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1.
BMC Complement Med Ther ; 22(1): 106, 2022 Apr 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1793957

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Pediatric integrative medicine, combining conventional and complementary medical approaches for children and adolescents, is an integral part of the health care system in Switzerland. However, there is still a lack of complementary and integrative medicine topics in training and continuing educational programs. For the first time on a national level, the 2021 annual conference of the Swiss Society of Pediatrics was entirely dedicated to the topic of integrative medicine. METHODS: Using a cross-sectional online survey, this study investigated congress participants' evaluation and feedback with the aim to assess whether the program had met their objectives and to get empirical data on their attitude, expectations and needs regarding pediatric complementary and integrative medicine. Descriptive methods were used to present the results. RESULTS: Among 632 participants of the conference, 228 completed the evaluation form (response rate 36%). The overall feedback about the congress and the main theme of pediatric integrative medicine was clearly positive. The majority of respondents had achieved their educational objectives including complementary and integrative medicine issues. 82% were motivated to learn more about complementary and integrative medicine and 66% were stimulated to integrate complementary therapies into their professional practice. CONCLUSION: This study from Switzerland confirms the interest in integrative medicine among pediatricians and supports the need for pre- and postgraduate pediatric training on topics related to complementary and integrative medicine. Developing and adapting training and continuing medical education based on evaluations of participant feedback can promote professional development and improve patient care for the benefit of physicians and patients.


Subject(s)
Integrative Medicine , Pediatrics , Adolescent , Child , Cross-Sectional Studies , Education, Medical, Continuing/methods , Humans , Integrative Medicine/education , Pediatrics/education , Switzerland
2.
PLoS One ; 17(3): e0264644, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1793511

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Patients with high-consequence infectious diseases (HCID) are rare in Western Europe. However, high-level isolation units (HLIU) must always be prepared for patient admission. Case fatality rates of HCID can be reduced by providing optimal intensive care management. We here describe a single centre's preparation, its embedding in the national context and the challenges we faced during the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus type 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic. METHODS: Ten team leaders organize monthly whole day trainings for a team of doctors and nurses from the HLIU focusing on intensive care medicine. Impact and relevance of training are assessed by a questionnaire and a perception survey, respectively. Furthermore, yearly exercises with several partner institutions are performed to cover different real-life scenarios. Exercises are evaluated by internal and external observers. Both training sessions and exercises are accompanied by intense feedback. RESULTS: From May 2017 monthly training sessions were held with a two-month and a seven-month break due to the first and second wave of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, respectively. Agreement with the statements of the questionnaire was higher after training compared to before training indicating a positive effect of training sessions on competence. Participants rated joint trainings for nurses and doctors at regular intervals as important. Numerous issues with potential for improvement were identified during post processing of exercises. Action plans for their improvement were drafted and as of now mostly implemented. The network of the permanent working group of competence and treatment centres for HCID (Ständiger Arbeitskreis der Kompetenz- und Behandlungszentren für Krankheiten durch hochpathogene Erreger (STAKOB)) at the Robert Koch-Institute (RKI) was strengthened throughout the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic. DISCUSSION: Adequate preparation for the admission of patients with HCID is challenging. We show that joint regular trainings of doctors and nurses are appreciated and that training sessions may improve perceived skills. We also show that real-life scenario exercises may reveal additional deficits, which cannot be easily disclosed in training sessions. Although the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic interfered with our activities the enhanced cooperation among German HLIU during the pandemic ensured constant readiness for the admission of HCID patients to our or to collaborating HLIU. This is a single centre's experience, which may not be generalized to other centres. However, we believe that our work may address aspects that should be considered when preparing a unit for the admission of patients with HCID. These may then be adapted to the local situations.


