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4.
Pan Afr Med J ; 40: 28, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1472503

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: the Coronavirus Disease 2019 pandemic has affected residency training globally. The aim of this study was to understand how the pandemic affected teaching and learning in residency programs in low resource settings where residents and faculty were working on the front line treating patients with the disease. METHODS: this qualitative study enrolled residents and faculty from the Aga Khan University in Tanzania who were providing front line care during the pandemic. Purposeful sampling was used and data was collected using focus group discussions and in-depth interviews between August and September 2020. Analysis was done using qualitative content analysis. RESULTS: twelve residents and six faculty members participated in this study. Two main themes emerged. The first was: "New and unfamiliar teaching and learning experiences." Residents and faculty had to adapt to changes in the learning environment and the academic program. Residents had increased responsibilities, including providing front line care and working with reduced supervision. The second theme was: "Learning opportunities amidst crisis." There were opportunities to improve critical care and procedural skills. They also had opportunities to improve non-technical skills like teamwork and communication. CONCLUSION: residents and faculty had to adapt to changes in teaching and learning. Residents also had to take up additional responsibilities. Support systems are required to help them adapt to the changes and settle in their new roles. There were opportunities to learn new skills, and training should be restructured to maximize the use of these opportunities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Education, Medical, Graduate/trends , Internship and Residency , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Communication , Humans , Interviews as Topic , Learning , Pandemics , Qualitative Research , SARS-CoV-2 , Tanzania , Teaching
5.
Br J Surg ; 108(10): 1162-1180, 2021 10 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1462296

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) was declared a pandemic by the WHO on 11 March 2020 and global surgical practice was compromised. This Commission aimed to document and reflect on the changes seen in the surgical environment during the pandemic, by reviewing colleagues' experiences and published evidence. METHODS: In late 2020, BJS contacted colleagues across the global surgical community and asked them to describe how severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) had affected their practice. In addition to this, the Commission undertook a literature review on the impact of COVID-19 on surgery and perioperative care. A thematic analysis was performed to identify the issues most frequently encountered by the correspondents, as well as the solutions and ideas suggested to address them. RESULTS: BJS received communications for this Commission from leading clinicians and academics across a variety of surgical specialties in every inhabited continent. The responses from all over the world provided insights into multiple facets of surgical practice from a governmental level to individual clinical practice and training. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic has uncovered a variety of problems in healthcare systems, including negative impacts on surgical practice. Global surgical multidisciplinary teams are working collaboratively to address research questions about the future of surgery in the post-COVID-19 era. The COVID-19 pandemic is severely damaging surgical training. The establishment of a multidisciplinary ethics committee should be encouraged at all surgical oncology centres. Innovative leadership and collaboration is vital in the post-COVID-19 era.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Perioperative Care/trends , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/trends , Surgical Procedures, Operative/trends , Adult , Biomedical Research/organization & administration , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/economics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Medical, Graduate/methods , Education, Medical, Graduate/trends , Female , Global Health , Health Resources/supply & distribution , Health Services Accessibility/trends , Humans , Infection Control/economics , Infection Control/methods , Infection Control/standards , International Cooperation , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Perioperative Care/education , Perioperative Care/methods , Perioperative Care/standards , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/standards , Surgeons/education , Surgeons/psychology , Surgeons/trends , Surgical Procedures, Operative/education , Surgical Procedures, Operative/methods , Surgical Procedures, Operative/standards
7.
Fam Pract ; 38(Suppl 1): i9-i15, 2021 Aug 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1376296

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Family physicians have played a unique clinical role during the COVID-19 pandemic. We hypothesized that the pandemic would be associated with significant deleterious effects on clinical activity, educational training, personal safety and well-being. OBJECTIVE: We conducted a national survey to obtain preliminary data that would assist in future targeted data collection and subsequent evaluation of the impact of the pandemic on family medicine residents and teaching faculty. METHODS: An anonymous online survey of residents and faculty was distributed via the Association of Family Medicine Residency Directors list serve between 5/21/2020 and 6/18/2020. Survey questions focused on clinical and educational activities, safety and well-being. RESULTS: One hundred and fifty-three residents and 151 teaching faculty participated in the survey. Decreased clinical activity was noted by 81.5% of residents and 80.9% of faculty and the majority began conducting telehealth visits (97.9% of residents, 91.0% of faculty). Distance learning platforms were used by all residents (100%) and 39.6% noted an overall positive impact on their education. Higher levels of burnout did not significantly correlate with reassignment of clinical duties (residents P = 0.164; faculty P = 0.064). Residents who showed significantly higher burnout scores (P = 0.035) and a decline in levels of well-being (P = 0.031) were more likely to participate in institutional well-being support activities. CONCLUSIONS: Our preliminary data indicate that family medicine residents and teaching faculty were profoundly affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. Future studies can be directed by current findings with focus on mitigation factors in addressing globally disruptive events such as COVID-19.


