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1.
PLoS One ; 17(3): e0265356, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1742023

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic forced many educational institutions to turn to electronic learning to allow education to continue under the stay-at-home orders/requests that were commonly instituted in early 2020. In this cross-sectional study, we evaluated the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on medical education in terms of students' attitudes toward online classes and their online accessibility; additionally, we examined the impacts of any disruption caused by the pandemic on achievement test performance based on the test results. The participants were 674 students (412 in pre-clinical, 262 in clinical) at Juntendo University Faculty of Medicine; descriptive analysis was used to examine the respondents' characteristics and responses. The majority of respondents (54.2%) preferred asynchronous classes. Mann-Whitney U tests revealed that while pre-clinical students preferred asynchronous classes significantly more than clinical students (39.6%, p < .001), students who preferred face-to-face classes had significantly higher total achievement test scores (U = 1082, p = .021, r = .22). To examine the impacts of pandemic-induced changes in learning, we conducted Kruskal-Wallis tests and found that the 2020 and 2021 scores were significantly higher than those over the last three years. These results suggest that while medical students may have experienced challenges adapting to electronic learning, the impact of this means of study on their performance on achievement tests was relatively low. Our study found that if possible, face-to-face classes are preferable in an electronic learning environment. However, the benefit of asynchronous classes, such as those that allow multiple viewings, should continue to be recognized even after the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Medical/methods , Students, Medical/psychology , Adult , COVID-19/psychology , Computer-Assisted Instruction , Cross-Sectional Studies , Educational Status , Female , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Japan , Male , Young Adult
2.
BMC Med Educ ; 22(1): 158, 2022 Mar 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1736409

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: As the field of education was adapting to virtual learning during the COVID-19 pandemic, a need quickly emerged for a course to prepare medical students for future clinical practice. This call to action was answered by creating an innovative Fundamentals of COVID-19 course at the Indiana University School of Medicine (IUSM). As a group of medical student leaders at IUSM, we developed this online course in order to support our fellow students and the community. METHODS: The study examined the educational effects of completing the Fundamentals of COVID-19 course. In order to examine these effects, the study asked enrolled students to complete both a pre- and post-course self-assessment survey. Students were asked an identical set of questions on each survey about their knowledge, skills, and abilities (KSA) regarding COVID-19. Composite scores were created for each KSA learning domain. Responses were provided using a five-point Likert scale ranging from 1 = strongly disagree to 5 = strongly agree. RESULTS: Out of the 724 students enrolled, 645 students completed both the pre- and post-course assessment surveys. Findings show that there were both meaningful and statistically significant differences in students' responses to the pre- and post-course surveys. Results show 1.) a significant mean increase in the knowledge composite score of 1.01, 95% CI [0.95, 1.06], t(644) = 36.4, p < .001, d = 1.43; 2.) a significant mean increase in the skills composite score of .55, 95% CI [0.50, 0.60], t(644) = 20.70, p < .001, d = 0.81. and 3.) a significant mean increase of the abilities composite score of 1.02, 95% CI [.97, 1.07], t(644) = 36.56, p < .001, d = 1.44. CONCLUSIONS: These findings demonstrate that the student-developed, online Fundamentals of COVID-19 course resulted in notable and statistically significant educational effects. The increase in students' self-reported ratings, especially in the knowledge and abilities domains, indicate that meaningful learning occurred within the course. These findings have notable implications for medical student training during healthcare emergencies, such as a pandemic, as well as within modern clerkship environments. Overall, our findings provide evidence that student-led curricular design and virtual delivery of course content can be effective tools in undergraduate medical education.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Medical, Undergraduate , Education, Medical , Students, Medical , COVID-19/epidemiology , Curriculum , Education, Medical/methods , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
3.
Med Teach ; 44(2): 187-195, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1730379

ABSTRACT

AIMS: The COVID-19 pandemic has seen a major disruption to undergraduate and postgraduate clinical medical education. The aim of this rapid review was to identify and synthesize published literature relating to the solutions, enablers and barriers to online learning implemented in clinical medical education during the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: All articles published before March 2021 in peer-reviewed journals, including MedEdPublish, that described authors' experience of online learning in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. A descriptive analysis of the solutions and a qualitative template analysis of enablers and barriers. RESULTS: 87 articles were identified for inclusion. Face to face teaching was maintained with interactive approaches between learners and/or learners and teachers. Several innovative solutions were identified. The enablers were a readiness and rapid response by institutions, with innovation by teachers. The barriers were the lack of planning and resources, usability problems and limited interactivity between teachers and students. CONCLUSIONS: Important and timely evidence was obtained that can inform future policy, practice and research. The findings highlighted the urgent need to use rapid design and implementation methods with greater explicit descriptions in published articles to ensure applicability to other contexts.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance , Education, Medical , COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Education, Medical/methods , Education, Medical/organization & administration , Humans , Pandemics
4.
Acad Med ; 96(12): 1634-1637, 2021 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1691789

