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1.
Adv Chronic Kidney Dis ; 29(6): 520-525, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2115727

ABSTRACT

Kidney pathology education is a critical component in training of nephrology fellows, as well as for continuing medical education for practicing nephrologists. Kidney pathology images are included on nephrology fellow board exams, and clinicopathologic correlation of kidney biopsy findings is critical in everyday clinical practice. Nephropathology training is a requirement by the American College of Graduate Medical Education within nephrology fellowship curricula. However, greater than one-third of fellowship program directors believe that nephropathology training for their fellows is not sufficient. During the Coronavirus Disease-19 pandemic, the use of digital learning has become commonplace with virtual conferences (local, national, and international) and online meetings becoming the norm for education. Nephrology has become a leader in free open-access online medical education, both prior to and, to even a greater extent, during the pandemic. Here, we review available resources to nephrology fellows and other learners to supplement nephropathology training, which includes medical blogs, journal clubs, interactive quizzes and games, online conferences, podcasts, and mentorship opportunities. These resources are archived and provide durable content to learners of all stages of training, even beyond the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nephrology , Humans , United States , Nephrology/education , COVID-19/epidemiology , Fellowships and Scholarships , Education, Medical, Graduate/methods , Kidney/pathology , Curriculum
2.
Curr Pain Headache Rep ; 26(11): 827-833, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2048551

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Our goal was to describe the changes to headache and neurological education that occurred as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, and the impact this had on medical learners. We also discuss subsequent implications for the future of education in the field of headache medicine. RECENT FINDINGS: Both educators and learners faced many challenges during the pandemic. These include the following: cancellation of in-person educational meetings, limited in-person networking and wellness events, disengagement from virtual didactic curricula, limitations in procedure-based learning, redeployment to inpatient settings with a decrease in outpatient exposures, and blurred boundaries between home and work life due to more virtual collaboration and home computer use. The development of telehealth programs and trainee wellness initiatives, improved collaboration opportunities among geographically distant institutions, and greater access to conferences for learners are among the many improvements forged by these challenging times in medical education. Given the high prevalence of headache disorders and the paucity of headache specialists, training new clinicians with competency in headache medicine is essential. There were many educational challenges and opportunities identified in the literature that resulted from the pressures of the pandemic. Educators need to develop assessments that capture any gaps in learning that may have occurred during this tumultuous time and be vigilant of remediation needs in our learners over the coming years. It is imperative to intentionally design curricula for the future by harnessing new pedagogical tools, innovations, and perspectives gleaned from our experience with the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Pandemics , Education, Medical, Graduate/methods , Curriculum , Headache/therapy
3.
J Am Coll Surg ; 235(2): 195-209, 2022 08 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2001542

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: A previous survey documented the severe disruption of the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic on surgical education and trainee well-being during the initial surge and systemic lockdowns. Herein, we report the results of a follow-up survey inclusive of the 2020 to 2021 academic year. STUDY DESIGN: A survey was distributed to education leaders across all surgical specialties in summer 2021. We compared the proportion of participants reporting severe disruption in key areas with those of the spring 2020 survey. Aggregated differences by year were assessed using chi-square analysis. RESULTS: In 2021, severe disruption of education programs was reported by 14% compared with 32% in 2020 (p < 0.0001). Severe reductions in nonemergency surgery were reported by 38% compared with 87% of respondents in 2020. Severe disruption of expected progression of surgical trainee autonomy by rank also significantly decreased to 5% to 8% in 2021 from 15% to 23% in 2020 among respondent programs (p < 0.001). In 2021 clinical remediation was reported for postgraduate year 1 to 2 and postgraduate year 3 to 4, typically through revised rotations (19% and 26%) and additional use of simulation (20% and 19%) maintaining trainee promotion and job placement. In 2021, surgical trainees' physical safety and health were reported as less severely impacted compared with 2020; however, negative effects of isolation (77%), burnout (75%), and the severe impact on emotional well-being (17%) were prevalent. CONCLUSIONS: One year after the initial coronavirus disease 2019 outbreak, clinical training and surgical trainee health were less negatively impacted. Disruption of emotional well-being remained high. Future needs include better objective measures of clinical competence beyond case numbers and the implementation of novel programs to promote surgical trainee health and well-being.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control , Education, Medical, Graduate/methods , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Surveys and Questionnaires
4.
Am J Phys Med Rehabil ; 101(2): 160-163, 2022 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1927467

