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1.
Med Educ Online ; 26(1): 1857322, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574791

ABSTRACT

Many challenges could occur that result in the need to handle an increase in the number of medical student clinical placements, such as curricular transformations or viral pandemics, such as COVID 19. Here, we describe four different institutions' approaches to addressing the impact of curricular transformation on clerkships using an implementation science lens. Specifically, we explore four different approaches to managing the 'bulge' as classes overlap in clerkships Curriculum leaders at four medical schools report on managing the bulge of core clinical placements resulting from reducing the duration of the foundational sciences curriculum and calendar shifts for the respective clerkship curriculum. These changes, which occurred between 2014 and 2018, led to more students being enrolled in core clinical rotations at the same time than occurred previously. Schools provided respective metrics used to evaluate the effectiveness of their bulge management technique. These data typically included number of students affected in each phase of their curricular transformation, performance on standardized examinations, and student and faculty feedback. Not all data were available from all schools, as some schools are still working through their 'bulge' or are affected by COVID-19. There is much to be learned about managing curricular transformations. Working on such endeavors in a learning collaborative such as the AMA Accelerating Change in Medical Education Initiative provided support and insights about how to survive, thrive and identifying lessons learned during curricular transformation.


Subject(s)
Clinical Clerkship , Curriculum , Schools, Medical , Students, Medical , COVID-19 , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/methods , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
2.
Pan Afr Med J ; 40: 42, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1513183

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease (COVID-19) has impacted many facets of everyday daily life, resulting in far-reaching consequences on social interaction, regional and global economies, and healthcare delivery systems. Numerous reports have commented on the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on medical education in various world regions. However, we know little about the influence of the pandemic on medical education in Africa. Here, we discuss the potential impact of COVID-19 on teaching and learning in undergraduate medical education in sub-Saharan Africa, illustrating some of the unexpected benefits and challenges the pandemic presents for medical education in sub-Saharan Africa.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/methods , Africa South of the Sahara , Humans , Learning , Teaching
3.
Am J Phys Med Rehabil ; 100(11): 1100-1104, 2021 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1483693

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Drastic and rapid changes to medical education are uncommon because of regulations and restrictions designed to ensure consistency among medical school curriculums and to safeguard student well-being. As a consequence of the COVID-19 pandemic, medical education had to break away from its conventions and transition from time-honored teaching methods to innovative solutions. This article explores the anticipated and actual efficacy of the swift conversion of a specialty elective from a traditional in-person format to a fully virtual clerkship. In addition, it includes a noninferiority study to determine where a virtual classroom may excel or fall short in comparison with conventional clinical rotations.


Subject(s)
Clinical Clerkship , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/methods , Models, Educational , Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine/education , Adult , COVID-19 , Curriculum , Educational Measurement , Female , Humans , Male , Minnesota , Organizational Innovation , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Ann Med ; 53(1): 1520-1530, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1455001

