Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 336
Filter
1.
Med Educ Online ; 27(1): 2067024, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1819703

ABSTRACT

Medical schools initially removed students from clinical rotations at the outset of COVID-19 for safety reasons when students were eager to help and health systems needed personnel. In response, we rapidly implemented an innovative 2-week rotation for medical students to participate in health systems operations and care through remote efforts including triage and resource allocation. The curriculum also contained online self-paced educational modules covering topics including ethics, crisis standards of care, and modeling. As the health system needs shifted, so too did learners' work. One hundred and twenty-five 3rd and 4th-year students completed the experience over 10 months. Learner satisfaction, confidence, and knowledge assessed through pre- and post-rotation surveys showed statistically significant and educationally meaningful improvement. A near uniform change greater than 1 point (on a 5-point scale) was demonstrated upon rotation completion. Blending health systems and educational structures to meet the needs of both creates unique opportunities to educate students in new ways.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Medical, Undergraduate , Students, Medical , Curriculum , Humans , Patient Care
2.
Global Health ; 18(1): 44, 2022 04 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1799099

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: International medical electives are an important and popular component of the academic curriculum in many medical schools and universities worldwide. The purpose of abroad electives is to provide medical students with an opportunity to gain a better understanding of education and healthcare in an international context. The COVID-19 pandemic, however, has substantially changed the international elective landscape. Travel restrictions, closures of international elective programs and the expansion of virtual methods for education caused a widespread disruption to abroad electives. A comprehensive analysis with regard to other consequences for abroad electives, however, has not been done before. Thus, we sought to a) summarize the current transformation of the international medical elective and b) to address potential challenges for post-pandemic international medical electives. METHODS: The methodology employed is a multidisciplinary narrative review of the published and grey literature on international electives during the last two years of the COVID-19 pandemic. RESULTS: Students worldwide had electives postponed or canceled. Apart from evident immediate pandemic-related consequences (such as the substantial decline in global electives and impaired elective research opportunities for educators), there are other several problems that have received little attention during the last two years. These include challenges in the elective application process, poorly-understood consequences for host institutions, and growing global (ethical) disparities that are likely to increase once elective programs will gradually re-open. There is ample evidence that the post-pandemic elective landscape will be characterized by increasing elective fees, and a more competitive seat-to-applicant ratio. Ethical problems for international electives arising from an unequal global vaccine distribution will pose an additional challenge to students and elective coordinators alike. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic transformed the international medical elective landscape in an unprecedented way, and future generations of medical students will face a series of additional challenges when applying for global medical electives.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Medical, Undergraduate , Students, Medical , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Curriculum , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/methods , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Schools, Medical
3.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(8)2022 04 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1785681

ABSTRACT

(1) Background: Immersive simulation-based learning is relevant and effective in health care professional pre-licensure training. Peer-assisted learning has reciprocal benefit for the learner and the teacher. A fully simulated model of fieldwork placement has been utilised at Curtin University since 2014, historically employing full-time faculty supervisors. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020, traditional clinical placement availability diminished. (2) Methods: This mixed-methods prospective observational study aimed to translate the existing faculty-led placement for penultimate-year physiotherapy students to a peer-taught model, thereby creating new teaching placements for final-year students. Final- and penultimate-year physiotherapy students undertook the fully simulated fieldwork placement either as peer learners or peer teachers. The placement was then evaluated using four outcome measures: The 'measure of quality of giving feedback scale' (MQF) was used to assess peer learner satisfaction with peer-teacher supervision; plus/delta reflections were provided by peer teachers and faculty supervisors; student pass/fail rates for the penultimate-year physiotherapy students. (3) Results: For 10 weeks during November and December 2020, 195 students and 19 faculty participated in the placement. Mean MQF scores ranged from 6.4 (SD 0.86) to 6.8 (SD) out of 7; qualitative data reflected positive and negative aspects of the experience. There was a 4% fail rate for penultimate-year students for the placement. Results suggested that peer learners perceived peer-led feedback was of a high quality; there were both positives and challenges experienced using the model. (4) Conclusions: Physiotherapy students effectively adopted a peer-taught fully simulated fieldwork placement model with minimal faculty supervision, and comparable clinical competency outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Medical, Undergraduate , COVID-19/epidemiology , Clinical Competence , Humans , Learning , Pandemics , Peer Group
4.
BMJ Open ; 12(4): e056749, 2022 Apr 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1779375