Subject(s)
Communicable Diseases/therapy , Critical Care/organization & administration , Intensive Care Units/organization & administration , Patient Isolation/organization & administration , COVID-19/epidemiology , Clinical Competence , Communicable Diseases/epidemiology , Education, Medical, Continuing/methods , Education, Medical, Continuing/organization & administration , Education, Nursing, Continuing/methods , Education, Nursing, Continuing/organization & administration , Environment Design , Germany/epidemiology , History, 21st Century , Humans , Pandemics , Patient Admission , Patient Care Team/organization & administration , Patient Isolation/methods , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Simulation Training/organization & administration , Workflow
3.
Surg Endosc ; 36(3): 1699-1708, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1661696

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has presented multiple challenges for health systems throughout the world. The clinical priorities of redirecting personnel and resources to provide the necessary beds, care, and staff to handle the initial waves of infected individuals, and the drive to develop an effective vaccine, were the most visible and rightly took precedent. However, the spread of the COVID-19 virus also led to less apparent but equally challenging impediments for healthcare professionals. Continuing professional development (CPD) for physicians and surgeons practically ceased as national societies postponed or canceled annual meetings and activities. The traditional in-person conferences were no longer viable options during a pandemic in which social distancing and minimization of contacts was the emerging norm. Like other organizations, The Society of American Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgeons (SAGES) had to first postpone and then cancel altogether the in-person 2020 Annual Meeting due to the contingencies brought about by the COVID-19 pandemic. As a result, the traditional hands-on (HO) courses that typically occur as part of the Annual Meeting, could not take place. SAGES had already begun to re-structure these courses in an effort to increase their effectiveness (Dort, Trickey, Paige, Schwarz, Dunkin in Surg Endosc 33(9):3062-3068, 2019; Dort et al. in Surg Endosc 32(11):4491-4497, 2018; Dort, Trickey, Schwarz, Paige in Surg Endosc 33(9):3062-3068, 2019). The cancelations brought about by COVID-19 provided an opportunity to refine and to innovate further. METHODS: In this manner, the Re-imaging Education & Learning (REAL) project crystallized, an innovative effort to leverage the latest educational concepts as well as communication and simulation-based technologies to enhance procedural adoption by converting HO courses to a virtual format. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: This manuscript describes the key components of REAL, reviewing the restructuring of the HO courses before and after the spread of COVID-19, describing the educational framework underlying it, discussing currently available technologies and materials, and evaluating the advantages of such a format.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Surgeons , Education, Medical, Continuing/methods , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surgeons/education , United States
5.
Recenti Prog Med ; 112(12): 824-836, 2021 12.
Article in Italian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1599875

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: This study developed and validated three questionnaires addressed to the accrediting bodies of the CME system, the providers and the end-users to investigate facilitating factors, barriers and achieved results. Facilitating factors, barriers and achieved results were then described, and the predictors of the achieved result were identified. METHODS: Multiphase and multi-method study. RESULTS: The developed questionnaires show evidence of validity and reliability. 8098 healthcare professionals, 10 accrediting bodies and 206 providers were enrolled to the study. The facilitating factors show the greater predictive capacity in explaining the variance of the perceptions of achieved results in all three groups. DISCUSSION: The common perspectives of the participants guided the creating of a framework aimed to provide guidance for strengthening facilitating factors regarding the activities of accrediting bodies, providers, and end-users of CME education.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Medical, Continuing , Attitude of Health Personnel , Education, Medical, Continuing/methods , Humans , Reproducibility of Results , Surveys and Questionnaires
6.
PLoS One ; 16(8): e0249872, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1341484