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: During the COVID-19 pandemic, emergency medicine (EM) teachers had to employ innovative methods to ensure the continuity of the education process. The purpose of this study was to explore the adequacy of the 360-degree video (video 360) technology in EM education in the context of: (a) students' attitudes towards the video 360; (b) students' academic performance in their required examination at the end of the EM course compared to the assessment results of students from the previous academic year. METHODS: A mixed-method research project enrolled the fourth-year medical students who attended the required EM course during the first semester of the academic year 2020-2021 when all activities with undergraduate students went online and teaching scenarios recorded in the video 360 format were employed. Data collection was two-fold: (a) anonymous questionnaires, complemented with basic YouTube analytics; (b) multiple-choice questionnaires (MCQ) and oral examination, contrasting the results with those in 2019-2020. Data analysis used descriptive statistics and non-parametric methods. RESULTS: Seventy-nine students (53 females and 26 males) participated in the project and all completed the EM course. Students' interest in and their acceptance of the video 360 technology were high (total scoring in the upper 20% of the respective scales), with consistently good performance in two parallel, independent, interview-based oral/practical evaluations (Spearman correlation coefficient R = 0.665, p < .001). The majority scored over 90% in the summative MCQ, with higher values compared to their colleagues' during the previous academic year (with on-site teaching): scoring percentages with mean ± standard deviation of 92.52 ± 4.57 and 76.67 ± 18.77, respectively. CONCLUSION: Our project showed that the video 360 scenarios were effective in teaching EM. In the long term, employing this accessible and inexpensive educational approach would add value to on-site training by enriching the exposure to a specific ED environment.KEY MESSAGESMedical students valued the 360-degree video scenarios as contributing substantially to their EM knowledge and preparedness.Examination results confirmed the 360-degree video scenarios as viable in EM teaching.The 360-degree video technology would be a sustainable solution for hybrid medical teaching in the long term.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/methods , Emergency Medicine/education , Students, Medical/statistics & numerical data , Virtual Reality , Educational Measurement , Female , Humans , Male
7.
Acad Med ; 96(9): 1263-1267, 2021 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1373679

ABSTRACT

The announcement of the closure of Philadelphia's Hahnemann University Hospital in June 2019 sent shock waves through the academic community. The closure had a devastating impact on the residents and fellows who trained there, the patients who had long received their care there, and faculty and staff who had provided care there for decades. Since its beginnings, the hospital, established as part of Hahnemann Medical College in 1885, was a major site for medical student education. The authors share the planning before and actions during the crisis that protected the educational experiences of third- and fourth-year medical students at Drexel University College of Medicine assigned to Hahnemann University Hospital. The lessons they learned can be helpful to leadership in academic health systems in the United States facing a diminishing number of clinical training sites for medical and other health professions students, a situation that is likely to worsen as the COVID-19 pandemic continues to weaken the health care ecosystem.


Subject(s)
Education, Medical, Undergraduate/organization & administration , Health Facility Closure/methods , Hospitals, University/organization & administration , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/methods , Faculty, Medical/organization & administration , Faculty, Medical/psychology , Humans , Interprofessional Relations , Philadelphia , Students, Medical/psychology
8.
Arch Gynecol Obstet ; 304(4): 957-963, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1345115

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The purpose of this survey was to assess medical students' opinions about online learning programs and their preferences for specific teaching formats during COVID 19 pandemic. METHODS: Between May and July 2020, medical students who took an online gynecology and obstetrics course were asked to fill in a questionnaire anonymously. The questionnaire solicited their opinions about the course, the teaching formats used (online lectures, video tutorials featuring real patient scenarios, and online practical skills training), and digital learning in general. RESULTS: Of 103 students, 98 (95%) submitted questionnaires that were included in the analysis. 84 (86%) students had no problem with the online course and 70 (72%) desired more online teaching in the future. 37 (38%) respondents preferred online to traditional lectures. 72 (74%) students missed learning with real patients. All digital teaching formats received good and excellent ratings from > 80% of the students. CONCLUSION: The survey results show medical students' broad acceptance of the online course during COVID 19 pandemic and indicates that digital learning options can partially replace conventional face-to-face teaching. For content taught by lecture, online teaching might be an alternative or complement to traditional education. However, bedside-teaching remains a key pillar of medical education.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/methods , Gynecology/education , Obstetrics/education , Students, Medical/psychology , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
9.
PLoS One ; 16(8): e0255635, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1341506