ABSTRACT

Medical students demonstrate their passion for participating in and improving health care both within and outside the classroom. As the COVID-19 pandemic swept across the world, medical students in the United States engaged in student-led service-learning initiatives to contribute to medicine and their local communities, including collecting and distributing personal protective equipment, creating and translating pandemic-related educational materials, and providing childcare for frontline workers. Their impact was recognized and appreciated. Service learning is an education method that incorporates community outreach with didactic coursework and student reflection. In this commentary, the authors argue for including service learning as a required component in the medical school curriculum to provide students with the tools and support to be advocates and leaders within society, as no such curriculum currently exists. The authors also discuss the history of medical student-led service-learning efforts through to the present day, barriers to implementing and sustaining student-led service-learning initiatives, and solutions to prepare students for service-learning initiatives.


Subject(s)
Education, Medical/methods , Problem-Based Learning/trends , COVID-19 , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
6.
Acad Med ; 96(12): 1663-1670, 2021 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1684831

ABSTRACT

At the outset of the COVID-19 pandemic, many medical students were removed from clinical duties and had their education put on hold. Some found novel ways to join efforts to respond to the pandemic. Georgetown University School of Medicine medical students created Medical Supply Drive (MSD or MedSupplyDrive), a 501(c)(3), on March 17, 2020, in response to the national shortage of personal protective equipment (PPE). This article reviews the formation of a national response to the pandemic, the methods employed to distribute PPE, and the results of MSD's work from March 17, 2020, through June 20, 2020. A focus was placed on equitable distribution, both within local regions and on the national scale, by distinguishing COVID-19 hotspots, including Native American reservations. As of June 20, 2020, over half a million items were donated, with 1,001 deliveries made to 423 hospitals, 182 clinics, 175 long-term care facilities, 25 homeless shelters, 32 public health departments, and 164 other facilities. From 46 states and the District of Columbia, 1,514 individuals volunteered, and 202 signed up as regional coordinators. MSD formed 2 international organizations, MedSupplyDrive UK and MedSupplyDrive Scotland, and established U.S.-based partnerships with 19 different PPE and aid organizations. MSD gained local, national, and international media attention with over 45 interviews conducted about the organization. While the pandemic temporarily disrupted formal medical education, MSD empowered medical students to actively learn about the needs of their communities and organize ways to address them while incorporating these values into their professional identities. The framework that this organization employed also provides a potential model for future disaster relief efforts in times of crisis. MSD hopes to motivate budding physicians to collaborate and play an active role in tackling public health inequities beyond hospitals and within the communities students will one day serve.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Education, Medical/methods , Health Care Rationing/organization & administration , Personal Protective Equipment/supply & distribution , Students, Medical , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
7.
Acad Med ; 96(12): 1655-1659, 2021 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1672283

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic continues to limit medical students' full reintegration into clinical learning environments, thus exacerbating an ongoing challenge in identifying a robust number of clinical educational activities at excellent clinical sites for all students. Because medical students across the United States were removed from direct patient care activities in mid-March 2020 due to COVID-19, medical centers have prioritized and implemented changes to the process of patient care. As some barriers are being lifted in the face of a highly contagious and deadly infection, the use of telehealth (delivery of health services remotely via telephone, video, and secure messaging), although not new, is rapidly expanding into all aspects of patient care. Health care providers have been encouraged to conduct many interactions at a physical distance. Telehealth largely replaced face-to-face visits for nonemergency care in an attempt to slow viral transmission while enabling physicians to continue to deliver patient education, manage acute and chronic illness, and nurture caring doctor-patient relationships. Health care providers, many of whom were initially reluctant to embrace telehealth technology and logistics, are becoming nimbler and more aware of the many positive aspects of telehealth. The authors suggest that integrating medical students into telehealth activities would help maintain and improve patients' health, extend the capabilities of health care teams and systems during and after the pandemic, and increase medical students' opportunities for experiential learning and professional identity formation. The authors expand on these 3 goals, suggest several concrete student telehealth activities, propose a curricular strategy, and outline opportunities to overcome key barriers to full alignment of telehealth and undergraduate medical education.