Family physicians have played a unique clinical role during the COVID-19 pandemic. We hypothesized that the pandemic would be associated with significant deleterious effects on clinical activity, educational training, personal safety and well-being. Towards setting a foundation for further studies, we conducted a national survey to obtain preliminary data that would assist in future targeted data collection and subsequent evaluation of the impact of the pandemic on family medicine residents and teaching faculty. Our preliminary data indicate that family medicine residents and teaching faculty were profoundly affected by the COVID-19 pandemic in all domains studied. Future studies can be directed by current findings with focus on mitigation factors in addressing globally disruptive events such as COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Medical, Graduate/trends , Family Practice/education , Adult , Aged , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Internship and Residency , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States/epidemiology
8.
J Surg Oncol ; 124(2): 174-180, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1303279

ABSTRACT

Electronic resources have changed surgical education in the 21st century. Resources spanning from digital textbooks to multiple choice question banks, online society meetings, and social media can facilitate surgical education. The COVID pandemic drastically changed the paradigm for education. The ramifications of Zoom lectures and online surgical society meetings will last into the future. Educators and learners can be empowered by the many available electronic resources to enhance surgical training and education.


Subject(s)
Education, Distance/trends , Education, Medical, Graduate/trends , General Surgery/education , Internet/trends , Audiovisual Aids , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Congresses as Topic/trends , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Medical, Graduate/methods , General Surgery/trends , Humans , Models, Educational , Social Media/trends , Societies, Medical/trends , United States/epidemiology , Videoconferencing/trends
9.
Plast Reconstr Surg ; 148(1): 133e-139e, 2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1284960

ABSTRACT

SUMMARY: The coronavirus disease of 2019 pandemic became a global threat in a matter of weeks, with its future implications yet to be defined. New York City was swiftly declared the epicenter of the pandemic in the United States as case numbers grew exponentially in a matter of days, quickly threatening to overwhelm the capacity of the health care system. This burgeoning crisis led practitioners across specialties to adapt and mobilize rapidly. Plastic surgeons and trainees within the New York University Langone Health system faced uncertainty in terms of future practice, in addition to immediate and long-term effects on undergraduate and graduate medical education. The administration remained vigilant and adaptive, enacting departmental policies prioritizing safety and productivity, with early deployment of faculty for clinical support at the front lines. The authors anticipate that this pandemic will have far-reaching effects on the future of plastic surgery education, trends in the pursuit of elective surgical procedures, and considerable consequences for certain research endeavors. Undoubtedly, there will be substantial impact on the physical and mental well-being of health care practitioners across specialties. Coordinated efforts and clear lines of communication between the Department of Plastic Surgery and its faculty and trainees allowed a concerted effort toward the immediate challenge of tempering the spread of coronavirus disease of 2019 and preserving structure and throughput for education and research. Adaptation and creativity have ultimately allowed for early rebooting of in-person clinical and surgical practice. The authors present their coordinated efforts and lessons gleaned from their experience to inform their community's preparedness as this formidable challenge evolves.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control/standards , Pandemics/prevention & control , Surgery, Plastic/trends , Academic Medical Centers/standards , Academic Medical Centers/statistics & numerical data , Academic Medical Centers/trends , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Education, Medical, Graduate/organization & administration , Education, Medical, Graduate/standards , Education, Medical, Graduate/trends , Elective Surgical Procedures/education , Elective Surgical Procedures/standards , Elective Surgical Procedures/trends , Faculty/organization & administration , Faculty/psychology , Faculty/statistics & numerical data , Forecasting , Humans , Internship and Residency/statistics & numerical data , New York City/epidemiology , Personnel Staffing and Scheduling/organization & administration , Personnel Staffing and Scheduling/trends , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures/education , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures/standards , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures/trends , Surgeons/organization & administration , Surgeons/psychology , Surgeons/statistics & numerical data , Surgery, Plastic/education , Surgery, Plastic/organization & administration , Surgery, Plastic/standards , Surveys and Questionnaires/statistics & numerical data , Uncertainty , Universities/standards , Universities/statistics & numerical data , Universities/trends
10.
BMC Med Educ ; 21(1): 216, 2021 Apr 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1190071

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic resulted in a transformation of clinical care practices to protect both patients and providers. These changes led to a decrease in patient volume, impacting physician trainee education due to lost clinical and didactic opportunities. We measured the prevalence of trainee concern over missed educational opportunities and investigated the risk factors leading to such concerns. METHODS: All residents and fellows at a large academic medical center were invited to participate in a web-based survey in May of 2020. Participants responded to questions regarding demographic characteristics, specialty, primary assigned responsibility during the previous 2 weeks (clinical, education, or research), perceived concern over missed educational opportunities, and burnout. Multivariable logistic regression was used to assess the relationship between missed educational opportunities and the measured variables. RESULTS: 22% (301 of 1375) of the trainees completed the survey. 47% of the participants were concerned about missed educational opportunities. Trainees assigned to education at home had 2.85 [95%CI 1.33-6.45] greater odds of being concerned over missed educational opportunities as compared with trainees performing clinical work. Trainees performing research were not similarly affected [aOR = 0.96, 95%CI (0.47-1.93)]. Trainees in pathology or radiology had 2.51 [95%CI 1.16-5.68] greater odds of concern for missed educational opportunities as compared with medicine. Trainees with greater concern over missed opportunities were more likely to be experiencing burnout (p = 0.038). CONCLUSIONS: Trainees in radiology or pathology and those assigned to education at home were more likely to be concerned about their missed educational opportunities. Residency programs should consider providing trainees with research or at home clinical opportunities as an alternative to self-study should future need for reduced clinical hours arise.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Medical, Graduate/trends , Internship and Residency , Physicians , Humans , Pandemics , Risk Factors , Surveys and Questionnaires
11.
BJS Open ; 5(2)2021 03 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1185654

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic had a profound impact on surgical services, potentially having a detrimental impact on training opportunities. The aim of this global survey was to assess the impact of the COVID-19 crisis on surgical training and to develop a framework for recovery. METHODS: A cross-sectional, web-based survey was conducted. This was designed by a steering committee of medical educationalists and validated by a group of trainees before dissemination. RESULTS: A total of 608 responses were obtained from 34 countries and 15 specialties. The results demonstrated major disruption in all aspects of training. The impact was greatest for conferences (525 of 608) and hands-on courses (517 of 608), but less for inpatient care-related training (268 of 608). European trainees were significantly more likely to experience direct training disruption than trainees in Asia (odds ratio 0.15) or Australia (OR 0.10) (χ2 = 87.162, P < 0.001). Alternative training resources (webinars, 359 of 608; educational videos, 234 of 608) have emerged, although trainees expressed some dissatisfaction with them. The collective responses generated a four-pillar framework for training recovery that involved: guidance from training stakeholders with the involvement of trainees; prioritization of training, especially the roles of senior surgeons/trainers; provision of access to alternative/new teaching methods; and measures to address trainee anxiety. CONCLUSION: Training has been greatly affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. The introduction of new teaching methods and a focus on training after the pandemic are imperative.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Medical, Graduate/trends , Specialties, Surgical/education , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Education, Medical, Graduate/methods , Education, Medical, Graduate/organization & administration , Female , Global Health , Humans , Logistic Models , Male , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires
17.
Rheumatol Int ; 41(3): 503-508, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1064464

ABSTRACT

During the COVID-19 pandemic, rheumatology educational programs around the world, face the daunting challenge of maintaining education for their trainees. Reduced in-person clinic exposures and social distancing requirements have significantly affected trainee education. Similar to programs around the USA, in early March 2020, our program was faced with an urgent need to pivot both our clinical and educational programs to virtual platforms. Within these limitations, we harnessed innovative educational models and restructured our curriculum to ensure adequate clinical and didactic exposure. We divided trainee's clinical rotations into four blocks, which include Inpatient consult service, Outpatient in-person and procedure clinics, Telehealth Clinics and Research/Elective week. By assigning specific rotations, we were able to ensure fellows were seeing adequate numbers of patients both through telemedicine and inperson while ensuring we complied with social distancing requirements. We further were able to ensure that trainee hands-on procedure training was not compromised. Acknowledging challenges presented by the COVID-19 pandemic and learner engagement in virtual environment, we designed an innovative educational portfolio. Utilizing synchronous and asynchronous learning methods, we have developed multiple complementary educational initiatives including: Rocket Rheumatology, Board Games, At the Elbow, Radiology Reading Rheum, Ultrasound Buddies, The History Rheum, and Rapid-Fire Journal Club. Virtual learning methods will become a cornerstone of medical education moving forwards. The GW Division of Rheumatology has rapidly incorporated innovative educational tools into our curriculum. Our approach will help Rheumatology training programs across the globe enhance rheumatology training.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Medical, Graduate/methods , Internship and Residency/organization & administration , Rheumatology/education , COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Medical, Graduate/trends , Humans , Pandemics , Physical Distancing , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine/methods
19.
Pain Physician ; 23(4S): S367-S380, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-979310

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The unexpected COVID-19 crisis has disrupted medical education and patient care in unprecedented ways. Despite the challenges, the health-care system and patients have been both creative and resilient in finding robust "temporary" solutions to these challenges. It is not clear if some of these COVID-era transitional steps will be preserved in the future of medical education and telemedicine. OBJECTIVES: The goal of this commentary is to address the sometimes substantial changes in medical education, continuing medical education (CME) activities, residency and fellowship programs, specialty society meetings, and telemedicine, and to consider the value of some of these profound shifts to "business as usual" in the health-care sector. METHODS: This is a commentary is based on the limited available literature, online information, and the front-line experiences of the authors. RESULTS: COVID-19 has clearly changed residency and fellowship programs by limiting the amount of hands-on time physicians could spend with patients. Accreditation Council for Graduate Medicine Education has endorsed certain policy changes to promote greater flexibility in programs but still rigorously upholds specific standards. Technological interventions such as telemedicine visits with patients, virtual meetings with colleagues, and online interviews have been introduced, and many trainees are "techno-omnivores" who are comfortable using a variety of technology platforms and techniques. Webinars and e-learning are gaining traction now, and their use, practicality, and cost-effectiveness may make them important in the post-COVID era. CME activities have migrated increasingly to virtual events and online programs, a trend that may also continue due to its practicality and cost-effectiveness. While many medical meetings of specialty societies have been postponed or cancelled altogether, technology allows for virtual meetings that may offer versatility and time-saving opportunities for busy clinicians. It may be that future medical meetings embrace a hybrid approach of blending digital with face-to-face experience. Telemedicine was already in place prior to the COVID-19 crisis but barriers are rapidly coming down to its widespread use and patients seem to embrace this, even as health-care systems navigate the complicated issues of cybersecurity and patient privacy. Regulatory guidance may be needed to develop safe, secure, and patient-friendly telehealth applications. Telemedicine has affected the prescribing of controlled substances in which online counseling, informed consent, and follow-up must be done in a virtual setting. For example, pill counts can be done in a video call and patients can still get questions answered about their pain therapy, although it is likely that after the crisis, prescribing controlled substances may revert to face-to-face visits. LIMITATIONS: The health-care system finds itself in a very fluid situation at the time this was written and changes are still occurring and being assessed. CONCLUSIONS: Many of the technological changes imposed so abruptly on the health-care system by the COVID-19 pandemic may be positive and it may be beneficial that some of these transitions be preserved or modified as we move forward. Clinicians must be objective in assessing these changes and retaining those changes that clearly improve health-care education and patient care as we enter the COVID era.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Delivery of Health Care/trends , Education, Medical, Graduate/trends , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Telemedicine/trends , Adult , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Delivery of Health Care/methods , Education, Medical, Graduate/methods , Fellowships and Scholarships/methods , Fellowships and Scholarships/trends , Humans , Internship and Residency/methods , Internship and Residency/trends , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine/methods
20.
J Surg Educ ; 78(2): 375-378, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-922085

ABSTRACT

Introduction The COVID 19 pandemic has affected education at all levels. Surgical fellows have faced unique challenges. PROBLEMS: The authors address aspects of Canadian surgical fellowships that have been impacted by the pandemic. These include case volumes, training objectives, funding models, burden of stress and research productivity. SOLUTIONS: Solutions are proposed including varying the mix of cases to meet objectives, pursuing alternative finance structures and leveraging technology for both research and advancing surgical technique. CONCLUSION: These solutions are offered to help mitigate the effects of future pandemics for both current and future surgical fellows.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Medical, Graduate/trends , Fellowships and Scholarships , General Surgery/education , Surgeons/economics , Surgeons/psychology , Canada/epidemiology , Efficiency , Fellowships and Scholarships/economics , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Workload/statistics & numerical data
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