ABSTRACT

The current pandemic has revolutionized medical education with a rapid shift to online teaching and learning strategies. The students have coped by turning to the online resources to keep pace with the change. To determine the type and practice of online resources used by undergraduate medical students and compare the use of online resources with gender and GPA. This was a cross-sectional study in which an online self-administered questionnaire was used to evaluate the type and practices of the online resources used by the medical students during the Covid-19 pandemic. Complete enumeration sampling method was used to collect the data from 180 medical students studying at College of Medicine, Majmaah University, Saudi Arabia. One hundred and thirty students (72.2%) were unaware of the free online resources offered by the University. Most students (58.3%, n = 105) consulted peers for online references. Male students preferred PowerPoint presentations and consulting online resources for studying as compared to the females, whereas females preferred to study textbooks predominantly as compared to males (p = 0.005). Male students significantly shifted to the online resources during the COVID-19 pandemic as compared to females (p = 0.028). Students with the highest GPA scores shifted to online educational resources during pandemic. A significant proportion of the undergraduate medical students at College of Medicine, Majmaah University used online educational resources for learning. We recommend that the college administration for deliberation with the medical educationalists for necessary curricular amendments and taking necessary steps to make the college Academic supervision and mentorship program more proactive to meet the challenges of students' use of online educational resources.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Distance , Education, Medical, Undergraduate , Adolescent , Adult , Consumer Behavior/statistics & numerical data , Cross-Sectional Studies , Education, Distance/statistics & numerical data , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/methods , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/organization & administration , Educational Measurement , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology , Schools, Medical/organization & administration , Students, Medical/psychology , Students, Medical/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires , Universities/organization & administration , Young Adult
10.
J Laryngol Otol ; 135(8): 737-740, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1340962

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic has greatly disrupted routine ENT services. Subsequently, universities have chosen to either augment or suspend clinical placements. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to elicit patients' perspectives toward various approaches to clinical placements in ENT during the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic. METHODS: Cross-sectional questionnaires were given to patients attending the ENT department for routine out-patient care. Responses were measured using a five-point Likert scale. Seventy-nine patients completed the survey. RESULTS: Ninety-five per cent of respondents felt the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic had not reduced their comfort in interacting with medical students. Most participants reported being comfortable with students participating directly or remotely in their care, and with students having access to their anonymised data. Twenty-five per cent of participants stated that they are uncomfortable with consultations being recorded and shared for medical education purposes. CONCLUSION: A number of approaches to clinical placements remain acceptable to patients. Educational leads should continue to offer placements in ENT that can incorporate direct or remote observation of consultations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Medical, Undergraduate , Otolaryngology/education , Attitude to Health , Cross-Sectional Studies , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/methods , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/organization & administration , Humans , Surveys and Questionnaires
11.
Arch Pathol Lab Med ; 145(7): 814-820, 2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1314912

ABSTRACT

CONTEXT.­: In the early months of the response to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine (JHUSOM) (Baltimore, Maryland) leadership reached out to faculty to develop and implement virtual clinical clerkships after all in-person medical student clinical experiences were suspended. OBJECTIVE.­: To develop and implement a digital slide-based virtual surgical pathology (VSP) clinical elective to meet the demand for meaningful and robust virtual clinical electives in response to the temporary suspension of in-person clinical rotations at JHUSOM. DESIGN.­: The VSP elective was modeled after the in-person surgical pathology elective to include virtual previewing and sign-out with standardized cases supplemented by synchronous and asynchronous pathology educational content. RESULTS.­: Validation of existing Web communications technology and slide-scanning systems was performed by feasibility testing. Curriculum development included drafting of course objectives and syllabus, Blackboard course site design, electronic-lecture creation, communications with JHUSOM leadership, scheduling, and slide curation. Subjectively, the weekly schedule averaged 35 to 40 hours of asynchronous, synchronous, and independent content, approximately 10 to 11 hours of which were synchronous. As of February 2021, VSP has hosted 35 JHUSOM and 8 non-JHUSOM students, who have provided positive subjective and objective course feedback. CONCLUSIONS.­: The Johns Hopkins VSP elective provided meaningful clinical experience to 43 students in a time of immense online education need. Added benefits of implementing VSP included increased medical student exposure to pathology as a medical specialty and demonstration of how digital slides have the potential to improve standardization of the pathology clerkship curriculum.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Clinical Clerkship/methods , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/methods , Pathology, Surgical/education , Baltimore/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Clinical Clerkship/organization & administration , Curriculum , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/organization & administration , Humans , Pandemics , Pathology, Surgical/methods , Program Development
12.
Acad Med ; 96(11): 1574-1579, 2021 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1310945

