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1.
BMC Med Educ ; 23(1): 389, 2023 May 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20232907

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Due to the 2019 Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) precaution, educational systems and learners' practices from all specialties have been negatively affected, especially university students. COVID-19 has a massive effect on the practice of allied health students. The students' hospital exposure has been severely affected by the cancelation of the clinical practice. This study aims to investigate the effect of COVID-19 pandemic on the clinical practice of respiratory therapy students in different universities around Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. METHODS: Analytical cross-sectional online questionnaire was distributed from August 2021 to November 2021 to respiratory therapy students. The study's sampling technique was non-probability consecutive, and the calculated sample size was 183 participants. The survey contained questions to identify the clinical exposure of the participants. The participants included RT students in their clinical training years from King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, King Abdulaziz University, and Batterjee Medical College in Jeddah. The survey evaluated the effects of the pandemic on students' clinical practice, confidence and clinical preparation, and education. RESULTS: A total of 187 respiratory therapy students completed the questionnaire. The results revealed that 145 (77.5%) of respiratory therapy students agreed that the pandemic had disrupted their clinical practice. The percentage of respiratory therapy students who felt that they were less confident and less prepared for the next academic year due to practical session cancellation was 141 (75.4%). Out of the total students, 135 (72.2%) students reported difficulty in connecting the clinical and theoretical part because of the pandemic. CONCLUSION: The majority of respiratory therapy students from the three universities similarly reported that the pandemic disrupted their practice and interfered with their ability to connect between clinical and theoretical part. Moreover, it had affected their confidence and preparedness for the next year.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Medical, Undergraduate , Students, Medical , Humans , Cross-Sectional Studies , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/methods , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology , Universities
2.
BMC Med Educ ; 23(1): 388, 2023 May 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20238906

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The establishment of new anatomy facilities needs to accommodate a combination of modern teaching modalities that best align with evidence-based best teaching practices. This article describes the process in which our state-of-the-art anatomy laboratories were designed and implemented, and how these facilities support aspects of modern anatomy education. METHODS: A list of best practices for anatomy education in a modern medical curriculum was summarized from the literature. To assess student satisfaction, a survey related to student perception of the anatomy facilities (5-point Likert scale) was conducted. RESULTS: Our educational modalities include a broad range of teaching approaches. The Instructional Studio houses prosected and plastinated specimens, and cadaveric dissections are performed. Each of our three Dry Laboratories allow for active learning and interaction between small student groups. The Webinar Room acts as a conference room for departmental and online meetings, discussions with students, and dialogues with affiliated hospitals via the internet. The Imaging Center is equipped with a Sectra® medical educational platform, CAE Vimedix® Virtual Medical Imaging Ultrasound Training System, and Philipps Lumify® Ultrasound devices to train students to conduct and interpret sonographic images. Moreover, the Complete Anatomy® program is made available to all our students. CONCLUSION: The layout of our newly created Anatomy Facilities allows for all aspects of modern medical education mentioned in the literature. These educational modalities and teaching approaches are highly appreciated by our faculty and students. Moreover, these technologies allowed for a smooth transition from on-site anatomy teaching to online education during the COVID pandemic.


Subject(s)
Anatomy , COVID-19 , Education, Medical, Undergraduate , Students, Medical , Humans , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/methods , COVID-19/epidemiology , Dissection/education , Curriculum , Educational Measurement/methods , Cadaver , Anatomy/education , Teaching
3.
Int J Med Educ ; 14: 36-42, 2023 Mar 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2326411

ABSTRACT

Objectives: To explore whether and how preclinical medical students changed perceptions and behaviors related to professionalism in small group learning activities from face-to-face to virtual during the pandemic. Methods: The study used a mixed-methods sequential research design. We first retrospectively examined quantitative data from 101 medical students who completed mandatory peer evaluation surveys assessing professional behaviors of small group members in two courses (one face-to-face, the other online). Differences between student perceptions in two settings were compared using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Findings from the quantitative stage were probed further using focus groups at the qualitative stage. Six focus groups (n = 27) were conducted using purposeful sampling. Interviews were transcribed and inductive thematic coding was used to identify emerging themes. Results: We found a significant decrease in perceptions of punctuality and attendance in the virtual setting compared to face-to-face learning (Z=-6.211, p<.001), despite lower expectations of their peers in online learning. Five major themes emerged from the qualitative data: punctuality/participation, camera usage, dress code/conversational style, multitasking, and engagement/accountability. Participants showed sensitivity when conceptualizing professional conduct, indicating the dynamic process of professional identity formation at the early stage of their career. Conclusions: Results show that students' perceptions of professionalism become contextualized, significantly influenced by the background of the virtual learning environment. Intentional communication about professionalism within specific sociocultural and educational contexts is vital for individual professional identity formation. These findings support of the importance of considering context when educational programs develop curricula and establish expectations related to professionalism.