Subject(s)
Education, Medical/methods , Problem-Based Learning/methods , Telemedicine , COVID-19 , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
8.
Front Biosci (Elite Ed) ; 13(2): 291-298, 2021 12 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1593500

ABSTRACT

At the end of 2019, patients with pneumonia of unknown etiology appeared in the city of Wuhan (China). After a short time, this infection affected not only the people of China but also the whole world. On March 11, 2020, the World Health Organization declared the disease a pandemic. A viral agent was identified - severe acute respiratory syndrome-related coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), and the disease itself was named "2019 novel coronavirus infection" (COVID-19). Telemedicine technologies are a form of medical care and training that can counteract the spread of a COVID-19 epidemic by eliminating direct contact of both medical workers with patients and medical workers and patients with each other. Lack of personal protective equipment, the suspension of clinical clerkship and supervision, and a reduction in the number of elective surgical cases inevitably affect medical and surgical education. Interesting solutions using virtual learning, video conferencing, social media, and telemedicine could effectively address the sudden discontinuation of medical education. In fact, it is currently the ideal combination of teleworking and study. Telemedicine can play an important role in this pandemic by minimizing the spread of the virus, leveraging healthcare providers' time, and alleviating the challenges of medical education. The aim of this study was to identify the role of telemedicine services in the management and controlling of diseases as well as on medical education during the COVID-19 outbreak.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Physical Distancing , Telemedicine , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Education, Medical/methods , Education, Medical/organization & administration , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine/methods , Telemedicine/organization & administration
10.
PLoS One ; 16(11): e0260140, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526692

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Early endotracheal intubation improves neurological outcomes in cardiopulmonary resuscitation, although cardiopulmonary resuscitation is initially carried out by personnel with limited experience in a significant proportion of cases. Videolaryngoscopes might decrease the number of attempts and time needed, especially among novices. We sought to compare videolaryngoscopes with direct laryngoscopes in simulated cardiopulmonary resuscitation scenarios. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Forty-four medical students were recruited to serve as novice users. Following brief, standardized training, students executed endotracheal intubation with the King Vision®, Macintosh and VividTrac® laryngoscopes, on a cardiopulmonary resuscitation trainer in normal and difficult airway scenarios. We evaluated the time to and proportion of successful intubation, the best view of the glottis, esophageal intubation, dental trauma and user satisfaction. RESULTS: In the normal airway scenario, significantly shorter intubation times were achieved using the King Vision® than the Macintosh laryngoscope. In the difficult airway scenario, we found that the VividTrac® was superior to the King Vision® and Macintosh laryngoscopes in the laryngoscopy time. In both scenarios, we noted no difference in the first-attempt success rate, but the best view of the glottis and dental trauma, esophageal intubation and bougie use were more frequent with the Macintosh laryngoscope than with the videolaryngoscopes. The shortest tube insertion times were achieved using the King Vision® in both scenarios. CONCLUSION: All providers achieved successful intubation within three attempts, but we found no device superior in any of our scenarios regarding the first-attempt success rate. The King Vision® was superior to the Macintosh laryngoscope in the intubation time in the normal airway scenario and noninferior in the difficult airway scenario for novice users. We noted significantly less esophageal intubation using the videolaryngoscopes than using the Macintosh laryngoscope in both scenarios. Based on our results, the KingVision® might be recommended over the VividTrac® and Macintosh laryngoscopes for further evaluation.


Subject(s)
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation/methods , Education, Medical/methods , Laryngoscopy/methods , Adult , Female , Humans , Intubation, Intratracheal/methods , Laryngoscopes , Male , Reference Standards , Respiratory Physiological Phenomena , Respiratory System/anatomy & histology , Students, Medical , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
12.
GMS J Med Educ ; 38(1): Doc7, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1503862

ABSTRACT

Background: Within days, the corona crisis has forced the "Lernzentrum", as well as all other places of training and further education, to discontinue classroom teaching at German universities and vocational schools. In order to start teaching online, tutors had to face the challenge to develop new digital learning formats (virtual classrooms) for the peer teaching of practical skills within a short time. This paper aims at outlining the project of developing e-tutorials with regard to the teaching of practical skills. Methodology: After analyzing the classroom lessons (n=30), some of the tutorials were transformed into digital formats. These so-called "e-tutorials" were held via a digital platform. They have been evaluated continuously with a standardized online questionnaire. The results of this evaluation have been analyzed descriptively. Results: From 27/04/2020 to 17/07/2020 eleven different e-tutorial formats were offered on 246 dates. The evaluation revealed a high degree of acceptance with these course offers as well as with the implementation by the tutors. Interpretation: During the pandemic crisis the substitution of peer teaching into forms of e-tutorials was considered valuable; however, these learning formats present challenges, especially with regard to the interaction between teachers and students. They cannot therefore fully replace the peer teaching of practical skills.


