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1.
J Vasc Surg ; 74(6): 2064-2071.e5, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1479664

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: In the present study, we sought to understand the challenges, advantages, and applications of a vascular surgery virtual subinternship (VSI) curriculum. METHODS: Our institution hosted 25 students for two 4-week VSI rotations, one in July 2020 and one in August 2020. The students participated in a curriculum centered around the use of Zoom and telephone interactions with residents and faculty. The curriculum included selected readings, surgical videos, group didactics, and one-on-one mentorship. Anonymous pre- and postrotation self-assessments were used to ascertain the students' achievement of the learning objectives and the utility of the educational tools implemented during the rotation. The faculty and resident mentors were also surveyed to assess their experience. RESULTS: With the exception of knot-tying techniques (P = .67), the students reported significant improvement in their understanding of vascular surgery concepts after the virtual elective (P < .05). The highest ranked components of the course were interpersonal, including interaction with faculty, mentorship, and learning the program culture. The lowest ranked components of the course were simulation training and research opportunities. The rating of the utility of aspects of the course were consistent with the ranking of the components, with faculty interaction receiving the highest average rating. The ideal amount of time for daily virtual interaction reported by the students ranged from 3 to 6 hours (median, 4 hours). Overall, most of the mentors were satisfied with the virtual course. However, they reported limited ability to assess the students' personality and fit for the program. The time spent per week by the mentors on the virtual vascular surgery rotation ranged from 2 to 7 hours (median, 4 hours). Of the 17 mentors completing the surveys, 14 reported that having a virtual student was a significant addition to their existing workload. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, our student and mentor feedback was positive. Several challenges inherent to the virtual environment still require refinement. However, the goals of a VSI are distinct and should be explored by training programs. With changes to healthcare in the United States on the horizon and the constraints resulting from the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 pandemic, implementing a virtual away rotation could be an acceptable platform in our adaptations of our recruitment strategies.


Subject(s)
Computer-Assisted Instruction , Education, Distance , Education, Medical, Graduate , Surgeons/education , Vascular Surgical Procedures/education , Virtual Reality , Adult , COVID-19 , Clinical Competence , Computer-Assisted Instruction/standards , Curriculum , Education, Distance/standards , Education, Medical, Graduate/standards , Educational Status , Female , Humans , Internship and Residency , Learning , Male , Quality Improvement , Retrospective Studies , Vascular Surgical Procedures/standards
2.
Int J Gynecol Cancer ; 31(9): 1268-1277, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1334589

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The SARS-CoV-2 global pandemic has caused a crisis disrupting health systems worldwide. While efforts are being made to determine the extent of the disruption, the impact on gynecological oncology trainees/training has not been explored. We conducted an international survey of the impact of SARS-CoV-2 on clinical practice, medical education, and mental well-being of surgical gynecological oncology trainees. METHODS: In our cross-sectional study, a customized web-based survey was circulated to surgical gynecological oncology trainees from national/international organizations from May to November 2020. Validated questionnaires assessed mental well-being. The Wilcoxon rank-sum test and Fisher's exact test were used to analyse differences in means and proportions. Multiple linear regression was used to evaluate the effect of variables on psychological/mental well-being outcomes. Outcomes included clinical practice, medical education, anxiety and depression, distress, and mental well-being. RESULTS: A total of 127 trainees from 34 countries responded. Of these, 52% (66/127) were from countries with national training programs (UK/USA/Netherlands/Canada/Australia) and 48% (61/127) from countries with no national training programs. Altogether, 28% (35/125) had suspected/confirmed COVID-19, 28% (35/125) experienced a fall in household income, 20% (18/90) were self-isolated from households, 45% (57/126) had to re-use personal protective equipment, and 22% (28/126) purchased their own. In total, 32.3% (41/127) of trainees (16.6% (11/66) from countries with a national training program vs 49.1% (30/61) from countries with no national training program, p=0.02) perceived they would require additional time to complete their training fellowship. The additional training time anticipated did not differ between trainees from countries with or without national training programs (p=0.11) or trainees at the beginning or end of their fellowship (p=0.12). Surgical exposure was reduced for 50% of trainees. Departmental teaching continued throughout the pandemic for 69% (87/126) of trainees, although at reduced frequency for 16.1% (14/87), and virtually for 88.5% (77/87). Trainees reporting adequate pastoral support (defined as allocation of a dedicated mentor/access to occupational health support services) had better mental well-being with lower levels of anxiety/depression (p=0.02) and distress (p<0.001). Trainees from countries with a national training program experienced higher levels of distress (p=0.01). Mean (SD) pre-pandemic mental well-being scores were significantly higher than post-pandemic scores (8.3 (1.6) vs 7 (1.8); p<0.01). CONCLUSION: SARS-CoV-2 has negatively impacted the surgical training, household income, and psychological/mental well-being of surgical gynecological oncology trainees. The overall clinical impact was worse for trainees in countries with no national training program than for those in countries with a national training program, although national training program trainees reported greater distress. COVID-19 sickness increased anxiety/depression. The recovery phase must focus on improving mental well-being and addressing lost training opportunities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Medical, Graduate/standards , Gynecology/education , Students, Medical/psychology , Surgical Oncology/education , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Internet , Male , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Surveys and Questionnaires
3.
PLoS One ; 16(7): e0254922, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1318325