ABSTRACT

This paper analyzes the application of various telemedicine services in Gansu Province, China during the COVID-19 epidemic, and summarizes the experiences with these services. In addition, the satisfaction levels of patients and doctors with the application of telemedicine in COVID-19 were investigated, the deficiencies of telemedicine in Gansu were determined, and recommendations for modification were proposed. Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) has broken out in China, and Gansu Province in Northwest of China has not been spared. To date, there are 91 local COVID-19 cases and 42 imported cases. 109 hospitals were selected as designated hospitals during the COVID-19 outbreak, and most of them were secondary hospitals. However, it was unsatisfactory that the ability of medical services is relatively low in most of secondary hospitals and primary hospitals. Therefore, we helped the secondary hospitals cope with COVID-19 by means of remote consultation, long-distance education, telemedicine question and answer (Q&A). Our practical experience shows that telemedicine can be widely used during the COVID-19 epidemic, especially in developing countries and areas with lagging medical standards.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Telemedicine/organization & administration , China/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Education, Distance/statistics & numerical data , Education, Medical, Continuing/methods , Education, Medical, Continuing/organization & administration , Education, Medical, Continuing/statistics & numerical data , Education, Nursing, Continuing/methods , Education, Nursing, Continuing/organization & administration , Education, Nursing, Continuing/statistics & numerical data , Epidemics , Geography , Health Services Accessibility/organization & administration , Health Services Accessibility/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Physician-Patient Relations , Remote Consultation/instrumentation , Remote Consultation/methods , Remote Consultation/organization & administration , Remote Consultation/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Software , Telemedicine/instrumentation , Telemedicine/methods
7.
Arch Argent Pediatr ; 119(4): 270-272, 2021 08.
Article in English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1325945

ABSTRACT

In patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection, endotracheal intubation is a procedure with a high risk for transmission. A videolaryngoscopy is a supplementary level of health care provider protection, but commercial videolaryngoscopes are expensive and not always available in pediatric intensive care units in Argentina. Our objective was to describe intubation practice using an infant head mannequin with a low-cost, handcrafted videolaryngoscope. Fifteen pediatricians with no prior experience using the device participated in an intubation practice in a head mannequin with a handcrafted videolaryngoscope. The average time for the first attempt was 116.4 seconds (95 % confidence interval [CI]: 84.8- 148.0) and, for the second one, 44.2 seconds (95 % CI: 27.7-60.6). Time decreased significantly for the second attempt (p: 0.0001). A successful intubation was achieved with the device in all attempts, and the procedure duration decreased with the second practice.


En pacientes con infección por SARS-CoV-2 la intubación endotraqueal es un procedimiento con riesgo elevado de contagio. La videolaringoscopia complementa la protección del profesional, pero los videolaringoscopios comerciales son caros y no siempre están disponibles en las terapias intensivas pediátricas argentinas. El objetivo fue describir la práctica de intubación en un modelo de cabeza de simulación de lactante con un videolaringoscopio artesanal de bajo costo. Quince pediatras sin experiencia previa con el dispositivo participaron de una práctica de intubación en una cabeza de simulación con un videolaringoscopio artesanal. El tiempo promedio del primer intento fue de 116,4 segundos (intervalo de confianza del 95 % [IC95 %]: 84,8-148,0) y, el del siguiente fue de 44,2 segundos (IC95 %: 27,7­60,6). El tiempo disminuyó de forma significativa en el segundo intento (p : 0,0001). El dispositivo permitió la intubación exitosa en todos los intentos acortando la duración del procedimiento en la segunda práctica.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Intubation, Intratracheal/instrumentation , Laryngoscopes/economics , Laryngoscopy/education , Pediatrics/education , Simulation Training/methods , Argentina , COVID-19/transmission , Clinical Competence/statistics & numerical data , Education, Medical, Continuing/methods , Health Care Costs , Humans , Infant , Internship and Residency/methods , Intubation, Intratracheal/economics , Intubation, Intratracheal/methods , Laryngoscopy/economics , Laryngoscopy/instrumentation , Laryngoscopy/methods , Learning Curve , Manikins , Pediatrics/economics , Time Factors , Video Recording
8.
J Child Adolesc Psychopharmacol ; 31(7): 457-463, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1317895

ABSTRACT

Objectives: Our goal was to develop an open access nationally disseminated online curriculum for use in graduate and continuing medical education on the topic of pediatric telepsychiatry to enhance the uptake of telepsychiatry among child psychiatry training programs and improve access to mental health care for youth and families. Methods: Following Kern's 6-stage model of curriculum development, we identified a core problem, conducted a needs assessment, developed broad goals and measurable objectives in a competency-based model, and developed educational content and methods. The curriculum was reviewed by experts and feedback incorporated. Given the urgent need for such a curriculum due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the curriculum was immediately posted on the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and American Association of Directors of Psychiatric Residency Training websites. Further evaluation will be conducted over the next year. Results: The curriculum covers the six areas of core competence adapted for pediatric telepsychiatry and includes teaching content and resources, evaluation tools, and information about other resources. Conclusion: This online curriculum is available online and provides an important resource and set of standards for pediatric telepsychiatry training. Its online format allows for ongoing revision as the telepsychiatry landscape changes.


