medicine/education , Pediatrics/education , Switzerland
2.
PLoS One ; 17(3): e0264644, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1793511

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Patients with high-consequence infectious diseases (HCID) are rare in Western Europe. However, high-level isolation units (HLIU) must always be prepared for patient admission. Case fatality rates of HCID can be reduced by providing optimal intensive care management. We here describe a single centre's preparation, its embedding in the national context and the challenges we faced during the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus type 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic. METHODS: Ten team leaders organize monthly whole day trainings for a team of doctors and nurses from the HLIU focusing on intensive care medicine. Impact and relevance of training are assessed by a questionnaire and a perception survey, respectively. Furthermore, yearly exercises with several partner institutions are performed to cover different real-life scenarios. Exercises are evaluated by internal and external observers. Both training sessions and exercises are accompanied by intense feedback. RESULTS: From May 2017 monthly training sessions were held with a two-month and a seven-month break due to the first and second wave of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, respectively. Agreement with the statements of the questionnaire was higher after training compared to before training indicating a positive effect of training sessions on competence. Participants rated joint trainings for nurses and doctors at regular intervals as important. Numerous issues with potential for improvement were identified during post processing of exercises. Action plans for their improvement were drafted and as of now mostly implemented. The network of the permanent working group of competence and treatment centres for HCID (Ständiger Arbeitskreis der Kompetenz- und Behandlungszentren für Krankheiten durch hochpathogene Erreger (STAKOB)) at the Robert Koch-Institute (RKI) was strengthened throughout the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic. DISCUSSION: Adequate preparation for the admission of patients with HCID is challenging. We show that joint regular trainings of doctors and nurses are appreciated and that training sessions may improve perceived skills. We also show that real-life scenario exercises may reveal additional deficits, which cannot be easily disclosed in training sessions. Although the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic interfered with our activities the enhanced cooperation among German HLIU during the pandemic ensured constant readiness for the admission of HCID patients to our or to collaborating HLIU. This is a single centre's experience, which may not be generalized to other centres. However, we believe that our work may address aspects that should be considered when preparing a unit for the admission of patients with HCID. These may then be adapted to the local situations.


Subject(s)
Communicable Diseases/therapy , Critical Care/organization & administration , Intensive Care Units/organization & administration , Patient Isolation/organization & administration , COVID-19/epidemiology , Clinical Competence , Communicable Diseases/epidemiology , Education, Medical, Continuing/methods , Education, Medical, Continuing/organization & administration , Education, Nursing, Continuing/methods , Education, Nursing, Continuing/organization & administration , Environment Design , Germany/epidemiology , History, 21st Century , Humans , Pandemics , Patient Admission , Patient Care Team/organization & administration , Patient Isolation/methods , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Simulation Training/organization & administration , Workflow
3.
World J Surg ; 46(5): 977-981, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1767479

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Corona virus disease 2019 (Covid-19) impacted continuing medical education programs such as the Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) course. Modifications made to medical training like teleconferencing could affect students' learning success. We sought to evaluate the effects of the American College of Surgeons modifications on success rates in passing the ATLS course. METHODS: This study evaluated 28 ATLS 10th edition courses educating 898 students at our region before and after Covid-19 modifications. Traditional two-day courses were performed in-person while modified courses were conducted with a one-day teleconference followed by a second in-person practical day. We compared the characteristics and course pass rates between the traditional and modified ATLS courses. RESULTS: Modified ATLS courses had significantly lower pass rates (81.0%; 95% confidence interval = [74.8-87.3]) compared to traditional ATLS courses (94.3%; [92.2-96.3]). CONCLUSIONS: Modifications to the ATLS course are associated with lower student pass. This is possibly due to ineffective knowledge consolidation. Better modifications to the course are required such as use of electronic learning tools with modification to course schedule or returning to the traditional course but with the use of Covid-19 vaccines and other protective measures. These suggestions should be considered and evaluated further by ATLS program leaders.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Traumatology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines , Clinical Competence , Education, Medical, Continuing , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Traumatology/education
4.
Reg Anesth Pain Med ; 47(5): 331-336, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1765136

ABSTRACT

Large group lectures, which are widely used in continuing medical education, are susceptible to pitfalls that can negatively impact their effectiveness. In this article, we describe evidence-based best practices from the educational literature that can revive the medical lecture as an effective educational tool. We provide practical tips for both developing and delivering lectures, emphasizing the key role that learning objectives can and should have in the development of lectures, the importance of organization, effective use of visuals and application of restraint in slide design. Pause techniques to authentically engage the audience are described. We also provide practical tips for promoting attention in virtual presentations.