Subject(s)
Education, Medical, Undergraduate , Students, Medical , Humans , Professionalism , Retrospective Studies , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/methods , Learning
4.
Natl Med J India ; 35(5): 299-302, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2318397

ABSTRACT

The Covid-19 pandemic affected undergraduate medical education worldwide. By March 2020, colleges in India had to close following a national lockdown. Most of the colleges including ours started using e-platforms. Our earlier studies highlighted concern for lack of patient examination in clinical settings and successes of the online teaching programmes were limited to didactic teaching. The year 2020 also was the year in which the National Medical Commission (NMC) introduced a competency-based system, which was new to all stakeholders. We assessed the impact of Covid-19 on the ongoing teaching pattern in our institute. Actual coverage of theory classes and practical/clinical teaching sessions were gathered from departments across all years of undergraduate medical education and the gap percentage was calculated against the NMC/ Medical Council of India requirements. The gap percentage was calculated as missing classes divided by required classes multiplied by hundred. The heads of departments were consulted, and details of theory, practical and clinical classes taken for each batch before and after lockdown were gathered using a questionnaire. These were compared against the mandated teaching by the NMC guideline for theory, practical and clinics. The results showed a gap ranging from 2% to 83% for theory classes, the least being in anatomy and the highest being in medicine. As there were no practical or clinical sessions during the lockdown, the gap was zero. Various challenges were faced due to online medical education. There was a dilemma over choosing the type of training that would produce adequate numbers with low quality or a delayed training but of assured quality. Various solutions including suspending the ongoing course and converting it to short-term skill training sessions to deal with pandemic care and strategies to improve online teaching were considered.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Medical, Undergraduate , Humans , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/methods , Pandemics/prevention & control , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control , Surveys and Questionnaires
5.
Mo Med ; 120(2): 128-133, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2300092

ABSTRACT

This study evaluated advanced pulmonary ultrasonography training for COVID-19 lung examination. Students completed identical pretests and post-tests and a survey. Changes were found for individual questions and overall scores (all P≤.02), specifically image identification, previous material, and COVID-19 questions. Students were receptive to the training for education and future practice (P<.001), and they felt capable using ultrasound for diagnosis and management of COVID-19 patients. Pulmonary ultrasonography training should be considered for the medical school curriculum.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Medical, Undergraduate , Lung Diseases , Students, Medical , Humans , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/methods , Educational Measurement/methods , Curriculum , Lung Diseases/diagnostic imaging , Ultrasonography/methods , Clinical Competence , COVID-19 Testing
6.
Postgrad Med J ; 98(1163): 710-717, 2022 Sep 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2298275

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic has impacted students learning, with the time off resulting in students 'de-skilling', increasing concerns for upcoming observed structured clinical examinations. Foundation Year 1 (F1) doctors (F1s), despite being expected to teach, rarely receive formal preparation, with COVID-19 exacerbating opportunities to practice. As such, a national orthopaedic teaching programme was designed to provide F1s with opportunities to develop their teaching skills and to synergistically teach medical students how to perform clinical orthopaedic examinations. METHODS: Six weekly sessions, each delivered by two newly qualified F1 tutors, on each joint examination were delivered online via Zoom Video Communications (USA). Presession and postsession multiple choice questions (MCQs) were provided to students to assess improvement in knowledge. Anonymous feedback forms were provided to both students and tutors. RESULTS: Of the 341 students that attended, 87.1% provided feedback. 86.2% felt that they had de-skilled due to time off, with a mean 15 weeks off from placement. Based on a 5-point Likert scale, students displayed a mean improvement in confidence (1.9±1.1, p<0.001) and MCQ scores (1.4±1.3, p<0.001) before and after the sessions. 91.6% and 95.3% agreed that the use of online teaching increased attendance and laid the foundation for practice. Of the six tutors, all reported improvement in confidence to teach and teaching skills. CONCLUSION: We demonstrate that online delivery of clinical orthopaedic examinations is effective, increasing the knowledge and confidence of students, while providing opportunities for F1s to teach. We present our findings to encourage similar teaching programmes to be adopted at other locations and specialties, to synergistically benefit students, doctors and ultimately, patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Medical, Undergraduate , Orthopedics , Students, Medical , Humans , Pandemics , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/methods , COVID-19/epidemiology , Teaching
7.
BMC Med Educ ; 23(1): 244, 2023 Apr 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2293553