ABSTRACT

PROBLEM: The COVID-19 pandemic has presented a unique set of challenges to medical education globally. Low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) have faced unique barriers in transitioning to virtual modalities, and many medical students in LMICs experienced dramatically reduced educational time. The authors created the Global Medical Education Collaborative (GMEC) to address this problem by providing free, online, case-based tutorials to medical students in LMICs during the pandemic. APPROACH: The authors developed a needs assessment to gauge students' educational requirements, which informed GMEC's 2 primary goals: to provide free access to interactive online tutorials for students in LMICs and to bridge the physical distance between educators and learners via an online platform. A pilot program in Nigeria (April 26-May 26, 2020) helped inform the current strategy and logistics. Tutors and students were recruited via social media and medical education networks at the authors' home institutions. OUTCOMES: Within the first 2 months (April 26-June 26, 2020), 324 students representing 12 countries and 20+ medical schools joined GMEC. Additionally, 95 physicians and trainees joined as tutors and, collectively, delivered 52 tutorials. Students responded to a needs assessment querying confidence in various clinical domains, interest in covering clinical topics, barriers to virtual learning, and the effect of the pandemic on their education. Tutors held 1-hour, interactive tutorials over Zoom covering a variety of clinical topics. According to surveys, 91% of students (71 of 78) felt more confident in the material related to the tutorial's topic after participating. NEXT STEPS: GMEC will continue to engage students, tutors, and collaborators to facilitate the delivery of innovative, high-quality tutorials to students affected by COVID-19 in LMICs. To ensure that the platform is sustainable and aligned with GMEC's mission to promote equity in global medical education, the collaborative will need to be agile and responsive.


Subject(s)
Developing Countries/statistics & numerical data , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Medical/ethics , Students, Medical/psychology , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Curriculum , Education, Medical/organization & administration , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/methods , Human Rights , Humans , Interdisciplinary Placement/organization & administration , Learning , Nigeria/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Social Media , Surveys and Questionnaires , User-Computer Interface
13.
PLoS One ; 16(7): e0253884, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1304459

ABSTRACT

During clinical reasoning case conferences, a learner-centered approach using teleconferencing can create a psychologically safe environment and help learners speak up. This study aims to measure the psychological safety of students who are supposed to self-explain their clinical reasoning to conference participants. This crossover study compared the effects of two clinical reasoning case conference methods on medical students' psychological safety. The study population comprised 4th-5th year medical students participating in a two-week general medicine clinical clerkship rotation, from September 2019 to February 2020. They participated in both a learner-centered approach teleconference and a traditional, live-style conference. Teleconferences were conducted in a separate room, with only a group of students and one facilitator. Participants in group 1 received a learner-centered teleconference in the first week and a traditional, live-style conference in the second week. Participants assigned to group 2 received a traditional, live-style conference in the first week and a learner-centered approach teleconference in the second week. After each conference, Edmondson's Psychological Safety Scale was used to assess the students' psychological safety. We also counted the number of students who self-explained their clinical reasoning processes during each conference. Of the 38 students, 34 completed the study. Six out of the seven psychological safety items were significantly higher in the learner-centered approach teleconferences (p<0.01). Twenty-nine (85.3%) students performed self-explanation in the teleconference compared to ten (29.4%) in the live conference (p<0.01). A learner-centered approach teleconference could improve psychological safety in novice learners and increase the frequency of their self-explanation, helping educators better assess their understanding. Based on these results, a learner-centered teleconference approach has the potential to be a method for teaching clinical reasoning to medical students.