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To find out how medical students think well-being should be measured. DESIGN: A mixed-methods study comprising a cross-sectional online survey (November 2020-March 2021) and semi-structured online interviews. Views on the frequency of availability for measurement, the format, type and purpose of measurement, and with whom well-being should be discussed were measured. When an outcome was scored 7-9 on a 9-point Likert scale of agreement by ≥75% of participants it was considered critical. Inductive thematic analysis was undertaken on the interview transcripts. SETTING: All medicine programmes at University of Southampton. PARTICIPANTS: Medical students from all years took part in the survey (n=118) and interviews (n=16). RESULTS: Most participants (94%) felt able to give 5 min to measure their well-being at least once per month. Research, governance and individual feedback were all considered critically important. Only subjective assessments undertaken by the individual in real-time were rated critically important (78.1%) measurement tools. Students selected that they would discuss their well-being with other medical students (n=87) nearly as often as they selected a member of the faculty (n=104). Five interview themes further explained these findings: (1) well-being is mental well-being; (2) exercise and support from friends and family are most important; (3) isolation and the design of the medicine programme are detrimental to well-being; (4) there are advantages to surveys, and conversations; (5) personal academic tutors and medical students in later years are the best to discuss well-being with. CONCLUSIONS: Medical students thought that measurement of their well-being was critically important for governance showing their support for quality assurance of well-being and peer support. They wanted to be able to choose surveys, or conversations, to measure their well-being, as well as the person they discussed well-being with. Four recommendations are discussed in light of these findings.


Subject(s)
Education, Medical, Undergraduate , Students, Medical , Cross-Sectional Studies , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/methods , Humans , Surveys and Questionnaires
5.
Scand J Surg ; 111(2): 14574969221083138, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1775244

ABSTRACT

In this editorial, we review our experience on distance teaching and based on our experiences suggest modifications to undergraduate surgical education.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance , Education, Medical, Undergraduate , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
6.
BMC Med Educ ; 22(1): 158, 2022 Mar 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1736409

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: As the field of education was adapting to virtual learning during the COVID-19 pandemic, a need quickly emerged for a course to prepare medical students for future clinical practice. This call to action was answered by creating an innovative Fundamentals of COVID-19 course at the Indiana University School of Medicine (IUSM). As a group of medical student leaders at IUSM, we developed this online course in order to support our fellow students and the community. METHODS: The study examined the educational effects of completing the Fundamentals of COVID-19 course. In order to examine these effects, the study asked enrolled students to complete both a pre- and post-course self-assessment survey. Students were asked an identical set of questions on each survey about their knowledge, skills, and abilities (KSA) regarding COVID-19. Composite scores were created for each KSA learning domain. Responses were provided using a five-point Likert scale ranging from 1 = strongly disagree to 5 = strongly agree. RESULTS: Out of the 724 students enrolled, 645 students completed both the pre- and post-course assessment surveys. Findings show that there were both meaningful and statistically significant differences in students' responses to the pre- and post-course surveys. Results show 1.) a significant mean increase in the knowledge composite score of 1.01, 95% CI [0.95, 1.06], t(644) = 36.4, p < .001, d = 1.43; 2.) a significant mean increase in the skills composite score of .55, 95% CI [0.50, 0.60], t(644) = 20.70, p < .001, d = 0.81. and 3.) a significant mean increase of the abilities composite score of 1.02, 95% CI [.97, 1.07], t(644) = 36.56, p < .001, d = 1.44. CONCLUSIONS: These findings demonstrate that the student-developed, online Fundamentals of COVID-19 course resulted in notable and statistically significant educational effects. The increase in students' self-reported ratings, especially in the knowledge and abilities domains, indicate that meaningful learning occurred within the course. These findings have notable implications for medical student training during healthcare emergencies, such as a pandemic, as well as within modern clerkship environments. Overall, our findings provide evidence that student-led curricular design and virtual delivery of course content can be effective tools in undergraduate medical education.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Medical, Undergraduate , Education, Medical , Students, Medical , COVID-19/epidemiology , Curriculum , Education, Medical/methods , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
8.
BMC Psychol ; 10(1): 49, 2022 Mar 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1724574