ABSTRACT

PROBLEM: Despite mounting evidence that incorporation of QI curricula into surgical trainee education improves morbidity and outcomes, surgery training programs lack standardized QI curricula and tools to measure QI knowledge. In the current study, we developed, implemented, and evaluated a quality improvement curriculum for surgical residents. INTERVENTION: Surgical trainees participated in a longitudinal, year-long (2019-2020) curriculum based on the Institute for Healthcare Improvement's online program. Online curriculum was supplemented with in person didactics and small group projects. Acquisition of skills was assessed pre- and post- course via self-report on a Likert scale as well as the Quality Improvement Knowledge Application Tool (QIKAT). Self-efficacy scores were assessed using the General Self-Efficacy Scale. 9 out of 18 total course participants completed the post course survey. This first course cohort was analyzed as a pilot for future work. CONTEXT: The project was developed and deployed among surgical residents during their research/lab year. Teams of surgical residents were partnered with a faculty project mentor, as well as non-physician teammates for project work. IMPACT: Participation in the QI course significantly increased skills related to studying the process (p = 0.0463), making changes in a system (p = 0.0167), identifying whether a change leads to an improvement (p = 0.0039), using small cycles of change (p = 0.0000), identifying best practices and comparing them to local practices (p = 0.0020), using PDSA model as a systematic framework for trial and learning (p = 0.0004), identifying how data is linked to specific processes (p = 0.0488), and building the next improvement cycle upon success or failure (p = 0.0316). There was also a significant improvement in aim (p = 0.037) and change (p = 0.029) responses to one QIKAT vignette. LESSONS LEARNED: We describe the effectiveness of a pilot longitudinal, multi component QI course based on the IHI online curriculum in improving surgical trainee knowledge and use of key QI skills.


Subject(s)
Clinical Competence/standards , Education, Medical, Graduate/standards , Quality Improvement , Surgeons/standards , Curriculum/standards , Female , Humans , Internship and Residency/standards , Male , Surveys and Questionnaires
5.
Plast Reconstr Surg ; 148(1): 133e-139e, 2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1284960

ABSTRACT

SUMMARY: The coronavirus disease of 2019 pandemic became a global threat in a matter of weeks, with its future implications yet to be defined. New York City was swiftly declared the epicenter of the pandemic in the United States as case numbers grew exponentially in a matter of days, quickly threatening to overwhelm the capacity of the health care system. This burgeoning crisis led practitioners across specialties to adapt and mobilize rapidly. Plastic surgeons and trainees within the New York University Langone Health system faced uncertainty in terms of future practice, in addition to immediate and long-term effects on undergraduate and graduate medical education. The administration remained vigilant and adaptive, enacting departmental policies prioritizing safety and productivity, with early deployment of faculty for clinical support at the front lines. The authors anticipate that this pandemic will have far-reaching effects on the future of plastic surgery education, trends in the pursuit of elective surgical procedures, and considerable consequences for certain research endeavors. Undoubtedly, there will be substantial impact on the physical and mental well-being of health care practitioners across specialties. Coordinated efforts and clear lines of communication between the Department of Plastic Surgery and its faculty and trainees allowed a concerted effort toward the immediate challenge of tempering the spread of coronavirus disease of 2019 and preserving structure and throughput for education and research. Adaptation and creativity have ultimately allowed for early rebooting of in-person clinical and surgical practice. The authors present their coordinated efforts and lessons gleaned from their experience to inform their community's preparedness as this formidable challenge evolves.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control/standards , Pandemics/prevention & control , Surgery, Plastic/trends , Academic Medical Centers/standards , Academic Medical Centers/statistics & numerical data , Academic Medical Centers/trends , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Education, Medical, Graduate/organization & administration , Education, Medical, Graduate/standards , Education, Medical, Graduate/trends , Elective Surgical Procedures/education , Elective Surgical Procedures/standards , Elective Surgical Procedures/trends , Faculty/organization & administration , Faculty/psychology , Faculty/statistics & numerical data , Forecasting , Humans , Internship and Residency/statistics & numerical data , New York City/epidemiology , Personnel Staffing and Scheduling/organization & administration , Personnel Staffing and Scheduling/trends , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures/education , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures/standards , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures/trends , Surgeons/organization & administration , Surgeons/psychology , Surgeons/statistics & numerical data , Surgery, Plastic/education , Surgery, Plastic/organization & administration , Surgery, Plastic/standards , Surveys and Questionnaires/statistics & numerical data , Uncertainty , Universities/standards , Universities/statistics & numerical data , Universities/trends
6.
Am Surg ; 87(10): 1678-1683, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1270917