Subject(s)
Clinical Reasoning , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/methods , Stress, Psychological/prevention & control , Students, Medical/psychology , Telecommunications , Adult , Clinical Clerkship/methods , Clinical Clerkship/statistics & numerical data , Clinical Competence/statistics & numerical data , Cross-Over Studies , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Japan , Male , Problem-Based Learning/methods , Problem-Based Learning/statistics & numerical data , Stress, Psychological/etiology , Students, Medical/statistics & numerical data , Young Adult
14.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 25(12): 4426-4434, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1296355

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This study aims to provide medical educators with insights into the current status and prospects of undergraduate medical education, which has been affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We conducted a database search of PubMed, Embase, and ERIC and identified articles on COVID-19-related undergraduate medical education. We independently reviewed titles and abstracts and extracted data on the geographic location of the study, area of specialty, phase in medical school (preclinical year, clerkship year, etc.), type of paper, and the main content of the study. RESULTS: A total of 49 articles published across multiple countries were included in this study. These were categorized as dealing with either (1) curriculum changes in undergraduate medical education due to COVID-19 or (2) student-led educational activities related to COVID-19. The 41 articles in the first category showed two main trends: replacing in-person lectures with online classes in the preclinical years and adopting various remote educational methods to compensate for the discontinued or truncated clerkship in the clinical years. The eight articles in the second category showcased various student educational activities that were conducted to meet the public's medical needs during the pandemic. CONCLUSIONS: This review summarized the essential changes in undergraduate medical education worldwide and reflected on the various teaching methods adopted by medical schools. In preparation for the post-COVID era, a comprehensive online curriculum and evaluation tools are needed, which require the development of necessary infrastructure and adequate resources. Education aimed at helping students be more socially aware and responsible as medical professionals must be promoted.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Curriculum , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/methods , Students, Medical , COVID-19/prevention & control , Curriculum/trends , Education, Distance/trends , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/trends , Humans , Students, Medical/psychology
15.
PLoS One ; 16(7): e0253860, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1295520

ABSTRACT

This study aimed to investigate the impact of student e-learning on the development of clinical competencies. The study participants were 3rd year students (n = 43) at a private mid-sized medical school located in a South Korean suburb on a four-year medical program. Educational intervention was implemented to enhance student clinical performance. Students engaged in learning activities that intended to promote their self-directed learning abilities and clinical performances using e-learning resources. Intervention was conducted for the duration of six months during the 3rd year and its effectiveness was investigated by comparing student performances in OSCEs in a pre- and post- comparison format and also by comparing them with national scores. In addition, student perceptions of the impact of e-learning on their OSCE performances were assessed using a questionnaire, which included 36 items that elicited student perceptions of their experiences of e-learning and readiness for e-learning. Student OSCE scores improved significantly after educational intervention in all domains of clinical competencies assessed and for total scores (p < 0.001). Furthermore, students achieved higher OSCE scores than national average scores in the post-test, whereas they had performed lower than national average scores in the pre-test. Students showed neutral or slightly positive responses to the effectiveness of e-learning, and their perceptions of e-learning were not associated with their e-learning readiness scores. The study shows student OSCE performance improved significantly after educational intervention, which indicate the effectiveness of e-learning to support student learning of clinical performance. Despite significant improvements in student OSCE scores after e-learning, their perceptions of its effectiveness were neutral. Furthermore, student perceptions of e-learning were not associated with their readiness for it. Suggestions are made to help students use e-learning more effectively to enhance their clinical competencies.