Subject(s)
Education, Medical, Continuing , Learning , Education, Medical, Continuing/methods , Humans , Teaching
5.
Surg Endosc ; 36(3): 1699-1708, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1661696

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has presented multiple challenges for health systems throughout the world. The clinical priorities of redirecting personnel and resources to provide the necessary beds, care, and staff to handle the initial waves of infected individuals, and the drive to develop an effective vaccine, were the most visible and rightly took precedent. However, the spread of the COVID-19 virus also led to less apparent but equally challenging impediments for healthcare professionals. Continuing professional development (CPD) for physicians and surgeons practically ceased as national societies postponed or canceled annual meetings and activities. The traditional in-person conferences were no longer viable options during a pandemic in which social distancing and minimization of contacts was the emerging norm. Like other organizations, The Society of American Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgeons (SAGES) had to first postpone and then cancel altogether the in-person 2020 Annual Meeting due to the contingencies brought about by the COVID-19 pandemic. As a result, the traditional hands-on (HO) courses that typically occur as part of the Annual Meeting, could not take place. SAGES had already begun to re-structure these courses in an effort to increase their effectiveness (Dort, Trickey, Paige, Schwarz, Dunkin in Surg Endosc 33(9):3062-3068, 2019; Dort et al. in Surg Endosc 32(11):4491-4497, 2018; Dort, Trickey, Schwarz, Paige in Surg Endosc 33(9):3062-3068, 2019). The cancelations brought about by COVID-19 provided an opportunity to refine and to innovate further. METHODS: In this manner, the Re-imaging Education & Learning (REAL) project crystallized, an innovative effort to leverage the latest educational concepts as well as communication and simulation-based technologies to enhance procedural adoption by converting HO courses to a virtual format. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: This manuscript describes the key components of REAL, reviewing the restructuring of the HO courses before and after the spread of COVID-19, describing the educational framework underlying it, discussing currently available technologies and materials, and evaluating the advantages of such a format.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Surgeons , Education, Medical, Continuing/methods , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surgeons/education , United States
6.
PLoS One ; 16(12): e0258348, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1633398

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Since the COVID-19 pandemic began, there have been concerns related to the preparedness of healthcare workers (HCWs). This study aimed to describe the level of awareness and preparedness of hospital HCWs at the time of the first wave. METHODS: This multinational, multicenter, cross-sectional survey was conducted among hospital HCWs from February to May 2020. We used a hierarchical logistic regression multivariate analysis to adjust the influence of variables based on awareness and preparedness. We then used association rule mining to identify relationships between HCW confidence in handling suspected COVID-19 patients and prior COVID-19 case-management training. RESULTS: We surveyed 24,653 HCWs from 371 hospitals across 57 countries and received 17,302 responses from 70.2% HCWs overall. The median COVID-19 preparedness score was 11.0 (interquartile range [IQR] = 6.0-14.0) and the median awareness score was 29.6 (IQR = 26.6-32.6). HCWs at COVID-19 designated facilities with previous outbreak experience, or HCWs who were trained for dealing with the SARS-CoV-2 outbreak, had significantly higher levels of preparedness and awareness (p<0.001). Association rule mining suggests that nurses and doctors who had a 'great-extent-of-confidence' in handling suspected COVID-19 patients had participated in COVID-19 training courses. Male participants (mean difference = 0.34; 95% CI = 0.22, 0.46; p<0.001) and nurses (mean difference = 0.67; 95% CI = 0.53, 0.81; p<0.001) had higher preparedness scores compared to women participants and doctors. INTERPRETATION: There was an unsurprising high level of awareness and preparedness among HCWs who participated in COVID-19 training courses. However, disparity existed along the lines of gender and type of HCW. It is unknown whether the difference in COVID-19 preparedness that we detected early in the pandemic may have translated into disproportionate SARS-CoV-2 burden of disease by gender or HCW type.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Personnel, Hospital , Adult , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Education, Medical, Continuing/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Male , Personnel, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Socioeconomic Factors , Surveys and Questionnaires
8.
Recenti Prog Med ; 112(12): 824-836, 2021 12.
Article in Italian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1599875