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Fellows have been uniquely affected by the widespread changes in educational structure, mandatory limitations in elective procedural volume, and hiring freezes during the COVID-19 global pandemic. STUDY DESIGN: A voluntary and anonymous survey was distributed to all Graduate Medical Education fellows at a tertiary medical center querying perspectives on clinical and didactic training and job placement. RESULTS: A total of 47 of 121 fellows (39%) completed the survey. The majority were in a medical (43%) or surgical specialty (34%) followed by critical care (13%) and procedure-based (11%) fellowships. Approximately 59% of surveyed fellows felt their programs were providing a virtual curriculum that would train them just as well as the in-person curriculum. Twenty-eight (60%) fellows were in their final or only year of training. Of the 25 fellows who were seeking employment, 52% have experienced difficulty in finding a job due to hiring freezes and 40% have encountered challenges with job interview cancellations and changes to virtual interview formats. CONCLUSION: Almost half of surveyed fellows reported an educational deterioration due to COVID-19 and graduating fellows seeking employment felt hindered by both the virtual interview format and widespread hiring freeze. Fellows are both unique and vulnerable as they balance the solidification of clinical training with securing employment during these tumultuous and unprecedented times.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Medical, Graduate/standards , Fellowships and Scholarships , Adult , California/epidemiology , Employment/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
7.
Am J Phys Med Rehabil ; 100(7): 712-717, 2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1270769

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: The field of physical medicine and rehabilitation should strive for a physician workforce that is ethnically/racially, sex, and ability diverse. Considering the recent realities of disparities in health outcomes related to COVID-19 and in racial injustice in the United States, we are called to be champions for antiracism and equity. The specialty of physical medicine and rehabilitation should be the leaders in fostering a culture of inclusion and pay special attention to the population of applicants who are underrepresented in medicine. The specialty needs tools to start addressing these disparities. This article aims to provide strategic and intentional evidence-based recommendations for programs to follow. Holistic review, implicit bias training, structured interviews, and targeted outreach for those underrepresented in medicine are some of the tools that will help students enter and become successful in our specialty. Furthermore, this article provides novel guidance and considerations for virtual interviews during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Cultural Diversity , Disabled Persons , Education, Medical, Graduate/standards , Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine , Prejudice/prevention & control , Workforce , Humans , Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine/education , Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine/organization & administration , Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine/standards , Prejudice/ethnology , Socioeconomic Factors , United States , Workforce/organization & administration , Workforce/standards
9.
Can J Cardiol ; 37(3): 519-522, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1071173

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has had an unprecedented impact on cardiology training. Novel opportunities have been identified in several domains: patient exposure, procedural experience, didactic education, research and development, advocacy and well-being, and career advancement. Lessons learned from COVID-19 should be used to further improve fellowship training such as, for example, through the development of a competency-based training and evaluation system. Multimodality teaching that incorporates telelearning provides creative solutions for trainee and continuing medical education. Fellow-initiated research should be supported and nurtured. Enhanced attention to trainee well-being and burnout is particularly important. The emerging cardiologists of the future and the way they are trained will be shaped by the COVID-19 challenge of our generation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiology/education , Education, Medical, Graduate/methods , Education, Medical, Graduate/standards , Quality of Health Care , Education, Medical, Graduate/organization & administration , Forecasting
10.
Am Surg ; 86(11): 1501-1507, 2020 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1067014