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Coronavirus disease of 2019 presented significant challenges to residency and fellowship programs. Didactic lectures were particularly affected as redeployment of faculty and trainees, limitations on in-person gathering, and other barriers limited opportunities for educational engagement. We sought to develop an online didactic series to address this gap in graduate medical education.Lecturers were recruited via convenience sample and from previous Association of Academic Physiatrists presenters from across the United States and Canada; these presented via Zoom during April and May 2020. Lecturers and content reflected the diverse nature of the specialty. Learning objectives were adapted from the list of board examination topics provided by the American Board of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation.Fifty-nine lectures were presented. Maximum concurrent live viewership totaled 4272 and recorded lecture viewership accounted for an additional 6849 views, for a total of at least 11,208 views between the date of the first lecture (April 9, 2020) and May 1, 2021. Live viewers of one of the lectures reported participating from several states and 16 countries.The Association of Academic Physiatrists-led virtual didactics augmented graduate medical education during the coronavirus disease of 2019 pandemic, and data confirm that the lectures have continued to enjoy a high level of viewership after the cessation of live lectures.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Medical, Graduate/methods , Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine/education , Humans , International Cooperation , SARS-CoV-2
5.
J Surg Res ; 277: 92-99, 2022 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1851661

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The oral general surgery certifying examination (CE) is required for board certification. A curriculum was designed to improve CE passage rates at an academic residency program. Limited literature exists that evaluates a long-term mock oral curriculum for senior residents. This study aims to evaluate the impact of this curriculum on essential elements for clinical practice and CE preparedness. METHODS: The curriculum consisted of weekly meetings with postgraduate year four and postgraduate year five residents (n = 10). Two residents were selected for a video-recorded board-style mock examination with a faculty examiner and peer audience. Each attendee completed a standard evaluation form that assessed score, anxiety, confidence, and medical knowledge. Blood pressure, pulse, and unused time were assessed. A postcurriculum survey was conducted. RESULTS: Medical knowledge had the greatest correlation with overall scores (R2 = 0.733). Positive correlations were seen between confidence and case number for faculty, self, and peer scores (R2 = 0.671, R2 = 0.566, and R2 = 0.729, respectively). There was a positive correlation between confidence and medical knowledge (R2 = 0.575). There was a significant difference between the overall score of nontachycardic versus tachycardic residents (P = 0.00994). CONCLUSIONS: Residents demonstrated increasing confidence as they progressed through the curriculum by self-reported and objective measures. Residents demonstrated improvements in overall scores. Future directions will examine results of the 2-y curriculum experience and CE passage rates to verify that a standardized, structured, weekly, longitudinal curriculum is beneficial for CE preparedness and clinical practice.


Subject(s)
General Surgery , Internship and Residency , Clinical Competence , Curriculum , Education, Medical, Graduate/methods , Educational Measurement/methods , General Surgery/education , Humans , Pilot Projects
7.
Glob Health Sci Pract ; 9(3): 690-697, 2021 09 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1542965