Subject(s)
Adolescent Psychiatry/education , COVID-19 , Child Psychiatry/education , Curriculum/trends , Education, Medical, Continuing , Education, Medical, Graduate , Access to Information , Adolescent , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Child , Education/methods , Education/organization & administration , Education, Medical, Continuing/methods , Education, Medical, Continuing/organization & administration , Education, Medical, Graduate/methods , Education, Medical, Graduate/organization & administration , Health Services Accessibility , Humans , Mental Health Services/standards , Mental Health Services/trends , Organizational Innovation , Organizational Objectives , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine/methods
9.
Arch Dermatol Res ; 313(5): 389-390, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1258200

ABSTRACT

The novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic has necessitated a dramatic shift in how our dermatology residents and fellows are educated. Distance or online learning has become the norm, and several national and international academic societies have combined resources to assure that continuing medical education occurs during this difficult time. The purpose of this communication is to review select online resources available to dermatology trainees and to encourage our colleagues to continue to advance our specialty through distance learning.


Subject(s)
Dermatology/education , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Medical, Continuing/methods , Internship and Residency/methods , COVID-19 , Humans , Internet
10.
Rev Neurol ; 72(9): 307-312, 2021 05 01.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1206625

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION AND AIM: COVID-19 pandemic has disturbed many hospital activities, including medical education. We describe the switch from in-person didactic sessions to videoconferencing in a Neurology department. We analyse the opinions and satisfaction of participants. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Narrative description of the adopted measures; Online survey among participants. RESULTS: One of the three weekly sessions was cancelled, and two switched to videoconferencing. There were more participants online than in the conference hall. 49 users answered the survey, 51% women, mean age 40.5 years (range 25-65). Satisfaction was higher for previous face-to-face meetings (8.68) than for videoconferencing (8.12) (p=0.006). There was a significant inverse correlation between age and satisfaction with virtual sessions (r=-0.37; p=0.01), that was not found for in-person attendance. Most users (75.5%) would prefer to continue with online sessions when the pandemic is over, and 87.8% support inter-hospital remote meetings, but the safety of web platforms is a concern (53.1%). CONCLUSIONS: The change from in-person to virtual sessions is an easy measure to implement in a neurology department, with a good degree of satisfaction among users. There are some unsolved problems with the use of commercial web platforms and inter-hospital connection. Most users recommend leadership and support from educational and health authorities.


TITLE: Cambio de sesiones docentes presenciales a virtuales durante la pandemia de COVID-19 en un servicio de neurología: descripción del proceso y satisfacción de los usuarios.Introducción y objetivo. La pandemia de COVID-19 ha trastornado la actividad hospitalaria, incluyendo la docente. Se describe el cambio de un sistema presencial a otro de sesiones en línea en un servicio de neurología, y se analizan la satisfacción y las opiniones de los usuarios. Material y métodos. Exposición de las medidas adoptadas para pasar a modalidad en línea y análisis de una encuesta entre los participantes. Resultados. Se pasó de tres a dos sesiones semanales, con restricción del público presencial. El público virtual superó al presencial. Contestaron la encuesta 49 participantes, un 51% mujeres, con una media de 40,5 años (rango: 25-65). La satisfacción de los asistentes fue mayor para las sesiones presenciales (8,68) que para las en línea (8,12) (p = 0,006). Existía una correlación inversa significativa entre la edad y la satisfacción con las sesiones en línea (r = ­0,37; p = 0,01) que no se daba para las sesiones presenciales. El 75,5% fue partidario de mantener las sesiones virtuales cuando se eliminaran las restricciones de aforo. Una mayoría (87,8%) apoyó sesiones interhospitalarias y recomienda que las autoridades sanitarias faciliten aplicaciones informáticas seguras (53,1%). Conclusiones. La introducción de sesiones virtuales es una medida fácil de implementar en un servicio de neurología, con un alto grado de satisfacción de los usuarios, aunque menor que con las sesiones presenciales. Existen problemas no resueltos respecto al uso de plataformas comerciales y conexión interhospitalaria. Sería recomendable que las autoridades sanitarias y educativas desarrollaran aplicaciones seguras y fomentaran la educación médica en línea.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Consumer Behavior , Education, Medical, Continuing/methods , Education, Medical, Graduate/methods , Neurology/education , Pandemics , Videoconferencing , Adult , Aged , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Hospital Departments , Hospitals, University , Humans , Internship and Residency , Male , Middle Aged , Neurologists/education , Neurologists/psychology , Patient Handoff , Students, Medical/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Videoconferencing/instrumentation , Videoconferencing/statistics & numerical data
11.
Surg Endosc ; 35(5): 1963-1969, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1171565