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Medical schools throughout the world were forced to modify their programming during the COVID-19 pandemic. In Malaysia, virtual learning plans were implemented for non-clinical programming, while clinical posting modifications were designed to meet local SOPs. The prolonged enforcement of these modifications to undergraduate medical education will have affected student experiences, including well-being. Since these feelings can relate to perceived relatedness, autonomy, and competence, it is important to identify any potential factors that may lead to reduced intrinsic motivation in students. It is also important to consider how demographic features may contribute to student perspectives, which can be studied using the unique diversity represented by Malaysian students. METHODS: A quantitative survey was distributed to Malaysian medical students to assess their overall wellbeing, autonomy in educational decision making, student experiences, and position on changes to graduation timing. Intrinsic components were identified using Principal Component Analysis and were aligned with the three needs for self-determination, namely relatedness, autonomy, and competence. Finally, trends in responses for participants from various sub-populations were assessed using ANOVA testing. RESULTS: Responses were collected from 442 students representing 23 accredited Malaysian medical schools. Upon validation and reliability testing, eight components were identified with themes relating to: mental health, social concerns, communication, timing of modifications, depth of learning, and student-centred learning. Of these, gender was related to mental health, student-centred learning, and delayed graduation, while stage was related to student-centred learning and delayed graduation in addition to concerns about depth of learning and timing of modifications. Interestingly, ethnicity was related to differences in opinions about delayed graduation and income was related to social concerns. CONCLUSION: The results of this study indicate that, while students were satisfied in general with the content and delivery of their programmes given the circumstances, there is evidence to suggest negative effects on emotional wellbeing and expression of student voice, due to the modifications that were made. Additionally, these feelings related to the three motivational needs, suggesting that students were experiencing a dampened motivational profile during the pandemic. Further, motivational profiles were distinct between student sub-groups, providing insight for developing appropriate and inclusive accommodations moving forward.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Medical, Undergraduate , Students, Medical , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Clinical Competence , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/methods , Humans , Malaysia/epidemiology , Mental Health , Motivation , Pandemics , Personal Autonomy , Reproducibility of Results , SARS-CoV-2 , Students, Medical/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires
9.
Scott Med J ; 67(2): 56-63, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1724148

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Digital health (DH) is continuously evolving by use of information and communications technology to improve healthcare provision, thereby reshaping systems and clinical practices. Recent studies identified an overwhelming lack of awareness of DH within the profession. This study aimed to analyse student perceptions and knowledge of DH to assess confidence in its use to develop greater DH awareness and literacy. METHODS: Students enrolled in undergraduate medical degrees were invited to take part in an online survey assessing aspects of DH including demography, familiarity, attitudes, level of knowledge and confidence. Anonymised data was collated and subsequently analysed to review DH awareness. RESULTS: A total of 143 students participated from nine British universities with 28.7% of respondents admitting low levels of familiarity of DH concepts. Students anticipated negative repercussions of DH including reduced data security (42.7%) and deterioration in doctor-patient relationship (30%); while improvements in healthcare access and health-outcomes are expected by 89.5% and 68.5%, respectively. 71.4% of participants believed they had minimal experience of exposure to DH and 76% believed they did not possess the necessary skills to utilise DH. Only 3.5% of students had some exposure to DH teaching during their course. CONCLUSION: There is an important requirement to address the lack of knowledge and exposure of students to DH, particularly as the world targets the COVID-19 pandemic. DH is forming the basis of the 'new normal' in healthcare, however the full potential of DH cannot be achieved unless there is an increase in its teaching incorporated into medical school curricula.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Medical, Undergraduate , Students, Medical , Curriculum , Humans , Pandemics , Physician-Patient Relations , Surveys and Questionnaires
11.
Am J Phys Med Rehabil ; 100(11): 1100-1104, 2021 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1700322