ABSTRACT

Emergency medicine (EM) is rapidly being recognized as a specialty around the globe. This has particular promise for low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) that experience the largest burden of disease for emergency conditions. Specialty education and training in EM remain essentially an apprenticeship model. Finding the required expertise to educate graduate learners can be challenging in regions where there are low densities of specialty providers.We describe an initiative to implement a sustainable, bidirectional partnership between the Emergency Medicine Departments of Weill Cornell Medicine (WCM) in New York, NY, USA, and Bugando Medical Center (BMC) in Mwanza, Tanzania. We used synchronous and asynchronous telecommunication technology to enhance an ongoing emergency medicine education collaboration.The Internet infrastructure for this collaboration was created by bolstering 4G services available in Mwanza, Tanzania. By maximizing the 4G signal, sufficient bandwidth could be created to allow for live 2-way audio/video communication. Using synchronous and asynchronous applications such as Zoom and WhatsApp, providers at WCM and BMC can attend real-time didactic lectures, participate in discussion forums on clinical topics, and collaborate on the development of clinical protocols. Proof of concept exercises demonstrated that this system can be used for real-time mentoring in EKG interpretation and ultrasound technique, for example. This system was also used to share information and develop operations flows during the COVID-19 pandemic. The use of telecommunication technology and e-learning in a format that promotes long-term, sustainable interaction is practical and innovative, provides benefit to all partners, and should be considered as a mechanism by which global partnerships can assist with training in emergency medicine in LMICs.


Subject(s)
Curriculum , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Medical, Graduate/methods , Emergency Medicine/education , Emergency Medicine/methods , Academic Medical Centers , Emergency Service, Hospital , Humans , Mobile Applications , New York City , Social Media , Tanzania
8.
J Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg ; 50(1): 65, 2021 Nov 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1523331

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has deeply impacted healthcare and education systems, including resident education. The impact of the pandemic on the different types of pedagogical activities, and the displacement of pedagogical activities to online modalities have not yet been quantified. We sought to evaluate the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on formal pedagogic components of otorhinolaryngology-head and neck surgery (ORL-HNS) residency, the switch to distance learning and program director's perceptions of the future of teaching and learning. METHODS: A nationwide online survey was conducted on Canadian ORL-HNS program directors. The use of standard didactic activities in-person and online, before and during the pandemic was rated with Likert scales. Perceptions of the pandemic were described with open-ended questions. RESULTS: A total of 11 of the 13 program directors contacted responded. The analysis were conducted using nonparametric statistics. There was a significant drop in overall didactic activities during the pandemic, regardless of the teaching format (3.5 ± 0.2 to 3.1 ± 0.3, p < 0.05). The most affected activities were simulation and in-house lectures. Online activities increased dramatically (0.5 ± 0.2 to 5.0 ± 0.5, p < 0.001), including attendance to lectures made by other programs (0.5 ± 0.3 to 4.0 ± 0.8, p < 0.05). Respondents stated their intention to maintain the hybrid online and in-person teaching model. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that hybrid online and in-person teaching is likely to persist in the post-pandemic setting. A balanced residency curriculum requires diversity in academic activities. The pandemic can have positive consequences if higher education institutions work to better support distance teaching and learning.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Curriculum , Disease Transmission, Infectious/prevention & control , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Medical, Graduate/methods , Internship and Residency/methods , Otolaryngology/education , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19/transmission , Canada , Child , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Quebec/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
11.
Br J Surg ; 108(10): 1162-1180, 2021 10 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1462296

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) was declared a pandemic by the WHO on 11 March 2020 and global surgical practice was compromised. This Commission aimed to document and reflect on the changes seen in the surgical environment during the pandemic, by reviewing colleagues' experiences and published evidence. METHODS: In late 2020, BJS contacted colleagues across the global surgical community and asked them to describe how severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) had affected their practice. In addition to this, the Commission undertook a literature review on the impact of COVID-19 on surgery and perioperative care. A thematic analysis was performed to identify the issues most frequently encountered by the correspondents, as well as the solutions and ideas suggested to address them. RESULTS: BJS received communications for this Commission from leading clinicians and academics across a variety of surgical specialties in every inhabited continent. The responses from all over the world provided insights into multiple facets of surgical practice from a governmental level to individual clinical practice and training. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic has uncovered a variety of problems in healthcare systems, including negative impacts on surgical practice. Global surgical multidisciplinary teams are working collaboratively to address research questions about the future of surgery in the post-COVID-19 era. The COVID-19 pandemic is severely damaging surgical training. The establishment of a multidisciplinary ethics committee should be encouraged at all surgical oncology centres. Innovative leadership and collaboration is vital in the post-COVID-19 era.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Perioperative Care/trends , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/trends , Surgical Procedures, Operative/trends , Adult , Biomedical Research/organization & administration , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/economics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Medical, Graduate/methods , Education, Medical, Graduate/trends , Female , Global Health , Health Resources/supply & distribution , Health Services Accessibility/trends , Humans , Infection Control/economics , Infection Control/methods , Infection Control/standards , International Cooperation , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Perioperative Care/education , Perioperative Care/methods , Perioperative Care/standards , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/standards , Surgeons/education , Surgeons/psychology , Surgeons/trends , Surgical Procedures, Operative/education , Surgical Procedures, Operative/methods , Surgical Procedures, Operative/standards
12.
World Neurosurg ; 157: e198-e206, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1458616