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic presented a unique challenge for Medical systems worldwide. Initial response to the crisis situation for the pandemic closely mirrored plans for a mass casualty event. By leveraging resources including human and physical, and by dividing our surgeon workforce into micro teams we were able to create a flexible and responsive infrastructure to address the crisis as it unfolded. By adoption of virtual platforms and equal division of labor, surgical resident education was continued. Specific adjustments to the schedule and curriculum for medical students allowed them to continue their studies safely and on schedule. Our model serves as an example by which hospital systems of similar size may utilize principles of mass casualty preparedness to craft their own plan for a future contagion response strategy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Curriculum/standards , Education, Medical, Graduate/standards , General Surgery/education , Guidelines as Topic , Internship and Residency/methods , Pandemics , Humans
13.
Ann Surg ; 273(1): 109-111, 2021 01 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-990974

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has posed unique challenges for evaluating general surgery residency applicants to MATCH 2021. In the absence of away rotations, programs are likely to afford greater importance to objective data to stratify the applicant pool and medical students are likely to experience difficulty in thoroughly assessing each program. Virtual rotations, meet-and-greet events conducted before the application submission deadline, personality testing before extending interviews, standardized letters of recommendation, and skills testing can serve as valuable adjuncts for determining the best applicant-program fit. Finally, an interview limit which sets the bar for the maximum number of accepted interviews per applicant per specialty can offer a level playing field in the absence of time and cost limitations associated with travel.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Medical, Graduate/standards , General Surgery/education , Guidelines as Topic , Internship and Residency/standards , Pandemics , Students, Medical/statistics & numerical data , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
16.
Clin Med (Lond) ; 20(6): e248-e252, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-761129

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 has proven to be a potent disruptor of postgraduate training, assessment and learning. In so doing, it has equally proved to be a potent catalyst and has driven innovation. Here we discuss the response of the Federation of the three UK Royal Colleges of Physicians to the challenges presented in these areas by the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Education, Medical, Graduate , Educational Measurement/methods , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , COVID-19 , Clinical Competence , Education, Medical, Graduate/methods , Education, Medical, Graduate/standards , Humans , Internet , Physicians , United Kingdom
17.
J Surg Educ ; 78(2): 394-399, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-741383

ABSTRACT

Through only a few months, the COVID-19 pandemic has greatly impacted the daily activities and education of surgical residents and fellows and the programs in which they are enrolled. The pandemic has also forced many changes for the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and its Review Committee for Surgery. This article details some of those changes and their effect on the process of conferring 2021 accreditation decisions by the Review Committee.


Subject(s)
Accreditation/standards , Advisory Committees , COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Medical, Graduate/standards , General Surgery/education , Humans , Internship and Residency , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology
19.
Int Orthop ; 44(9): 1611-1619, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-660016

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: This study aimed to evaluate the impact of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic on orthopaedic and trauma surgery training in Europe by conducting an online survey among orthopaedic trainees. METHODS: The survey was conducted among members of the Federation of Orthopaedic and Trauma Trainees in Europe (FORTE). It consisted of 24 questions (single-answer, multiple-answer, Likert scales). Orthopaedic trainees' demographic data (six questions), clinical role changes (four questions), institutional changes due to the COVID-19 pandemic (nine questions), and personal considerations (five questions) were examined. RESULTS: Three hundred and twenty-seven trainees from 23 European countries completed the survey. Most trainees retained their customary clinical role (59.8%), but a significant number was redeployed to COVID-19 units (20.9%). A drastic workload decrease during the pandemic was reported at most institutions. Only essential activities were performed at 57.1% of institutions and drastic disruptions were reported at 36.0%. Of the respondents, 52.1% stated that faculty-led education was restricted and 46.3% pursued self-guided learning, while 58.6% stated that surgical training was significantly impaired. Concerns about the achievement of annual training goals were expressed by 58.2% of the participants, while 25.0% anticipated the need for an additional year of training. CONCLUSIONS: The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic significantly affected orthopaedic and trauma training in Europe. Most trainees felt the decrease in clinical, surgical, and educational activities would have a detrimental effect on their training. Many of them consulted remote learning options to compensate training impairment, stating that after the COVID-19 pandemic electronic educational approaches may become more relevant in future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Clinical Competence/standards , Internship and Residency/standards , Orthopedics/education , Pandemics , Traumatology/education , Adult , Education, Distance/statistics & numerical data , Education, Medical, Graduate/standards , Education, Medical, Graduate/statistics & numerical data , Europe/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Internet , Internship and Residency/statistics & numerical data , Male , Orthopedics/standards , Orthopedics/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires/statistics & numerical data , Traumatology/standards , Traumatology/statistics & numerical data , Workload/standards , Workload/statistics & numerical data
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