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4.
Postgrad Med J ; 98(e3): e141, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2153072
5.
Ann Med ; 54(1): 3342-3348, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2134154

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic led to many changes in healthcare including graduate medical education (GME). Residency and fellowship programs halted in-person recruitment and pivoted to virtual models. Residency selection and recruitment were practices ripe for redesign, as they relied on in-person interviewing as the major point of contact prior to match list creation. In this commentary, we review the state of virtual interviewing and propose a future state where virtual interactions are commonplace and integrated into a comprehensive recruitment process. DISCUSSION: Virtual recruitment has led to a reduction of expenses, improved time efficiency for all parties and a reduced carbon footprint. Residency match outcomes have not changed substantially with the advent of virtual interviewing. Hybrid approaches, including virtual and in-person options have significant drawbacks and pitfalls which may limit adoption. Given the upheaval in GME recruitment caused by the pandemic, and the limitations of current methods for candidate assessment and interactions with programs, further innovation is needed to achieve an optimal state for all stakeholders. Multiple technology innovations are on the horizon which may improve the ability to interact virtually. Adoption of new technology along with expanding the timeline for residency recruitment may further optimize the process for both applicants and programs. CONCLUSIONS: The GME community was able to adopt technology for the recruitment interview rapidly due to the pandemic. As more opportunities for technology-based interactions grow, the opportunity exists to reimagine recruitment beyond the interview. While resources are constrained, some of the efficiencies gained by adopting virtual interviewing can be leveraged to expand the interactions between programs and applicants. Incorporation of in-person interaction may still be needed. Models will need to be developed to build upon the best characteristics of the virtual and in-person environments to optimize GME recruitment.KEY MESSAGES:Virtual communication methods have substantially changed residency recruitment during the COVID -19 pandemic.COVID -19 related changes in residency recruitment, including wide adoption of virtual methods, should be maintained and strengthened.Efforts should be made to advance the gains in residency recruitment strategy during the pandemic by use of technologies that expand virtual interactions beyond the interview.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Internship and Residency , Humans , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Medical, Graduate
6.
J Surg Orthop Adv ; 31(3): 150-154, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2125756

ABSTRACT

The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic presented a novel challenge to modern healthcare systems and medical training. Resource allocation and risk mitigation dramatically affected resident training. The objective of this article is to develop new strategies to maintain a healthy, competent residency program while combating the unique challenges to resident education and wellness. In 2020, our institution implemented a revolving 3-Team system. While the "Inpatient-Team" delivered direct care, the "Back-up Team" and "Quarantine-Team" managed the telemedicine virtual clinic and education-wellness strategy, respectively. Our 3-Team system allowed delivery of safe, high-quality patient care while optimizing resident education, research, and wellness. The efficient use of technology led to both improved virtual education outside of the hospital and intentional wellness opportunities despite social distancing restrictions. Utilization of virtual platforms for patient care, education, research, and wellness grew out of necessity in this pandemic, yet represent an opportunity for lasting improvement. (Journal of Surgical Orthopaedic Advances 31(3):150-154, 2022).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Internship and Residency , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Medical, Graduate , Health Promotion
7.
Fam Med ; 54(10): 791-797, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2111349

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The COVID-19 pandemic obliged the field of graduate medical education to pivot from in-person to virtual residency interviews in 2020. The decreased travel and financial barriers of this format could potentially lead to greater diversity and equity in the primary care workforce. We aimed to evaluate changes in applicant pools from in-person to virtual interviewing cycles. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective review of Electronic Residency Application Services (ERAS) from five US family medicine residencies across five interview cycles (three in-person and two virtual; 2017/2018 through 2021/2022). We compared geographic and demographic data about applicants as well as administrative program data. RESULTS: The study included 25,271 applicants. The average distance between applicants and programs was 768 miles during in-person interview years and 772 miles during virtual interview years (P=.27). Applicants who interviewed with programs were 446 and 459 miles away, respectively (P=.06). During in-person application years, applicants with backgrounds historically underrepresented in medicine (URM) submitted an average of 21% of applications; this increased approximately 1% during virtual interviewing years (OR, 1.08; P=.03). There were no other differences between in-person and virtual application years in rates of URM applicants. Residency programs received more applications from US medical schools (OR, 1.46; P<.0001) and were more likely to interview a US medical school applicant (OR, 2.26; P<.0001) in virtual years. Program fill rates appeared to be lower during virtual years. CONCLUSIONS: The virtual interviewing format did not appear to substantially increase the geographic, racial, or ethnic diversity of applicants, and was associated with increased applications from US medical schools.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Internship and Residency , Humans , Family Practice , Pandemics , Education, Medical, Graduate
9.
Adv Chronic Kidney Dis ; 29(6): 520-525, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2115727

ABSTRACT

Kidney pathology education is a critical component in training of nephrology fellows, as well as for continuing medical education for practicing nephrologists. Kidney pathology images are included on nephrology fellow board exams, and clinicopathologic correlation of kidney biopsy findings is critical in everyday clinical practice. Nephropathology training is a requirement by the American College of Graduate Medical Education within nephrology fellowship curricula. However, greater than one-third of fellowship program directors believe that nephropathology training for their fellows is not sufficient. During the Coronavirus Disease-19 pandemic, the use of digital learning has become commonplace with virtual conferences (local, national, and international) and online meetings becoming the norm for education. Nephrology has become a leader in free open-access online medical education, both prior to and, to even a greater extent, during the pandemic. Here, we review available resources to nephrology fellows and other learners to supplement nephropathology training, which includes medical blogs, journal clubs, interactive quizzes and games, online conferences, podcasts, and mentorship opportunities. These resources are archived and provide durable content to learners of all stages of training, even beyond the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nephrology , Humans , United States , Nephrology/education , COVID-19/epidemiology , Fellowships and Scholarships , Education, Medical, Graduate/methods , Kidney/pathology , Curriculum
10.
BMC Med Educ ; 22(1): 782, 2022 Nov 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2115630

ABSTRACT

CONTEXT: The COVID-19 pandemic created a worldwide public health emergency, in which hospitals created new COVID departments and doctors from different disciplines had to work together. In the Netherlands, a large proportion of doctors in these departments were residents. With knowledge of the disease developing only gradually, the influx of COVID-19 patients called for adaptability, innovative work behavior, and intraprofessional collaboration (intraPC) between residents and between residents and medical specialists. RESEARCH GOAL: This study investigates how the delivery of COVID-19 care in hospital settings altered the way residents develop their sense of adaptability and intraPC during their training. METHODS: Sixteen semi-structured interviews were conducted with residents and medical specialists from various disciplines who worked at a COVID department or Intensive Care Unit (ICU) during the COVID pandemic in the Netherlands, focusing on adaptability and intraPC learning. Transcripts were analyzed using (thematic) template analysis. RESULTS: Four themes that influenced learning during COVID care were identified: collective uncertainty, social cohesion and a sense of safety, the need for adaptive performance and intraPC learning. During the first wave, collective uncertainty about the unknown disease and the continuation of the crisis urged residents to adapt in order to take care of patients with a disease that was as yet unknown. The combination of collective uncertainty, social cohesion and a sense of safety, and the presence of different disciplines in one department promoted residents' intraPC learning. However, intraPC learning was not always the matter of course due to the scope of the crisis and the huge numbers of new patients. CONCLUSION: Collective uncertainty affected the residents' adaptability. The combination of collective uncertainty, social cohesion, and the presence of different disciplines in one department promoted the residents' intraPC learning. An important facilitating factor for both adaptability and intraPC learning is a high level of social cohesion and safety. The physical and psychological proximity of supervisors is an important factor contributing to a safe learning environment. This study provides implications for practice for learning during postgraduate training in non-crisis settings.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Internship and Residency , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Education, Medical, Graduate , Learning
11.
Br J Hosp Med (Lond) ; 83(10): 1-6, 2022 Oct 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2100430

ABSTRACT

Clinical teaching fellowships are becoming increasingly popular, with the numbers of posts ever-expanding. This increase has accelerated as education and training start to recover from the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic. However, the nature of these roles, the entry requirements and the potential benefits are often poorly defined. This article outlines the author's experience of working as a clinical teaching fellow for a year and provides tips on what to look out for when considering these roles, as well as how to get the most out of them.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Medical, Graduate , Humans , Pandemics , Fellowships and Scholarships , Teaching
12.
Pain Physician ; 25(7): E1021-E1025, 2022 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2084148

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Approximately 70% of Americans use social media platforms, and use of specific platforms, such as Instagram, Twitter, Snapchat, and TikTok, is especially common among adults under 30. The presence of social media accounts among residency and fellowship programs in academic medicine has been used to connect with other specialties, highlight achievements and research, disseminate information to the general public, and as a recruiting tool for applicants. OBJECTIVES: The objective of this cross-sectional study was to evaluate the social media presence, specifically on Twitter and Instagram, of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME)-accredited Pain Medicine fellowship programs. We hypothesized that programs with more fellows were more likely to have a social media presence, as well as more content pertaining to branding for recruitment purposes. STUDY DESIGN: A cross-sectional study observing the social media presence of ACGME- accredited Pain Medicine fellowship programs. METHODS: Two independent reviewers conducted searches for corresponding official pain programs and departmental accounts on Twitter and Instagram over the period of July 1, 2020 to June 31, 2021. For all social media accounts identified, number of posts (total and within the study period), followers, and date of first post were recorded. Each post was categorized as medical education, branding, or social. RESULTS: Of the 111 ACGME-accredited Pain Medicine fellowship programs, 4 (3.6%) had both Twitter and Instagram accounts,10 (9%) only Twitter, 7 (6.3%) only Instagram, and 90 (81.1%) had neither. A significant association between the number of fellows and the odds of having an Instagram, but not Twitter, fellowship account was found (odds ratio 1.38, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.02,1.88; P = 0.038). Also, a linear relationship existed between the number of followers and tweets (B coefficient 3.7, 95% CI: 3.6, 3.8; P < 0.001). LIMITATIONS: Limitations include that the data were collected during the COVID-19 pandemic, which may correlate to increased likelihood of social media usage. We were also limited by our ability to find all of the pain management fellowship program accounts on social media. CONCLUSIONS: Less than 20% of the pain fellowship programs are currently utilizing Twitter and/or Instagram. When compared to primary anesthesiology residencies, social media presence among pain fellowships is much lower. By utilizing basic social media strategies, including image-based content posting, hashtags, and videos, programs can increase their engagement with the social media community, and increase their overall number of followers, thus expanding their potential reach to prospective applicants. Although social media can be an effective tool for branding purposes, it is vital to address the safe use of social media among all trainees.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Internship and Residency , Social Media , Adult , Humans , Fellowships and Scholarships , Cross-Sectional Studies , Pandemics , Education, Medical, Graduate , Accreditation , Pain
13.
J Gen Intern Med ; 37(9): 2251-2258, 2022 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2075552

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Animation in medical education has boomed over the past two decades, and demand for distance learning technologies will likely continue in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. However, experimental data guiding best practices for animation in medical education are scarce. OBJECTIVE: To compare the efficacy of two animated video styles in a diabetes pharmacotherapy curriculum for internal medicine residents. DESIGN: Learners were randomized to receive one of two versions of the same multimodal didactic curriculum. They received identical lectures, group activities, and quizzes, but were randomized to either digital chalk talk (DCT) videos or Sugar-Coated Science (SCS). SCS is an animated series using anthropomorphic characters, stories, and mnemonics to communicate knowledge. PARTICIPANTS: Ninety-two internal medicine residents at a single academic medical center received the curriculum within ambulatory medicine didactics. MAIN MEASURES: Knowledge was measured at multiple time points, as was residents' self-reported comfort using each medication class covered. Surveys assessed video acceptability and telepresence. Key themes were identified from open-ended feedback. KEY RESULTS: Baseline knowledge was low, consistent with prior needs assessments. On immediate posttest, mean scores were higher with SCS than DCT (74.8% versus 68.4%), but the difference was not statistically significant, p = 0.10. Subgroup analyses revealed increased knowledge in the SCS group for specific medication classes. Delayed posttest showed significant knowledge gains averaging 17.6% across all participants (p < 0.05); these gains were similar between animation types. SCS achieved significantly higher telepresence, entertainment, and acceptability scores than DCT. Qualitative data suggested that residents prioritize well-designed, multimodal curricula over specific animation characteristics. CONCLUSION: SCS and DCTs both led to learning within a multimodal curriculum, but SCS significantly enhanced learner experience. Animation techniques exemplified by both SCS and DCTs have roles in the medical educator toolkit. Selection between them should incorporate context, learner factors, and production resources.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus , Internship and Residency , COVID-19/drug therapy , Calcium Carbonate , Curriculum , Education, Medical, Graduate , Humans , Pandemics
15.
Fam Med ; 54(9): 708-712, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2056796

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Residency program directors (PDs) are tasked with supporting resident well-being, and a 2018-2019 CERA survey found PDs to be generally satisfied with residency wellness curricula. However, less is known about graduate medical education wellness programming following the unprecedented social and public health stressors of 2020. This study aimed to evaluate PDs' satisfaction with wellness programming and perceived changes in wellness program implementation in the context of these factors. METHODS: An online survey was administered by CERA to the program directors of all ACGME-accredited, US-based family medicine residencies. The survey replicated a 2018 CERA survey and assessed PDs' satisfaction with the wellness curriculum and which wellness curricular elements were currently implemented in the residency. RESULTS: The survey was completed by 263 PDs (42% response rate). There was no difference in total number of wellness curricular elements reported in programs in 2021 (M=9.85) vs 2018 (M=9.57; P=.377). Compared to the 2018 survey, PDs reported increased assessment of resident burnout (P=.02), increased scheduled time for personal needs (P=.002), but decreased scheduled time for interpersonal connection (P=.017). Most PDs reported increased emphasis on wellness and the same or increased access to wellness resources compared to 2018 χ2 indicated no significant difference in PD satisfaction with wellness programming between the two years (P=.84). CONCLUSIONS: Despite significant social and public health challenges to curriculum delivery, family medicine PDs did not perceive significant reductions in wellness programming, and in fact reported increases in some specific curricular elements and an overall increased emphasis on well-being. Future studies should explore the factors that facilitate and impede the implementation of wellness programming.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Internship and Residency , Curriculum , Education, Medical, Graduate , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Surveys and Questionnaires
17.
Curr Pain Headache Rep ; 26(11): 827-833, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2048551