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic in parallel with concerns about bias in grading resulted in many medical schools adopting pass/fail clinical grading and relying solely on narrative assessments. However, narratives often contain bias and lack specificity. The purpose of this project was to develop asynchronous faculty development to rapidly educate/re-educate > 2000 clinical faculty spread across geographic sites and clinical disciplines on components of a well-written narrative and methods to minimize bias in the assessment of students. METHODS: We describe creation, implementation, and pilot data outcomes for an asynchronous faculty development curriculum created by a committee of volunteer learners and faculty. After reviewing the literature on the presence and impact of bias in clinical rotations and ways to mitigate bias in written narrative assessments, the committee developed a web-based curriculum using multimedia learning theory and principles of adult learning. Just-in-time supplemental materials accompanied the curriculum. The Dean added completion of the module by 90% of clinical faculty to the department chairperson's annual education metric. Module completion was tracked in a learning management system, including time spent in the module and the answer to a single text entry question about intended changes in behavior. Thematic analysis of the text entry question with grounded theory and inductive processing was used to define themes of how faculty anticipate future teaching and assessment as a result of this curricula. OUTCOMES: Between January 1, 2021, and December 1, 2021, 2166 individuals completed the online module; 1820 spent between 5 and 90 min on the module, with a median time of 17 min and an average time of 20.2 min. 15/16 clinical departments achieved completion by 90% or more faculty. Major themes included: changing the wording of future narratives, changing content in future narratives, and focusing on efforts to change how faculty teach and lead teams, including efforts to minimize bias. CONCLUSIONS: We developed a faculty development curriculum on mitigating bias in written narratives with high rates of faculty participation. Inclusion of this module as part of the chair's education performance metric likely impacted participation. Nevertheless, time spent in the module suggests that faculty engaged with the material. Other institutions could easily adapt this curriculum with provided materials.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Medical, Undergraduate , Adult , Humans , Pandemics , Curriculum , Narration , Faculty , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/methods
8.
Clin Anat ; 36(5): 818-829, 2023 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2290442

ABSTRACT

Anatomy has traditionally been taught through prosected specimens and the use of models and other techniques. During the COVID-19 period, this was replaced by tutorials, where students came to college to continue taking practical sessions. The study comprised four components. The first component consisted of demographic data. The second component consisted of questions concerning students' satisfaction with the tutorials. The third component included questions for Year 2 medical students only because they had tried both the new and old systems. The fourth component included the results for the Year 2 medical students. The study included 102 medical students. The number of tutorials each week and the duration of each tutorial were considered successful, since 47 (46.1%) and 44 (43.1%) students approved, respectively. The students were comfortable with understanding the information from PowerPoint presentations; 41 (40.2%) agreed with this statement. Moreover, 44 students (43.1%) agreed about the ability to recall material after the tutorial and the interaction it allowed them with the doctors. Overall, all the questions proved that the tutorials were of great value to the students during the COVID-19 period. Although COVID-19 limited anatomy teaching, tutorials were seen as a light at the end of the tunnel pending the end of the COVID-19 period.