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: This study developed and validated three questionnaires addressed to the accrediting bodies of the CME system, the providers and the end-users to investigate facilitating factors, barriers and achieved results. Facilitating factors, barriers and achieved results were then described, and the predictors of the achieved result were identified. METHODS: Multiphase and multi-method study. RESULTS: The developed questionnaires show evidence of validity and reliability. 8098 healthcare professionals, 10 accrediting bodies and 206 providers were enrolled to the study. The facilitating factors show the greater predictive capacity in explaining the variance of the perceptions of achieved results in all three groups. DISCUSSION: The common perspectives of the participants guided the creating of a framework aimed to provide guidance for strengthening facilitating factors regarding the activities of accrediting bodies, providers, and end-users of CME education.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Medical, Continuing , Attitude of Health Personnel , Education, Medical, Continuing/methods , Humans , Reproducibility of Results , Surveys and Questionnaires
9.
BMJ Open ; 11(12): e049687, 2021 12 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1556235

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Reliance on webinars for continuing medical education (CME) has increased since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic. Here, we aimed to evaluate the teaching methods used in these webinars. DESIGN: Retrospective, longitudinal study. SETTING: 20 CME-approved webinars, conducted March-December 2020 in Germany, and lasting 2.25 hours each. PARTICIPANTS: Otorhinolaryngologists pursuing CME credits. INTERVENTIONS: Postwebinar participant assessments of the speaker, effects on practical work, desired scientific content, technical quality, interactions, attention and future training behaviour. RESULTS: On average, 780 participants joined each webinar. The mean survey response rate was 35% (n=282). When asked how well the speaker had mastered the content, 38% responded 'very well', 44% responded 'well', 14% indicated 'satisfactory' and 4% chose 'sufficient'. The frequency of webinars was considered appropriate by 92%, too high by 4% and too low by 4% of participants. The measured attention of the participants was 90%. After the COVID-19 pandemic lockdown, 68% of participants preferred online teaching. The average costs per participant were €3.50 (about $4.25 or £3.15) per webinar. CONCLUSIONS: Although the pandemic context likely influenced the results, we conclude that periodic ear, nose and throat webinar training during COVID-19 in 2020 was an effective alternative delivery method. We found high attention rates, high levels of participant satisfaction and low costs. Evaluations and re-evaluations will be necessary to adapt teaching concepts successfully and ensure high levels of teaching and learning efficiency.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Otolaryngology , Communicable Disease Control , Education, Medical, Continuing , Germany/epidemiology , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
11.
Acad Pediatr ; 21(8S): S177-S183, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1487556

ABSTRACT

Children are the poorest age group in our country, with 1 in 6, or 12 million, living in poverty. This sobering statistic became even more appalling in spring 2020 when COVID-19 magnified existing inequities. These inequities are particularly important to pediatricians, because poverty, along with racism and other interrelated social factors, significantly impact overall child health and well-being. It is imperative that pediatric educators redouble their efforts to train learners to recognize and address health inequities related to poverty and all of its counterparts. In this paper, we describe the current state of poverty-related training in pediatric undergraduate, graduate, and continuing medical education as well as opportunities for growth. We highlight gaps in the current curricula, particularly around the intersectionality between poverty and racism, as well as the need for robust evaluation. Using a logic model framework, we outline content, learning strategies, and outcomes for poverty-related education. We include opportunities for the deployment of best practice learning strategies and the incorporation of newer technologies to deliver the content. We assert that collaboration with community partners is critical to shape the depth and breadth of education. Finally, we emphasize the paramount need for high-quality faculty development and accessible career paths to create the cadre of role models and mentors necessary to lead this work. We conclude with a call for collaboration between institutions, accrediting bodies, and policymakers to promote meaningful, outcome-oriented, poverty-related education, and training throughout the medical education continuum.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pediatrics , Child , Education, Medical, Continuing , Humans , Poverty , SARS-CoV-2
15.
PLoS One ; 16(10): e0257162, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1456080