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Drastic and rapid changes to medical education are uncommon because of regulations and restrictions designed to ensure consistency among medical school curriculums and to safeguard student well-being. As a consequence of the COVID-19 pandemic, medical education had to break away from its conventions and transition from time-honored teaching methods to innovative solutions. This article explores the anticipated and actual efficacy of the swift conversion of a specialty elective from a traditional in-person format to a fully virtual clerkship. In addition, it includes a noninferiority study to determine where a virtual classroom may excel or fall short in comparison with conventional clinical rotations.


Subject(s)
Clinical Clerkship , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/methods , Models, Educational , Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine/education , Adult , COVID-19 , Curriculum , Educational Measurement , Female , Humans , Male , Minnesota , Organizational Innovation , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
12.
BMC Med Educ ; 22(1): 103, 2022 Feb 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1690921

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Anatomy education in US medical schools has seen numerous changes since the call for medical education reform in 2010. The purpose of this study was to survey US medical schools to assess recent trends in anatomy education, the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on anatomy teaching, and future directions of medical school anatomy curricula. METHODS: We sent a 29-item survey to anatomy course directors of 145 AAMC-associated allopathic medical schools inquiring about their schools' anatomy curricula. The survey contained objective discrete questions concerning the curricula changes preceding COVID-19 and those directly related to COVID-19. We also asked subjective and open-ended questions about the impact of COVID-19 and future directions of anatomy education. RESULTS: A total of 117/143 course directors (82%) completed the survey. Most schools (60%) reported a major change to their anatomy course within the past five years, including a decrease in total course time (20%), integration of anatomy into other courses (19%), and implementation of a "flipped classroom" (15%) teaching style. Due to COVID-19, there was a decrease in the fraction of course time dedicated to "hands-on" learning (p < 0.01) and teaching of clinical correlates (p = 0.02) and radiology (p < 0.01). Most course directors (79%) reported that COVID-19 had a negative impact on quality of learning due to decreased interactive or in-person (62%) learning and lack of dissection (44%). Incorporation of virtual-reality applications or 3D anatomy software (23%) and a decrease in cadaver dissection (13%) were the most common future anticipated changes. CONCLUSION: The constraints conferred by COVID-19 highlight the importance of maximizing interactive learning in the discipline of anatomy. In an era of social distancing and decreased emphasis on conventional anatomy dissection, adaptations of new technologies and teaching modalities may allow for traditional educational rigor to be sustained.


Subject(s)
Anatomy , COVID-19 , Education, Medical, Undergraduate , Education, Medical , Anatomy/education , Curriculum , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Schools, Medical
13.
J Coll Physicians Surg Pak ; 32(3): 359-363, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1687823

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To compare the discriminating ability of online assessment tools in the module examinations during the COVID-19 pandemic. STUDY DESIGN: Descriptive study. PLACE AND DURATION OF STUDY: Department of Anatomy, CMH Multan Institute of Medical Sciences (CIMS), Multan, from 22 June to 09 July 2021. METHODOLOGY: In the academic year 2020, the first module examinations of the 2nd-year MBBS anatomy course was conducted on-campus via multiple-choice questions, short answer questions, and viva-voce. Owing to the COVID-19 lockdown, the following two module examinations were held online. The effectiveness of different assessment tools in the three module examinations was compared by calculating the discrimination indices and the area under the curve (AUC), using the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. RESULTS: SAQs showed the highest discrimination index (0.38) compared to MCQs and viva-voce in the on-campus module examinations but dropped to the lowest in the subsequent online modules (0.24 and 0.18). In contrast, the discriminating power of the viva-voce increased from marginally (0.23) to very good (0.47 and 0.49) as the mode of assessment shifted to online examinations. The ROC AUC also showed the same pattern. In the second and third module examinations, the viva-voce had significantly higher (p <0.05) AUC than MCQs alone and both the MCQs and SAQs, respectively. CONCLUSION: Viva-voce had a significantly higher discriminating index than MCQs and SAQs in online examinations. On-campus, SAQs had the highest discriminatory index. Using this statistical approach, the effectiveness of different components of the online examinations can be monitored to improve the quality of online examinations amidst the COVID-19 crisis. Key Words: COVID-19, Distance learning, Online education, Discrimination index, ROC curve, Pakistan, Assessment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Medical, Undergraduate , Communicable Disease Control , Educational Measurement , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
14.
Adv Exp Med Biol ; 1356: 281-297, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1680591