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Surgeons in practice have limited opportunities to learn new techniques and procedures. Traditionally, in-person hands-on courses have been the most common means for surgeons to gain exposure to new techniques and procedures. The COVID19 pandemic caused a cessation in these courses and left surgeons with limited opportunities to continue their professional development. Thus, SAGES elected to create an innovative hands-on course that could be completed at home in order to provide surgeons with opportunities to learn new procedures during the pandemic. METHODS: This course was initially planned to be taught as an in-person hands-on course utilizing the Acquisition of Data for Outcomes and Procedure Transfer(ADOPT) method 1. We identified a virtual telementoring platform, Proximie Ltd(London, UK), and a company that could create a model of an abdominal wall in order to perform a Transversus Abdominis Release, KindHeart™(Chapel Hill, NC, USA). The course consisted of pre-course lectures and videos to be reviewed by participants, a pre-course call to set learning goals, the hands-on telementoring session from home, and monthly webinars for a year. RESULTS: The ADOPT hands-on hernia course at home was successfully completed on October 23rd of 2020. All participants and faculty were successfully able to set up their model and utilize the telementoring platform, but 15% required assistance. Post course-surveys showed that participants felt that the course was successful in meeting their educational goals and felt similar to prior in-person courses. CONCLUSIONS: SAGES was successfully able to transition and in-person hands-on course to a virtual at-home format. This innovative approach to continuing professional development will be necessary during the times of the COVID19 pandemic, but may be a helpful option for rural surgeons and others with travel restrictions in the future to continue their professional development without the need to travel away from their practice.


Subject(s)
Education, Medical, Continuing/methods , Herniorrhaphy/education , Surgeons/education , Animals , COVID-19 , Curriculum , Faculty , Herniorrhaphy/methods , Humans , Incisional Hernia/surgery , Proof of Concept Study , Swine , Virtual Reality
12.
Indian J Ophthalmol ; 69(4): 951-957, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1138819

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To ascertain ophthalmologist's perceptions about webinars as a method of continued medical education during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: In a cross-sectional study, a 21-question survey was circulated using digital media platform to approximately 1400 ophthalmologists in India between 16th August 2020 to 31st August 2020. The questionnaire focussed on the quality and usefulness of webinars based on the Bloom's taxonomy. The responses (on 4- or 5-point Likert scale) were analyzed among three professional groups- ophthalmologists in-training, consultants in public sector, and private practitioners. RESULTS: 393 ophthalmologists participated in the survey, with a response rate of 28%. The mean age was 34.6 ± 9.7 years, and males constituted 49.6% (199/393) of the respondents. Forty-seven percent of the respondents perceived the quality of webinars as good or excellent (185/393), 72.8% reported knowledge gain from webinars (286/393), and 63.9% felt that webinars are important in clinical practice and should continue post-COVID-19 pandemic (251/393), with distinct responses among the professional groups. The drawbacks perceived were overt number of webinars (371; 94.4%), confusion regarding which webinars to attend (313; 79.6%), repetition of the information (296; 75.3%), limited opportunity for participant interaction (146; 37.2%) and disparate weightage to the core disciplines of Ophthalmology. CONCLUSION: Most respondents had favorable perceptions of Ophthalmology webinars happening during the COVID-19 pandemic. However, there is need for improvisation in the volume of webinars, target-audience-based delivery, and participant interaction to add value to this new dimension of teaching-learning.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Medical, Continuing/methods , Ophthalmologists/psychology , Ophthalmology/education , SARS-CoV-2 , Webcasts as Topic , Adult , Aged , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Health Surveys , Humans , India/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
14.
Nephrology (Carlton) ; 26(7): 569-577, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1105348