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Successful implementation of medical technologies applied in life-threatening conditions, including extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) requires appropriate preparation and training of medical personnel. The pandemic has accelerated the creation of new ECMO centers and has highlighted continuous training in adapting to new pandemic standards. To reach high standards of patients' care, we created the first of its kind, National Education Centre for Artificial Life Support (NEC-ALS) in 40 million inhabitants' country in the Central and Eastern Europe (CEE). The role of the Center is to test and promote the novel or commonly used procedures as well as to develop staff skills on management of patients needing ECMO. METHOD: In 2020, nine approved and endorsed by ELSO courses of "Artificial Life Support with ECMO" were organized. Physicians participated in the three-day high-fidelity simulation-based training that was adapted to abide by the social distancing norms of the COVID-19 pandemic. Knowledge as well as crucial cognitive, behavioral and technical aspects (on a 5-point Likert scale) of management on ECMO were assessed before and after course completion. Moreover, the results of training in mechanical chest compression were also evaluated. RESULTS: There were 115 participants (60% men) predominantly in the age of 30-40 years. Majority of them (63%) were anesthesiologists or intensivists with more than 5-year clinical experience, but 54% had no previous ECMO experience. There was significant improvement after the course in all cognitive, behavioral, and technical self-assessments. Among aspects of management with ECMO that all increased significantly following the course, the most pronounced was related to the technical one (from approximately 1.0 to more 4.0 points). Knowledge scores significantly increased post-course from 11.4 ± SD to 13 ± SD (out of 15 points). The quality of manual chest compression relatively poor before course improved significantly after training. CONCLUSIONS: Our course confirmed that simulation as an educational approach is invaluable not only in training and testing of novel or commonly used procedures, skills upgrading, but also in practicing very rare cases. The implementation of the education program during COVID-19 pandemic may be helpful in founding specialized Advanced Life Support centers and teams including mobile ones. The dedicated R&D Innovation Ecosystem established in the "ECMO for Greater Poland" program, with developed National Education Center can play a crucial role in the knowledge and know-how transfer but future research is needed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance , Education, Medical, Continuing , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Simulation Training , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Female , Humans , Male
17.
PLoS One ; 16(8): e0249872, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1341484

ABSTRACT

This paper analyzes the application of various telemedicine services in Gansu Province, China during the COVID-19 epidemic, and summarizes the experiences with these services. In addition, the satisfaction levels of patients and doctors with the application of telemedicine in COVID-19 were investigated, the deficiencies of telemedicine in Gansu were determined, and recommendations for modification were proposed. Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) has broken out in China, and Gansu Province in Northwest of China has not been spared. To date, there are 91 local COVID-19 cases and 42 imported cases. 109 hospitals were selected as designated hospitals during the COVID-19 outbreak, and most of them were secondary hospitals. However, it was unsatisfactory that the ability of medical services is relatively low in most of secondary hospitals and primary hospitals. Therefore, we helped the secondary hospitals cope with COVID-19 by means of remote consultation, long-distance education, telemedicine question and answer (Q&A). Our practical experience shows that telemedicine can be widely used during the COVID-19 epidemic, especially in developing countries and areas with lagging medical standards.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Telemedicine/organization & administration , China/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Education, Distance/statistics & numerical data , Education, Medical, Continuing/methods , Education, Medical, Continuing/organization & administration , Education, Medical, Continuing/statistics & numerical data , Education, Nursing, Continuing/methods , Education, Nursing, Continuing/organization & administration , Education, Nursing, Continuing/statistics & numerical data , Epidemics , Geography , Health Services Accessibility/organization & administration , Health Services Accessibility/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Physician-Patient Relations , Remote Consultation/instrumentation , Remote Consultation/methods , Remote Consultation/organization & administration , Remote Consultation/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Software , Telemedicine/instrumentation , Telemedicine/methods
18.
Arch Argent Pediatr ; 119(4): 270-272, 2021 08.
Article in English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1325945

ABSTRACT

In patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection, endotracheal intubation is a procedure with a high risk for transmission. A videolaryngoscopy is a supplementary level of health care provider protection, but commercial videolaryngoscopes are expensive and not always available in pediatric intensive care units in Argentina. Our objective was to describe intubation practice using an infant head mannequin with a low-cost, handcrafted videolaryngoscope. Fifteen pediatricians with no prior experience using the device participated in an intubation practice in a head mannequin with a handcrafted videolaryngoscope. The average time for the first attempt was 116.4 seconds (95 % confidence interval [CI]: 84.8- 148.0) and, for the second one, 44.2 seconds (95 % CI: 27.7-60.6). Time decreased significantly for the second attempt (p: 0.0001). A successful intubation was achieved with the device in all attempts, and the procedure duration decreased with the second practice.