ABSTRACT

The rise of Information and Communication Technologies and Computer Assisted Instruction have led to the adoption of digital visual learning aids to improve anatomy instruction. Creation of cadaveric video resources surged during 2020-2021 as they provided one option to continue teaching anatomy using cadaveric specimens in a time when all in-person practical teaching was prohibited to maintain safety during the Covid-19 pandemic. Cadaveric videos are relatively inexpensive to create and with the correct set up can be filmed independently by one anatomist. This makes cadaveric videos a feasible option for anatomists to create using their own specimens and tailored to their own curriculum. The use of cadaveric videos is not limited to instances where practical teaching is not an option and can provide an excellent supplementary exercise. Using cadaveric videos in conjunction with in-person dissection sessions could enhance student's self-efficacy, promote autonomous learning and reduce the likelihood of students experiencing cognitive overload while learning in the dissection room environment. However, sharing resources that contain cadaveric material online should be approached with caution and anatomists should ensure they have a secure method of distributing cadaveric video content to the intended audience only.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Medical, Undergraduate , Students, Medical , Cadaver , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
15.
BMC Med Educ ; 22(1): 73, 2022 Jan 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1662417

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic poses a huge challenge for clinical teaching due to contact restrictions and social distancing. Medical teachers have to balance potential risks and benefits of bedside teaching, especially in course formats intended to foster practical clinical skills. In this context, we aimed to address the question, whether presence-based teaching formats without patient involvement are suitable to teach practical skills. METHODS: In this quasi-experimental study, presence-based teaching formats with and without patient contact were retrospectively compared regarding their effects on medical students' theoretical knowledge and practical skills, i.e. the performance and clinical interpretation of the neurological exam. To this end, evaluations from 102 students and their lecturers participating in a neurological bedside teaching course at a German university hospital between October 2020 and April 2021 were obtained. Students were initially randomly assigned to course dates. However, 53 students assigned to courses in November and December 2020, were not able to go bedside due to contact restrictions. These students formed the interventional group and the remaining 49 students the control group. The primary outcome measures were students' overall grading of the course (school grades, 1-6) as well as ratings of knowledge and skills provided by the students themselves and their lecturers on a numerical rating scale (0-10). Comparison between groups was performed using frequentist and Bayesian t-statistics. RESULTS: The teaching format without patient contact received a significantly poorer overall grade by the students (p = 0.018). However, improvements in the students' self-ratings of knowledge and skills did not differ between the two formats (all p > 0.05, BF10max = 0.42). Moreover, especially practical skills were even rated significantly better in the group without patient contact by the lecturers (p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Teaching formats without patient contact are less well-received by the students. However, they are able to teach practical skills regarding the performance and clinical interpretation of examination techniques. Still, the evaluations obtained might not adequately capture the importance of bedside teaching in preparing future physicians for their practice. Perspectively, hybrid teaching approaches including flipped-classroom concepts hold considerable potential to enhance effectiveness of bedside teaching in the present pandemic situation and in the future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Medical, Undergraduate , Bayes Theorem , Humans , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
16.
PLoS One ; 17(1): e0262827, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1643285