Subject(s)
Education, Distance , Education, Medical , Teaching , Universities , COVID-19 , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Medical/methods , Education, Medical/standards , Germany , Humans , Peer Group , Surveys and Questionnaires , Teaching/standards
13.
BMC Med Educ ; 21(1): 560, 2021 Nov 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1502000

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The aim of the study was to obtain feedback from medical students in Russia regarding their e-learning experience during COVID-19 Pandemic. METHODS: Thirteen thousand forty students from 46 Medical Schools in Russia completed an original evaluation form validated by 6 experts. Criterion and construct validity were determined in a pilot study (n = 46). The study design was based on the use of Google Forms. Participants used the Visual Analog Scale from 1 to 10 to assess the level of knowledge acquired. RESULTS: 95.31% of medical schools in Russia switched to e-learning during the Pandemic. 39.8% of the students stated that the time to prepare for the class has doubled. For 19.9% of them, it increased by one third, while 26.6% did not report any changes. 38,4% of the participants are satisfied with particular elements of e-learning, 27.5% like such a format, 22.9% do not like it, and 11.2% could not answer the question. The average scores for the knowledge assessment were 5.9 for the humanities, 6.1 for fundamental science, and 6.0 for clinical training. CONCLUSIONS: The most important findings are increased self-instruction time, insufficient knowledge gained and territorial and socio-economic inequalities within the country. Meanwhile, most students favor distance learning or its particular elements. Consequently, medical education leaders in Russia should consider the implementation of blended training in medicine taking into account specific regional factors, ensuring its effectiveness at all stages.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance , Education, Medical/methods , Students, Medical , Humans , Pandemics , Pilot Projects , Russia
14.
BMC Med Educ ; 21(1): 557, 2021 Nov 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1496164

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Pakistan has not been a major contributor to medical research, mainly because of the lack of learning opportunities to medical students. With the increase in online learning systems during COVID-19, research related skills can be taught to medical students via low-cost peer taught virtual research workshops. AIM OF THE STUDY: To assess the effectiveness of a comprehensive low-cost peer-taught virtual research workshops amongst medical students in Pakistan. METHODS: This quasi-experimental study assessed the effectiveness of five virtual research workshops (RWs) in improving core research skills. RWs for medical students from across Pakistan were conducted over Zoom by medical students (peer-teachers) at the Aga Khan University, Pakistan, with minimal associated costs. The content of the workshops included types of research, ethical approval and research protocols, data collection and analysis, manuscript writing, and improving networking skills for research. Improvement was assessed via pre-and post-quizzes for each RW, self-efficacy scores across 16 domains, and feedback forms. Minimum criteria for completion of the RW series was attending at least 4/5 RWs and filling the post-RW series feedback form. A 6-month post-RW series follow-up survey was also emailed to the participants. RESULTS: Four hundred medical students from 36 (/117; 30.8%) different medical colleges in Pakistan were enrolled in the RWs. However, only 307/400 (76.75%) medical students met the minimum requirement for completion of the RW series. 56.4% of the participants belonged to the pre-clinical years while the rest were currently to clinical years. The cohort demonstrated significant improvement in pre-and post-quiz scores for all 5 RWs (p <  0.001) with the greatest improvement in Data Collection and Analysis (+ 34.65%), and in self-efficacy scores across all domains (p <  0.001). 166/307 (54.1%) participants responded to the 6 months post-RWs follow-up survey. Compared to pre-RWs, Research involvement increased from 40.4 to 62.8% (p <  0.001) while proportion of participants with peer-reviewed publications increased from 8.4 to 15.8% (p = 0.043). CONCLUSION: Virtual RWs allow for a wide outreach while effectively improving research-related knowledge and skills, with minimal associated costs. In lower-middle-income countries, virtual RWs are a creative and cost-effective use of web-based technologies to facilitate medical students to contribute to the local and global healthcare research community.