Subject(s)
Anatomy , COVID-19 , Education, Medical, Undergraduate , Students, Medical , Humans , Pandemics , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/methods , Anatomy/education , Curriculum
9.
J Pak Med Assoc ; 72(9): 1731-1735, 2022 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2248880

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the medical students' performance with and perception towards different multimedia medical imaging tools. METHODS: The cross-sectional study was conducted at the College of Medicine, Qassim University, Saudi Arabia, from 2019 to 2020, and comprised third year undergraduate medical students during the academic year 2019-2020. The students were divided into tow groups. Those receiving multimedia-enhanced problem-based learning sessions were in intervention group A, while those receiving traditional problem-based learning sessions were in control group B. Scores of the students in the formative assessment at the end of the sessions were compared between the groups. Students' satisfaction survey was also conducted online and analysed. Data was analysed using SPSS 21. RESULTS: Of the 130 medical students, 75(57.7%) were males and 55(42.3%) were females. A significant increase in the mean scores was observed for both male and female students in group A compared to those in group B (p<0.05). The perception survey was filled up by 100(77%) students, and open-ended comments were obtained from 88(88%) of them. Overall, 69(74%) subjects expressed satisfaction with the multimedia-enhanced problem-based learning sessions. CONCLUSIONS: Radiological and pathological images enhanced the students' understanding, interaction and critical thinking during problem-based learning sessions.


Subject(s)
Education, Medical, Undergraduate , Students, Medical , Male , Female , Humans , Problem-Based Learning/methods , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/methods , Cross-Sectional Studies , Diagnostic Imaging
10.
PLoS One ; 18(3): e0278673, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2279483

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Chatbots, conversational agents that walk medical students (MS) though a clinical case, are serious games that seem to be appreciated by MS. Their impact on MS's performance in exams however was not yet evaluated. Chatprogress is a chatbot-based game developed at Paris Descartes University. It contains 8 pulmonology cases with step-by-step answers delivered with pedagogical comments. The CHATPROGRESS study aimed to evaluate the impact of Chatprogress on students' success rate in their end-term exams. METHODS: We conducted a post-test randomized controlled trial held on all fourth-year MS at Paris Descartes University. All MS were asked to follow the University's regular lectures, and half of them were randomly given access to Chatprogress. At the end of the term, medical students were evaluated on pulmonology, cardiology and critical care medicine. MAIN OUTCOMES MEASURES: The primary aim was to evaluate an increase in scores in the pulmonology sub-test for students who had access to Chatprogress, compared to those who didn't. Secondary aims were to evaluate an increase in scores in the overall test (Pulmonology, Cardiology and Critical care medicine test (PCC)) and to evaluate the correlation between access to Chatprogress and overall test score. Finally, students' satisfaction was assessed using a survey. RESULTS: From 10/2018 to 06/2019, 171 students had access to Chatprogress (the Gamers) and among them, 104 ended up using it (the Users). Gamers and Users were compared to 255 Controls with no access to Chatprogress. Differences in scores on the pulmonology sub-test over the academic year were significantly higher among Gamers and Users vs Controls (mean score: 12.7/20 vs 12.0/20, p = 0.0104 and mean score: 12.7/20 vs 12.0/20, p = 0.0365 respectively). This significant difference was present as well in the overall PCC test scores: (mean score: 12.5/20 vs 12.1/20, p = 0.0285 and 12.6/20 vs 12.1/20, p = 0.0355 respectively). Although no significant correlation was found between the pulmonology sub-test's scores and MS's assiduity parameters (number of finished games among the 8 proposed to Users and number of times a User finished a game), there was a trend to a better correlation when users were evaluated on a subject covered by Chatprogress. MS were also found to be fans of this teaching tool, asking for more pedagogical comments even when they got the questions right. CONCLUSION: This randomised controlled trial is the first to demonstrate a significant improvement in students' results (in both the pulmonology subtest and the overall PCC exam) when they had access to Chatbots, and even more so when they actually used it.


Subject(s)
Education, Medical, Undergraduate , Students, Medical , Video Games , Humans , Educational Measurement , Software , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/methods
11.
Anat Sci Educ ; 16(4): 768-784, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2287005