En pacientes con infección por SARS-CoV-2 la intubación endotraqueal es un procedimiento con riesgo elevado de contagio. La videolaringoscopia complementa la protección del profesional, pero los videolaringoscopios comerciales son caros y no siempre están disponibles en las terapias intensivas pediátricas argentinas. El objetivo fue describir la práctica de intubación en un modelo de cabeza de simulación de lactante con un videolaringoscopio artesanal de bajo costo. Quince pediatras sin experiencia previa con el dispositivo participaron de una práctica de intubación en una cabeza de simulación con un videolaringoscopio artesanal. El tiempo promedio del primer intento fue de 116,4 segundos (intervalo de confianza del 95 % [IC95 %]: 84,8-148,0) y, el del siguiente fue de 44,2 segundos (IC95 %: 27,7­60,6). El tiempo disminuyó de forma significativa en el segundo intento (p : 0,0001). El dispositivo permitió la intubación exitosa en todos los intentos acortando la duración del procedimiento en la segunda práctica.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Intubation, Intratracheal/instrumentation , Laryngoscopes/economics , Laryngoscopy/education , Pediatrics/education , Simulation Training/methods , Argentina , COVID-19/transmission , Clinical Competence/statistics & numerical data , Education, Medical, Continuing/methods , Health Care Costs , Humans , Infant , Internship and Residency/methods , Intubation, Intratracheal/economics , Intubation, Intratracheal/methods , Laryngoscopy/economics , Laryngoscopy/instrumentation , Laryngoscopy/methods , Learning Curve , Manikins , Pediatrics/economics , Time Factors , Video Recording
19.
Acad Med ; 96(10): 1379-1382, 2021 10 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1320332

ABSTRACT

The world's health care providers have realized that being agile in their thinking and growth in times of rapid change is paramount and that continuing education can be a key facet of the future of health care. As the world recovers from the COVID-19 pandemic, educators at academic health centers are faced with a crucial question: How can continuing professional development (CPD) within teams and health systems be improved so that health care providers will be ready for the next disruption? How can new information about the next disruption be collected and disseminated so that interprofessional teams will be able to effectively and efficiently manage a new disease, new information, or new procedures and keep themselves safe? Unlike undergraduate and graduate/postgraduate education, CPD does not always have an identified educational home and has had uneven and limited innovation during the pandemic. In this commentary, the authors explore the barriers to change in this sector and propose 4 principles that may serve to guide a way forward: identifying a home for interprofessional continuing education at academic health centers, improving workplace-based learning, enhancing assessment for individuals within health care teams, and creating a culture of continuous learning that promotes population health.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/therapy , Curriculum , Education, Medical, Continuing/organization & administration , Health Personnel/education , Pandemics/prevention & control , Adult , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2
20.
J Child Adolesc Psychopharmacol ; 31(7): 457-463, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1317895

ABSTRACT

Objectives: Our goal was to develop an open access nationally disseminated online curriculum for use in graduate and continuing medical education on the topic of pediatric telepsychiatry to enhance the uptake of telepsychiatry among child psychiatry training programs and improve access to mental health care for youth and families. Methods: Following Kern's 6-stage model of curriculum development, we identified a core problem, conducted a needs assessment, developed broad goals and measurable objectives in a competency-based model, and developed educational content and methods. The curriculum was reviewed by experts and feedback incorporated. Given the urgent need for such a curriculum due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the curriculum was immediately posted on the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and American Association of Directors of Psychiatric Residency Training websites. Further evaluation will be conducted over the next year. Results: The curriculum covers the six areas of core competence adapted for pediatric telepsychiatry and includes teaching content and resources, evaluation tools, and information about other resources. Conclusion: This online curriculum is available online and provides an important resource and set of standards for pediatric telepsychiatry training. Its online format allows for ongoing revision as the telepsychiatry landscape changes.


Subject(s)
Adolescent Psychiatry/education , COVID-19 , Child Psychiatry/education , Curriculum/trends , Education, Medical, Continuing , Education, Medical, Graduate , Access to Information , Adolescent , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Child , Education/methods , Education/organization & administration , Education, Medical, Continuing/methods , Education, Medical, Continuing/organization & administration , Education, Medical, Graduate/methods , Education, Medical, Graduate/organization & administration , Health Services Accessibility , Humans , Mental Health Services/standards , Mental Health Services/trends , Organizational Innovation , Organizational Objectives , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine/methods
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