ABSTRACT

Home dialysis therapies are flexible kidney replacement strategies with documented clinical benefits. While the incidence of end-stage kidney disease continues to increase globally, the use of home dialysis remains low in most developed countries. Multiple barriers to providing home dialysis have been noted in the published literature. Among known challenges, gaps in clinician knowledge are potentially addressable with a focused education strategy. Recent national surveys in the United States and Australia have highlighted the need for enhanced home dialysis knowledge especially among nephrologists who have recently completed training. Traditional in-person continuing professional educational programmes have had modest success in promoting home dialysis and are limited by scale and the present global COVID-19 pandemic. We hypothesize that the use of a 'Hub and Spoke' model of virtual home dialysis mentorship for nephrologists based on project ECHO would support home dialysis growth. We review the home dialysis literature, known educational gaps and plausible educational interventions to address current limitations in physician education.


Subject(s)
Hemodialysis, Home/education , Kidney Failure, Chronic/therapy , Nephrologists/education , Teaching , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Education, Medical, Continuing/methods , Hemodialysis, Home/methods , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , User-Computer Interface
15.
Bosn J Basic Med Sci ; 21(1): 93-97, 2021 Feb 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1063537

ABSTRACT

In many areas of the world, critical care providers caring for COVID-19 patients lacked specific knowledge and were exposed to the abundance of new and unfiltered information. With support from the World Health Organization, we created a multimodal tele-education intervention to rapidly share critical care knowledge related to COVID-19 targeting providers in a region of Southeastern Europe. We delivered 60-minute weekly interactive tele-education sessions over YouTubeTM between March 2020 and May 2020, supplemented by a dedicated webpage. The intervention was reinforced using a secure social media platform (ViberTM), providing continuous rapid knowledge exchange among faculty and learners. A high level of engagement was observed, with over 2000 clinicians participating and actively interacting over a 6-week period. Surveyed participants were highly satisfied with the intervention. Tele-education interventions using social media platforms are feasible, low-cost, and effective methods to share knowledge during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Access to Information , COVID-19/epidemiology , Critical Care/organization & administration , Education, Medical, Continuing/methods , Inservice Training/methods , Pandemics , Social Media , Europe , Humans , Surveys and Questionnaires , World Health Organization
17.
J Contin Educ Health Prof ; 41(1): 70-74, 2021 01 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-990832

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: The COVID-19 pandemic is forcing society to re-evaluate how it educates learners of all levels, from medical students to faculty. Travel restrictions and limits on large public gatherings have necessitated the cancelling of numerous regional and national conferences as well as local grand rounds at many academic centers. Podcasting provides a potential solution for providing CME in a safe, socially distant way as an alternative to these more traditional CME sources for health care professionals. Using a popular CME podcast for pediatric hospitalists as an example, this article describes the many advantages that podcasting poses over more traditional CME methods, outlines some of the methodological and technological considerations that go into creating a high-quality podcast, and describes how podcasting can be leveraged during a global pandemic. Finally, we identify areas for further research regarding podcasting, including effective ways to virtually replace the more social and community building aspects of traditional conferences and grand rounds.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Medical, Continuing/methods , Pediatrics/education , Physical Distancing , Webcasts as Topic , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
18.
West J Emerg Med ; 21(5): 1089-1094, 2020 Jul 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-793196