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The potential role of medical students in raising awareness during public health emergencies has been acknowledged. To further explore their potentials as public educators and role models for the communities during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, this study aims to assess the knowledge, attitude, and practice of these students toward COVID-19. METHODS: An online cross-sectional survey was conducted among undergraduate medical students in Indonesia. Socio-demographics characteristics, social interaction history, information-seeking behavior, as well as knowledge, attitude, and practice toward COVID-19 were collected through a self-reported questionnaire. A p-value of <0.05 indicated statistical significance. RESULTS: Out of 4870 respondents, 64.9% had positive attitude and 51.5% had positive practice toward COVID-19, while only 29.8% had adequate knowledge. Knowledge was slightly positively correlated with attitude and practice (ρ = 0.074 and ρ = 0.054, respectively; both p<0.001), while attitude was weakly correlated with practice (ρ = 0.234, p<0.001). Several factors including age, sex, place of residence, institution type, academic level, family income, history of chronic illness, prior volunteering experience, and perceptual awareness on COVID-19 were significantly associated with either knowledge, attitude, and/or practice toward COVID-19. Furthermore, health institution's and the government's press releases, as well as health expert opinions were deemed as the most reliable sources of COVID-19-related information-yet trivially none of these sources were associated with knowledge, attitude, and practice in the study population. CONCLUSION: Many undergraduate medical students in Indonesia had positive attitude and practice against COVID-19, yet only a few had adequate knowledge. This warrants further interventions to keep them updated with COVID-19 evidence to maximize their potentials in raising public awareness on COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Social Perception/psychology , Students, Medical/psychology , Age Factors , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Education, Medical, Undergraduate , Female , Humans , Indonesia/epidemiology , Male , Sex Factors , Surveys and Questionnaires , Universities , Young Adult
17.
Hum Resour Health ; 20(1): 9, 2022 01 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1638058

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: International medical electives are one the highlights of medical training. Literature about international electives is scarce, and understanding what made a student choose one destination over another is unclear. Many medical students based in Europe travel to Africa each year for their elective, however, students' expectations and motivations are yet largely unexplored. METHODS: To gain insights into the factors driving students to travel to Africa, we analyzed two large international elective databases based in Germany. We reviewed elective testimonies and extrapolated geographical data as well as the choice of discipline for electives completed in Africa. Based on pre-defined categories, we also investigated students' motivations and expectations. RESULTS: We identified approximately 300 elective reports from medical students from German-speaking countries who chose to travel to Africa for their elective. Students commonly reported destinations in Southern and East Africa, with the Republic of South Africa and Tanzania being the most frequently selected destinations. Surgical disciplines were the most commonly reported choice. Diverse motivations were identified, including the desire to improve knowledge and clinical examination skills. A large proportion of students reported a link between destination choice and the potential to partake in surgical procedures not feasible at home; whether these surgeries were not or no longer practiced at home, or whether students could not partake due to level of training, was not ascertainable from the data. A trend-analysis revealed a growing interest in travelling to Africa for electives within the last 15 years. We observed a sharp decline in reports in 2020, a phenomenon most likely related to SARS-CoV-2-related travel restrictions. CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that medical electives in Africa are commonly reported by medical students from German-speaking countries, with diverse motivations for the choice of destination. A non-neglectable proportion of students identified the possibility to engage in surgical procedures as one of the main reasons for choosing Africa. This poses a series of ethical dilemmas, and well-structured pre-departure trainings may be a solution to this. The recent dip in overseas electives should be seen as a unique opportunity for medical schools and universities to restructure their international elective programs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Medical, Undergraduate , Students, Medical , Global Health , Humans , Motivation , SARS-CoV-2 , South Africa , Tanzania
18.
BMC Med Educ ; 22(1): 42, 2022 Jan 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1632869