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the COVID-19 pandemic, disruption of surgical hands-on training has hampered the skills acquisition by budding neurosurgeons. Online and virtual classrooms have not been able to substitute the hands-on experience and learning via direct interaction with senior colleagues. To overcome these challenges, we organized a hybrid workshop where simulation-based learning modules, and direct and virtual interaction with surgeons during live surgeries or didactic lectures were utilized to help delegates in understanding the nuances of neurosurgery. METHODS: A 3-day hybrid workshop was held in March 2021, which was attended by 133 delegates. A structured questionnaire was utilized to record their feedback. RESULTS: An overwhelming majority of the respondents (94.1%, n = 64) found hybrid conferences to be better than an online conference. Most of the respondents (88.3%, n = 60) rated the utility of direct face-to-face interaction to be more satisfying as compared with online interaction with faculty during a webinar. Again, many the respondents (86.8%, n = 59) believed that similar hybrid events will be the new normal given the current situation of COVID-19 pandemic. A large majority (88.2%, n = 60) of the respondents reported that they will prefer a hybrid event over an online conference. CONCLUSIONS: In this era of the COVID-19 pandemic, "hybrid" microneurosurgery workshops offer unique opportunities to enhance surgical skills acquisition by hands-on simulation-based learning and observing live surgical demonstrations, apart from 2-way interactions with experts under one roof. This may be a stepping stone for what lies ahead in the future of neurosurgical training.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Medical, Graduate/methods , Neurosurgery/education , Humans , Neurosurgical Procedures/education , SARS-CoV-2
13.
Ann Surg ; 274(5): e381-e382, 2021 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1455427

ABSTRACT

Virtual recruitment of candidates applying into General Surgery residency during the COVID-19 pandemic presented a number of benefits and challenges. Notable benefits for candidates included financial and resource cost savings, the ability to conduct multiple interviews within short time frame, and the ability to meet more faculty members on virtual interview day. Challenges included technological difficulties, difficulty assessing culture and authenticity of in-program relationships, zoom fatigue, and inability to form relationships with co-applicants. After assessing our experiences with these benefits and challenges, the authors recommend that future recruitment cycles maintain virtual interview days with optional, nonevaluative open house days for revisit and second look opportunities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Medical, Graduate/methods , Faculty/organization & administration , General Surgery/education , Internship and Residency/organization & administration , Pandemics , Humans
14.
PLoS One ; 16(9): e0257039, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1416882

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Newly graduated medical doctors in their internships are positioned to strengthen the front line in combating COVID-19. We developed a Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) to equip them with adequate knowledge for COVID-19 management. This paper aims to analyze the MOOC and evaluate participant satisfaction and increase in knowledge after completing the course. METHODS: An observational study was conducted. Quantitative data were obtained from questionnaires and pre- and post-tests. Responses to open-ended questions of the questionnaires were collected. Analysis using the Quality Reference Framework was also completed. RESULTS: The MOOC consisted of fundamental knowledge of COVID-19 (Part A) and further enrichment (Part B), and the content was written in the Indonesian language. A total of 3,424 and 2,462 participants completed the course in August and November 2020, respectively. Most participants agreed that the platform was easy to navigate, the design was interesting, and the content was aligned with their needs. Pre- and post-test scores in Part A's subjects increased significantly. Factors contributing to and inhibiting usability and areas for improvement were further highlighted. DISCUSSION: The use of a specific quality framework facilitated a comprehensive evaluation of the MOOC's strengths, weaknesses, and areas for future improvements. The participants' satisfaction and pre- and post-test results showed that the current MOOC holds great potential benefit for continuing education for medical interns joining the frontliners during the pandemic. Future implementation should consider increasing the quality of learning resources, scaling up the platform and its technical supports, and enhancing organizational supports.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Medical, Graduate/methods , Program Evaluation , Educational Measurement , Humans , Indonesia/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires
16.
J Am Soc Cytopathol ; 11(1): 46-55, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1385816

