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1.
South Med J ; 114(12): 807-811, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1534910

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Numerous studies have demonstrated the high risk for burnout and mental illness in medical students. Because of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, our medical school transitioned to an all-virtual learning environment from March to June 2020, which raised concerns among student leaders and administrators, as reduced interpersonal attachments have known associations with decreased mental health. In an effort to facilitate student well-being during the pandemic, the Virtual Wellness and Learning Communities (VWLC) program was established. VWLC consisted of hour-long events that offered students the opportunity to engage with their peers online. METHODS: More than 20 events and workshops were conducted from March to June 2020, including trivia nights, song and guitar performances, sketching, video editing tutorials, chess lessons, yoga, and personal investing tips. An institutional review board-approved survey to assess the efficacy of the VWLC program was sent to medical student participants and nonparticipants. RESULTS: The overall response rate of this study was 43% (53/123). The response rate for students who attended a VWLC event was 51% (33/65), and the response rate for students who did not attend a VWLC event was 34% (20/58). Of all of the respondents, 85% (45/53) reported a decreased sense of connectivity with peers because of the pandemic, and 40% (21/53) reported a decrease in their sense of wellness. After attending a VWLC event, 79% (26/33) reported an increased sense of peer connectivity, 61% (20/33) reported improved wellness, and 55% (18/33) believed that these events should continue postpandemic to supplement in-person programming. Those who did not attend a virtual event stated that the main barriers to attending were unfamiliarity with attendees and screen fatigue. CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic has worsened medical student well-being and sense of community. VWLC programming may be an effective strategy for promoting medical student wellness and community while social distancing during the COVID-19 pandemic. To our knowledge, this is the first virtual wellness program for promotion of medical student mental health during the COVID-19 pandemic to be described in the literature.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Computer-Assisted Instruction , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/organization & administration , Students, Medical/psychology , Adult , Curriculum , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
3.
J Med Libr Assoc ; 109(3): 497-502, 2021 Jul 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1463961

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Prior to 2020, library orientation for first-year medical students at Weill Cornell Medicine took the form of an on-site treasure hunt competition. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the orientation for the MD class of 2024 was shifted to an all-virtual format. This shift mandated a full redesign of the library orientation. CASE PRESENTATION: The Samuel J. Wood Library sought to preserve the excitement and fun of the treasure hunt in the new virtual format. The competition was redesigned as a Zoom meeting using breakout rooms, with library faculty and staff serving as team facilitators. Tasks were rewritten, shifting the focus from the library's physical spaces to its virtual services and online resources. The redesigned orientation was evaluated using two data sources: a postsession survey of student participants and a debriefing of the library employees who participated. Student evaluations were positive, while the faculty and staff provided numerous suggestions for improving future virtual orientations. CONCLUSIONS: A successful virtual library orientation requires careful preparation, including testing the competition tasks, full rehearsal with library facilitators, and a thoughtful approach to technology and logistics. We have chosen to share the materials we developed for other academic health sciences libraries that may wish to take a similar approach to their own virtual orientations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/organization & administration , Libraries, Digital/organization & administration , Libraries, Medical/organization & administration , Organizational Case Studies , Adult , Female , Humans , Male , New York , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Students, Medical , Young Adult
5.
GMS J Med Educ ; 38(1): Doc4, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1389118

ABSTRACT

Background: Due to the ban on classroom teaching during the pandemic, the Munich "Anamnesegruppen" had to be switched to e-learning at short notice. There were no established concepts for this, which is why digitalization was piloted and evaluated for feasibility. Student "Anamnesegruppen": "Anamnesegruppen" have existed for over 50 years and are organized as independent student peer teaching. In small groups of medical and psychology students, interviews with patients are conducted once a week during the semester. This is followed by a feedback and discussion round, in which ethical and professional questions are discussed in addition to the patient's medical history. The goal is to train the participants' ability to communicate and reflect. Adaptation to digital methods: The anamnesis seminars have been moved to a virtual group room using video conference. Patients were mainly recruited from the participants' circle of acquaintances. The group size was set at eight people each in four groups and supervised by a pair of student tutors. Confidentiality and data protection declarations were obtained in writing. Results: By switching to digital anamnesis groups, all four groups were successfully completed. Both the final supervision of the tutors and the electronic evaluation of the participants yielded positive feedback. Compared to the two previous evaluations of the semesters in classroom sessions, there were no significant differences in the evaluation. Discussion: The continuously good evaluation results, which did not differ between the digital format and the classroom course of the previous semesters, show that an ad hoc conversion to digital teaching is possible. We want to stress the fact that elements reflecting the doctor-patient relationship were successfully preserved. For the similarly structured Balint groups, virtual sessions may also be considered. Further research, especially prospective, is desirable in order to better understand the possibilities of digital teaching in this area.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/organization & administration , Peer Group , Physician-Patient Relations , Teaching/organization & administration , Videoconferencing/organization & administration , Communication , Group Processes , Humans , Pandemics , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
6.
GMS J Med Educ ; 37(7): Doc96, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1389116

ABSTRACT

Objectives: In undergraduate medical education and in the subject of child and adolescent psychiatry, examining young patients face-to-face is a key element of teaching. With the abrupt shutdown of face-to-face teaching caused by the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, a case-based online training program integrating audio and video of real patients was developed. Methods: The blended learning platform CaseTrain guides medical students in their final year through real child-psychiatric patient cases, such as anorexia, autism, or attention deficit disorder, through presentation of video and audio of real patients and parents. The teaching format complements lectures on child psychiatric topics, comprising asynchronous elements (self-study using the digital material) as well as synchronous elements (web-conferences with a specialist). Learning objectives for students were set to develop knowledge of the spectra of psychiatric disorders that affect children and to recognize approaches how to assess and manage common psychiatric problems of childhood and adolescence. Results: The feedback from medical students through oral and written evaluation was positive. They appreciated getting to know 'real-world patients' in times of such a pandemic, to learn explorative techniques from role models, and to be in close contact with the supervising specialist. In consequence of critical feedback on the length of some video sequences, these training units will undergo revision. Conclusions: Case-based online training may continue to be a useful option in a post-pandemic future as integral part of medical education, complementing face-to-face lectures and training in (child) psychiatry.


Subject(s)
Adolescent Psychiatry/education , COVID-19/epidemiology , Computer-Assisted Instruction/methods , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/organization & administration , Anorexia/diagnosis , Anorexia/physiopathology , Attention Deficit and Disruptive Behavior Disorders/diagnosis , Attention Deficit and Disruptive Behavior Disorders/physiopathology , Autistic Disorder/diagnosis , Autistic Disorder/physiopathology , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
7.
Acad Med ; 96(9): 1263-1267, 2021 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1373679

ABSTRACT

The announcement of the closure of Philadelphia's Hahnemann University Hospital in June 2019 sent shock waves through the academic community. The closure had a devastating impact on the residents and fellows who trained there, the patients who had long received their care there, and faculty and staff who had provided care there for decades. Since its beginnings, the hospital, established as part of Hahnemann Medical College in 1885, was a major site for medical student education. The authors share the planning before and actions during the crisis that protected the educational experiences of third- and fourth-year medical students at Drexel University College of Medicine assigned to Hahnemann University Hospital. The lessons they learned can be helpful to leadership in academic health systems in the United States facing a diminishing number of clinical training sites for medical and other health professions students, a situation that is likely to worsen as the COVID-19 pandemic continues to weaken the health care ecosystem.


Subject(s)
Education, Medical, Undergraduate/organization & administration , Health Facility Closure/methods , Hospitals, University/organization & administration , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/methods , Faculty, Medical/organization & administration , Faculty, Medical/psychology , Humans , Interprofessional Relations , Philadelphia , Students, Medical/psychology
8.
J Laryngol Otol ; 135(8): 737-740, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1340962

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic has greatly disrupted routine ENT services. Subsequently, universities have chosen to either augment or suspend clinical placements. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to elicit patients' perspectives toward various approaches to clinical placements in ENT during the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic. METHODS: Cross-sectional questionnaires were given to patients attending the ENT department for routine out-patient care. Responses were measured using a five-point Likert scale. Seventy-nine patients completed the survey. RESULTS: Ninety-five per cent of respondents felt the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic had not reduced their comfort in interacting with medical students. Most participants reported being comfortable with students participating directly or remotely in their care, and with students having access to their anonymised data. Twenty-five per cent of participants stated that they are uncomfortable with consultations being recorded and shared for medical education purposes. CONCLUSION: A number of approaches to clinical placements remain acceptable to patients. Educational leads should continue to offer placements in ENT that can incorporate direct or remote observation of consultations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Medical, Undergraduate , Otolaryngology/education , Attitude to Health , Cross-Sectional Studies , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/methods , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/organization & administration , Humans , Surveys and Questionnaires
9.
PLoS One ; 16(8): e0255635, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1341506

ABSTRACT

The current pandemic has revolutionized medical education with a rapid shift to online teaching and learning strategies. The students have coped by turning to the online resources to keep pace with the change. To determine the type and practice of online resources used by undergraduate medical students and compare the use of online resources with gender and GPA. This was a cross-sectional study in which an online self-administered questionnaire was used to evaluate the type and practices of the online resources used by the medical students during the Covid-19 pandemic. Complete enumeration sampling method was used to collect the data from 180 medical students studying at College of Medicine, Majmaah University, Saudi Arabia. One hundred and thirty students (72.2%) were unaware of the free online resources offered by the University. Most students (58.3%, n = 105) consulted peers for online references. Male students preferred PowerPoint presentations and consulting online resources for studying as compared to the females, whereas females preferred to study textbooks predominantly as compared to males (p = 0.005). Male students significantly shifted to the online resources during the COVID-19 pandemic as compared to females (p = 0.028). Students with the highest GPA scores shifted to online educational resources during pandemic. A significant proportion of the undergraduate medical students at College of Medicine, Majmaah University used online educational resources for learning. We recommend that the college administration for deliberation with the medical educationalists for necessary curricular amendments and taking necessary steps to make the college Academic supervision and mentorship program more proactive to meet the challenges of students' use of online educational resources.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Distance , Education, Medical, Undergraduate , Adolescent , Adult , Consumer Behavior/statistics & numerical data , Cross-Sectional Studies , Education, Distance/statistics & numerical data , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/methods , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/organization & administration , Educational Measurement , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology , Schools, Medical/organization & administration , Students, Medical/psychology , Students, Medical/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires , Universities/organization & administration , Young Adult
10.
Arch Pathol Lab Med ; 145(7): 814-820, 2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1314912

ABSTRACT

CONTEXT.­: In the early months of the response to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine (JHUSOM) (Baltimore, Maryland) leadership reached out to faculty to develop and implement virtual clinical clerkships after all in-person medical student clinical experiences were suspended. OBJECTIVE.­: To develop and implement a digital slide-based virtual surgical pathology (VSP) clinical elective to meet the demand for meaningful and robust virtual clinical electives in response to the temporary suspension of in-person clinical rotations at JHUSOM. DESIGN.­: The VSP elective was modeled after the in-person surgical pathology elective to include virtual previewing and sign-out with standardized cases supplemented by synchronous and asynchronous pathology educational content. RESULTS.­: Validation of existing Web communications technology and slide-scanning systems was performed by feasibility testing. Curriculum development included drafting of course objectives and syllabus, Blackboard course site design, electronic-lecture creation, communications with JHUSOM leadership, scheduling, and slide curation. Subjectively, the weekly schedule averaged 35 to 40 hours of asynchronous, synchronous, and independent content, approximately 10 to 11 hours of which were synchronous. As of February 2021, VSP has hosted 35 JHUSOM and 8 non-JHUSOM students, who have provided positive subjective and objective course feedback. CONCLUSIONS.­: The Johns Hopkins VSP elective provided meaningful clinical experience to 43 students in a time of immense online education need. Added benefits of implementing VSP included increased medical student exposure to pathology as a medical specialty and demonstration of how digital slides have the potential to improve standardization of the pathology clerkship curriculum.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Clinical Clerkship/methods , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/methods , Pathology, Surgical/education , Baltimore/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Clinical Clerkship/organization & administration , Curriculum , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/organization & administration , Humans , Pandemics , Pathology, Surgical/methods , Program Development
11.
Med Educ Online ; 26(1): 1953953, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1309553

ABSTRACT

Augmented reality (AR) is a relatively new technology that allows for digitally generated three-dimensional representations to be integrated with real environmental stimuli. AR can make use of smart phones, tablets, or other devices to achieve a highly stimulating learning environment and hands-on immersive experience. The use of AR in industry is becoming widespread with applications being developed for use not just for entertainment and gaming but also healthcare, retail and marketing, education, military, travel and tourism, automotive industry, manufacturing, architecture, and engineering. Due to the distinct learning advantages that AR offers, such as remote learning and interactive simulations, AR-based teaching programs are also increasingly being adopted within medical schools across the world. These advantages are further highlighted by the current COVID-19 pandemic, which has caused an even greater shift towards online learning. In this review, we investigate the use of AR in medical training/education and its effect on students' experiences and learning outcomes. This includes the main goals of AR-based learning, such as to simplify the delivery and enhance the comprehension of complex information. We also describe how AR can enhance the experiences of medical students, by improving knowledge and understanding, practical skills and social skills. These concepts are discussed within the context of specific AR medical training programs, such as HoloHuman, OculAR SIM, and HoloPatient. Finally, we discuss the challenges of AR in learning and teaching and propose future directions for the use of this technology in medical education.


Subject(s)
Augmented Reality , Computer-Assisted Instruction/methods , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/organization & administration , Students, Medical/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , Clinical Competence/standards , Education, Distance/methods , Humans , Learning , Schools, Medical/organization & administration
14.
Med Educ Online ; 26(1): 1940765, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1269454

ABSTRACT

Due to comprehensive social distancing measures related to the COVID-19 pandemic, medical faculties worldwide have made a virtue of necessity in resorting to online teaching. Medical faculties grapple with how to convey clinical competencies to students in this context. There is a need for research not only to map but also to explain the effect of these secondary measures on students' learning and mental wellbeing. During a period of ongoing comprehensive social distancing measures in Germany, we translated a competency-based curriculum including obstetrics, paediatrics, and human genetics to an e-learning course based on online patient and teacher encounters. In our qualitative study on students' and teachers' views, we identify potential enablers and drivers as well as barriers and challenges to undergraduate medical education under lockdown. In summer 2020, we conducted six focus group interviews to investigate medical students' and teachers' perspectives, experiences and attitudes. All focus groups were videotaped, transcribed verbatim and coded. To guide our deductive and inductive analysis, we applied the theoretical framework of Regmi and Jones. Content analysis was performed in a multi-perspective group. We identified five major themes contributing to a successful use of clinical competency-based e-learning under lockdown: Communication (with teachers, students, and patients), Mental wellbeing, Structure and self-organization, Technical issues, and Learning and commitment. We discuss enablers and potential barriers within all themes and their overlap and link them in an explanatory model. In our setting, students and teachers find e-learning holds strong potential and especially in times of COVID-19 it is greatly appreciated. We broaden the understanding of the impact of distant learning on acquiring competencies, on attitudes, and on mental wellbeing. Our model may serve for a thoughtful, necessary transition to future e-learning and hybrid programs for a competency-based medical education with ongoing social distancing measures.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Clinical Competence/standards , Education, Distance , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/organization & administration , Adult , Competency-Based Education/organization & administration , Curriculum , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/standards , Faculty, Medical , Focus Groups , Germany , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Qualitative Research , SARS-CoV-2 , Students, Medical
15.
Acad Med ; 96(12): 1650-1654, 2021 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1226569

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic caused substantial disruptions in medical education. The University of British Columbia (UBC) MD Undergraduate Program (MDUP) is the sixth-largest medical school in North America. MDUP students and faculty developed a joint response to these disruptions to address the curriculum and public health challenges that the pandemic posed. After clinical activities were suspended in March 2020, third- and fourth-year MDUP students formed a COVID-19 Medical Student Response Team (MSRT) to support frontline physicians, public health agencies, and community members affected by the pandemic. A nimble organizational structure was developed across 4 UBC campuses to ensure a rapid response to meet physician and community needs. Support from the faculty ensured the activities were safe for the public, patients, and students and facilitated the provision of curricular credit for volunteer activities meeting academic criteria. As of June 19, 2020, more than 700 medical students had signed up to participate in 68 projects. The majority of students participated in projects supporting the health care system, including performing contact tracing, staffing public COVID-19 call centers, distributing personal protective equipment, and creating educational multimedia products. Many initiatives have been integrated into the MDUP curriculum as scholarly activities or paraclinical electives for which academic credit is awarded. This was made possible by the inherent flexibility of the MDUP curriculum and a strong existing partnership between students and faculty. Through this process, medical students were able to develop fundamental leadership, advocacy, communication, and collaboration skills, essential competencies for graduating physicians. In developing a transparent, accountable, and inclusive organization, students were able to effectively meet community needs during a crisis and create a sustainable and democratic structure capable of responding to future emergencies. Open dialogue between the MSRT and the faculty allowed for collaborative problem solving and the opportunity to transform disruption into academic innovation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/organization & administration , Problem-Based Learning/organization & administration , Universities/organization & administration , British Columbia , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/methods , Intersectoral Collaboration , Problem-Based Learning/methods , SARS-CoV-2
18.
Acad Med ; 96(7): 964-966, 2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1140014

ABSTRACT

As the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic hit the United States in March 2020, there was widespread disruption of clinical medical education: Hospital clerkships were suspended nationwide and students were moved out of the hospital and continued their studies remotely through virtual learning systems. Frustrated by not being able to directly care for patients, medical students across the country formed diverse volunteer initiatives to help frontline clinicians. In this article, the authors describe the essential role of medical students at Weill Cornell Medicine in quickly designing and building a large registry of COVID-19 patients who presented at 3 New York City hospitals. The Cornell COVID-19 Registry, which contains granular clinical information on more than 4,000 patients, informed hospital operations and guided clinical management during the first wave of the pandemic. One month after its creation, the registry led to the first published description of the clinical characteristics of a U.S.-based cohort of hospitalized COVID-19 patients. Using their experience as a model, the authors propose that students who cannot participate in their clinical clerkships because of the pandemic can augment their traditional medical education by contributing to COVID-19 research. In the case described in this article, students reviewed the management of COVID-19 patients, followed inpatients throughout their hospitalization (much like students would on clinical rotations), and refined their interpersonal skills through discussions with patients and patients' families during follow-up calls. The authors conclude that medical students who are displaced from their hospital rotations can further their education and provide an invaluable contribution to the fight against COVID-19 by serving as essential frontline researchers.


Subject(s)
Biomedical Research/organization & administration , COVID-19 , Education, Medical, Undergraduate , Professional Role , Registries , Students, Medical , Biomedical Research/methods , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/methods , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/organization & administration , Humans , Leadership , New York City/epidemiology , Pandemics , Professional Role/psychology , Students, Medical/psychology , Volunteers/psychology
19.
Teach Learn Med ; 33(3): 334-342, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1132252

ABSTRACT

Issue: Calls to change medical education have been frequent, persistent, and generally limited to alterations in content or structural re-organization. Self-imposed barriers have prevented adoption of more radical pedagogical approaches, so recent predictions of the 'inevitability' of medical education transitioning to online delivery seemed unlikely. Then in March 2020 the COVID-19 pandemic forced medical schools to overcome established barriers overnight and make the most rapid curricular shift in medical education's history. We share the collated reports of nine medical schools and postulate how recent responses may influence future medical education. Evidence: While extraneous pandemic-related factors make it impossible to scientifically distinguish the impact of the curricular changes, some themes emerged. The rapid transition to online delivery was made possible by all schools having learning management systems and key electronic resources already blended into their curricula; we were closer to online delivery than anticipated. Student engagement with online delivery varied with different pedagogies used and the importance of social learning and interaction along with autonomy in learning were apparent. These are factors known to enhance online learning, and the student-centered modalities (e.g. problem-based learning) that included them appeared to be more engaging. Assumptions that the new online environment would be easily adopted and embraced by 'technophilic' students did not always hold true. Achieving true distance medical education will take longer than this 'overnight' response, but adhering to best practices for online education may open a new realm of possibilities. Implications: While this experience did not confirm that online medical education is really 'inevitable,' it revealed that it is possible. Thoughtfully blending more online components into a medical curriculum will allow us to take advantage of this environment's strengths such as efficiency and the ability to support asynchronous and autonomous learning that engage and foster intrinsic learning in our students. While maintaining aspects of social interaction, online learning could enhance pre-clinical medical education by allowing integration and collaboration among classes of medical students, other health professionals, and even between medical schools. What remains to be seen is whether COVID-19 provided the experience, vision and courage for medical education to change, or whether the old barriers will rise again when the pandemic is over.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/organization & administration , Schools, Medical , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Students, Medical
20.
GMS J Med Educ ; 38(1): Doc6, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1110228

ABSTRACT

Objective: The COVID-19 pandemic also called for the teaching of practical skills to develop teaching formats outside of classroom teaching. Methods: Selected physical examination techniques (musculoskeletal system, neurological system) were taught via video conference using a modified Peyton method. The core element was the mutual, real demonstration of the respective skill by student tutor and student with immediate possible correction. Results: The IT requirements turned out to be sufficient, direct feedback from tutors and students was positive. Conclusion: Whether this method can be a substitute for classroom courses must be evaluated in more extensive studies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/organization & administration , Physical Examination/methods , Videoconferencing/organization & administration , Attitude of Health Personnel , Humans , Pandemics , Personal Satisfaction , SARS-CoV-2
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