Subject(s)
Clinical Competence/statistics & numerical data , Computer-Assisted Instruction , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/methods , Students, Medical/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Male , Republic of Korea , Schools, Medical/statistics & numerical data , Young Adult
16.
Arch Gynecol Obstet ; 304(6): 1383-1386, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1293366

ABSTRACT

Despite having a good understanding of medicine, doctors lack clinical skills, problem-solving abilities, and the ability to apply knowledge to patient care, particularly in unanticipated circumstances. To overcome this, medical education has evolved into a system-oriented core curriculum with cognitive, psychomotor, and affective learning goals. With an emphasis on problem-based learning, the educator's aim is to establish a long-term, predetermined improvement in the learner's behavior, acquired skills, and attitudes (Datta R, Upadhyay KK, Jaideep CN. Simulation and its role in medical education. Med J Armed Forces India. 2012;68(2):167-172. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0377-1237(12)60040-9 ). However, teaching these disciplines to real patients is almost impossible; this is where simulation comes in. This opinion paper will discuss the relevance and necessity of a simulation-based undergraduate curriculum in obstetrics and gynecology. What are the biggest obstacles that medical schools face in making the most of simulation-based learning, and how can they be overcome?


Subject(s)
Curriculum , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/methods , Gynecology/education , Obstetrics/education , Simulation Training , Students, Medical/psychology , Female , Humans , Schools, Medical
18.
Educ Prim Care ; 32(5): 296-302, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1286512

ABSTRACT

The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic required Higher Educational Institutions to redesign and implement new ways of delivering core-learning outcomes for medical students. Much of this change resulted in a transition to virtual teaching across medical schools. Medical education in primary care is often delivered as part of GP-facilitated small group teaching and with this came unique challenges for the transition to online education.Transition to virtual small group teaching utilised blended learning and flipped classroom methodologies alongside the use of virtual teaching platforms. This quality improvement project describes the educational approaches used when transitioning medical education, and compares student experience from receiving small group teaching using face-to-face and virtual teaching methods before and during the COVID-19 pandemic, respectively. Analysis of student feedback found an ongoing delivery of high-quality primary care education using virtual small group teaching, and that there was no attrition in student experience when compared to face-to-face teaching delivered before COVID-19 for the same learning outcomes.These findings are reassuring and suggest that the transition to virtual small group teaching, using methods such as flipped classrooms and blended learning, enables continued and sustained delivery of high-quality education and student experiences in primary care.


Subject(s)
Education, Distance/methods , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/methods , General Practitioners/education , COVID-19 , Curriculum , Humans , Students, Medical/psychology , Teaching , United Kingdom
19.
World Neurosurg ; 152: e250-e265, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1272774

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Before the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, medical students training in neurosurgery relied on external subinternships at institutions nationwide for immersive educational experiences and to increase their odds of matching. However, external rotations for the 2020-2021 cycle were suspended given concerns of spreading COVID-19. Our objective was to provide foundational neurosurgical knowledge expected of interns, bootcamp-style instruction in basic procedures, and preinterview networking opportunities for students in an accessible, virtual format. METHODS: The virtual neurosurgery course consisted of 16 biweekly 1-hour seminars over a 2-month period. Participants completed comprehensive precourse and postcourse surveys assessing their backgrounds, confidence in diverse neurosurgical concepts, and opinions of the qualities of the seminars. Responses from students completing both precourse and postcourse surveys were included. RESULTS: An average of 82 students participated live in each weekly lecture (range, 41-150). Thirty-two participants completed both surveys. On a 1-10 scale self-assessing baseline confidence in neurosurgical concepts, participants were most confident in neuroendocrinology (6.79 ± 0.31) and least confident in spine oncology (4.24 ± 0.44), with an average of 5.05 ± 0.32 across all topics. Quality ratings for all seminars were favorable. The mean postcourse confidence was 7.79 ± 0.19, representing an improvement of 3.13 ± 0.38 (P < 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS: Feedback on seminar quality and improvements in confidence in neurosurgical topics suggest that an interactive virtual course may be an effective means of improving students' foundational neurosurgical knowledge and providing networking opportunities before application cycles. Comparison with in-person rotations when these are reestablished may help define roles for these tools.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/statistics & numerical data , Neurosurgery/education , Students, Medical/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires , COVID-19/complications , Curriculum/statistics & numerical data , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/methods , Educational Status , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
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