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has led to a dramatic shift in volumes and practice patterns for hospitals around the globe. We analyzed its effect on the cytopathology subspecialty practice and resident education at our institution. DESIGN: Specimen volumes were analyzed for the cytology practice for 2019 and 2020. Patient registration and elective and scheduled surgery volumes were also included in the analysis for 2020. The impact of innovative concepts, such as virtual teaching, on resident teaching was evaluated using a survey consisting of 5 multiple choice questions with 4 possible responses each. RESULTS: The total number of specimens decreased by 28% in March 2020 (P < 0.00001), with a continuing decline in April (66% decrease year-over-year, P < 0.00001), followed by recovery in May and return to baseline within June 2020. Specimen volumes continued to show an upward trend thereafter. Improved specimen volumes correlated with patient registration and surgical volumes. The majority of residents considered virtual teaching conferences (75%) and self-study sets (58%) as beneficial and did not view absence of one-on-one microscope learning (58%) as significantly affecting their education. CONCLUSION: The recovery curve for our cytopathology service was V-shaped, essentially the most ideal response to an economic downturn. The majority of residents viewed virtual teaching conferences and self-study sets favorably and did not regard absence of one-on-one microscope learning as adversely affecting their education.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cytodiagnosis , Education, Medical, Graduate/methods , Pathology/economics , Pathology/education , Humans , Internship and Residency , SARS-CoV-2
17.
J Surg Oncol ; 124(2): 193-199, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1378940

ABSTRACT

Telesimulation (TS), the process of using the internet to link educators and trainees at locations remote from one another, harnesses the powers of technology to enable access to high-quality simulation-based education and assessment to learners across the globe. From its first uses in the teaching and assessment of laparoscopic skills to more recent interpretations during the current pandemic, TS has shown promise in helping educators to address pressing dilemmas in medical education.


Subject(s)
Education, Distance/methods , Education, Medical, Graduate/methods , Educational Measurement/methods , Simulation Training/methods , Specialties, Surgical/education , Educational Technology , Global Health , Humans , International Cooperation , Internet
18.
Ann Vasc Surg ; 77: 63-70, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1377660

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The corona virus disease (COVID-19) pandemic has radically changed the possibilities for vascular surgeons and trainees to exchange knowledge and experience. The aim of the present survey is to inventorize the e-learning needs of vascular surgeons and trainees as well as the strengths and weaknesses of vascular e-Learning. METHODS: An online survey consisting of 18 questions was created in English, with a separate bilingual English-Mandarin version. The survey was dispersed to vascular surgeons and trainees worldwide through social media and via direct messaging from June 15, 2020 to October 15, 2020. RESULTS: Eight hundred and fifty-six records from 84 different countries could be included. Most participants attended several online activities (>4: n = 461, 54%; 2-4: n = 300, 35%; 1: n = 95, 11%) and evaluated online activities as positive or very positive (84.7%). In deciding upon participation, the topic of the activity was most important (n = 440, 51.4%), followed by the reputation of the presenter or the panel (n = 178, 20.8%), but not necessarily receiving accreditation or certification (n = 52, 6.1%). The survey identified several shortcomings in vascular e-Learning during the pandemic: limited possibility to attend due to lack of time and increased workload (n = 432, 50.5%), no protected/allocated time (n = 488, 57%) and no accreditation or certification, while technical shortcomings were only a minor problem (n = 25, 2.9%). CONCLUSIONS: During the COVID-19 pandemic vascular e-Learning has been used frequently and was appreciated by vascular professionals from around the globe. The survey identified strengths and weaknesses in current e-Learning that can be used to further improve online learning in vascular surgery.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Medical, Graduate/methods , Learning , Specialties, Surgical/education , Surveys and Questionnaires , Vascular Diseases/epidemiology , Vascular Surgical Procedures/education , Comorbidity , Computer-Assisted Instruction , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Vascular Diseases/surgery
19.
Ann Diagn Pathol ; 54: 151807, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1356125