ABSTRACT

Historically, Anatomy education is an in-person discipline involving exposure to human body donors that facilitates personal and professional growth through, in part, the initiation of reflection on the topic of death. However, during the COVID-19 pandemic the decreased exposure to cadaveric anatomy for many health professions students may have influenced the depth of their individual reflections on this topic. Accordingly, this study aimed to investigate the effect of an alternate approach-focus group discussions between peers with varying degrees of exposure to cadaveric material-that may offer one strategy to stimulate deep reflection on the topic of death. A programmatic intervention was introduced, wherein students (n = 221) from 13 international universities discussed differences in their anatomy courses during small focus group sessions as part of an online exchange program. An inductive semantic thematic analysis was conducted on responses to an open-ended text-response question on how the activity influenced students' reflections about death. Resulting themes were organized into categories that described the content and topics of the students' discussions as they grappled with this sensitive topic. The students reportedly engaged in deep reflection and expressed an increased sense of connectedness with their peers, despite their disparate exposure levels to cadaveric anatomy and being physically distanced. This demonstrates that focus groups with students experiencing different laboratory contexts can be used to help all students reflect on the topic of death and that interchanges between dissecting and non-dissecting students can initiate thoughts about death and body donation among non-dissecting students.


Subject(s)
Anatomy , COVID-19 , Education, Medical, Undergraduate , Students, Medical , Humans , Focus Groups , Anatomy/education , Dissection/education , Pandemics , Cadaver , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/methods
12.
BMC Med Educ ; 23(1): 128, 2023 Feb 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2251412

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Near-peer medical education serves as an important method of delivering education to junior students by senior students. Due to the reduced clinical exposure because of the COVID-19 pandemic, we developed a mentorship scheme to help medical students with their Integrated Structured Clinical Examinations (ISCEs) by providing a combination of near-peer mentorship together with lecture-based teaching on a weekly basis for a 12-week period. Students attended a specialty-focused lecture every Tuesday followed by a small group teaching session organised by their tutor. METHODS: A longitudinal evaluative interventional study was undertaken by the international student led medical education organisation, OSCEazy. The teaching programme was organised and conducted by third year medical students to a recruited cohort of second year medical students. Students' perceptions of ISCEs (confidence, anxiety, and overall performance) were evaluated using 5-point Likert scales while their knowledge of the specialty was assessed using 10 single best answer questions which were distributed via Google® forms at the start and end of each week. In addition, we assessed tutor perceptions of their teaching and learning experience. RESULTS: Seventy-two tutees were enrolled in the programme (mean age: 24.4, female: 77.8%). 88.9% of the participants had not attended any online ISCE teaching prior to this. They preferred in-person ISCE teaching as compared to virtual sessions [median 4.5 (IQR 4-5) vs 3 (IQR 3-4), p <  0.0001), respectively]. There was a significant overall increase in knowledge when comparing pre-session and post-session performance [mean 53.7% vs 70.7%, p <  0.0001)]. There was a significant increase in student confidence [Confidence: median 3 (IQR:3-4) vs 4 (IQR 3-4), p <  0.0001] while no change was seen in the anxiety and perception of their overall performance in an ISCE. [Anxiety: median 3 (IQR 2-4) vs 3 (IQR 3-4), p = 0.37, Performance: median 3 (IQR 3-4) vs median 3 (IQR 3-4), p <  0.0001]. The tutors reported an increase in their confidence in teaching ISCEs online [median 3 (IQR 2-3.25) vs median 4 (IQR 4-5), p <  0.0001)]. CONCLUSION: Online near-peer teaching increases the confidence of both tutees and tutors involved while enhancing the tutees' knowledge of the specialty. Thus, medical schools should incorporate near-peer teaching in their curriculum to enhance the student learning experience.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Medical, Undergraduate , Students, Medical , Humans , Female , Young Adult , Adult , Pandemics , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/methods , Learning , Curriculum , Peer Group , Teaching
13.
Acad Med ; 98(6S): S30-S33, 2023 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2250239

ABSTRACT

While the traditional medical school curriculum specializes in teaching doctor-patient communication at the individual patient level, the need to train physicians to communicate science and medicine effectively to the public at large is, for the most part, ignored. With the unchecked proliferation of misinformation and disinformation during the COVID-19 pandemic, it is critical that current and future medical professionals learn to engage in the public arena using multiple methods (written, oral, social media) across multimedia platforms to dispel misinformation and accurately educate the public. This article describes the authors' interdisciplinary approach at the University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine to teaching science communication to medical students, early experiences, and future directions in this vein. The authors' experiences show that medical students are viewed as trusted sources of health-related information, and thus, need the skills and training to tackle misinformation and that students across these learning experiences appreciated the opportunity to choose a topic of their interest according to what matters to them and their communities most. The feasibility of successfully teaching scientific communication in an undergraduate and medical education curriculum is confirmed. These early experiences support the feasibility and impact of training medical students to improve communication about science with the general public.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Medical, Undergraduate , Physicians , Humans , Pandemics , Trust , COVID-19/epidemiology , Curriculum , Communication , Power, Psychological , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/methods
14.
BMC Med Educ ; 23(1): 115, 2023 Feb 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2266775

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease (COVID-19) has significantly changed healthcare systems and medical education. Universities were required to develop innovative curricula based on remote and distance education to continue medical education. This prospective questionnaire-based study aimed to investigate the impact of COVID-19-associated remote learning on the surgical training of medical students. METHODS: A 16-item questionnaire-based survey was distributed to medical students at the University Hospital of Münster before and after a surgical skills laboratory (SSL). Two cohorts were included: summer semester 2021 (COV-19), with rigorous social-distancing restrictions requiered SSL to be remotely, and winter semester 2021 (postCOV-19), in which the SSL was provided as a face-to-face, hands-on course. RESULTS: Both, cohorts showed a significant improvement in self-assessment of pre- and post-course confidence. While no significant difference in the average gain in self-confidence for sterile working was observed between the two cohorts, improvement in self-confidence was significantly higher in the COV-19 cohort regarding skin suturing and knot tying (p < 0.0001). However the average improvement regarding history and physical was significantly higher in the postCOV-19 cohort (p < 0.0001). In subgroup analysis, gender-associated differences varied in the two cohorts and were not related to specific subtasks, while age-stratified analysis revealed superior results for younger students. CONCLUSION: The results of our study underline the usability, feasibility, and adequacy of remote learning for the surgical training of medical students. The on-site distance education version, presented in the study, allows the continuing of hands-on experience in a safe environment in compliance with governmental social-distancing restrictions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance , Education, Medical, Undergraduate , Students, Medical , Humans , Prospective Studies , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/methods , COVID-19/epidemiology
15.
Clin Anat ; 36(2): 291-296, 2023 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2245570

ABSTRACT

To address anatomy knowledge gaps exacerbated by the education constraints of a new shortened medical school curriculum and the COVID-19 pandemic, the Orthopedic Surgery Interest Group (OSIG) created a novel hybrid anatomy curriculum for students interested in orthopedic surgery. The main objectives were to determine (1) Does this elective supplement to the curriculum improve students' perceived confidence with regard to orthopedic anatomy? (2) What are the students' preferred formats for receiving this elective supplement to the curriculum? To determine this, we used a prospective study design to determine the impact of the OSIG's student-led hybrid anatomy sessions. A survey with a five-point Likert scale (1) Strongly disagree; (2) Disagree; (3) Neither agree nor disagree; (4) Agree; (5) Strongly agree; was used to quantify responses. Chi-squared tests, Fisher's exact tests and T-tests were used when appropriate. Our results show that participants without prior anatomy experience rated the course higher on average when compared with those with prior anatomy experience (4.27 vs. 3.67, respectively; p = 0.168). Most students (88.2%) prefer for anatomy sessions to be held more frequently and 76.4% enjoyed having virtual components. 82.4% of participants reported that this course improved their self-confidence regarding orthopedic anatomy, and 100% would recommend it to other students. Most students enjoyed the course and reported improved self-perceived anatomy knowledge after participating. Medical schools that have a shortened anatomy curriculum can consider using the present study as a model for an optional musculoskeletal anatomy supplement at their institution.


Subject(s)
Anatomy , COVID-19 , Education, Medical, Undergraduate , Students, Medical , Humans , Schools, Medical , Prospective Studies , Pandemics , COVID-19/prevention & control , Curriculum , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/methods , Anatomy/education
16.
Int. j. morphol ; 40(6): 1656-1661, dic. 2022.
Article in Spanish | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-2236653

ABSTRACT

Los recursos educativos digitales se han transformado en un importante material de apoyo al proceso de enseñanza- aprendizaje, especialmente durante la pandemia por COVID-19. Estos corresponden a recursos de autoaprendizaje, generalmente en línea y de dominio público cuya disponibilidad inmediata a todo tipo de dispositivos electrónicos permite una rápida interacción del estudiante con materiales didácticos programados. El objetivo de este estudio fue evaluar el grado de satisfacción de cinco recursos educativos digitales, desarrollados como herramientas de apoyo para la enseñanza de la patología general, en estudiantes de carreras de pregrado del área de la salud de la Universidad Austral de Chile. Estudio descriptivo y exploratorio. Se desarrollaron cinco recursos educativos digitales donde se visualizan imágenes microscópicas correspondientes a procesos patológicos ocurridos en diferentes tejidos. Estos recursos fueron alojados en repositorios de la universidad y se encuentran actualmente disponibles en el canal de YouTube. Para conocer el grado de satisfacción, en sus aspectos pedagógicos y técnicos, se realizó una encuesta digital, anónima y voluntaria a estudiantes que cursaron asignaturas de patología, la que contempló cuatro dominios con sus respectivas preguntas: forma; control de usuario; contenido educativo y valoración global. El 94 % de los estudiantes calificaron el recurso de excelente o muy bueno y todos los dominios obtuvieron sobre el 80 % de satisfacción. Los contenidos representan lo que el recurso dice ofrecer, ayuda a resolver dudas y facilita la comprensión de la materia. El tamaño y color del texto es el adecuado y las imágenes presentan una excelente calidad y resolución. Los recursos cumplen con una alta calidad técnica y pedagógica, que asegura un gran potencial de uso para la enseñanza de la patología general, guiar el trabajo autónomo del estudiante y las actividades prácticas con el microscopio.


SUMMARY: Digital educational resources have become an important material to support the teaching-learning process, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic. These correspond to self-learning resources, generally online and the public domain, whose immediate availability to all types of electronic devices allows for rapid learner interaction with programmed didactic materials. The public domain and its immediate availability to all types of electronic devices allows a quick interaction of the student with self-explanatory didactic materials. The objective of this study was to evaluate the degree of satisfaction of five digital educational resources, developed as support tools for the teaching of general pathology, in undergraduate students of the health area of the Universidad Austral de Chile. Descriptive and exploratory study. Five digital educational resources have been developed where microscopic images corresponding to pathological processes occurring in different tissues are visualized these resources were hosted in university repositories and uploaded to the YouTube channel. To determine the degree of satisfaction, in their pedagogical and technical aspects, an anonymous and voluntary digital survey was carried out among students taking pathology courses, which included four domains with their respective questions: form; user control; educational content and overall assessment. The 94 % of the students evaluated the resource as excellent or very good and all domains obtained over 80 % satisfaction. The contents represent what the resource says it offers, helps to resolve doubts and facilitates the understanding of the subject. The size and color of the text is adequate, and the images present excellent quality and resolution. The resources developed offer a high technical and pedagogical quality, which guarantees a great potential for use in the teaching of general pathology, guiding the student's autonomous work and practical activities with the microscope.


Subject(s)
Humans , Pathology/education , Students, Health Occupations , Computer-Assisted Instruction/methods , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/methods , Teaching Materials , Surveys and Questionnaires
17.
BMC Med Educ ; 23(1): 92, 2023 Feb 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2235759

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic changed the way we work, spend, live, and learn. The impact was felt in the health sector where hospitals cancelled elective surgery, put on hold outpatient services, and implemented new social distancing procedures and telehealth systems, to enable hospitals to increase bed capacity. For medical students, these factors meant significant disruption to their clinical placements, remote delivery of their education, cessation of international and interstate placements, complicated by significant travel restrictions and border closures. There were concerns that final year students might be unable to graduate that year due to this lack of clinical exposure. INNOVATION: As a result of this disruption in late March 2020 we developed an innovative 6 week 'COVID-19 e-lective' rotation, consisting of online modules, virtual clinical tutorials and a COVID project totalling the equivalent of 200 h of work. RESULTS: An evaluation was undertaken that found it to be remarkably successful in meeting the students' learning needs and alleviating concerns about disrupted placements. It was also conducted during 2021 for all Year 4 students to help expand clinical placement opportunities. OUTCOMES: This paper describes the e-lective, its innovations, its challenges, and its evaluation findings, for others to learn from.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Medical, Undergraduate , Preceptorship , Students, Medical , Telemedicine , Humans , Pandemics , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/methods
18.
Educ Health (Abingdon) ; 35(2): 67-68, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2201701

ABSTRACT

After outbreaks in more than 110 countries, the World Health Organization declared COVID-19 a global pandemic on the March 11, 2020, heralding unprecedented challenges in medical education. Our aim is to provide a descriptive overview of the impact of COVID-19 on medical education worldwide and to assess its future repercussions. Worldwide, medical students were removed from clerkship training. Clinical skills and practical procedure training transitioned to being online, and in some cases, postponed. Medical educators scrambled to convert the curriculum into online formats. Access to Internet, technology, and computer education posed resource allocation challenges in developing countries and further widened the disparities in medical education. Even in countries where the framework and funding were available to support the online transition, debatably, this arrangement can lead to disparities in clinical skills, bedside manner, and field experience among pre- and post-COVID-19 medical graduates. Challenges extend beyond undergraduate medical education to include the medical licensing process of international and national postgraduates. The international community of medical educators needs to collaborate to drive the future of medical education, as the world adapts to the "new normal."


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance , Education, Medical, Undergraduate , Education, Medical , Students, Medical , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Curriculum , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/methods
19.
BMC Med Educ ; 23(1): 42, 2023 Jan 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2196231

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Undergraduate medical curricula often fail to integrate experiential learning methodologies. Thus, a pilot series of interactive pathology lessons was designed and implemented in an attempt to promote experiential learning. METHODS: Thirty pre-graduate medical students voluntarily participated in the interactive study groups at the First Department of Pathology of the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Medical School. A questionnaire was designed to investigate the satisfaction of students regarding their participation in pathology study groups and to identify the characteristics that shape students' perceptions of the foundations of medical education. Descriptive statistics (mean values) were used to describe the students' evaluations of the pathology study groups, and thematic analysis was conducted to investigate the data collected using open-ended questions. RESULTS: Interactions with the professor and the option of co-observing the slides using dual-view optical microscopes and virtual slides were each evaluated as "Excellent" by ≅ 95% of the students. Four overarching themes were identified regarding the core characteristics of medical education according to the students' perspectives: 1) educational background in medical education, 2) interaction with educators in medical education, 3) educational material in medical education and 4) assessment in medical education. CONCLUSIONS: The high rates of acceptance of the pathology study groups reflect the desire and need for active learning methodologies to be implemented in modern medical education. Nearly all the students mentioned the need for practical skill acquisition, the integration of theory into practice and ethics in medical education. The success of these optional pathology study groups highlights the need for similar modalities to be incorporated into the main medical education curriculum.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Medical, Undergraduate , Education, Medical , Students, Medical , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Curriculum , Problem-Based Learning , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/methods
20.
Adv Exp Med Biol ; 1397: 151-172, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2157994

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 sparked massive educational change and dictated that traditional courses rapidly transitioned online. This presented a unique challenge for anatomy, a visually orientated subject that has conventionally relied heavily on face-to-face teaching. Near-peer teaching (NPT) is one method with the potential to address this challenge. When given more responsibility, student-teachers are more likely to deliver effective teaching sessions and include the most appropriate resources for the learners. Current literature surrounding the use of NPT in both frontline and supplementary settings have already demonstrated its potential, however, its efficacy in an online environment is still largely unknown. The Faculty of Medicine at the University of Southampton has a well-established NPT programme as part of its 5 year undergraduate course (BM5). A quasi-experimental cohort study was conducted to determine whether the benefits associated with NPT are preserved when delivered online. Two cohorts of second year BM5 students received cranial nerve NPT as part of their formal clinical neuroanatomy module, one face to face (N = 150) and the other online (N = 168). Knowledge tests were undertaken by participants to assess knowledge gain and retention, and an established Likert style survey instrument was administered to assess student perceptions. Both online and face-to-face NPT sessions resulted in significant increases in student knowledge gain (p < 0.0001), yet the difference between the two was insignificant (p = 0.2432). Subsequent knowledge retention tests were also shown to be similar (p = 0.7732). Students perceived both methods of NPT delivery positively but found online NPT less enjoyable (p < 0.0001) and considered it to be a more inefficient use of time (p = 0.0035). This research suggests that online NPT can be deployed without a detrimental risk to learning when compared to traditional NPT applications in pre-clinical neuroanatomy teaching.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Medical, Undergraduate , Humans , Neuroanatomy/education , Cohort Studies , Peer Group , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/methods
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