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Postgraduate entrance examination (the Unified National Graduate Entrance Examination) is the major way for Chinese medical undergraduate student to apply for postgraduate studies. It consists of two stages: the preliminary basic written test and the re-examination in form of both written tests and interviews. With the spread of COVID-19, the traditional on-site re-examination of postgraduates must be changed to online re-examination. By comparing the re-examination process and admission results of online and on-site re-examination, we studied the feasibility of online re-examination for postgraduates and measures to improve it. METHODS: This was a retrospective cohort study using data from the Unified National Graduate Entrance Examination. Our sample population was the applicants to Peking University Third Hospital (PUTH) who completed re-examinations. In total, 281 records were successively selected from March 2017 to May 2020. By comparing the re-examination process and admission results of the 2020 online re-examination with those of the 2017-2019 on-site re-examinations, we analyzed the process, difficulties and improvement of online re-examination. RESULTS: A total of 281 subjects were included, of whom 77.9% completed an on-site re-examination in 2017-2019 and 22.1% completed the 2020 online re-examination. In the on-site re-examinations, 70.8% of the students were admitted, and in the online re-examination, 74.2% of the students were admitted. There were no significant differences between the students who completed on-site and online re-examinations in terms of gender, recent graduation, cultivation type, graduate from a key university, and admission (P>0.05). The on-site and online re-examination results were very similar among the admitted students. The multivariable logistic regression analysis showed that online re-examination had no effect on student admissions. Students seeking professional degree were less likely to be admitted than those seeking academic degree, and those with a better standardized rank in medicine and a better standardized rank of re-examination score were more likely to be admitted. CONCLUSIONS: The online re-examination implemented in 2020 during the COVID-19 pandemic achieved the same selective effect as on-site re-examination. Effective time management, a standardized test question template, well-trained staff and effective technology are the keys to success.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Medical, Undergraduate , Students, Medical , Humans , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
19.
Surg Radiol Anat ; 44(1): 75-79, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1626307

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: In view of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, anatomy education programs were amended so as to shift to primarily online mode from physical classes. In the whole process, main concern area that has emerged is regarding dearth of physical human dissection sessions. There is enough evidence available in literature to suggest that dissection room is an ideal place to cultivate and inculcate discipline independent skills or humanistic skills among the students. These include attributes in relation to ethical practice, professionalism, communication skills, empathy and compassion. Imbibing these skills are an essential element of medical education curriculum as it is desirable that students exhibit these traits when they begin medical practice. Hence deficiency in terms of exposure to physical dissection sessions can adversely affect training of medical students on a long term. METHODS: A literature search of relevant, peer-reviewed, published articles was undertaken from indexed databases (Medline and PubMed, Scopus, Embase, CINAHL Plus, Web of Science and Google Scholar) for this study. RESULTS: To counter the pertinent issue in online anatomy teaching program, a few measures have been suggested in this paper based on identification of actual deficit areas in terms of learning and analysis thereof. Live streaming of real time dissection, awareness sessions on human dissection, online interactive learning sessions and reflective thoughts-based exercise can contribute to building discipline independent skills in present scenario. CONCLUSION: Incorporation and implementation of these interventions within the realm of online anatomy education programs during COVID-19 pandemic can possibly contribute towards desirable learning outcomes.


Subject(s)
Anatomy , COVID-19 , Education, Medical, Undergraduate , Students, Medical , Anatomy/education , Curriculum , Dissection , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Teaching
20.
Surg Radiol Anat ; 44(1): 25-32, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1626309

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 pandemic has created a lot of turmoil in medical teaching, the magnitude of impact is many folds in the subject of anatomy, as it is practical based. A major challenge for anatomy teachers is to replicate the experience of practical exposures. These exposures range from cadaveric dissection to demonstration of bones, museum specimens, and histology slides, where they will have interactive communication with students, and thus help in the enhancement of communication and clinical skills among them. In recent days, anatomy teachers throughout the globe started using various advanced technology to make the teaching-learning session more interesting. In pre-pandemic era, usage of such advancements in information and communication technology was a 'choice'. But pandemic has changed the situation drastically, what was a 'choice' earlier is now an 'obligation.' Presently although infection rate is low, vaccination rate is high, most of the medical schools re-opened for usual offline teaching, still body donation is all time low making the situation 'back to square one'. Keeping such unprecedented situations in mind, we need to incorporate various innovative educational technologies in day-to-day teaching-learning methodologies.


Subject(s)
Anatomy , COVID-19 , Education, Medical, Undergraduate , Students, Medical , Anatomy/education , Curriculum , Educational Technology , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Teaching
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL