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1.
Curr Opin Obstet Gynecol ; 33(4): 317-323, 2021 08 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526205

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Effects of the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic prompted the need for rapid, flexible change in the delivery of care, education, and commitment to the well-being of obstetrics and gynecology (OB/GYN) residents. RECENT FINDINGS: Published literature shows multiple models for surge scheduling for residency programs in other specialties. We describe our experience creating a surge schedule for OB/GYN residents that allowed for sufficient coverage of inpatient care while minimizing resident exposure and limited hospital resources, respecting work hour requirements, and plans for coverage due to illness or need for home quarantine. We also report innovative approaches to trainee education through the use of remote-learning technology and gynecologic surgery skills training in absence of normal clinical exposure. SUMMARY: Our approach serves as a model for adapting to unprecedented challenges and offers suggestions for creative transformations of traditional teaching that can be continued beyond the immediate crisis.


Subject(s)
Education, Distance/organization & administration , Education, Medical, Graduate/organization & administration , Internship and Residency/organization & administration , Obstetrics and Gynecology Department, Hospital , Continuity of Patient Care , Humans , Simulation Training , Videoconferencing
3.
Dig Dis Sci ; 66(11): 3635-3658, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1406167

ABSTRACT

AIM: To report revolutionary reorganization of academic gastroenterology division from COVID-19 pandemic surge at metropolitan Detroit epicenter from 0 infected patients on March 9, 2020, to > 300 infected patients in hospital census in April 2020 and > 200 infected patients in April 2021. SETTING: GI Division, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, has 36 GI clinical faculty; performs > 23,000 endoscopies annually; fully accredited GI fellowship since 1973; employs > 400 house staff annually since 1995; tertiary academic hospital; predominantly voluntary attendings; and primary teaching hospital, Oakland-University-Medical-School. METHODS: This was a prospective study. Expert opinion. Personal experience includes Hospital GI chief > 14 years until 2020; GI fellowship program director, several hospitals > 20 years; author of > 300 publications in peer-reviewed GI journals; committee-member, Food-and-Drug-Administration-GI-Advisory Committee > 5 years; and key hospital/medical school committee memberships. Computerized PubMed literature review was performed on hospital changes and pandemic. Study was exempted/approved by Hospital IRB, April 14, 2020. RESULTS: Division reorganized patient care to add clinical capacity and minimize risks to staff of contracting COVID-19 infection. Affiliated medical school changes included: changing "live" to virtual lectures; canceling medical student GI electives; exempting medical students from treating COVID-19-infected patients; and graduating medical students on time despite partly missing clinical electives. Division was reorganized by changing "live" GI lectures to virtual lectures; four GI fellows temporarily reassigned as medical attendings supervising COVID-19-infected patients; temporarily mandated intubation of COVID-19-infected patients for esophagogastroduodenoscopy; postponing elective GI endoscopies; and reducing average number of endoscopies from 100 to 4 per weekday during pandemic peak! GI clinic visits reduced by half (postponing non-urgent visits), and physical visits replaced by virtual visits. Economic pandemic impact included temporary, hospital deficit subsequently relieved by federal grants; hospital employee terminations/furloughs; and severe temporary decline in GI practitioner's income during surge. Hospital temporarily enhanced security and gradually ameliorated facemask shortage. GI program director contacted GI fellows twice weekly to ameliorate pandemic-induced stress. Divisional parties held virtually. GI fellowship applicants interviewed virtually. Graduate medical education changes included weekly committee meetings to monitor pandemic-induced changes; program managers working from home; canceling ACGME annual fellowship survey, changing ACGME physical to virtual site visits; and changing national conventions from physical to virtual. CONCLUSION: Reports profound and pervasive GI divisional changes to maximize clinical resources devoted to COVID-19-infected patients and minimize risks of transmitting infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/economics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Economics, Hospital/organization & administration , Gastroenterology/education , Hospital Administration/methods , SARS-CoV-2 , Cities/economics , Cities/epidemiology , Education, Medical, Graduate/organization & administration , Gastroenterology/economics , Hospital Administration/economics , Humans , Internship and Residency , Michigan/epidemiology , Organizational Affiliation/economics , Organizational Affiliation/organization & administration , Prospective Studies , Schools, Medical/organization & administration
4.
Ann Glob Health ; 87(1): 61, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1325924

ABSTRACT

Objectives: The changing global landscape of disease and public health crises, such as the current COVID-19 pandemic, call for a new generation of global health leaders. As global health leadership programs evolve, many have incorporated experiential learning and mentoring (ELM) components into their structure. However, there has been incomplete consideration on how ELM activities are deployed, what challenges they face and how programs adapt to meet those challenges. This paper builds on the co-authors' experiences as trainees, trainers, organizers and evaluators of six global health leadership programs to reflect on lessons learned regarding ELM. We also consider ethics, technology, gender, age and framing that influence how ELM activities are developed and implemented. Findings: Despite the diverse origins and funding of these programs, all six are focused on training participants from low- and middle-income countries drawing on a diversity of professions. Each program uses mixed didactic approaches, practice-based placements, competency and skills-driven curricula, and mentorship via various modalities. Main metrics for success include development of trainee networks, acquisition of skills and formation of relationships; programs that included research training had specific research metrics as well. Common challenges the programs face include ensuring clarity of expectations of all participants and mentors; maintaining connection among trainees; meeting the needs of trainee cohorts with different skill sets and starting points; and ensuring trainee cohorts capture age, gender and other forms of diversity. Conclusions: ELM activities for global health leadership are proving even more critical now as the importance of effective individual leaders in responding to crises becomes evident. Future efforts for ELM in global health leadership should emphasize local adaptation and sustainability. Practice-based learning and established mentoring relationships provide the building blocks for competent leaders to navigate complex dynamics with the flexibility and conscientiousness needed to improve the health of global populations. Key Takeaways: Experiential learning and mentorship activities within global health leadership programs provide the hands-on practice and support that the next generation of global health leaders need to address the health challenges of our times.Six global health leadership programs with experiential learning and mentorship components are showcased to highlight differences and similarities in their approaches and capture a broad picture of achievements that can help inform future programs.Emphasis on inter-professional training, mixed-learning approaches and mentorship modalities were common across programs. Both individual capacity building and development of trainees' professional networks were seen as critical, reflecting the value of inter-personal connections for long-term leadership success.During program design, future programs should recognize the "frame" within which the program will be incorporated and intentionally address diversity-in all its forms-during recruitment as well as consider North-South ethics, leadership roles, hierarchies and transition plans.


Subject(s)
Education, Medical, Graduate/methods , Global Health/education , Leadership , Mentoring/methods , Problem-Based Learning/methods , Clinical Competence , Developing Countries , Education, Medical, Graduate/organization & administration , Humans , International Cooperation , Mentoring/organization & administration , Problem-Based Learning/organization & administration , Program Development/methods
5.
J Child Adolesc Psychopharmacol ; 31(7): 457-463, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1317895

ABSTRACT

Objectives: Our goal was to develop an open access nationally disseminated online curriculum for use in graduate and continuing medical education on the topic of pediatric telepsychiatry to enhance the uptake of telepsychiatry among child psychiatry training programs and improve access to mental health care for youth and families. Methods: Following Kern's 6-stage model of curriculum development, we identified a core problem, conducted a needs assessment, developed broad goals and measurable objectives in a competency-based model, and developed educational content and methods. The curriculum was reviewed by experts and feedback incorporated. Given the urgent need for such a curriculum due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the curriculum was immediately posted on the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and American Association of Directors of Psychiatric Residency Training websites. Further evaluation will be conducted over the next year. Results: The curriculum covers the six areas of core competence adapted for pediatric telepsychiatry and includes teaching content and resources, evaluation tools, and information about other resources. Conclusion: This online curriculum is available online and provides an important resource and set of standards for pediatric telepsychiatry training. Its online format allows for ongoing revision as the telepsychiatry landscape changes.


Subject(s)
Adolescent Psychiatry/education , COVID-19 , Child Psychiatry/education , Curriculum/trends , Education, Medical, Continuing , Education, Medical, Graduate , Access to Information , Adolescent , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Child , Education/methods , Education/organization & administration , Education, Medical, Continuing/methods , Education, Medical, Continuing/organization & administration , Education, Medical, Graduate/methods , Education, Medical, Graduate/organization & administration , Health Services Accessibility , Humans , Mental Health Services/standards , Mental Health Services/trends , Organizational Innovation , Organizational Objectives , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine/methods
6.
Plast Reconstr Surg ; 148(1): 133e-139e, 2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1284960

ABSTRACT

SUMMARY: The coronavirus disease of 2019 pandemic became a global threat in a matter of weeks, with its future implications yet to be defined. New York City was swiftly declared the epicenter of the pandemic in the United States as case numbers grew exponentially in a matter of days, quickly threatening to overwhelm the capacity of the health care system. This burgeoning crisis led practitioners across specialties to adapt and mobilize rapidly. Plastic surgeons and trainees within the New York University Langone Health system faced uncertainty in terms of future practice, in addition to immediate and long-term effects on undergraduate and graduate medical education. The administration remained vigilant and adaptive, enacting departmental policies prioritizing safety and productivity, with early deployment of faculty for clinical support at the front lines. The authors anticipate that this pandemic will have far-reaching effects on the future of plastic surgery education, trends in the pursuit of elective surgical procedures, and considerable consequences for certain research endeavors. Undoubtedly, there will be substantial impact on the physical and mental well-being of health care practitioners across specialties. Coordinated efforts and clear lines of communication between the Department of Plastic Surgery and its faculty and trainees allowed a concerted effort toward the immediate challenge of tempering the spread of coronavirus disease of 2019 and preserving structure and throughput for education and research. Adaptation and creativity have ultimately allowed for early rebooting of in-person clinical and surgical practice. The authors present their coordinated efforts and lessons gleaned from their experience to inform their community's preparedness as this formidable challenge evolves.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control/standards , Pandemics/prevention & control , Surgery, Plastic/trends , Academic Medical Centers/standards , Academic Medical Centers/statistics & numerical data , Academic Medical Centers/trends , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Education, Medical, Graduate/organization & administration , Education, Medical, Graduate/standards , Education, Medical, Graduate/trends , Elective Surgical Procedures/education , Elective Surgical Procedures/standards , Elective Surgical Procedures/trends , Faculty/organization & administration , Faculty/psychology , Faculty/statistics & numerical data , Forecasting , Humans , Internship and Residency/statistics & numerical data , New York City/epidemiology , Personnel Staffing and Scheduling/organization & administration , Personnel Staffing and Scheduling/trends , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures/education , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures/standards , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures/trends , Surgeons/organization & administration , Surgeons/psychology , Surgeons/statistics & numerical data , Surgery, Plastic/education , Surgery, Plastic/organization & administration , Surgery, Plastic/standards , Surveys and Questionnaires/statistics & numerical data , Uncertainty , Universities/standards , Universities/statistics & numerical data , Universities/trends
7.
Fam Med ; 53(6): 461-466, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1257437

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Scholarship is recognized as a challenge in many family medicine residency programs. Among evaluations of scholarship curricula, few describe resident experiences of such interventions. To bridge this gap in knowledge, we measured resident confidence, satisfaction, and participation before and after implementing a new scholarship curriculum. METHODS: The redesigned curriculum included a structured project timeline, resident research in progress meetings, faculty mentorship, scholarly skills workshops, and mentored journal clubs. We conducted a curriculum evaluation via surveys of residents prior to implementation and after years 1 and 2, measuring satisfaction with the scholarly environment and opportunities, and confidence and participation in specific scholarly activities using Likert scales from 1 (least confidence) to 5. RESULTS: Compared to baseline (n=28), after 2 years (n=27) of the curriculum, residents reported increased mean confidence in critical appraisal of scientific articles (2.6±1.1 to 3.3±0.7, P=.007), carrying out a scholarly project (2.5±0.8 to 3.4±1.0, P=.005), and writing an abstract (3.0±0.8 to 3.8±0.7, P=.002). As compared to the first year, more residents in the second year participated in quality improvement projects (7.1% vs 29.6%, P=.031) and wrote conference abstracts (10.7% vs 37.0%, P=.022). Over the same period, those very satisfied with the scholarly environment increased from 0 (0%) to 8 (29.6%, P=.017). The June 2020 survey identified increased interest in scholarship because of the antiracism movement (51.9%) and COVID-19 pandemic (40.7%). CONCLUSIONS: Implementation of a redesigned scholarship curriculum was associated with increases in family medicine resident scholarship confidence and satisfaction.


Subject(s)
Education, Medical, Graduate/organization & administration , Family Practice/education , Fellowships and Scholarships/organization & administration , Internship and Residency/organization & administration , Professional Competence , Biomedical Research/statistics & numerical data , Curriculum , Humans , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , Program Evaluation
8.
Postgrad Med J ; 97(1149): 423-426, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1247399

ABSTRACT

Little has been published regarding postgraduate assessments during the COVID-19 pandemic. There is an urgent need to graduate well-trained specialists including family physicians who play a key role in patient care. The successes and challenges encountered in mounting qualifying 2020 Family Medicine examinations during the COVID-19 pandemic at the University of the West Indies are described in this paper. Human resource, planning, use of technology and virtual environments are discussed, which enabled successful examinations at this multicampus regional site.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Certification , Education, Medical, Graduate/organization & administration , Educational Measurement , Family Practice/education , Physicians, Family/standards , Academic Performance , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Certification/methods , Certification/standards , Educational Measurement/methods , Educational Measurement/statistics & numerical data , Educational Status , Educational Technology/methods , Humans , Needs Assessment , SARS-CoV-2 , Teaching/standards , Teaching/trends , West Indies
9.
BJS Open ; 5(2)2021 03 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1185654

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic had a profound impact on surgical services, potentially having a detrimental impact on training opportunities. The aim of this global survey was to assess the impact of the COVID-19 crisis on surgical training and to develop a framework for recovery. METHODS: A cross-sectional, web-based survey was conducted. This was designed by a steering committee of medical educationalists and validated by a group of trainees before dissemination. RESULTS: A total of 608 responses were obtained from 34 countries and 15 specialties. The results demonstrated major disruption in all aspects of training. The impact was greatest for conferences (525 of 608) and hands-on courses (517 of 608), but less for inpatient care-related training (268 of 608). European trainees were significantly more likely to experience direct training disruption than trainees in Asia (odds ratio 0.15) or Australia (OR 0.10) (χ2 = 87.162, P < 0.001). Alternative training resources (webinars, 359 of 608; educational videos, 234 of 608) have emerged, although trainees expressed some dissatisfaction with them. The collective responses generated a four-pillar framework for training recovery that involved: guidance from training stakeholders with the involvement of trainees; prioritization of training, especially the roles of senior surgeons/trainers; provision of access to alternative/new teaching methods; and measures to address trainee anxiety. CONCLUSION: Training has been greatly affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. The introduction of new teaching methods and a focus on training after the pandemic are imperative.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Medical, Graduate/trends , Specialties, Surgical/education , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Education, Medical, Graduate/methods , Education, Medical, Graduate/organization & administration , Female , Global Health , Humans , Logistic Models , Male , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires
12.
GMS J Med Educ ; 38(1): Doc22, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1110241

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The corona virus pandemic rendered most live education this spring term impossible. Many classes were converted into e-learning formats. But not all learning content and outcomes can readily be transferred into digital space. Project outline: Emergency medicine teaching relies on hands-on simulation training. Therefore, we had to devise a catalogue of measures, that would enable us to offer simulation training for Advanced Life Support. Summary of work: Strict hygienic rules including disinfection of hands, wearing personal protective gear at all times and disinfection of equipment were implemented. Group size and number of staff was reduced, introducing fixed student teams accompanied by the same teacher. Only large rooms with good ventilation were used. Under these conditions, we were allowed to carry out core Advanced Life Support simulations. Other content had to be transferred to online platforms. Discussion: Heeding general hygiene advise and using personal protective gear, a central cluster of simulations was carried out. Students and staff adhered to rules without complaint. No infections within faculty or student body were reported. Conclusion: It seems feasible to conduct core simulations under strict hygienic protocol.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Medical, Graduate/organization & administration , Emergency Medicine/education , Physical Distancing , Disinfection/standards , Hand Disinfection/standards , Humans , Naphthoquinones , Pandemics , Personal Protective Equipment/supply & distribution , Pyrans , SARS-CoV-2
15.
Can J Cardiol ; 37(3): 519-522, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1071173

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has had an unprecedented impact on cardiology training. Novel opportunities have been identified in several domains: patient exposure, procedural experience, didactic education, research and development, advocacy and well-being, and career advancement. Lessons learned from COVID-19 should be used to further improve fellowship training such as, for example, through the development of a competency-based training and evaluation system. Multimodality teaching that incorporates telelearning provides creative solutions for trainee and continuing medical education. Fellow-initiated research should be supported and nurtured. Enhanced attention to trainee well-being and burnout is particularly important. The emerging cardiologists of the future and the way they are trained will be shaped by the COVID-19 challenge of our generation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiology/education , Education, Medical, Graduate/methods , Education, Medical, Graduate/standards , Quality of Health Care , Education, Medical, Graduate/organization & administration , Forecasting
16.
Adv Physiol Educ ; 45(1): 37-43, 2021 Mar 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1066949

ABSTRACT

In the wake of COVID-19, the postgraduate activities in physiology were shifted from live (face-to-face teaching) to virtual mode. This transition posed a challenge to postgraduate students and faculty moderators, especially for participant-centric group discussion, wherein face-to-face interaction contributes significantly to active learner engagement. To bridge the gap between live group discussion (GD) and virtual GD in the conventional format (VGD), we implemented an innovative yet feasible multistep approach of conducting structured virtual group discussion (sVGD). It involved priming of students during the preparatory phase and incorporation of the Tuckman model of group dynamics, which consists of sequential substages of forming, storming, norming, and performing into the virtual format. Unsupervised synchronous and asynchronous, as well as supervised synchronous interactions within and in between the minigroups in a structured way, led to active engagement of students with one another and the moderator, despite the constraints imposed by the virtual format. After establishing the feasibility of the approach during the first GD (sVGD-1), sVGD-2 was conducted, further refining the approach, and feedback was obtained from the postgraduate students. Pre-GD feedback revealed that the live session was preferred over virtual for the conduct of GD, whereas both live GD and sVGD were perceived to be more effective than VGD in the post-GD feedback. Such pedagogical innovations may also help to address the challenges posed in traditional teaching across the undergraduate and postgraduate courses in medical education and beyond during such unforeseeable circumstances.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Education, Graduate/organization & administration , Pandemics , Physiology/education , SARS-CoV-2 , Students/psychology , Virtual Reality , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Graduate/methods , Education, Medical, Graduate/methods , Education, Medical, Graduate/organization & administration , Feasibility Studies , Feedback, Psychological , Group Processes , Humans , India , Internet , Students, Medical/psychology
18.
Postgrad Med J ; 97(1149): 427-431, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1033472

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted education-related activities, including the conduct of examinations. We review the literature regarding high-stakes examinations during the pandemic, discuss the decision-making process of whether to proceed with a high-stakes examination and share published experiences in conducting high-stakes examinations during the pandemic. We illustrate our own recent experiences of decision-making and conduct of our high-stakes gastroenterology licencing examinations during the height of the COVID-19 pandemic. It is possible to conduct high-stakes examinations virtually during pandemic situations with fidelity and adherence to the established format and standards.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Medical, Graduate/organization & administration , Educational Measurement/methods , Gastroenterology/education , Licensure/trends , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Clinical Competence , Educational Status , Educational Technology/methods , Humans , Infection Control/organization & administration , SARS-CoV-2 , Singapore
19.
Neurol Sci ; 42(3): 817-823, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1028429

ABSTRACT

The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic is having a huge impact on clinical activity of all hospitals, including the ones involved in training of residents. In addition, neurology residents underwent substantial modifications of their training program. Aim of our investigation was to evaluate the impact of COVID-19 pandemic on the educational activities of Italian neurology residents through an online questionnaire delivered to neurology residents. The results obtained showed that almost 30% of the respondents were redistributed to COVID-19 units. Neurology departments underwent substantial modifications of their organization influencing clinical educational activities; lessons and seminars were rescheduled online and research protocols were stopped and transferred to remote working, when feasible. There was a relevant use of telemedicine approach even if most of the respondents had never been trained before. Some of the changes had a North-South gradient, following the epidemiology of the pandemic. The data obtained from our survey highlight those points to address to be prepared for possible future emergencies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Medical, Graduate/organization & administration , Internship and Residency/organization & administration , Neurology/education , Adult , Female , Humans , Italy , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
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