ABSTRACT

Digital pathology has become an integral part of pathology education in recent years, particularly during the COVID-19 pandemic, for its potential utility as a teaching tool that augments the traditional 1-to-1 sign-out experience. Herein, we evaluate the utility of whole slide imaging (WSI) in reducing diagnostic errors in pigmented cutaneous lesions by pathology fellows without subspecialty training in dermatopathology. Ten cases of 4 pigmented cutaneous lesions commonly encountered by general pathologists were selected. Corresponding whole slide images were distributed to our fellows, along with two sets of online surveys, each composed of 10 multiple-choice questions with 4 answers. Identical cases were used for both surveys to minimize variability in trainees' scores depending on the perceived level of difficulty, with the second set being distributed after random shuffling. Brief image-based teaching slides as self-assessment tool were provided to trainees between each survey. Pre- and post-self-assessment scores were analyzed. 61% (17/28) and 39% (11/28) of fellows completed the first and second surveys, respectively. The mean score in the first survey was 5.2/10. The mean score in the second survey following self-assessment increased to 7.2/10. 64% (7/11) of trainees showed an improvement in their scores, with 1 trainee improving his/her score by 8 points. No fellow scored less post-self-assessment than on the initial assessment. The difference in individual scores between two surveys was statistically significant (p = 0.003). Our study demonstrates the utility of WSI-based self-assessment learning as a source of improving diagnostic skills of pathology trainees in a short period of time.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Clinical Competence , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Medical, Graduate/methods , Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted/methods , Pathology, Clinical/education , Skin Diseases/pathology , Diagnostic Errors/prevention & control , Fellowships and Scholarships , Humans , Pathology, Clinical/methods , Skin Diseases/diagnosis , United States
20.
Urology ; 158: 39-44, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1356476

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Show feasibility of and develop a program to provide mentorship for applicants to urology residency during COVID-19 using a virtual program, #UroStream101. METHODS: Urology resident volunteers were paired with fourth year medical students based on shared areas of urologic interest and geographic location. A mentorship guide was provided. Mentees were offered an opportunity to design a twitter based educational resource, tweetorial, with mentor supervision. Program success was assessed by participation and with MEMeQ, a validated mentorship assessment survey. RESULTS: A total of 111 students and 93 urology residents enlisted in #Urostream101. All AUA sections were represented. At time of enrollment, 19% (n = 21) of medical students lacked affiliation with urology department, 24% (n = 27) lacked urology mentors, and 32% (n = 36) had no formal clinical exposure to urology. Many students joined twitter during the application cycle (45% within 1 month of enrollment, n = 50) for solely professional reasons (71% of participants, n = 79). When asked their top priority in participating in #UroStream101, most students answered resident mentorship (61%, n = 68) followed by exposure to a geographically distant urology program (32%, n = 36). Twenty tweetorials were created spanning the breadth of urology. A total of 29 students (26%) completed the full MEMeQ evaluation survey, assessing a student's goals and satisfaction with mentor. Overall program satisfaction was 6.1/7 on Likert scale, "very satisfied." Students identified program selection and ERAS application assistance as their main goals. CONCLUSION: #UroStream101 was a successful mentorship program for students interested in urology. This was desperately needed during an atypical application cycle and provides invaluable insight into further development of formal mentorship programs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mentors , Social Media , Urology/education , Education, Medical, Graduate/methods , United States
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