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The correct use of personal protective equipment (PPE) limits transmission of serious communicable diseases to healthcare workers, which is critically important in the era of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). However, prior studies illustrated that healthcare workers frequently err during application and removal of PPE. The goal of this study was to determine whether a simulation-based, mastery learning intervention with deliberate practice improves correct use of PPE by physicians during a simulated clinical encounter with a COVID-19 patient. METHODS: This was a pretest-posttest study performed in the emergency department at a large, academic tertiary care hospital between March 31-April 8, 2020. A total of 117 subjects participated, including 56 faculty members and 61 resident physicians. Prior to the intervention, all participants received institution-mandated education on PPE use via an online video and supplemental materials. Participants completed a pretest skills assessment using a 21-item checklist of steps to correctly don and doff PPE. Participants were expected to meet a minimum passing score (MPS) of 100%, determined by an expert panel using the Mastery Angoff and Patient Safety standard-setting techniques. Participants that met the MPS on pretest were exempt from the educational intervention. Testing occurred before and after an in-person demonstration of proper donning and doffing techniques and 20 minutes of deliberate practice. The primary outcome was a change in assessment scores of correct PPE use following our educational intervention. Secondary outcomes included differences in performance scores between faculty members and resident physicians, and differences in performance during donning vs doffing sequences. RESULTS: All participants had a mean pretest score of 73.1% (95% confidence interval [CI], 70.9-75.3%). Faculty member and resident pretest scores were similar (75.1% vs 71.3%, p = 0.082). Mean pretest doffing scores were lower than donning scores across all participants (65.8% vs 82.8%, p<0.001). Participant scores increased 26.9% (95% CI of the difference 24.7-29.1%, p<0.001) following our educational intervention resulting in all participants meeting the MPS of 100%. CONCLUSION: A mastery learning intervention with deliberate practice ensured the correct use of PPE by physician subjects in a simulated clinical encounter of a COVID-19 patient. Further study of translational outcomes is needed.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Education, Medical, Continuing/methods , Infection Control/methods , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , Personal Protective Equipment , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Simulation Training/methods , COVID-19 , California , Checklist , Clinical Competence/statistics & numerical data , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Emergency Service, Hospital , Humans , Infection Control/instrumentation , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , SARS-CoV-2
19.
Ann Biol Clin (Paris) ; 78(4): 446-448, 2020 Aug 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-634852

ABSTRACT

Training and education are essential for medical students. During the COVID-19 outbreak, numerous schools and universities have had to close. Ensuring pedagogical continuity requires alternatives to the traditional classroom, especially in medical education. Usual distance learning tools such as videos and downloadable handouts are not sufficient to promote efficient teaching. Distance learning requires self-motivation and does not give you direct access to your instructor. Some students fear the loss of human contact with an instructor - like asking questions during and after class - which promotes learning, understanding and communication. Moreover, classical distance learning methods do not offer immediate feedback that can help students in their understanding of the lecture. In this context, interactive pedagogic tools (IPT) could be useful for medical education continuity and for maintaining human contact necessary in pedagogy. We briefly evaluated interactive pedagogic tool compared to traditionnal distancial tools on medical students. This study showed the importance to have direct contact with a teacher and feedback during a lecture and to not exclusively perform distance learning without direct interaction and feedback. Hence, in the present context, we encourage teacher to use this type of tools to maintain direct interaction with students - which is essential in pedagogy - and ensure a qualitative pedagogical continuity.


Subject(s)
Computer-Assisted Instruction/methods , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Medical, Continuing/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Simulation Training , Software , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Clinical Laboratory Services/organization & administration , Computer-Assisted Instruction/standards , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Disease Outbreaks , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Education, Distance/standards , Education, Medical, Continuing/organization & administration , Humans , Internet/organization & administration , Internet/standards , Learning , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Problem-Based Learning/methods , Problem-Based Learning/organization & administration , Problem-Based Learning/standards , SARS-CoV-2 , Simulation Training/methods , Simulation Training/organization & administration , Simulation Training/standards , Students, Medical/psychology , Students, Medical/statistics & numerical data , Video Recording/methods , Video Recording/standards
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