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Our goal was to describe the changes to headache and neurological education that occurred as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, and the impact this had on medical learners. We also discuss subsequent implications for the future of education in the field of headache medicine. RECENT FINDINGS: Both educators and learners faced many challenges during the pandemic. These include the following: cancellation of in-person educational meetings, limited in-person networking and wellness events, disengagement from virtual didactic curricula, limitations in procedure-based learning, redeployment to inpatient settings with a decrease in outpatient exposures, and blurred boundaries between home and work life due to more virtual collaboration and home computer use. The development of telehealth programs and trainee wellness initiatives, improved collaboration opportunities among geographically distant institutions, and greater access to conferences for learners are among the many improvements forged by these challenging times in medical education. Given the high prevalence of headache disorders and the paucity of headache specialists, training new clinicians with competency in headache medicine is essential. There were many educational challenges and opportunities identified in the literature that resulted from the pressures of the pandemic. Educators need to develop assessments that capture any gaps in learning that may have occurred during this tumultuous time and be vigilant of remediation needs in our learners over the coming years. It is imperative to intentionally design curricula for the future by harnessing new pedagogical tools, innovations, and perspectives gleaned from our experience with the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Pandemics , Education, Medical, Graduate/methods , Curriculum , Headache/therapy
19.
Am J Surg ; 224(3): 893-899, 2022 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2014810

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: While the advent of work-hour restrictions contributes to increased resident well-being, new interventions are needed to ensure that surgical residents continue to be adequately trained. Our study aims to take the evidence supportive of enhanced feedback and apply it in the real world by creating a feedback training curriculum within a surgical residency. METHODS: A large academic general surgery residency program consisting of 42 residents was sequentially surveyed using the Kirkpatrick model to assess baseline attitudes towards feedback and the efficacy of a feedback training program for faculty and residents. RESULTS: After feedback training, the number of residents that believed their faculty were providing feedback effectively increased from 23% to 54%. Although limited by small sample size, improvements were likely seen in constructive feedback overall and quality feedback from senior residents. CONCLUSIONS: Formal feedback training should be incorporated into efforts to enhance educational skills among surgical faculty.


Subject(s)
General Surgery , Internship and Residency , Clinical Competence , Curriculum , Education, Medical, Graduate , Feedback , Humans
20.
Semin Oncol ; 49(5): 383-388, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2008344

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has led to significant disruptions across all levels of medical training. International fellows in subspecialty training programs are essential members of the frontline physician workforce, but may face additional and unique challenges as a result of being away from their home country. In this study, we aimed to understand the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the wellbeing of international fellows in the Hematology and/or Oncology fellowship program at the PMCC. METHODS: In collaboration with our staff psychiatrist, we conducted an online survey of hematology and/or oncology fellows at the PMCC from July 6 to August 10, 2020. The survey consisted of 60 questions divided into 4 sections: demographics, wellbeing assessment using the validated Short Warwick Edinburgh Mental Wellbeing Scale (SWEMWBS), fellowship specific questions (personal and professional) and coping strategies using the validated brief COPE scale. RESULTS: Overall 24/52 (46%) fellows completed the survey: 21/24 were international fellows with 48% from Asia, 3/24 were Canadian fellows but away from home; 54% were male; 48% were aged 31-35 years; 65% were married, 48% had children. Mean SWEMWBS score was 21, indicating lower overall wellbeing than the general population who had a score of 23.6. Compared to their pre-COVID status, many reported a decline in their wellbeing (63%), sense of guilt for not being with their family (45%) or helping their country (41%), stress in personal relationships (26%), fatigue (50%), sleep disorders (38%) and loss of interest in daily activities (38%). Personal events were altered by almost 80%; and 20% planned to extend their fellowship. According to the Brief-COPE scale, during the pandemic, most fellows used more adaptive coping mechanisms (mean score 39.2) as opposed to maladaptive ones (mean score 21.8). CONCLUSIONS: The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has negatively affected the overall wellbeing of international fellows. Understanding the specific challenges and coping mechanisms used by international fellows may help institutions develop better targeted strategies to promote wellbeing, professional development and ensure high-quality patient care during unprecedented times like the COVID pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hematology , Neoplasms , Child , Humans , Male , Female , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Medical, Graduate , Canada/epidemiology , Hematology/education
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