Subject(s)
Education, Distance , Education, Medical/methods , Peer Group , Students, Medical , Humans , Pakistan
16.
Arch Pathol Lab Med ; 145(11): 1350-1354, 2021 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1485407

ABSTRACT

CONTEXT.­: The main focus of education in most pathology residency and subspecialty pathology fellowships is the light microscopic examination of pathology specimens. Classes with multiheaded scopes are the most popular among pathology trainees. Until recently, it was difficult to imagine that this educational approach could change. In the beginning of March 2020, our country faced a serious challenge, which all of us now know as the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. The rules of social distancing and work from home were applied. These types of restrictions were implemented in almost all parts of our life, including work and pathology education. OBJECTIVE.­: To share our experience in the Department of Hematopathology at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center during the COVID-19 pandemic. We describe our experience in modifying our approaches to education. We show how we overcame many obstacles to learning by building one of the largest virtual hematopathology educational platforms via Cisco WebEx and using social media, in particular Twitter. These tools facilitated the learning of hematopathology by medical students, pathology trainees, and practicing pathologists from all over the world. DATA SOURCES.­: During the first 3 months of the pandemic (April, May, and June, 2020), we evaluated the visitor attendance to the MD Anderson Cancer Center Hematopathology Virtual Educational Platform using data collected by the Cisco WebEx Web site. To determine the impact that the platform had on medical education for the hematopathology community on Twitter, the analytic metrics obtained from Symplur LLC (www.symplur.com, April 27, 2020) were used via its Symplur Signals program. CONCLUSIONS.­: Our experience using the MD Anderson Hematopathology Virtual Platform showed that there is substantial global interest and desire for virtual hematopathology education, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Medical/methods , Hematology/education , Pathology/education , Social Media , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Education, Distance/trends , Education, Medical/organization & administration , Education, Medical/trends , Humans , Texas
18.
FEMS Microbiol Lett ; 368(18)2021 10 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1455295

ABSTRACT

The Covid-19 pandemic has demanded modifications to undergraduates' learning experiences and promised a more challenging scientific world in which they will live. Bespoke evidence synthesis and critical appraisal skills modules are an opportunity to utilize our information-saturated world to our advantage. This program of study made use of a virtual journal club, structured literature searches, scoping review methods and a variety of online research tools to navigate and critique the literature. The program design is here outlined with sample learning objectives and reference to the resources used.


Subject(s)
Education, Medical/methods , Teaching , COVID-19/epidemiology , Evidence-Based Medicine , Humans , Journalism, Medical , SARS-CoV-2 , Thinking
19.
Med Teach ; 44(2): 187-195, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1450319

ABSTRACT

AIMS: The COVID-19 pandemic has seen a major disruption to undergraduate and postgraduate clinical medical education. The aim of this rapid review was to identify and synthesize published literature relating to the solutions, enablers and barriers to online learning implemented in clinical medical education during the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: All articles published before March 2021 in peer-reviewed journals, including MedEdPublish, that described authors' experience of online learning in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. A descriptive analysis of the solutions and a qualitative template analysis of enablers and barriers. RESULTS: 87 articles were identified for inclusion. Face to face teaching was maintained with interactive approaches between learners and/or learners and teachers. Several innovative solutions were identified. The enablers were a readiness and rapid response by institutions, with innovation by teachers. The barriers were the lack of planning and resources, usability problems and limited interactivity between teachers and students. CONCLUSIONS: Important and timely evidence was obtained that can inform future policy, practice and research. The findings highlighted the urgent need to use rapid design and implementation methods with greater explicit descriptions in published articles to ensure applicability to other contexts.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance , Education, Medical , COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Education, Medical/methods , Education, Medical/organization & administration , Humans , Pandemics
20.
Am J Phys Med Rehabil ; 100(9): 831-836, 2021 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1447682

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: The novel coronavirus 2019 pandemic has led to new dilemmas in medical education because of an initial shortage of personal protective equipment, uncertainty regarding disease transmission and treatments, travel restrictions, and social distancing guidelines. These new problems further compound the already existing problem of limited medical student exposure to the field of physical medicine and rehabilitation, particularly for students in medical schools lacking a department of physical medicine and rehabilitation, approximately 50% of medical schools. A virtual medical student physical medicine and rehabilitation rotation was created to mitigate coronavirus 2019-related limitations and impact on medical education. Using audiovisual technology, students had the opportunity to participate in clinical inpatient and outpatient care, live-streamed procedures, and virtual didactics, develop and showcase their clinical knowledge and reasoning skills, and become familiar with the culture of the physical medicine and rehabilitation residency program. Adaptive educational approaches, including integration of the flipped classroom model, success, pitfalls, and areas for improvement will be described and discussed. Providing nontraditional methods for physical medicine and rehabilitation education and exposure to medical students is crucial to maintain and promote growth of the field in this unprecedented and increasingly virtual era.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Medical/methods , Internship and Residency/methods , Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine/education , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
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